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/ • .• THE TRIBUNE. NASSAU. N P. ies fi. L 1 8s. house rather than the punishment of the prison. The people of Nassau should be grateful to Mr. Pearson for preventing a further and more serious outbreak. After the fire bad been extinguished to all appearances, he rebabABLK IN ADVANCK er. issued by the Germans io'LILLE, in German.) FIRE. has no intention of resorting <".•••".>., and l.tup the heavens 0 time of solstice and whenever the li to conscription. The Germans continue the of asphyxiating gases, use but it is satisfactory to know that Sir Hiram Maxim is at bis work-bench inventing something that Will nullify and destroy the effectiveness countries were i i danger I his v< it fires of joy shall flare 'rum the Bismarck | tier who ha l atl l e l The crimson seeds of human 0,l £, n( e i e I he Liennan Whose awful fruit is woe. The infant wails with hunger The hives and udders dry, Beside the ashes of their homes The old despairing die The harvest wilts ungathered The sickles idly rust The fields neglected cower In the infamy of dust. The streets are dark and silent The children cease to play And withered hearts and blasted hopes Hide from the light of day. The lovers vows are broken The maiden's dream is done f h f Nains widow kneels bes.d! Dardanelles and'tl,, downfall of Constantinople will knock the bottom out of this terrible war. Columns throughout the length and hreadth of German for on 1st April, just one hundred years ago, ourcountiv's greatest son was horn. Let us celehratithis event in a manner deep, far-reaching and mighty I BLOOD AND IKON. Let every German, m n or woman, young or old, find in his heart a Bismarck Column, a pillar of tire now 111 these days of this atrocious weapon of of sl rm ani1 %  J !" Ifithtofire, enkin tt._ clt-d 111 (Vi iv Oilman breast, be a h <: of joy, of holiest enth siasm. But let it be | Startlei bast evening tlie Rev. \V. Hopps, W. M. held a service presumably at Khenezcr Church fur some burial Society. Alter the Service a Mrs. Pinwas submarine too continue to get in its deadly work but we are not without hope that they too will ere long be checkmated, we have an instance already of submarine sinking submarine. We do not think thai there is any need to lose any nights rest over the report of the German intention to make another try at Calais, so long at least as the Russians can entertain them in the East. We think that we have good reason to be hopeful, not only so but to be encouraged. A decisive defeat the wending her way homeward passing through tlie yard of some friend in which was an uncovered well, when near the well some person in possession of an electric torch thought July 9th 1915. London, 7th:-By the employ ment of strong reinforcements the Russians, temporarily at least, have checked the Austro German advance toward the Lublin Railway which, if successful, would imperil Warsaw. The Russians yesterday claimed a serious defeat for the Austro German army in the region of K/asnik,south of that railway while the Austrians tonight s'ate that the battle i's invigorated by the participation of strong Rus sian reserves, So far as communications are concerned the Russians now have the advantage of positions as they have a splendid system of railways, by whi-Ii they can quickly move troops and guns to threatened areas. The first battle on a great -cale since the Teutonscommenc ed their drive through Gulicia has just begun but according to despatches received in G< neva ttered, let it carry horror fell into the well which is said i osses on Moyo?wi iLov5thk. to be 35 feet deep,happily beTheM dMpa tches state that thousands of wounded are anivin the West and one in -o— FIRE IN ST. MATTHEWS CHURCH Last Wednesday a fire was the gate And mourns her only son. The bowl of life is shattered The wine red runs to waste, And every sweet and pleasant fruit Is bitter to the taste. Oh' Lord, from thine achievement Of suffering and pain, Thy pity on this stricken earth And visit it again. A change for the better has taken place in the character of the news received from the jt heat re of war during the last >r two. lay we learn that the Hans stand of a few days jo has developed a change from being pursued to pursuing and between the 5th and of the late Rector was torn 7th have taken 7000 Austrian jout of the Bible on the Lecprisoners beside which their tern. Such acts are as stupid as they are criminal. However we do not think that the perpetrator is likely to be caught. In fact it seems possible to commit such deeds in this colony with impunity. terrible, unfettered, let it carry and de tructi no one come enemy 1" We all have but one enemy, England! How long have we wooed her almost to the point of our own self abasement. She would none of us, n le ive to her the apostles of peace, the "No War" disciples The time has passed when we would do homage to everything English —our cousins that were ? "God punish England I" "May He punish her This is the greeting that now passes when Germans meet. The fire of this righteous hate is all aglow! You men of Germany, from East and West, forced to abed your blood in the defence of your home-land through England's infamous envy and hatred of Cier mauy's progress, feed th-flame that burnt in vour souls. We have but one war-cry, "COL) PUNISH ENGLAND I" Hiss tbi* to one another in the trenches, in the charge, hit* as it were the sound of lick ing flames. Behold in every dead comrade a s crifice forced from you by this accursed people. Take ten fut 1 vengeance lor each hero* death You German [>eop|e at home, fee I this fire of hate You mothers, engrave this in the heart of the babe at your bre .st I You thousands of teachers, to whom millions of German children look up with eyes and hearts, teach HATE! unquenchable H \TK You homes of German learning pile up the fuel on this fire Tell the nation that this hate is not they d pay the fool and flashed from Austrian sources the Rusthe torch in her face w!,„ ,, M ms (hus (;|r h;iv „ ,,.,,, ||( ^ '.f it and have inflicted heavy the invaders. discovered by Miss Peters' un-German, that it is not poison and Miss F.'Smith in the 5F^ p •^^!!£to! %  *! ,, %  0 .. i ... .. lire the name of oir bitterest eneVestry ot M. Matthew SUy. you guardians of the truth, Church accompanied by a feed this sacred HATE robbery of two of the Church! You German fathers, lead your Dues ftoxes and the breaking children up to the high hills of our open of a third. home-land at their feet our dear *.,., r country bathed in sunshine. Your I he lire seems to be an act WO men and children shall starve : of incendiarism. Matches bestial, devilish conception. Engwere used to set alight to 4 cassocksand sftrplices belonging to choir boys. These were consumed together with \ ond some severe contusions she received no further injury assistance was soon rendered and the unfortunate woman was rescued from her perilous situation. Better use should he made of electric torches and be it known that to leave a well undecked cir otherwise protected is criminal negligence. We understand however, that Mr. Christopher Brown had recently furnished the occupier of the premises with lumber sufficient to deck the well which has been inflected. Tlie Mail steamer "Havana"] steamed from New York at 11 o'clocl; this forenoon with 28 passengers for Nassau. The Mail Steamer "Yumuri" left New York for Nassau with 4900 barrels of freight on Friday afternoon. — :o: — Tlie American Steam Yacht, a Film Company vessel "Verdana" steamed this afternoon en route to California via Panama Canal. The Motor "Frances E" arrived in Miami early this morn ing. ing in I.ember", l'szemysl and Jaroslav. The German onslaught in the West has been confined to the Woevre region where the army of the German Crown Prince is trying to re Rain ground lost in April when the French attempted to force the witedravval of what is known as the St. Mihiel wedge. The Germans have won some trenches at the tip of the wedge but at other points the French I claim they were repulsed with heavy losses. Artillery combats continue from Arras to the sea and it is stated tonight that as the result of German bombardment Arras is in flames anil its cathedral destroyed The Germans also claim to have re taken trenches lost to the British N01 th of Ypies vester day However the fighting here appears to be desultory despite the reports of the arrival of large German reinforcements for another try at Calais. On The Gallipot I Peninsula Sunday the Turks made their third attempt within a week to remain tlie ground taken by the Allies.' The offensive, according to land wills it Surely, all that is in you rifes against such infamy Usten t.. the MMeleMntong of I ^^uU7~ completed ]Z the German forest, behold the I, •• L fruitful fields like rolling seas, then >^' examinations this week, the large portrait ol "Parson! w ill your love for this wondrous! M r Culmer hopes to be Sauuders" which hung above land find the right words. HATE, | admitted to the bar on the them. Apparently the name unquenchable HATE. Germany, 21st inst. We understand that Mr. 1 British and French reports reTimothy \V. R. Culmer, the wiled In complete discomfiture son of Joseph S. Culmer, Esq., position is said to be an advantageous one, having at their command "a splendid system of railways by \^hich thev can quickly move troops and guns to threatened areas'* The French too have made marked success, advancing such things metres and capturing 800 half-demented prisoners. Germany above all I I-ct it be inculcated in yoiu children and it will crow like a land slide, irresistible, from generation to generation. You fathers, proclaim it aloud over the billowing fields, that the toiling peasant below may he^r you,' %  „J. .„,:-,,! ;., „„ that the birds of th e forest mav fly te Lamp advertised in anfly away with the message;into all the land, that echoes from German cliffs In any case people who do'"end it reverberating Hka the clangout a doubt a magnilicient are probably!".' 'Wls from tower to tower iU um inalor. 1 throughout the country-siue. ,•• t t i_ 1 _,..,. 1 creatures and H \ TEt H ATE, the accursed I One of these lamps has EnfTish, HATE!" | been lighted in our ollice and deserve the care of the Madtithe Turks who are said to Commissioner, sat Xor a \u\ liav r e suffered severely. The Allies are only six miles from their goal, the Narrows of the Dardanelles, but th country is strongly fortified and a gain of a few hundred yards is all that can be expected at one time. There is talk of a new combined sea and land attack. Berlin, via London:—The German Foreign Office today formally called the attention of Ambassador Gerard to shells manufactured by the Cleveland Automatic Machine Company, pointing out that such shells are a contravention of the Hague Convention. Cincinnati, Ohio: — 25 are dead as a result of a storm We extend our congratulations to Mr. Culmer and wish him a brilliant career in the learned profession. The Beacon Kerosene Manother column for sale by Mr. Thomas E. Nabbie is withO ; J l i



