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THE TRIBUNE NASSAU. BAHAMAS L. OILBKRT DUPUCH. Editor and Proprietor. OFFICK: Corner Shirley Che.rlote St. \assau, -V. P., Bakamas •PHONK2W. P.O. BOX 103. 'PUBLISHED DAILY Monday, Wednesday and Fridaysingle copy •• %  —. — Tuesday, and Thursday—single copy l lo Saturday—single copy WeeVlv ... Monthly ... S uarterly ... alfYearly... Yearly ... is. .. 4s. ud 6.1 6d PAYABLE IN ADVANCE and we observe tl.ata new fence said to be Rutt /'roof is being stretched thereon. This will add to the appearance of a much frequented walk for natives and tourists alike. We have one criticism however to nnke, and that is, that the wire is being put on wrong edge up. Those of us who are familiar with wire fencing, know that the smaller meshes are intended for the lower edge. informed that the rooms in Hotel Colonial are taken, arrangements are being made for rooms at the Hotel Royal Victoria and the sev.eral pri vale houses are expecting to fill up. True this is late in the season, but "better Late than never." On Monday at the opening of the Legislature when H Districts, on the Out Islands, and Key West, Fla. Although so recently our Court decided that a Barrel of Grits wa 5 a Barrel within the meaning of the contract with the Cuba and Mad Steamship Company for which a freight rate at fifty cents only was chargeable, yet w e .-ire rel.abK informed that the present steam er h#n brought down Bills of idiniE u> cmiffiieee with Grits w lich resul .t^ffaIn the House of Assembly Excellency The \dministrncharged at the rate of Sixty Advertising Rates :— SIK pence per line lor first insertion; three (*nce per line lofsecood insertion ; ;u..i one penny per line for sul>-.quent niserti> >i>^. .dvertiscmei.ts under eight hn 4 s TEbe tribune ATURDAY. February 13. 1915. PUBLISHED AT 8 P. M. "Variety is the spice of life"' so the sages say, and there is scarcely anything that does not become uninteresting and commonplace if persistently repeated. We hear a good story, and appreciate it to the Thursday night, The lion J P. Sands Leader for the Government presented 9 Messages from H. E. the Administrator, 8 of which were requests for Votes nf Indemnity for Monies expended without Authority, amounting in total to £"263.16.1 1. Mr Cole presented reported address in reply to 11. E.*Sopening speech which was read, ordered to be printed and noted for Committal at the next meetin L'. Mr. Albury gave notice of questions as to the Constitution ajitv of the Gov. in Council remitting £10,000 of this Colony's monies, on the vote of an informal meeling 01 uttered the words "I congratulate the Colony on having at last obtained a boon which 'he Government has for years woi ked for, 1 refer to the mutual penny postage between America and the Bahamas," the I OuristS on all sides were seen nodding their heads in approbation, and satisfaction. It has not been so much the 5 cents postage rate which has annoyed our Tourists, but rather the penalties i .riposted for short postages. Their friends being acctislome I to their inland 2 cents postagi Notwithstanding the protests of the Government, and the pro posals of the Chamber of Com merce to pay the additional cost, at Havana tally. We would call the attention of the public to the Notice in the ^dvertieing columns of The Sale in the School Grounds of "Sacred Hcait'on Monday and Tuesday 151I1 and 16th insts.,on liast Shirk's Stuet. We would bespeak lor it, a laige patronage. FIRE AT THE GROVE The bush at "The Grove", the property of the I Ion. T M. Meneudez, was discovered to be mi fire to-day. An alarm was turned in to* the Central Sta. Mm', and a part o! the Lire De. Mr. Turtle gave" notice of! rate usually omitted to add questions as to the Waul Line's | the additional 3 cents Stamp proposal! to the Government j for foreign service aid con f remittance, the Ward continues to demand the pre-: .. . .... succeeded n payment nt freight, lliisopeiatesconsiderably to the disad vantage of Importers; as the Commission Merchants in NewYork prepay the freight, add the amount to the Invoice charges and consequently figun their Commissions thereon. Tliprogramme for tiansfei of Commissioners in March this j eai is as follows : — o • • partment immediately proceed* s ed with the Commandant, and full, its wit, its