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I*/* THE TRIBUNE. NASSAU. N P. t I which inflicted a loss of a million dollars on this city. Street car service and telephone systems were entirely suspended. "~ Washington:—The indictment of five men in San I'ran cisco charged with enlisting men for the British army may bring out a serious diplomatic controversy if the United States insists that English patriotic societies cannot send British subjects to ttie army. Berlin:—Officials will not discuss Germanvs forthcoming reply t<> the United States. What is known of its contents is Satisfactory to President Wilson. It is said thai I iermany doe-, not admit liability for the sinking of the Lusitania but says Americans may navel safely on the high s?as under certain re stnetions imposed by Germany, which cannot be altered. I915. July 10th London, 9th. Governor, Bahamas. Official news : General Botha has accepted the sur render of the entire German forces m Southwest Africa and hostilities have ceased. The campaign there has been successfully concluded. The French government report Germans attack betwn n Angn s Souchez complex ly repulsed. A line of German trenches captured Mi rthofSoui hez station subsequently taken by the ene my. German attack on trenches recestl} • >, tun d by British was dispersed with very hi avv losses. In the Vosges the French obtained marked sue.ess ad vanciflg 700 metres on a metre front. 80c prisoners were captured. 1 lie Russian Government Washington:—Consular ad vices say that Villa is retreating Northward after his defeat b> Carranza forces, south of Aguas Calientas. Limb n:—Submarines sunk the British liner Guider and the bark Mary Ligbtbody. The crews were saved. Lord Kitchener has made a public appeal for additional recruiting. He declares that the Allies position is better though wrious. Sufficient arms ami equipment are awaiting the new army. A submarine shelled the Rus sians steamer Anna. The crew abandoned the ship. Montenegro has officially announced that future of Albania will be submitted to the decision of the powers. Paris claims the capture of enemy trenches in the Vosges after sanguinary fighting. Both sides claim many prisoners. Halifax: — The steamer Min nehaha has arrived here with her cargo HI lire. The captain s.ivs a violent explosion oc success. Their work is confine] to platform duties. ObviousK women could not be expected to perform the more hazardous duties associated with a porter's occupation, such as switching, coupling and uncoupling cars' and the like." Women ticket collectors have been introduced on the Great Western, the London and North Western, and the London 3righton & Sout^h Coast. Owing to the large number of the employers who have joined the Army, the three principal Scottish railway companies (Caledonian, Glasgow & South Westem,and North British) are said to be considering an increase in the female stalls in their employment, which "will a mainly the Various clerical de partments, but will also apply to booking-clerks, parcel-clerks, ticket collectors, and telegraphoperators." The Schooner "Admiral" arrived yesterday evening I SlAve'.'au ARROW Striped A Lidra.5 COLLAR One of the m< I popu; f the recenl style introductions in Mad. as collars. ON %  • : NASSAU'S BEST KKTAII.i USE1 \v\\^ postage tin •MS'I west In' shilling! per U liainas Jd ml Id. NiainpJ ptt 100. Write or sen Prompt an.I fair settlement ciia /. EMORY RENOLL, Hanover? curred on Wednesday probably ^om Miami with lumber and from a bomb, in the hold, gasolmeand the Following Wednesday was I lav men P a ** n 8 ers : tioned by Holt on which he Misses Mary Hannah, Leoexpected explosions to occur on nora Hannah, Fredrona Addifferent sh 1 ps bound for EngCLUl IT. PEABODY CO., Inc. AKI RS, TROY, N. Y. V., S. A. C. L. LOFTHOUSE F.xcluslvo Agent. H. DIGHTON PEARSON Fellow of the Royal Institute of British Architects. is practicing as a Architect &Surv in the Bahamas Those who are interest PUBLIC or PRIVATE building; schemes will be we advised to consult him as to Designing, Superintending of Building, Surveying, Dilap idathns, and improvements of property generally. Temporary Address, ST. MATTHEW'S RECTORY. Telephone No. 191. land. London: The big powder mills operated by the Curtis Company in Middlesex werede stroyed by ;i senes of explosions tod iy shortly a ftei .1 I 1 over a blind red nun began work Washington: Miami, Florida, anil 01 hi t Ci >ast Cities air under surve llance by United states officials It is I. ared that filibustering ex| editions aimed at Mexico are being contemplat ed. Chicago:— Three commission ersrepresent ing Montenegro and the Charge d'Affaires at Constantinople were indicted here today charged with conspiracy to violate the neutrality of the United States. derley, Bula Adderli v. and Miriam Adderli j ; Mesdarm Sophia Adderley, Floreno Munroe and infant. Eliza CONTINUED FROM FIRST PAGE fire, all I can below and in it! s, let him go Also a st SS? SEE ft ti'-;;; WOMAN'SW0K IH WAR-T.ME the Vistula the enemy using poisonous gases occupied some section of first line trenches near IJolimow. The position was subsequently recovered by Russian counter-attacks. Woman's work has branched nut into new fields since the war called the men from their tasks. It will he interesting to see whetner this expansion will be followed hy a corresponding contraction w li e n hostilities have ceased. The Railway Near Lublin the Russians Gazette (Chicago, May 38) notes have defeated the Austrians i apturing 70-" prisoners between the Sth and 71I1. The Italian cruiser Ainalli was sunk by submarines in the Adriatic. 1 he crew was saved. (Signed) BON'AR LAW. — :o: — July 10th 1915. Pretoria:—General Botha commanding the British South African forces has accepted the unconditional surrender of ull German forces in Southeast Africa. Many British troops will thus be icleased for d-utv in Europe. It is said that the conquered territory will be annexed Berlin:—The German feplv to the American note on the sinking of the Uisitaniahasl-ploymentof women on British line Meadows, and ()phelia Wallace; Mr. and Mrs. John Murray, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Adderley; Messrs Gi orge Barry, S im Mackey, Ophamc Wynns, George Gardner, and W. C. Sweeting; Mast Herbert Scott. Ralph Adderley, Thomas Ranger, Har• out Meadows and Cleaveland Wallace. Dispute Over Munitions Shortage May Be Aired in British Parliament Sir Henry DsUziel Will Raise the Question in the House of Commons He Hints Mr. Lloyd George is Hampered by the Ordnance Department. that the employment of women London, Saturday.—Sir Henrv on railway work in Great Bri Dalziel, Liberal Member of tain is extending apace. The Parliament and newspaper pro basic idea is that by getting prietor, whose arraignment of woman to fill the places of men, the Ordnance Department in more recruits may enter the the House of Commons last Army. It says: Thursday startled the British "Even in time <>f peace the [nation, to-day announced his number of female railway emdetermination to continue on ployecs in (ireat Br i t a i n \ the warpath until, in his own amounted in the aggregate to a words, the "men directly guilty fairly large figure, altho it was for the failures of the last year mainly in the clerical, accountare cleared out, bag and bagging, and refreshment departage." ments that scope was found for their services. A certain number of women were also cmplo) ed on Scottish railways as earclcaers before the war. (in the European Continent the em ploy men t of women on railways Bis always been much more' common than in Great Britain.. "The extension of the em A£C Rose.Almeria Hannah, Caro |s required to have a practi il and theoretii al know It df ma< Inner) of quite a high standaid: altogether, he is a through ly all-around, competent man. There are, of course, degrees in the stokers* hierarchy. The arch priests are Known as Chief Stokers, and wi r a fore-andalf*rig,and ver) solid, staid, and sound members of society the) are. I do not know why it should be so, but almost always a chief stoker has the breath of two ordinary men; an I to look at the little round hole that does duty for a hah hu ay on the deck of a destroyer and then go down it and discover a chief stoker actually there in bodily presence, reminds on of the narrow necked bottles with models of full-rigged ship inside so dear to the old-time sailor. 1 know of no more impressive sight in the woild than three chief stokers walking. abreast I along the streets of a foreign port. Ponderous, slow, majestic, and inevitable is their progress: you watch them with awe, and you realise exactly how the British Empire has slowly swept its way across the world. I heard a storv of a stoker lately. It happens to be absolutely true, but even if I did not know this for a fact, I should still believe it. One of our destroyers was in action, and in the course of the fight was struck by a shell which penetrated into one of her bunkers and there exploded. Fragments of the bunkhead and a litter of coal came living out into the itokebeen delivered to American Ambassador Gerard. The note will probabl} arrive in Wash ington <'ii Saturday. Berne: —Switzerland has decided to issue a t,wcnty mil lion loan to cover the cost of mobilisation.! Vienna: —It is admitted that the Austsians have been repulsed and are retreating in Ihe vicinity of Lublin. The reverse is said to be due to a blunder by Archduke Ferdinand. The Russians arc pursuing the re treating Austrians. the lack of guns and ammunition." "I am determined," he says, "that the awful facts shall be dragged to the light of day. This scandal is due to two main facts—censorship and public railwaysDegan With taking over 1 indifference, and largely because Sir Henry early newt week will ask Premier Asquith to give the House of Commons fa ci lit ies for full discussion "on |hoM; and shot out with them in an increasing number of woman as cerks and for cleaning-pur"The London & North Westem introduced women clerks at Wilcsden Junction about the end of March. At about the same time the Great Central tried the experiment of employing women as platform porters at Marylebone, its London terminal station. These women the real state of affairs is not disclosed. The tragedy is further from being closed than the general public has yet conceived." Sir Henry Dal/.il asserts that a conflict of authority already has arisen between the Ordnance Department and the Ministry of Munitions and he declares that the only solution is to give Mr. David Lloyd George a cloud of black dust came also a stoker, who had at the time been trimming coal inside. He picked himself up slowly, gave himself a shake, and then, turning to the chief stoker, said : "I don't see that I'm doin" much good in there: the bloomin coal's trimmin' itself !" were selected from the carsupreme authority for munition cleaners whom the company had supplies. already been employing with —New York Herald July 4th. RELIGIOUS SERVICES SUNDAY, JULY 11TH. ST MATTHEWS l-Altlsil CHURCH Church and Shirley St. W. S. Lovtll,Rt*tor TaiNi iv VI J 16 1 m 11. !\ Comraui ion. 10 IS Sund ill a.m Holy Eucharisl Ltion." i Senii 'i Catechism (in church. I p.m. Junior Catechism (in school. 7.30 p.m. Evens >ng. Pn ich r, I ha Rev. C. R, C. Waktfii Id citi ROH OF ST AGNJE8, V If. Grants Town, Blue Hill Road A'.. Aiulley J. hi .,, %  /.. Holy CniMriHiiii.nl 7.:!n .i.ni. Matin* 0 50 .i.ni. Mitsa Cantata and Sermon 1030 a.iii Cat i I p.m. Solemn Evi n song and Sermon 7 :MI p.m. WeekDaj Low Mass daily 7.;in except Saturdays. I \i naon {—Moi lay ami Tl day &30 p.m. Wed. ami Kriday 7 p.m. ST. ik.W.ls X A VI Kit's < -III RCH Wi .i Street Rev. Chrytatt m Schreiner, O.S.I}., Vicar F iraiM Matt and Sermon 11 a.m. Sermon and Benedii lion 5 pin. Wi ek-daysMass 7 am, BACHED HEART CHAPEL East ShiUey Street Mass & Sermon 0 I Benediction I pm. ST. ANDRKW'8 PRR8BTTERIAM CHURCH Princes Street fil S J. Jtennett, Pastor. Morning 11 a.m. Evening 7 p.m. ZIOR HAI'TIST CHUKCM Ci HIT East and Shirley Sts, Reu. Chat. .1. Dann, Patter. 11 am. and 7 pm. BAPTIST UNION CHURCH Parliament St 7?ei>. D. Wiltheri, Pa • Singing*, Prayer, Sermon, 11 a.m., 7 p.m. Sunday School, :i p.m. CHARITY TABERNACLE l restown Rev II IDann, Pa Morninr> at II a in Eveningat 7 pm WKSI.KVAN METHOniST CHURCH EBENBZER ]{..: Sidnty I. East Shirley Street n a in ami 7:30 pm CHRSrTIAN BCIENCE Bay Street, aboveBank o( N'ssau Sunilay II am. and Wednesday8 pm QO8PEL HALL Dnwdeswrll anil Christie Streets (I 111 Mi "iinu'. Evening al 7.30 QOSPBL HALL I I m leswell Street im n Victoria Ave.) Worship meeting II am. Sun >1, &30pm Gospel pnaching, 130 I White Lime AM offering FOR SALE my entire sto k of White Lime of about 800 bushels at 6d r per bushel. Orders left at Mr. Solomon Finlayson, Deveaux St. or Phone J58 or "The Tribune" Office. JOSIAH RAMMING June 30, 1915. RUPTURE GUI by STUART'S PLAPAO PADS you c*n tbl >• i*y (lie paiolul liuss .iltojf ihcy Hjr nude 10 Cure rupture and n..t %\ .1 .Id It; IwiiHJC tiiasdr self-adhesive to prevent tliupinj t hry hiv, iherrf<*n\ alto proven to he sui tmport&V ^ %  sfr iPflO-CERATf I c -^a. 1 lioiMj no'letnsclves in the privacy of the hom*> ired-nod^Isty I ale df* ir roni w' y *Proo %  fit >'i\ 1 nalural, to afterwards p AwiPw* nd Sold Meidal International Lupoaltlon, Rome i Grand Prim t Parla. wme a to-day to I i ^ 1 klAl II. \1*.0 r Kr I Addre STUART PIASTER PAD CO LTD.. tlrr< WI (J AJ.bl.KaOA \> -l |U\." \ L r '••.