humour, its prepayment of freights. I sequently the receivers would point, but let it be dinned in1 The House will meet again have to pay the penalties, to our ears day after day, and [on Monday Evening. worse than all, by the samr individual, and we are bore.I to death and try to avoid the story-teller, whenever we can, we "might supply many instances of real good becoming monotonus and valueless; our readers we know can themselves supply many. But as this is a private and personal ^opinion, we are ourselves doling what we reprobate in hers. the matter of what are as "editorials," or ," they are principalWriters expression of and we think very I. the readers whose ad opinions may be V are of greater value, )re we [impose to our introducing a change The Sub Committee of the War Relief Fund are making another shipment of (>8 Boxes of fine Grape Fruit to the British Red Cross Society in England for use ot the soldiers, by to day's Steamer. The fruit has scheduled time. been given gratuitously by Messrs John Butler, R.M. LightW. D. Armbrister, Esq (the only remaining unassigned Commissioner), at the present time in charge of the Harbour Island District is t 1 be removed extinguishing the lire without much damage being sustained. When turning Brown's Point a Motor Car with Mr. Samuel Minns and others upset. Mr. Minns was injured and brought up to the B. G. Hospital. The rest of the occupants weie unhurt. COMMUNICATED class So far this vear the P. and O. S S. "Miami" has made Q fi her trips with great regulan<3o m JUionerj at the present ty. Almost every trip up to time u cn argeof the Governor's present time she has armed | Harbour District is to go to In an hour or more ahead of her| a g U a, Why is this? Devees O. Johnson, Esq (first All of us remember how each I class Commissioner) now at year previously there have I Matthew Town Inagua, is to be The Schr. "Hatiie H. Roberts" was sol I at Public Auc tion yesterday by Mr. John Butler, This vessel formed part of the estate of the late John Albeds and was thoroughly reto Governor's Harbour, Lieu paired a few months ago at a cost <>f £300 J £400. thera. Messrs joilll uuuei, I\..I. i-i^mj^"> j -y 11 1 1 bourn and W (^Fountain and been sticking in the mud, to transferred to Harbour Islan other friends hyive also subscribed the necessary expenses of shipment. j* Owing to the strong winds the Steamers "Monterey" and "Esperanza" are around at South West Bay, transferring cargo. When will the Bar be deepened, to admit our larger ships to come alongside the wharves? I s ture by Dr. The first art lee ,e beaten track and to McHattie on 1 uesday nigh ... what has been our the government House Ball mtime immemorialr? m „ wfta largely attended, the great annoyance, inconvience, embarassment, and in many cases, we fear disgust, of the tourists. j The Motor Schooner "Frances L" which from her maiden trip has been running regularly to Miami, Fla., at the present time, in consequence of the running of the S. S. Miami, under contract with our Government, is lying at anchor in the Harbour The occasion however is being made good use of, as she The Schooner "Nellie Leo nora owned by W J. Pinder, Esq. is undergoing at the pre sent time a thorough overhaul ing. The vessel usually per forms the service of transferring our Commissioners and their belongings, from one District on the Out Islands lo another, and it is rumoured that in all pro bability her services will be required next month for this pin p se. jm time immemorial ,. ft i ? • .1 11 „J fler the spat e as a free a members we have is being painted and cleaned ie [lie spiu e us ci 1 ice feuilleton which i m et nave expressed their great beg I may appeal to the lumber of our readers rest them more than the effusions whi h ir are at times areas dry stand which they would iiss. i 1 this number we lave to introduce the new lea, changing the caption of the series at our will and leasure. We want to get the reading public interested in our work, we want it to be a literary co-operative society, and we shall welcome any contributions of a local character which it may be pleased to furnish us, provided, we are not rendered amenable to legal proceedings being instituted'against us. —:o:— During the recent summer the Hotel Colonial authorities, who lease the Tort Charlotte grounds, for Golf Links, were communicated with by thelioardi of Worksrelatne to the unsightM interest in the work. We again urge that these lectures should be thrown open to the Public generally and not confined to a limited number. . We learn from the Street Sweeping Contractor that he finds difficulty in securing a suit, able place for d u m piu g the refuse. Some time ago, it was suggested that the portion of Harbour immediately opposited the Eastern Abutment be Idled in. It is now suggested that the Sweepings of our Streets be utilized for this pur p o S e. The Board of Health are now calling for T e n d e r s for next year's contract, and the scheme is well worth considering at this time. j It is roughly estimated that from 50,000 to 60,000 do/on pineapples will be reap! d Irom the fields in the W'ullf! Road and Ljtl vicinity. It must be remembered that up to within the last feu years were considered ly looking fence along the Bay Street frontage, and it is certainlv refreshing to see that a new fence is now in course of erection. Most of the old posts have been replaced by new ones, of little value. j* The next few weeks promised to be the record for the season as far as the number of Tourist are concerning. We are up anew. J At Dun more Town, Harbour Island, last week, two fires were discovered simultaneously in two separate parts of the Island, TWO UNOCCUPIED HOUSES, and both were totaly destroyed. It is thought that these fires are the work of an incendiary, and it is hoped that the Government will leave no stone unturned to punish the wrong doers. TOMATOES crated for ship meat, to the United States of America, are coming in this week in large quantities from, the Eleuthera, and Harbour Island Districts. S vend I) at8 are here with cargoes awaiting transshipment to the Ward Line and Miami steamers. Prices obtained are encouraging, we are informed, but the worm-, arc proving very disastrous to the vines and crops. J* The Westeyan Methodist Synod, closed its 1913 business Thurs The New Residency at liar hour Island f<>r winch the House of Assembly In 1913 voted £800 has been completed, and is no I occupied by I'.W.I) Armbristi 1 Esq the Commissioner and his family. Tins building is situated on a Hill, commandso line view of the township and Harbour, an I adds generally to the appearance of the Town from its ap proaches. 'The property in the City known formerly as Culmer and Uussellsopposite the Market has recently changed hands. Mr. William F. Harris is the new owner of the same. The S. S. "Havana" sailed 'from New York at 11 a.m. for Nassau to day, with \2 passengers, and is d'le on Tuesday morning. • —:o: — The S. S. "Miami" arrived from Miami i<> a.m. today, with 26 passengers and 4 tons of cargo. —:o: — The Waul Liner S. S. "Mes ico" is expected to arrive from Havana to morrow morning at 6 or 7 o'clock. —:o: — The Post Otue will be open until 2 hours after the arrival day night, by an Open Session of the mails there. in Trinity Church. In a day or two the various ministers will separate for their respective —.0:— We have heard that there has been a case of Bubonic Plague She was purchased by Mr. W. .1 Pinder for £28^ and we exp.-ct he Knows what to do with her. 'The low price which this line vet.seI brought will give ime idea of the state of business, 11 doesn't war 1 ant a high ei tariff at any rate. What say I you Bay Street ? COMMUNICATED 18th January 191.S. The Editor, The Tribune hear Sir, The writer of the communicated article in your issue of 2bth December last, signed "Sibboleth and Shibboleth" is evidently not a nauiical man. for Ins meteorology is so mixed and So different bom that genei illy accepted, that perhaps it is a new the 'iv t" which he had better have attached h.s name. He says, "Now a hurricane does not iieossauW imply a wind ot f.virai 1 i.nai \ velocity, but iis spe< ific motii >n, spiral or rotary and progressive," I SH) No Sir, a hurricane docs imply extraordinary velocit) and forte, and a storm with a rotator) and progressive motion is termed a cyclone ; a cyclone may or may not be of hurricane force, and a hurricane is not necessai ily a cyclone. He says "The) 1 seamen) speak of a still bn