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p &f / • 1 THE TR.IBUNE. NASSAU. N P % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % %  Scientific Oertaii\tie.?" "..si: 'annononnopi urys" Foods are based on scientific certainties. Used as directed, they what a baby needs to develop into a healthy and robust child. The s' Foods are easily assimilated: digestive and kindred disorders are by their use. Infants fed on these foods are neither fretful nor wakeful lle&biixgs Foods TO IIF. OP.TAIS-F.D FROM ALL CHEMISTS AND STOUFS. Milk Fond No. I. Milk Food No. 2. Mailed Food No. , The 'Allenburys' Rusks (Malted). rri.ni birth tn 3 muwhi. I run 3 in 6 month*. From t mnnih-jMnnl*. From ID snaths Upward! Pamphlet "Infant reeding and Management" sent Free. -*no ALLEN & KANBiURYS LTD., LONDON, ENGLAND. "' %  }' % %  % %  • • laonnnntjnannann a anrr nnnnnDaaoaauuaanUDH • : .:.'; r nnfDnannn mnncDDDIL .-*ftaaia3iaajaEa*.!*Bat.i.-s.icimuimnni ai.ui;ji uiiaaax.u.aaa.aaua. ummm aumm ummm a... n... a... t:... D.B. n... t:.. [-.... :. ::..! na.B ;: % % %  :HI\I %  %  M %  0 Qolrl "FRAHSOI'iHIT" k'im Itnuxf* In Knglauil. OUR GUARANTEE. ffifSTmBS&mVt raetory In ivarr war. you ran aanj It hark to ua ar our t and we will retnrn your money In lull. Inrlmll'or AM. i %  ehlfffM TOO lui %  paid .int. DFSRRIPTInnl Pruiilan Collar, Croat Pnc'ela, %  '" %  •wFIll-'llT.sni. C.ntr. gilt tn Hitck. i i-.l Faring., and PockHa. s. wn ***-an,H an.l h.li:,If breferretl, Wa'rjiroof ran tn opp 11 .1 with Htcpl' .liar liiaipad of I'rii-Hlan Collir. without extrachi.^r. Weigh! paaaad. 5lb*. 91/. or tSW It our Low Prlot for thli IharsaShlS Bell *•/ ibli wmninot. HIKI.V r. -..II.TI, • %  nI wear win rouKh wnatln-r. QuSranteed to I. :il>ilutel) Waterpro I 21/ or 3.04. •tin muuh Sullablilor all iiiu.il. Ladlei or Gen*'* %  No. 70M5 I'll.-. FOR *2T 'R or *", vou c n n v >P" l rWr %  "• i/w proof made from the flnett quality Kub ft bar and KAvptlan rot:on. Hat Htorm Cnffa, n I %  %  •" i I in i>. supplUMl w.i. I Dttrpoaet If *eqniret1. will i extra t'hai %  %  %  we of theae watrrliro.ii Cflatl Ihor I II %  Ladle* or Oant'lilU rlo.lQ.ll I'rke %  • . 278.ir 15,(0. COLOURS I'rah. Fawn anil tl-.-in. illin. an.I llla.-k ^^^ % %  w** ••*• Pi uni '<> I *.." 38 c. %  Cent* Stock aim (Kxtra lame -!/", 2 8 %  r 60c. .^ tr.. I Bri.ut 31 3fi :w to ii II In. hi Lentil h 4li If. 41*. IH |J IN TAKIKO "EaSURF.Mr.NTS : aw., m loratolj oloe, nevpi tlKht, over the eoat, h the Wat.-riir.iof will be wont. Waterproof! tnaJe to m attire 16 lor Me.) extra Ladle*' Stock Size* 'F.xtra large lr.r26or 60c, extrol, Itr.ast 31 31 X 38 • i lie,. I^nrti. vi M :.' ,i SEND ONLY A or 0 0 wl "' Yo 0l • %  Offloe 'Caah on Prliven n .biu.rv. II n iterpi i .. • ... "Mad.ro %  aaiure" I i Laimalee I* or.l.le.1, nn.l ONI aRTfcll ... itb youroi.U i. 8PKCIAI. V\AR CUARANTI I.. WE OUARANTFF, the safe delivery or nil our rtoncit i tin. War. Should Bin to replace thi-iii a.....in, :> M;i;i OFCHAROI FEARS LTD.( te ^ay d )H8.Brii!Ql Bridge. BRISTOL. Kogland. If You Havn't Anything* to Advertise, Advertise Your Business For Sale! RV A YOUNG MAX who, is willing t sntisfic'l with B Muftll salary to begin with; give me a trial ant filling the tyrant ami pores of wood, pvaparinii fm tinfinish Johnson's Powdered Was for bal room Hi .rirs. FOR. SALE BY 1 o be nad at *ii Grocers Cm L. LofthOUSe-Companv's Agent Corner George and King Sis. umps, irrigation Hydrants, dtc. Installed under the direct tttpervition of //. Mcl'lierson and Brother. Prices on Application. H. J. THOMPSON, Agent large purchase. Fresh stock arriving every week. C. C SAUNI)PR'S. %  L) SUMMER SUITS Palm Beach Qloth at 3s. yd. • W/M. HILTON. l-HONE 201. T. M. Knowles £28 Bay Street. I S now prepared to supplv Rubber lire* for Babies Carriages, also to reset, and repair them. Satisfaction Guaranteed, Mar. 30th, 1915. Chas. E. Albury GASOLINE In Drums Eleven pence per Gallon. Ten Gallon Cans One Shil ling per Gallon C. C. SAUNDERS East Bay Street Nassau N. P. Every Monday SALE HERE FOR Boots, Shoes, W. A. MATHER Colors, Notions, I Don! miss your chnnc-. SohH A P r ''. 13th iqi 3 for small value. Come and SAVE MONEY. J. K. AMQURY. iiay Street. D 1 *. UNDERTAKER IRKS lo inform his friends and the Public that re has Hist received a complete outfit of facilities for the buisness of an un. drrtaker, which places him in ;i position lo rarry nut Funerils tltnt may i>e ntruated to his care with sysieio ami despatch ; and ra*pn 1 fully solicits theii patroiuiue Gel my Pi ices fust ;md prove that these are the vary loweat for the fust clnu woi k. FOP SALE For Results Advertise in fhe Tribune. ALL of the huildiiifjs (to be removed) situate on pro perty in Deveaux St. near Shirley St.. East. Tlie buildings are now occupied by Mr. Jos. T. Dean. For further y>ar.icu lars. Apply L. GILBERT DUPUCH. y • *. Williarns' Shoes Ap^ Betteg