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THE TRIBUNE NASSAU. BAHAMAS %  w • I am aware mat it is common in the Bahamas among would be weather prophets to speak recklessly o' cyclone as one and the same thing, but in exact meteorology it is not so by any means, as I have endeavoured to show. "Storm" 'in I "hurricane" are noi interchangeable terms, and have nev< i been sim e San Sal vador (Watlings Island] was discovered In COLUMBUS P. S I'.M i\ storm is not a hurricane, hut every hurricane is a storm. .* of the chief charms of a race. The order was excellent and there was no unpleasant inci icane and | dents that often spoil the pleasure of an event of this kind. There are many improvements that could be suggested but as the racing qualities of our ponies develop, we have no doubt that tli: Committee will add these and revive on Dunmore Track the memories of the old racing days of Hobby Horse. We publish a list of the win ners below : i. FIRST CLASS RACE. i. Black Prince, D J. DeCnegory—Winner, B. R. 2, Kanacke, \Y. NorthWinner, R. R George, I.. V, Sands. OPEN assent to fixing minimum prices]Governor, joth .Ian 1915. I he 11 ibuue 3The Edito Dear Sir, Will you kindlj permit mel* through the colums uf your valued aewspapei lo saj 1 few words to, The S. h >l Chil iren 0) the Bahamas, M\ de.u young friends, B >ya and Girls, 1 presunx that all your teachers have already told you of the great tflu nph of our Public Schools, in winni ig to years in succession, Lord deaths, Empire Day Challenge Cup, in com pet i lion with the School Children ol the hole British Empire, it is a victoi y l w in h even one of you may justly be proud, t<> me it has been the si >ur< e ol the greatest pl< isure. It isnot 11' 1 ssai) thai 1 should explain to \ 011 v. lint tins Cbal lenged Cup 1-, us I am sure that v an teacln rs have dune so, and t< r than I ran As you kn*w Francis Bruce Sands <'i the i\irpum Ba\ (Eleuthera) Public School was the w inner the yeui before the last, and Walter McGregor Albury \ 2 !; r, / ". ., ,. .• \\ inner, B K of the Boj s Central School, (Nassau) was the winner last year; Sands did so well again last year that received Honourable Mention; that isgrand isn't BLUR RIBBON loos. R* D RIBBON I IS, 3. SWEEPSTAKES. 1. Shamrock. .1 V Bethel, j Maw F. North, — Winner, R. R. ; Drizzle C DeGregory— Winner, IV R 1 nnpariel, F. Claridge 5 Flint, T l'ooie, But It Corn, .1. \\ Green, BLOB RIBBON 40S. RBI RIBBON .,. ASSt M "I \TI< >N R VCES. 1. May, H. N Chipman, Chipman, R. I\. 2 Rajah, 11 \l I >avenport,— \\ inner Cup 3 George, K V Solomon, 4 Sudan, K < i Malcolm, HI IF. R1BB IN CUP RRD RIBBON 7 SMALL I" % MIES i Sultan. O Buinsidc,— Winner, R R Cash,— ii? I am proud ui those two bovs, are yoi t? Now uiiat I want to say gnls and bo\> is this, that I want to see that cup won by the Ba hamas again ii• iyear, will you doit? // tkoul i be the girlt turn thit year. Now, jus to make it a little moreencouragmg. I will planin the hands i if ill Editor of The Tribune! >NE GU1NE \ for the winner in addition to the I'lii ee Guineas that goes \ ith the cup Will School teachers pleas. read thiSCom iiiinii a tioii to then schools : Now girls and boys there you are, and I am a B. C. S. of '6t. This i'lc.i of supplimeuting Lord Meath's prize as an incentive t o winning t h B c u p again this y at -'tans tn us %  < good one. Might n. n V developed fine qualities b ii we must give the praise to the Jockey Mr. Degre gory who II nn exciting finish lifted his mount to victory The \ -.a in..a Ra N i •; I J.' lo s, Ma 4 Star, McQuay, BLUB RIBBON 30 s. RED 15^. SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE INWARDS but steps are being taken to improve the situation. The government isalso considering means to carry on a more stringent campaign against German trade. Petrograd:—A Russian state in.