PAGE 1

I r •• ;'. Vol. XII. No. 297 NASSAU. N. P.. BAHAMAS. SATURDAY. JULY 10. I'm Prica. THREE CENTS. Verifies Story Of Crucifixion here, since the battalion already had a medical orderly sergeant, I had to take turn with the rest various lands and ages. 1 could have added o to the list. Back in t/ drilling and learning the use of 'ago days of Sunday-sc, Of 2 Canadians. Sergt. Barter, in Hospital, Writes of German Atrocities. Sprained Ankle On Weary March. Gives High Praise to Commissariat Department and Transports. W HAT the war looks like to Sergt. Fred. Barter is told in a letter to Controller McDonald's Secretary before going to the front in the ambulance corps, and is well known in athletic circles. Writing from No. 8 General Hospital, Rouen, France, where he is suffering from a sprained ankle contracted on a night march from "Somewhere in Belgium" to "Somewhere in France," Sergt. Barter says: "It was surprising to us that the enemy got on to our arrival so quickly; but I fancy it can be explained by their aeroplanes and by a spy who was found in a farmhouse about too yards behind us. To me it is astounding the number of spies that are found day by day. Some may be the invention of a too imagi native yarn spinner, but it is nevertheless a fact that many are unpleasant realities; and I cannot remember a day during the time 1 was near the front that one at last was not dis covered and brought in. "After two hours firing the enemy quieted down —presumably to cool down — so our boys and other reinforcing detachments returned to our noon location aodbutied themselves by 'digging in'—that is, making individual trenches just wide enough and long enough to allow one to lie at full length below ground surface level. At the time of the evening meal they opened up again. This time the boys just laid in the dug-outs, and the only result (to the^Germans) was one of our boys killed and three slightly wounded. The whole thing struck me as a contemptibly extravagant waste of ammunition and energy on the part of the enemy. As the darkness came on the boys, were preparing to spend the night in the dug-outs and ditches, when the order came at eleven o'clock to muster and march to another billet, some three and a half miles away. Everything was carried out in orderly manner and just the hour between dawn W8 found ourselves in a onetime brewery (German owned) and glad to throw ourselves on the bales of hops and litters of straw for an hour or two's re pose. DAILY DRILL. "Hare in our new billet we were exercised, drilled, paraded and instructed in the use of riile aud bayonet for three days; and here we were allotted to our new companies—the whole of the old D Company of the 23rd, however, being attached with other details from England, to the 4th Battalion, 1st Brigade Canadians— C\P of the battalions that had earned honors a few days previously in the grand charge against the enemy near Ypies. "On Sunday night we were suddenly ordered to go up and occupy support trenches. There is little or no danger in this work; all one has to do is to keep the eyes and ears open, be ready to move at the word and when shells pass overhead duck down as low as possible in the trench. Meanwhile we got acquainted with the different kinds of shells, learned to tell our own from the enemy's artillery, and interestedly watched the shooting of flares by the Germane, These flares burst into a brilliant light— some thing like an incandescent flame —in the air above the fighting trenches and light up the ground around for quite an appreciable period of time Their use is for the purpose of preventing or rather giving warning of—surprise advance^and movements of our troops In the dark. "On the way. and close to our trenches, we met a number— about 200—of our Canadian boys being carried and helped away from the firing line. They had been overcome by the poisonous gas fumes and a more helpless, horribly stricken bunch of men I have never seen. Mouths wide open, gasping for breath, coughing,choking and vomiting; faces ashen in color and eyes bloodshot and staring with agony. The worst of it is, that the poor fellows seldom, if ever, get rid of the effects, and if they recover sufficiently to reach the hospital, it's ten to one compli gun and bayonet. Hence my presence in the trenches and on the march. "It is simply wonderful that England is able to convey hundreds and hundreds of thounice—Saint Jude's wa, in the country then, a'nu ^ spring-time all the year roun the children used to return fro their long day and tumble out from the packed and hot rail cations such as pneumonia and bronchitis set in. Two boys of the 4th Battalion taken prisoners in that last fight (one of them wounded) were crucified on a barn door, riddled with bullets and bayonet stabs and left for their comrades to find and look at. "Can you wonder that some of the Canadian soldiers are decorating their caps with a "No prisoners" legend in indelible ink? Of course they'll behave as handsomely as the British soldier always does when the fight is on, but that 'no prisoners' sentiment is the first that is impelled by sight and knowledge of German methods of warfare. STOR.Y OF ACCIDENT. "The next night we marched away. It was on thi. trip that 1 managed to put my foot in a' hole and got thrown heavily. I got up and with the aid of a couple of comrades managed to keep going for another three miles or so; but my right ankle was badly strained and after it gave away three times morel found myself in a ditch by the wayside and a private with me for company to wait, in the rain, for an ambulance or any kind of conveyance that would carry me on. Half an hour's waiting during which my comrade and myself got wet through and our equipments soaked, convinced me of the futility of being picked up, so like a lame dog, leaning on my companion's shoulder, I hopped and hobbled along for four hours, at the end of which vre found ourselves somewhere in France and at a new billet of our troops. Two hours later I was in the hospital. The next morning I was in hospital at Boulogne (formerly the Casino, now military hospital of 600 beds); three days there and I was transferred here in Rouen, and here I shall be for a few daysmore until the inflammation leaves my foot and the ligaments have a chance to mend. "I ought to have told you earlier that when leaving England with myoompany, I had to take off my red cross, and on arrival sands of troops across to France *vay carriages into the arms of and Belgium without mishap; but it is even more wonder/ul the way the commissariat is re gulated. The tioops are fed and cared for in the best possible way — supplies are maintained and served with automatic precision; and in the event of transports being shelled and put out of commission — 1 refer to road transportation now— there isalwaysa reserve on hand anil every man has in addition an emergency ration. Not only are we provided with the ordinary needs of life, but added luxuries in the shape of fruit, tobacco and cigarettes are from time to time issued, so you see there is no fighting on empty bellies. The Canadian troops we can claim, with satisfaction and without boasting, are the best cared for and looked after in the field; and they show their appreciation of this wise provi lion by lighting in such a way as to be called "Saucy savages" (that's the description given me by a French officer). PRAISES HOSPITALS "Then in the hospitals, in fact from the second of being wounded until health is fully and finally restored, there, is not a thing devised for the care of the wounded that is not on hand. Stretchers carry them from the field to the waiting motor ambulances that dash with them to the nearest hospital. There they are sorted out, receiving treatment and are sent in specially equipped trains—travelling private hospitals call them — to the various base hospital! where they are taken and cared for until every trace of injury and sickness is removed and after hospital, convalescent depot. "Our soldiers while realizing to the full Germany's equipment and high efficiency, are optimistic and believe that the war will end when we start to drive the Germans out of Belgium. One thing I will say on this point and that is—I do not think there will ever be fighting on German soil. That's my prophecy." —Canadian Paper. A Grand Fleet Chaplain's Note-Book. XIII. -"Slrokor. First Claaa." The other day I read somewhere a very interesting article about the world's most popular tune, "Malbrouk," giving a list of the many different "words" to which that air has been set in) their mothers waiting on the platform, and there sing : "God bless the Engine Driver (ter) !• or driving us so well!" It is a sentiment which I heartily echo in applying it to the Engine-Driver of the fleet. He is rated "Stoker, First-class," to take the typical representative of this kind, and a first-class fellow indeed he is He has a great deal of work, i~ precious little glory; although in this latter respect he is coming into his own at last. Popular opinion has vastly misjudged him, and, while ready ever to sing the praises of the glorious A. B., has rather looked clown upon the Stoker as a grimy, underground sort of fellow only to be classed on suf ferance with the Lads in Navy Blue. How such an idea ever started, goodness only knows! Certainly it does not hold on board ship. We know that during this war-time the stokers have been the. hardest-worked body of men in the ship, and that where a vessel has been in action the good steaming has had as much to do with the result as the straight shooting. Jealousies and odious comparisons between different branches are non-existent, I am thankful to say, and everyone recognises that it is not much good having gunnery at the pitch of perfection unless the ship can be push ed along to bring and keep the guns within range. And this is the stoker's part, a part he performs splendidly. "Yon heave the bricks at 'em— we'll shove the old 'bus along," I overheard a stoker saying to one of a turret's crew, and that illustrates pretty well the spirit that unites the upper-deck people with those down below. Not that the stokers' work is always "down below" by any means. This is another of the things not by all understood, that a stoker goes through very much the same training as everybody else on board. He has his course of musketry training—and frequently proves himself the best shot at the range; he is taught how to pull— not seldom in the races bet different "parts of the shi stokers' cutter bears away prize. On the same principl an Able Seaman has to go through periodical stokehold training classes; for the work of a stoker is not a task that requires no learning, though many appear to think it is so. On the contrary, # t is skilled workman's almost an expert's, task; and if anybody thinks it is simply a matter of shotellin/j coals on a Continuedoi\ Third Pane Wear Apmbpistep's Shoes — 1


The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02362
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Saturday, July 10, 1915
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02362

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Vol. XII. No. 297
NASSAU. N. P.. BAHAMAS. SATURDAY. JULY 10. I'm
Prica. THREE CENTS.
Verifies Story
Of Crucifixion
here, since the battalion already
had a medical orderly sergeant,
I had to take turn with the rest
various lands and ages.
1 could have added o
to the list. Back in t/
drilling and learning the use of 'ago days of Sunday-sc,
Of 2 Canadians.
Sergt. Barter, in Hospital, Writes of German Atrocities.
Sprained Ankle On Weary March.
Gives High Praise to Commissariat Department and Transports.
WHAT the war looks
like to Sergt. Fred.
Barter is told in a let-
ter to Controller Mc-
Donald's Secretary before going
to the front in the ambulance
corps, and is well known in
athletic circles. Writing from
No. 8 General Hospital, Rouen,
France, where he is suffering
from a sprained ankle contract-
ed on a night march from
"Somewhere in Belgium" to
"Somewhere in France," Sergt.
Barter says:
"It was surprising to us that
the enemy got on to our arrival
so quickly; but I fancy it can be
explained by their aeroplanes
and by a spy who was found in
a farmhouse about too yards
behind us. To me it is astound-
ing the number of spies that are
found day by day. Some may
be the invention of a too imagi
native yarn spinner, but it is
nevertheless a fact that many
are unpleasant realities; and I
cannot remember a day during
the time 1 was near the front
that one at last was not dis
covered and brought in.
"After two hours firing the
enemy quieted down presum-
ably to cool down so our boys
and other reinforcing detach-
ments returned to our noon lo-
cation aodbutied themselves by
'digging in'that is, making
individual trenches just wide
enough and long enough to al-
low one to lie at full length be-
low ground surface level. At
the time of the evening meal
they opened up again. This
time the boys just laid in the
dug-outs, and the only result (to
the^Germans) was one of our
boys killed and three slightly
wounded. The whole thing
struck me as a contemptibly
extravagant waste of ammuni-
tion and energy on the part of
the enemy. As the darkness
came on the boys, were prepar-
ing to spend the night in the
dug-outs and ditches, when the
order came at eleven o'clock to
muster and march to another
billet, some three and a half
miles away. Everything was
carried out in orderly manner
and just the hour between dawn
W8 found ourselves in a one-
time brewery (German owned)
and glad to throw ourselves on
the bales of hops and litters of
straw for an hour or two's re
pose.
DAILY DRILL.
"Hare in our new billet we
were exercised, drilled, paraded
and instructed in the use of riile
aud bayonet for three days; and
here we were allotted to our new
companiesthe whole of the
old D Company of the 23rd,
however, being attached with
other details from England, to
the 4th Battalion, 1st Brigade
Canadiansc\p of the batta-
lions that had earned honors a
few days previously in the grand
charge against the enemy near
Ypies.
"On Sunday night we were
suddenly ordered to go up and
occupy support trenches. There
is little or no danger in this
work; all one has to do is to
keep the eyes and ears open, be
ready to move at the word and
when shells pass overhead duck
down as low as possible in the
trench. Meanwhile we got ac-
quainted with the different
kinds of shells, learned to tell
our own from the enemy's ar-
tillery, and interestedly watched
the shooting of flares by the
Germane, These flares burst
into a brilliant light some
thing like an incandescent flame
in the air above the fighting
trenches and light up the ground
around for quite an appreciable
period of time Their use is for
the purpose of preventing or
rather giving warning ofsur-
prise advance^and movements
of our troops In the dark.
"On the way. and close to our
trenches, we met a number
about 200of our Canadian
boys being carried and helped
away from the firing line. They
had been overcome by the poi-
sonous gas fumes and a more
helpless, horribly stricken bunch
of men I have never seen.
Mouths wide open, gasping for
breath, coughing,choking and
vomiting; faces ashen in color
and eyes bloodshot and staring
with agony.
The worst of it is, that the
poor fellows seldom, if ever, get
rid of the effects, and if they re-
cover sufficiently to reach the
hospital, it's ten to one compli
gun and bayonet. Hence my
presence in the trenches and on
the march.
"It is simply wonderful that
England is able to convey hun-
dreds and hundreds of thou-
niceSaint Jude's wa,
in the country then, a'nu ^
spring-time all the year roun
the children used to return fro
their long day and tumble out
from the packed and hot rail
cations such as pneumonia and
bronchitis set in. Two boys of
the 4th Battalion taken priso-
ners in that last fight (one of
them wounded) were crucified
on a barn door, riddled with
bullets and bayonet stabs and
! left for their comrades to find
and look at.
"Can you wonder that some
of the Canadian soldiers are de-
corating their caps with a "No
prisoners" legend in indelible
ink? Of course they'll behave
as handsomely as the British
soldier always does when the
fight is on, but that 'no prison-
ers' sentiment is the first that is
impelled by sight and knowled-
ge of German methods of war-
fare.
STOR.Y OF ACCIDENT.
"The next night we marched
away. It was on thi. trip that
1 managed to put my foot in a'
hole and got thrown heavily. I
got up and with the aid of a
couple of comrades managed to
keep going for another three
miles or so; but my right ankle
was badly strained and after it
gave away three times morel
found myself in a ditch by the
wayside and a private with me
for company to wait, in the
rain, for an ambulance or any
kind of conveyance that would
carry me on. Half an hour's
waiting during which my com-
rade and myself got wet through
and our equipments soaked,
convinced me of the futility of
being picked up, so like a lame
dog, leaning on my companion's
shoulder, I hopped and hobbled
along for four hours, at the end
of which vre found ourselves
somewhere in France and at a
new billet of our troops. Two
hours later I was in the hospital.
The next morning I was in hos-
pital at Boulogne (formerly the
Casino, now military hospital
of 600 beds); three days there
and I was transferred here in
Rouen, and here I shall be for a
few daysmore until the inflam-
mation leaves my foot and the
ligaments have a chance to
mend.
"I ought to have told you ear-
lier that when leaving England
with myoompany, I had to take
off my red cross, and on arrival
sands of troops across to France *vay carriages into the arms of
and Belgium without mishap;
but it is even more wonder/ul
the way the commissariat is re
gulated. The tioops are fed
and cared for in the best possi-
ble way supplies are main-
tained and served with automa-
tic precision; and in the event
of transports being shelled and
put out of commission 1 refer
to road transportation now
there isalwaysa reserve on hand
anil every man has in addition
an emergency ration. Not only
are we provided with the ordi-
nary needs of life, but added
luxuries in the shape of fruit,
tobacco and cigarettes are from
time to time issued, so you see
there is no fighting on empty
bellies. The Canadian troops
we can claim, with satisfaction
and without boasting, are the
best cared for and looked after
in the field; and they show their
appreciation of this wise provi
lion by lighting in such a way
as to be called "Saucy savages"
(that's the description given me
by a French officer).
PRAISES HOSPITALS
"Then in the hospitals, in fact
from the second of being wound-
ed until health is fully and fin-
ally restored, there, is not a
thing devised for the care of the
wounded that is not on hand.
Stretchers carry them from the
field to the waiting motor am-
bulances that dash with them to
the nearest hospital. There
they are sorted out, receiving
treatment and are sent in speci-
ally equipped trainstravelling
private hospitals call them
to the various base hospital!
where they are taken and cared
for until every trace of injury
and sickness is removed and af-
ter hospital, convalescent depot.
"Our soldiers while realizing
to the full Germany's equipment
and high efficiency, are opti-
mistic and believe that the war
will end when we start to drive
the Germans out of Belgium.
One thing I will say on this
point and that isI do not
think there will ever be fighting
on German soil. That's my
prophecy."
Canadian Paper.
A Grand Fleet
Chaplain's
Note-Book.
XIII. -"Slrokor. First Claaa."
The other day I read some-
where a very interesting article
about the world's most popular
tune, "Malbrouk," giving a list
of the many different "words"
to which that air has been set in)
their mothers waiting on the
platform, and there sing :
"God bless the Engine Driver
(ter)
! or driving us so well!"
It is a sentiment which I hearti-
ly echo in applying it to the
Engine-Driver of the fleet. He
is rated "Stoker, First-class," to
take the typical representative
of this kind, and a first-class
fellow indeed he is !
He has a great deal of work, i~
precious little glory; although
in this latter respect he is com-
ing into his own at last. Popu-
lar opinion has vastly misjudg-
ed him, and, while ready ever
to sing the praises of the glori-
ous A. B., has rather looked
clown upon the Stoker as a
grimy, underground sort of fel-
low only to be classed on suf
ferance with the Lads in Navy
Blue. How such an idea ever
started, goodness only knows!
Certainly it does not hold on
board ship. We know that
during this war-time the stokers
have been the. hardest-worked
body of men in the ship, and
that where a vessel has been in
action the good steaming has
had as much to do with the re-
sult as the straight shooting.
Jealousies and odious compari-
sons between different branches
are non-existent, I am thankful
to say, and everyone recognises
that it is not much good having
gunnery at the pitch of perfec-
tion unless the ship can be push
ed along to bring and keep the
guns within range. And this is
the stoker's part, a part he per-
forms splendidly. "Yon heave
the bricks at 'emwe'll shove
the old 'bus along," I overheard
a stoker saying to one of a tur-
ret's crew, and that illustrates
pretty well the spirit that unites
the upper-deck people with
those down below.
Not that the stokers' work is
always "down below" by any
means. This is another of the
things not by all understood,
that a stoker goes through very
much the same training as
everybody else on board. He
has his course of musketry train-
ingand frequently proves him-
self the best shot at the range;
he is taught how to pull
not seldom in the races bet
different "parts of the shi
stokers' cutter bears away
prize. On the same principl
an Able Seaman has to go
through periodical stokehold
training classes; for the work of
a stoker is not a task that re-
quires no learning, though many
appear to think it is so. On the
contrary, #t is skilled workman's
almost an expert's, task; and if
anybody thinks it is simply a
matter of shotellin/j coals on a
Continuedoi\ Third Pane
Wear Apmbpistep's Shoes


1



/
!
.
THE TRIBUNE. NASSAU. N P.
ies le oipv ... ... ... I'l
lay, and Thursdaysingle copy id
Saturdaysingle copy ... lid
Weekly ............ 5'1
^M .uthly ............is. 6 uarterly...........4s- M
[Yearly............>fi.
L .........18s.
house rather than the pun-
ishment of the prison. The
people of Nassau should be
grateful to Mr. Pearson for
preventing a further and
more serious outbreak. After
the fire bad been extinguish-
ed to all appearances, he re-
bab-
ABLK IN ADVANCK
ption: three |*nce per line
[insertion ; aiiU one penny pe
suusquent insertions.
Tvertikeineutt under eight lines 4s.
Zhe tribune
SATURDAY. July 10.1915.
.-*- PUBLISHED AT 6 P. M.
Modern Progress. |
By H. C. Christie.
The sword is drunk with
slaughter
The slavers hands are red,
And rotting in the market
place
Are pyramids of dead,
The cannons plough the
meadows
Where wars ghastly tillers
sow,
Better still, where we may
be said to be more interested,
is the news that Lord Kitche-
ner says "sufficient arms and
equipment are awaiting the
new Army."
The news that the Ger-
mans have unconditionally
surrendered in Southwest
Africa, and that the territory
will be annexed, also that by
this victorious ending of the
Southwest African campaign
many British troops will be
released for duty in Europe,
is highly satisfactory.
From tlie Gallipoli Penin-
sular too there comes gratify-
ing news in that "The Allies
are only six miles from their
goal, the Narrows of the Dar-
danelles," conditions are such
that progress must necessari-
ly be slow.
All things considered the
1 1 J -A~A1.. l.__. f. ,1 (By LlKOTENANT-Coi.ONKI K.\DF.N.)
outlook is decidedly hopeful ^ (h ,,.,, mi|iy ()f us tawpUyed
and a few more successes may with it: some of us have seen an out
bring Us ill sight of the be- bieak ..flite. Firs a small tongue like
V flame appi-ars, it grows into a uevastiit
ginning OI the end. ln(, fut ,,I heat. We OOt here in the
One very important fact field have teen more than enough of it.
,\ 1 _i j 1 But there i also the firt of lov, of aa-
must not be overlooked and a d enthufiaIm | arSl. frJm s.,ri
that is that the government cial altars, from mountain hr-miits of
t th
we are bound to say that the
You masters, ca'ry the flame to
your workshops; axe and hammer
will fall the heavier when arms are
nerved by this HATE.
You peasants, guard this flame,
fan it anew in the heart! of your
toilers, that the hand may rest
heavy on the plough that throws
up the soil of our homeland.
What CARTHAGE was $0 -Wtrir liffh irea would
BOMB, ENGLAND is to GER- tne elenc M^111 .. a.wo",:u
Electric light was thrown 1%
the shade for brilliancy ana
clearness.
Those in need of lightin
for halls, lodge rooms, and
places of worship, especially
those beyond the radius of
cognised that it was pro
ly lingering under the pins MANY. For HOME as for us it is do well to investigate mis
ter Unless the plaster had [ft question of "to he or not to be." I very excellent lamp,
accordingly been stripped off *?,"'V*0* find a faithful men-
JT.U r } J . j tor like Cato. His ceterum cen-
a"^ ihe/"e.U" :5_ .6X.1,;k ' Carthaginem esse delendam" [^a(esf War Ne\VS
for us Germans means.
"GOD PUNISH ENGLAND."
and put out, it is not unlike-
ly that it might have obtain-
ed a Strong hold, and that
lave been N. B.A copy of this newspa-
per was found on a German pri-
soner captured during the recent
figktingatSEUVE C/7.-I1'F.LLE
It is ol interest as showing the
hatred for Great Britain which is
being sedulously cultivated inGer
many. This hatred is being en-
couraged and jostercd officially by
every possible means.
A SERIOUS ACCIDENT BARELY
AVOIDED.
tlir. church might
destroyed.
Trtntlation from "LILLE WAR
GAZETTE," 3rd March, VJ15. .
(This is a weekly newspa|>er. issued by
the Germans io'LILLE, in German.)
FIRE.
has no intention of resorting <".".>., and l.tup the heavens
0 time of solstice and whenever the li
to conscription.
The Germans continue the
of asphyxiating gases,
use
but it is satisfactory to know
that Sir Hiram Maxim is at
bis work-bench inventing
something that Will nullify
and destroy the effectiveness
countries were i i danger I his v< it
fires of joy shall flare 'rum the Bismarck | tier who ha l atl.....le l
The crimson seeds of human 0,l,n( e" ,
i e I he Liennan
Whose awful fruit is woe.
The infant wails with hunger
The hives and udders dry,
Beside the ashes of their
homes
The old despairing die
The harvest wilts ungathered
The sickles idly rust
The fields neglected cower
In the infamy of dust.
The streets are dark and silent
The children cease to play
And withered hearts and
blasted hopes
Hide from the light of day.
The lovers vows are broken
The maiden's dream is done ,f h f ,
Nains widow kneels bes.d! Dardanelles and'tl,, downfall
of Constantinople will knock
the bottom out of this terrible
war.
Columns throughout the length and
hreadth of German for on 1st April,
just one hundred years ago, ourcountiv's
greatest son was horn. Let us celehrati-
this event in a manner deep, far-reaching
and mighty I BLOOD AND IKON.
Let every German, m n or woman,
young or old, find in his heart a Bismarck
Column, a pillar of tire now 111 these days
of this atrocious weapon of of sl"rm ani1 J Ifithtofire, enkin
tt._ clt-d 111 (Vi iv Oilman breast, be a h <: of
joy, of holiest enth siasm. But let it be | Startlei
bast evening tlie Rev. \V.
Hopps, W. M. held a service
presumably at Khenezcr
Church fur some burial Society.
Alter the Service a Mrs. Pin-
was
submarine
too continue to get in its
deadly work but we are not
without hope that they too
will ere long be checkmated,
we have an instance already
of submarine sinking sub-
marine.
We do not think thai there
is any need to lose any nights
rest over the report of the
German intention to make
another try at Calais, so long
at least as the Russians can
entertain them in the East.
We think that we have
good reason to be hopeful,
not only so but to be en-
couraged. A decisive defeat
the
wending her way homeward
passing through tlie yard of
some friend in which was an
uncovered well, when near the
well some person in possession
of an electric torch thought
July 9th 1915.
London, 7th:-By the employ
ment of strong reinforcements
the Russians, temporarily at
least, have checked the Austro
German advance toward the
Lublin Railway which, if suc-
cessful, would imperil Warsaw.
The Russians yesterday claim-
ed a serious defeat for the Aus-
tro German army in the region
of K/asnik,south of that railway
while the Austrians tonight s'ate
that the battle i's invigorated by
the participation of strong Rus
sian reserves,
So far as communications are
concerned the Russians now
have the advantage of positions
as they have a splendid system
of railways, by whi-Ii they can
quickly move troops and guns to
threatened areas.
The first battle on a great
-cale since the Teutonscommenc
ed their drive through Gulicia
has just begun but according to
despatches received in G< neva
ttered, let it carry horror fell into the well which is said iosses on
Moyo?wi!iLov5thk. to be 35 feet deep,happily be- TheM dMpatches state that
thousands of wounded are aniv-
in the West and one
in
-o
Fire in St. Matthews Church
Last Wednesday a fire was
the gate
And mourns her only son.
The bowl of life is shattered
The wine red runs to waste,
And every sweet and pleasant
fruit
Is bitter to the taste.
Oh' Lord, from thine achieve-
ment
Of suffering and pain,
Thy pity on this stricken
earth
And visit it again.
A change for the better has
taken place in the character
of the news received from the
jt heat re of war during the last
>r two.
lay we learn that the
Hans stand of a few days
jo has developed a change
from being pursued to pursu-
ing and between the 5th and of the late Rector was torn
7th have taken 7000 Austrian jout of the Bible on the Lec-
prisoners beside which their tern. Such acts are as stupid
as they are criminal. How-
ever we do not think that
the perpetrator is likely to be
caught. In fact it seems pos-
sible to commit such deeds
in this colony with impunity.
terrible, unfettered, let it carry
and de tructi
no one come
enemy 1" We all have but one enemy,
England! How long have we wooed
her almost to the point of our own self
abasement. She would none of us, n
le ive to her the apostles of peace, the
"No War" disciples The time has pass-
ed when we would do homage to every-
thing English our cousins that were ?
"God punish England I" "May He
punish her This is the greeting that
now passes when Germans meet.
The fire of this righteous hate is all
aglow!
You men of Germany, from East and
West, forced to abed your blood in the
defence of your home-land through Eng-
land's infamous envy and hatred of Cier
mauy's progress, feed th-flame that burnt
in vour souls. We have but one war-cry,
"COL) PUNISH ENGLAND I" Hiss
tbi* to one another in the trenches, in the
charge, hit* as it were the sound of lick
ing flames.
Behold in every dead comrade a s cri-
fice forced from you by this accursed
people. Take ten fut 1 vengeance lor each
hero* death !
You German [>eop|e at home, fee I this
fire of hate !
You mothers, engrave this in the heart
of the babe at your bre .st I
You thousands of teachers, to whom
millions of German children look up
with eyes and hearts, teach HATE!
unquenchable H \TK !
You homes of German learning
pile up the fuel on this fire Tell
the nation that this hate is not
they d pay the fool and flashed from Austrian sources the Rus-
the torch in her face w!, ,, m ms (hus (;|r h;iv ,,.,,, ,||(, ^
'.f it and have inflicted heavy
the invaders.
discovered by Miss Peters' un-German, that it is not poison
and Miss F.'Smith in the 5F^p^^!!to!*!,,0,
.. i ... .. lire the name of oir bitterest ene-
Vestry ot M. Matthew SUy. you guardians of the truth,
Church accompanied by a feed this sacred hate !
robbery of two of the Church! You German fathers, lead your
Dues ftoxes and the breaking children up to the high hills of our
open of a third. home-land at their feet our dear
*.,., r country bathed in sunshine. Your
I he lire seems to be an act WOmen and children shall starve :
of incendiarism. Matches bestial, devilish conception. Eng-
were used to set alight to 4
cassocksand sftrplices belong-
ing to choir boys. These
were consumed together with
\ ond some severe contusions she
received no further injury assist-
ance was soon rendered and the
unfortunate woman was rescued
from her perilous situation.
Better use should he made of
electric torches and be it known
that to leave a well undecked
cir otherwise protected is crimi-
nal negligence.
We understand however, that
Mr. Christopher Brown had
recently furnished the occupier
of the premises with lumber
sufficient to deck the well
which has been inflected.
Tlie Mail steamer "Havana"]
steamed from New York at 11
o'clocl; this forenoon with 28
passengers for Nassau.
The Mail Steamer "Yumu-
ri" left New York for Nassau
with 4900 barrels of freight
on Friday afternoon.
:o:
Tlie American Steam Yacht,
a Film Company vessel "Verda-
na" steamed this afternoon en
route to California via Panama
Canal.
The Motor "Frances E" ar-
rived in Miami early this morn
ing.
ing in I.ember", l'szemysl and
Jaroslav.
The German onslaught in the
West has been confined to the
Woevre region where the army
of the German Crown Prince is
trying to re Rain ground lost in
April when the French attempt-
ed to force the witedravval of
what is known as the St. Mihiel
wedge.
The Germans have won some
trenches at the tip of the wedge
but at other points the French
I claim they were repulsed with
heavy losses.
Artillery combats continue
from Arras to the sea and it is
stated tonight that as the result
of German bombardment Arras
is in flames anil its cathedral
destroyed
The Germans also claim to
have re taken trenches lost to
the British N01 th of Ypies vester
day However the fighting here
appears to be desultory despite
the reports of the arrival of
large German reinforcements for
another try at Calais.
On The Gallipot I Peninsula
Sunday the Turks made their
third attempt within a week to
remain tlie ground taken by the
Allies.'
The offensive, according to
land wills it Surely, all that is in
you rifes against such infamy !
" Usten t.. the MMeleMntong of I ^^uU7~ completed ]Z
the German forest, behold the I, .L- ,
fruitful fields like rolling seas, then >^' examinations this week,
the large portrait ol "Parson!will your love for this wondrous! Mr- Culmer hopes to be
Sauuders" which hung above land find the right words. HATE, | admitted to the bar on the
them. Apparently the name unquenchable HATE. Germany, 21st inst.
We understand that Mr. 1 British and French reports re-
Timothy \V. R. Culmer, the wiled In complete discomfiture
son of Joseph S. Culmer, Esq.,
position is said to be an ad-
vantageous one, having at
their command "a splendid
system of railways by \^hich
thev can quickly move troops
and guns to threatened areas'*
The French too have made
marked success, advancing such things
metres and capturing 800 half-demented
prisoners.
Germany above all I
I-ct it be inculcated in yoiu
children and it will crow like a land
slide, irresistible, from generation
to generation.
You fathers, proclaim it aloud
over the billowing fields, that the
toiling peasant below may he^r you,' j..,:-,,! ;.,
that the birds of the forest mav fly te Lamp advertised in an-
fly
away with the message;into all the
land, that echoes from German cliffs
In any case people who do'"end it reverberating Hka the clang- out a doubt a magnilicient
are probably!".' 'Wls from tower to tower iUuminalor.
. 1 throughout the country-siue. , t ti_ 1 _,..,. 1
creatures and -H\TEt HATE, the accursed I One of these lamps has
EnfTish, HATE!" | been lighted in our ollice and
deserve the care of the Mad-
tithe Turks who are said to
Commissioner, sat Xor a\u\ liavre suffered severely.
The Allies are only six miles
from their goal, the Narrows of
the Dardanelles, but th country
is strongly fortified and a gain
of a few hundred yards is all
that can be expected at one
time.
There is talk of a new com-
bined sea and land attack.
Berlin, via London:The
German Foreign Office today
formally called the attention of
Ambassador Gerard to shells
manufactured by the Cleveland
Automatic Machine Company,
pointing out that such shells are
a contravention of the Hague
Convention.
Cincinnati, Ohio: 25 are
dead as a result of a storm
We extend our congratu-
lations to Mr. Culmer and
wish him a brilliant career
in the learned profession.
The Beacon Kerosene Man-
other column for sale by Mr.
Thomas E. Nabbie is with-
O
;J
li


I*/*
THE TRIBUNE. NASSAU. N P.
t
I

!
-
*

.
which inflicted a loss of a mill-
ion dollars on this city. Street
car service and telephone sys-
tems were entirely suspended.
"~ Washington:The indict-
ment of five men in San I'ran
cisco charged with enlisting
men for the British army may
bring out a serious diplomatic
controversy if the United States
insists that English patriotic
societies cannot send British
subjects to ttie army.
Berlin:Officials will not
discuss Germanvs forthcoming
reply t<> the United States.
What is known of its contents
is Satisfactory to President Wil-
son.
It is said thai I iermany doe-,
not admit liability for the sink-
ing of the Lusitania but says
Americans may navel safely on
the high s?as under certain re
stnetions imposed by Germany,
which cannot be altered.
I915.
July 10th
London, 9th.
Governor,
Bahamas.
Official news : General
Botha has accepted the sur
render of the entire German
forces m Southwest Africa
and hostilities have ceased.
The campaign there has been
successfully concluded.
The French government
report Germans attack be-
twn n Angn s Souchez com-
plex ly repulsed. A line of
German trenches captured
Mi rthofSoui hez station sub-
sequently taken by the ene
my.
German attack on trenches
recestl} >, tun d by British
was dispersed with very hi a-
vv losses.
In the Vosges the French
obtained marked sue.ess ad
vanciflg 700 metres on a '
metre front. 80c prisoners
were captured.
1 lie Russian Government
Washington:Consular ad
vices say that Villa is retreating
Northward after his defeat b>
Carranza forces, south of Aguas
Calientas.
Limb n:Submarines sunk
the British liner Guider and the
bark Mary Ligbtbody. The
crews were saved.
Lord Kitchener has made a
public appeal for additional
recruiting. He declares that
the Allies position is better
though wrious. Sufficient arms
ami equipment are awaiting
the new army.
A submarine shelled the Rus
sians steamer Anna. The crew
abandoned the ship.
Montenegro has officially an-
nounced that future of Albania
will be submitted to the deci-
sion of the powers.
Paris claims the capture of
enemy trenches in the Vosges
after sanguinary fighting. Both
sides claim many prisoners.
Halifax: The steamer Min
nehaha has arrived here with
her cargo hi lire. The captain
s.ivs a violent explosion oc
success. Their work is confine]
to platform duties. ObviousK ,
women could not be expected
to perform the more hazardous
duties associated with a porter's
occupation, such as switching,
coupling and uncoupling cars'
and the like."
Women ticket collectors have
been introduced on the Great
Western, the London and North
Western, and the London
3righton & Sout^h Coast. Ow-
ing to the large number of the
employers who have joined the
Army, the three principal Scot-
tish railway companies (Cale-
donian, Glasgow & South West-
em,and North British) are said
to be considering an increase in
the female stalls in their em-
ployment, which "will a
mainly the Various clerical de
partments, but will also apply
to booking-clerks, parcel-clerks,
ticket collectors, and telegraph-
operators."
The Schooner "Admiral"
arrived yesterday evening
I
SlAve'.'au
Arrow
Striped A Lidra.5
COLLAR
One of the m< I popu-
; f the recenl style
introductions in Mad-
. as collars.
ON :
NASSAU'S
BEST KKTAII.i
USE1
\v\\^
postage
tin
ms'i west In'
shilling! per U
liainas ,
Jd ml Id. NiainpJ-
ptt 100. Write or sen
Prompt an.I fair settlement ciia
/. EMORY RENOLL, Hanover?
curred on Wednesday probably ^om Miami with lumber and
from a bomb, in the hold, gasolmeand the Following
Wednesday was I.....lav men Pa** n8ers:
tioned by Holt on which he Misses Mary Hannah, Leo-
expected explosions to occur on nora Hannah, Fredrona Ad-
different sh 1 ps bound for Eng-
CLUl IT. PEABODY CO., Inc.
AKI RS, TROY, N. Y. V., S. A.
C. L. LOFTHOUSE
F.xcluslvo Agent.
H. Dighton Pearson
Fellow of the Royal Institute
of British Architects.
is practicing as a
Architect &Surv
in the Bahamas
Those who are interest
PUBLIC or PRIVATE
building; schemes will be we
advised to consult him as to
Designing, Superintending
of Building, Surveying, Dilap
idathns, and improvements
of property generally.
Temporary Address,
ST. MATTHEW'S RECTORY.
Telephone No. 191.
land.
London: The big powder
mills operated by the Curtis
Company in Middlesex werede
stroyed by ;i senes of explosions
tod iy shortly a ftei .1 I 1
over a blind red nun began work
Washington: Miami, Flori-
da, anil 01 hi t Ci >ast Cities air
under surve llance by United
states officials It is I. ared that
filibustering ex| editions aimed
at Mexico are being contemplat
ed.
Chicago: Three commission
ersrepresent ing Montenegro and
the Charge d'Affaires at Con-
stantinople were indicted here
today charged with conspiracy
to violate the neutrality of the
United States.
derley, Bula Adderli v. and
Miriam Adderli j ; Mesdarm -
Sophia Adderley, Floreno
Munroe and infant. Eliza
CONTINUED FROM FIRST PAGE
fire, all I can
below and in it!
s, let him go
Also a st
SS? SEE ft ti'-;;; WOMAN'SW0K IH WAR-T.ME
the Vistula the enemy using
poisonous gases occupied
some section of first line
trenches near IJolimow. The
position was subsequently
recovered by Russian coun-
ter-attacks.
Woman's work has branched
nut into new fields since the war
called the men from their tasks.
It will he interesting to see
whetner this expansion will be
followed hy a corresponding
contraction w li e n hostilities
have ceased. The Railway
Near Lublin the Russians Gazette (Chicago, May 38) notes
have defeated the Austrians
i apturing 70-" prisoners be-
tween the Sth and 71I1.
The Italian cruiser Ainalli
was sunk by submarines in
the Adriatic. 1 he crew was
saved.
(Signed)
BON'AR LAW.
:o:
July 10th 1915.
Pretoria:General Botha
commanding the British South
African forces has accepted the
unconditional surrender of ull
German forces in Southeast
Africa. Many British troops
will thus be icleased for d-utv
in Europe. It is said that the
conquered territory will be an-
nexed
Berlin:The German feplv
to the American note on
the sinking of the Uisitaniahasl-ploymentof women on British
line Meadows, and ()phelia
Wallace; Mr. and Mrs. John
Murray, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph
Adderley; Messrs Gi orge
Barry, S im Mackey, Ophamc
Wynns, George Gardner, and
W. C. Sweeting; Mast
Herbert Scott. Ralph Adder-
ley, Thomas Ranger, Har-
out Meadows and Cleave-
land Wallace.
Dispute Over Muni-
tions Shortage May
Be Aired in British
Parliament
Sir Henry DsUziel Will Raise the
Question in the House of
Commons He Hints Mr. Lloyd
George is Hampered by the
Ordnance Department.
that the employment of women London, Saturday.Sir Henrv
on railway work in Great Bri Dalziel, Liberal Member of
tain is extending apace. The Parliament and newspaper pro
basic idea is that by getting prietor, whose arraignment of
woman to fill the places of men, the Ordnance Department in
more recruits may enter the the House of Commons last
Army. It says: Thursday startled the British
"Even in time <>f peace the [nation, to-day announced his
number of female railway em- determination to continue on
ployecs in (ireat Br i t a i n \ the warpath until, in his own
amounted in the aggregate to a words, the "men directly guilty
fairly large figure, altho it was for the failures of the last year
mainly in the clerical, account- are cleared out, bag and bagg-
ing, and refreshment depart- age."
ments that scope was found for
their services. A certain num-
ber of women were also cmplo)
ed on Scottish railways as ear-
clcaers before the war. (in the
European Continent the em
ploy men t of women on railways
Bis always been much more'
common than in Great Britain..
"The extension of the em
AC
Rose.Almeria Hannah, Caro |s required to have a practi il
and theoretii al know It df
ma< Inner) of quite a high stand-
aid: altogether, he is a through
ly all-around, competent man.
There are, of course, degrees
in the stokers* hierarchy. The
arch priests are Known as Chief
Stokers, and wi r a fore-and-
alf*rig,and ver) solid, staid, and
sound members of society the)
are. I do not know why it
should be so, but almost always
a chief stoker has the breath of
two ordinary men; an I to look
at the little round hole that
does duty for a hah hu ay on the
deck of a destroyer and then go
down it and discover a chief
stoker actually there in bodily
presence, reminds on of the
narrow necked bottles with mo-
dels of full-rigged ship inside so
dear to the old-time sailor.
1 know of no more impressive
sight in the woild than three
chief stokers walking. abreast
I along the streets of a foreign
port. Ponderous, slow, majes-
tic, and inevitable is their pro-
gress: you watch them with awe,
and you realise exactly how the
British Empire has slowly swept
its way across the world.
I heard a storv of a stoker
lately. It happens to be abso-
lutely true, but even if I did not
know this for a fact, I should
still believe it. One of our des-
troyers was in action, and in
the course of the fight was struck
by a shell which penetrated in-
to one of her bunkers and there
exploded. Fragments of the
bunkhead and a litter of coal
came living out into the itoke-
been delivered to American
Ambassador Gerard. The note
will probabl} arrive in Wash
ington <'ii Saturday.
Berne: Switzerland has
decided to issue a t,wcnty mil
lion loan to cover the cost of
mobilisation.!
Vienna: It is admitted that
the Austsians have been repuls-
ed and are retreating in Ihe
vicinity of Lublin. The reverse
is said to be due to a blunder
by Archduke Ferdinand. The
Russians arc pursuing the re
treating Austrians.
the lack of guns and ammuni-
tion."
"I am determined," he says,
"that the awful facts shall be
dragged to the light of day.
This scandal is due to two main
factscensorship and public
railwaysDegan With taking over1 indifference, and largely because
Sir Henry early newt week
will ask Premier Asquith to
give the House of Commons fa
ci lit ies for full discussion "on |hoM; and shot out with them in
an increasing number of woman
as cerks and for cleaning-pur-
"The London & North West-
em introduced women clerks at
Wilcsden Junction about the
end of March. At about the
same time the Great Central
tried the experiment of employ-
ing women as platform porters
at Marylebone, its London ter-
minal station. These women
the real state of affairs is not
disclosed. The tragedy is fur-
ther from being closed than the
general public has yet conceiv-
ed."
Sir Henry Dal/.il asserts that
a conflict of authority already
has arisen between the Ordn-
ance Department and the Min-
istry of Munitions and he de-
clares that the only solution is
to give Mr. David Lloyd George
a cloud of black dust came also
a stoker, who had at the time
been trimming coal inside. He
picked himself up slowly, gave
himself a shake, and then, turn-
ing to the chief stoker, said : "I
don't see that I'm doin" much
good in there: the bloomin coal's
trimmin' itself !"
were selected from the car- supreme authority for munition
cleaners whom the company had supplies.
already been employing with New York Herald July 4th.
RELIGIOUS SERVICES
Sunday, July 11th.
ST MATTHEWS l-Altlsil CHURCH
Church and Shirley St.
. W. S. Lovtll,Rt*tor
TaiNi iv VI
J 16 1 m 11. !\ Comraui ion. 10 IS
Sund ill a.m Holy Eucharisl
Ltion."
i Senii 'i Catechism (in church. I
p.m. Junior Catechism (in school. 7.30
p.m. Evens >ng. Pn ich r, I ha Rev. C. R,
C. Waktfii Id
citi ROH OF st AGNJE8, V If.
Grants Town, Blue Hill Road
A'.. Aiulley J. hi .,,, /..
Holy CniMriHiiii.nl 7.:!n .i.ni. Matin* 0 50
.i.ni. Mitsa Cantata and Sermon 1030
a.iii Cat i I p.m. Solemn Evi n
song and Sermon 7 :mi p.m.
WeekDaj -
Low Mass daily 7.;in except Saturdays.
I \i naon {Moi lay ami Tl
day &30 p.m. Wed. ami Kriday 7 p.m.
ST. ik.W.ls X A VI Kit's < -III RCH
Wi .i Street
Rev. Chrytatt m Schreiner, O.S.I}.,
Vicar F iraiM
Matt and Sermon 11 a.m. Sermon and
Benedii lion 5 pin. Wi ek-daysMass 7 am,
BACHED HEART CHAPEL
East ShiUey Street
Mass & Sermon 0 I Benediction I pm.
ST. ANDRKW'8 PRR8BTTERIAM
CHURCH
Princes Street
fil S J. Jtennett, Pastor.
Morning 11 a.m. Evening 7 p.m.
ZIOR HAI'TIST CHUKCM
Ci hit East and Shirley Sts,
Reu. Chat. .1. Dann, Patter.
11 am. and 7 pm.
BAPTIST UNION CHURCH
Parliament St
7?ei>. D. Wiltheri, Pa
Singing*, Prayer, Sermon, 11 a.m., 7 p.m.
Sunday School, :i p.m.
CHARITY TABERNACLE
l restown
Rev II I- Dann, Pa
Morninr> at II a in Eveningat 7 pm
WKSI.KVAN METHOniST CHURCH
EBENBZER
]{..: Sidnty I. .
East Shirley Street
n a in ami 7:30 pm
CHRSrTIAN BCIENCE
Bay Street, aboveBank o( N'ssau
Sunilay II am. and Wednesday8 pm
QO8PEL HALL
Dnwdeswrll anil Christie Streets
(I 111 Mi "iinu'. Evening al 7.30
QOSPBL HALL
II m leswell Street im n Victoria Ave.)
Worship meeting II am. Sun
>1, &30pm Gospel pnaching, 130
I
White Lime
AM offering FOR SALE
my entire sto k of White
Lime of about 800 bushels
at 6dr. per bushel.
Orders left at Mr. Solomon
Finlayson, Deveaux St. or
Phone J58 or "The Tribune"
Office.
Josiah Ramming
June 30, 1915.
RUPTURE GUI
by STUART'S PLAPAO PADS
you c*n tbl > i*y (lie paiolul liuss .iltojf
ihcy Hjr nude 10 Cure rupture and n..t %\
.1 .Id It; IwiiHJC tiiasdr self-adhesive to prevent tliupinj
thry hiv, iherrf<*n\ alto proven to he sui tmport&V
^"'"sfr
iPflO-CERATf
I.....c
-^a. 1 lioiMj no-
'letnsclves in
the privacy of the hom*>
ired-nod^Isty
I ale df* ir
roni w tay to apply i"*,,[*'''>'y*- Proo fit >'i\ 1
nalural, to afterwards p AwiPw*
nd Sold Meidal International Lupo-
altlon, Rome i Grand Prim t Parla.
wme a to-day to I i ^ 1 klAl
II. \1*.0 r Kr I .
Addre STUART PIASTER PAD CO LTD..
tlrr< WI (J AJ.bl.KaOA\> -l |U\."
\
L
r
'.


p
.?
/
1
THE TR.IBUNE. NASSAU. N P
*
Scientific Oertaii\tie.?" "..si:
'annononnopi
urys" Foods are based on scientific certainties. Used as directed, they
what a baby needs to develop into a healthy and robust child. The
s' Foods are easily assimilated: digestive and kindred disorders are
by their use. Infants fed on these foods are neither fretful nor wakeful
lle&biixgs Foods
TO IIF. OP.TAIS-F.D FROM ALL CHEMISTS AND STOUFS.
Milk Fond No. I. Milk Food No. 2. Mailed Food No. , The 'Allenburys' Rusks (Malted).
rri.ni birth tn 3 muwhi. I run 3 in 6 month*. From t mnnih-jMnnl*. From ID snaths Upward!
Pamphlet "Infant reeding and Management" sent Free. -*no
ALLEN & KANBiURYS LTD., LONDON, ENGLAND.
"'.....}'- .....-........laonnnntjnannann a anrr nnnnnDaaoaauuaanUDH
: .:.'; r nnfDnannn mnncDDDIL
.-*ftaaia3iaajaEa*.!*Bat.i.-s.icimuimnni ai.ui;ji uiiaaax.u.aaa.aaua.
ummm
aumm
ummm
a...
n...
a...
t:...
D.B.
n...
t:..
[-....
:.
::..!
na.B
;:
. :hi\i
M
?
? a i.-
: ' rM
[.um
tia.u
IlLl
i mum
Lina

an

aranteed Waterproofs 21 / & 27/3
Position Wanted.
($5.04 Cold
...t>0 Qolrl ,
"FRAHSOI'iHIT" quality Hiibu-r anil Cotton, an.I cut by taper* ealtarf In lai
atllir.iv.'il slvi.-n Quality r.ilihl.li red. our prlct f.ir WiU.-rnr.
limit OR! THIRD lean than tin- nrirr. u.iallv obanred by It. rail
Store* ami other r*r...>k'im Itnuxf* In Knglauil.
OUR GUARANTEE. ffifSTmBS&mVt
raetory In ivarr war. you ran aanj It hark to ua ar our t
and we will retnrn your money In lull. Inrlmll'or AM. i
ehlfffM TOO lui paid .int.
DFSRRIPTInnl Pruiilan Collar, Croat Pnc'ela,
'"wFIll-'llT.sni. C.ntr. gilt tn Hitck. i i-.l
Faring., and PockHa. s. wn ***-an,H an.l h.li:,- If breferretl,
Wa'- rjiroof ran tn opp 11 .1 with Htcpl' .liar liiaipad of I'rii-Hlan
Collir. without extrachi.^r. Weigh! paaaad. 5lb*.
91/. or tSW It our Low Prlot for thli IharsaShlS Bell
*/ ibli wmninot. hikI.v r. -..ii.ti, nI wear
win rouKh wnatln-r. QuSranteed to I. :il>- ilutel) Waterpro I
21/ or 3.04.
tin muuh
Sullabli- lor all
iiiu.il. Ladlei or Gen*'* .
No. 70M5 I'll.-.
FOR *2T 'R or *"-, vou c*n n*v >P"lrWr
" i/w proof made from the flnett quality Kub ft
bar and KAvptlan rot:on. Hat Htorm Cnffa, n I " i
I in i>. supplUMl w.i. I
Dttrpoaet If *eqniret1. will.....i extra t'hai ! we of theae
watrrliro.ii Cflatl Ihor I II
Ladle* or Oant'lilU rlo.lQ.ll I'rke 278.ir 15,(0.
COLOURS I'rah. Fawn anil tl-.-in. illin. an.I llla.-k
^^^w** * Pi uni '<> I *.." 38 c.
Cent* Stock aim (Kxtra lame -!/", 2 8 r 60c. .^ tr.. i
Bri.ut 31 3fi :w to ii ii In. hi
Lentil h 4li If. 41*. ih |J
IN TAKIKO "EaSURF.Mr.NTS : aw.,
m loratolj oloe, nevpi tlKht, over the eoat, h the
Wat.-riir.iof will be wont. Waterproof! tnaJe to m attire 16
lor Me.) extra
Ladle*' Stock Size* 'F.xtra large lr.r26or 60c, extrol,
Itr.ast 31 31 X 38 i lie,.
I^nrti. vi M :.' ,i
SEND ONLY A or "00 wl"' Yo" 0l
Offloe 'Caah on Prliven .......n
.biu.rv. II n iterpi i .. ... "Mad.ro aaiure" I i
Laim- alee I* or.l.le.1, nn.l ONI aRTfcll ... itb
youroi.U i.
8PKCIAI. V\AR CUARANTI I..
WE OUARANTFF, the safe delivery or nil our rtoncit i
tin. War. Should Bin
to replace thi-iii a.....in, :> M;i;i OFCHAROI
FEARS LTD.(te^ayd)H8.Brii!Ql Bridge. BRISTOL. Kogland.
If You Havn't Anything* to Advertise,
Advertise Your Business
For Sale!
RV A YOUNG MAX who, is will-
ing t the (irocery business, can ride a
wheel, and drive a horse ; also has
ability in office work and ready for
all kinds of work that is honour-
able.
I will bf> sntisfic'l with B Muftll
salary to begin with; give me a
trial an tlo not suit, 1 will not expect to be
paid.
I am a Hariamian by birth, a res-
ident in Miami for over a year and
can furnish best of references.
Cable oh Wbutb to
HERBERT E. MTJNNINGS,
517 Avenue I.
Miami, Fla.
Care W. E. FROST,
Manager.
.1. <;. McCRORY'8 Iota, and lOoto.
Store, 12th St. Miami, Fla.
Entertainment
An Entertainment will be
given in
ST. JOHN'S BAPTIST CHURCH
on MONDAY, lath inst.
at 8 p.m.
ADMISSION 60. FOR ADULTS.
3D. FOR CHILDREN-
All are cordially invited.
Don't miss this opportunity
of passing an hour of intense
excitement.
Refreshments will be sold,
reasonably and best service
guaranteed.
FRENCH RED CROSS FUND.
Subscriptions cfre^prgently
lor the above ft*id
(THE LINEN STORE.)
i\U Bm) lUl\l{Vr)Q and all donations, however
Ha.ve Received small, will be gratefully ac-
The Latest Spring Novelty cepted, and will be acknow-
THE HEW "LAVE" [NETS jWged in the newspapers
H. F. ARMBMSTfcR,
Consular Agent for France.
Nassau, N. P.,
2nd July, iqr 5.
Guaranteed Untarnishable,
and Washable.
Suitable for Waists, Yokes,
Dresses, Millinery.
White and Black, White and
Silver, Black and Silver,
While and Gold Ecru and
Gold, Heliotrope and Gold,
Saxe Blue and Gold. Gold
Silver and Crystal Tassels.
White, Cream, and Ecru lire
tonne Nets, Shadow Nets,
NOTICE TO FRENCH CITIZENS.
Instructions have been re-,
reived summoning allFrench*
men born in Martinique,
Guadelope or French Guiana
belonging to the classes' i8qo
to 1909 (born from 1870 to
!r? r?,61 Spi (!V7v'7 D^I^Mo'present themselves
dEsprit, Pleated Net Ruch ; immediately at the Vice Con-
' m 1 ii u isulate of France at I'ort-of-
Washable Marquisettes. Spain or at any of the twe,Ve
Black and White, Sand and Consular Agencies of the Bri-
W'hite,- Double Width. 'tish West Indies to pass a
Poplin. medical examination.
Black Poplin, White Poplin, I _m. f. armbrister,
K
RUMSEY'S PUMPS
c
ISTK RN Pumps, Wei
Pumps. W i n d in i 1
double width.
White Washing Silk.
Silk Crepe, Cotton Crepe.
May 1st, 1915.
Shingles
Pumps, Diaphragm Pumps,
House Pumps, Pneumatic
Systems, Spray Pumps, Hy-
draulic Rams, Mine Pumps,
Deep Well Pumps, Electric
Pumps, Cylinder and Valvi s,
Triplex Power Pumps, Cen-
trifugal Pumps, Waterworks
Machinery, Rotary Pumps,
Sump Pumps, Fire Pumps,
Air Compressors, Ship Pumps!
Pressure Pumps. Boiler Feed I
Pumps,
Best No. 1 Heart 5m. Cypresi
Shingles at $9.60 per thous
sand of 20 bundles
Discounts on lots of ovei
5000 shingles.
Special Price
also on cheaper gradesalso
5tn. Cypress at $6.72 per
thousand of 20 bundles. This
Consular Agent for France
Nassau, N. P.,
2nd July, 1915.
Johnson's
Artistic Wood
Finishes
Johnson's i'reparcit! Wax a .in
plete lini-.li and polish foi all Furaitute
1 woodwork and Amira.
Johnson's Wood Dye f.t the artistic
coloring of all wood, s.ft or hard
Johnson's Under Laca spirit
finish, very much luperioi t.. ihellac <<
at 11 Mi
Johnson's Flivt Wood Finishfor a
beautiful, artistic, hjmu-rtibbeil effect
witli.iut the expsusc of rubhinr,
Johnson's Past. Wood Fillerf.>t
filling the tyrant ami pores of wood,
pvaparinii fm tin- finish
Johnson's Powdered Was for bal
room Hi .rirs.
FOR. SALE BY
1 o be nad at *ii Grocers
Cm L. LofthOUSe-Companv's Agent
Corner George and King Sis.
umps, irrigation
Hydrants, dtc.
Installed under the direct
tttpervition of //. Mcl'lierson
and Brother.
Prices on Application.
H. J. THOMPSON,
Agent
large purchase.
Fresh stock arriving every
week.
C. C SAUNI)PR'S.

l)
SUMMER SUITS
Palm Beach Qloth
at 3s. yd.
W/M. HILTON.
l-HONE 201.
T. M. Knowles
28 Bay Street.
IS now prepared to supplv
Rubber lire* for Babies
Carriages, also to reset, and
repair them.
Satisfaction Guaranteed,
Mar. 30th, 1915.
Chas. E. Albury
GASOLINE
In Drums Eleven pence
per Gallon.
Ten Gallon Cans One Shil
ling per Gallon
C. C. SAUNDERS
East Bay Street
Nassau N. P.
Every Monday
SALE HERE FOR
Boots, Shoes,
W. A. MATHER Colors, Notions,
I Don! miss your chnnc-. SohHAPr''. 13th iqi3.
for small value. Come and
SAVE MONEY.
J. K. AMQURY.
iiay Street.
D1*.
UNDERTAKER
IRKS lo inform his friends
and the Public that re has
Hist received a complete outfit of
facilities for the buisness of an un.
drrtaker, which places him in ;i
position lo rarry nut Funerils tltnt
may i>e ntruated to his care with
sysieio ami despatch ; and ra*pn 1
fully solicits theii patroiuiue Gel
my Pi ices fust ;md prove that these
are the vary loweat for the fust clnu
woi k.
Fop SALE
For
Results
Advertise in
fhe Tribune.
ALL of the huildiiifjs (to be
removed) situate on pro
perty in Deveaux St. near Shir-
ley St.. East. Tlie buildings
are now occupied by Mr. Jos.
T. Dean. For further y>ar.icu
lars.
Apply
L. GILBERT DUPUCH.
. y


. *.

Williarns' Shoes Ap^ Betteg


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