-lit tonight says that the Rus sians are retiring in Easl Prussia towards the Russian frontier be cause of the concentration of a great ( ei man force in the Mazurian Lakes. I he stati meat says that the enemy is being held in check as the Russians rein at. Washington: — < irent Britain and German have been warned most emphatically against menacing vessels and lives of American citizens travelling in the recently proclaimed war / me at sea. The Impel ial German government will be held strictly accountable lor any acts of its naval authorities resulting in destruction of American livi The publication tonight of the t.'xt of both notes sent yesterday to Great Britain and Germany revealed that both were warned most emphatically, I rermanj was ad\ ised that the United States "Would be ?on strained to hold the Imperi il I ierman government to strict accountability Should a deplorable situation arise" the Ameri111 government "Would take any steps it maydei m necessary to 5 ifeguard its' citizens livi s and property." Vumiden, Netherlands: -The G< nn.m submarine L" 2. yester.I i) attempted to torpedo the British steamer Laertes which \\ ed here today from Java. The vessel escaped by fast steaming. The Dutch authori ties will make an inquiry, as it 1su Jgested thai the attempt was m-ale within Dutch territorial waters I ie I lague: — United States Ministei Van D\ ke has appeal jed to tinWashington goverm men' saying that hiscommuniBahamas. Official newFebruary 12th: The French government reports violent fighting in Argonne near Bagatelle. The German attack was broken by infantry and artillery lire. Heavy losses occurred on both sides. The Russian government reports four new German army n -.concentrated in Fast Prussia. The Russians are retiring holding the enemy. In the Carpathians enemy attacks were repulsed and more pris uiers were captured (Signed) HARCOURT. London: —The Admiralty annouuees '.hat during the last [4 hours combined aeroplane and seaplane operations have been carried on by the naval department in the Balnki nberge, Zeebuigge and Ostend districts with a view of preventing the Germans establishing submarine bases. 54 aeroplanes and seaplanes look part. Great damage is reported to the railway station at Ostend which was probably burned to the ground. The railway station at Blankenberge wasdamaged and the railwa\ line torn up in many placi Bombs were dropped on the Middl COMMUNICATED Nassau Bahamas Feb. 13th. The brisk cool weather of the past few days, when the thermometer dropped into the sixties and native Nassauvians looked confident each morning for snow, has been much enjoyed by visitors from the States. Entertainments outdoors and in are being run off with a rapidity that is positively breath taking. A large tea at the Victoria Tea Gardens was given on Thursday by Mr. and Mrs. Hailman and Mrs. Joseph R. Woodwell of Pittsburg. The Colonial Tango orchestra played through out the afternoon, and dancing was indulged in b\ a few irrepressibleson a platform high up in a great silk cotton tree.Many] guests were present from the lish official colony, Hon. F. C. Wells-Durrant K. C. Mrs. Durrani and Miss I hirrant, I Ion. Ilanourt Malcolm and Mrs. Malcolm, His Honor Chief Justice Tudor, among them. Those present from the American colony included Mi. and Mrs. A. Van Winkle of Newark, Mr. and Mrs. W. F, Carliu of New York, Mr. and Mrs. !•'.. I I. Brown of Minn. apolis, Mr. and Mrs. Frank N. Double.lay and Miss Dorothy Doubleday, Mr. and Mrs. F. Coit German positions at Middle[ 0 hnson of Oyster Bay L. L, Miss :.-er.*e and also on the railway Betty Wood well, Mr. Rees Scul Iv of Pittsburg,Miss II R.OstStation and the German mine sweepiog vessels at Zeebrugge. During the attacks the machines ehcountared heavy banks ol --now. No submarines were seen. Flight commander Gral am White fell into the sea off Nieuport and was rescued by a French vessel. Germany says they have taken 26.000 prisoner! and pushed back the Russian rapidly in Fast PrussiaParis announcs that the Rus sians have completely beaten the Germans in Poland killing '9>5 Feb. 8, Admiral, rhompson, mandjer at I rier becattse thej Miami 26 Passengers were sealed with the stamp of and Cargo. the American Legation. .,, S S. MI'.IIHI. Sharpley,] Ottawa:—-A drastic tax has iiii-ii'. scsi '"( *im* lituwiiiinuui" 1 cation with Luxemburg has been more than 40.000 men among cutoff by the German Com I the German im aders. Miami, 25 Passengers, and Cargo. 10 Eefteranta, Fanning, Guantanamo 2 Passengers Cienj \e , Mangumlla an.I Sautiago. cargo 11 Miami. Sharpley, Mia been inaugurated by the Dominion Government and the free 1 is-t has practically been wiped out b) its Stringent orders. Tariffs on imports, governments banks, railroads telegraphs and all industries areaffecb d London: I he latest supple Feb. 9 mi, a j Passengers cargo, meat of the !. onion Gazette shows that 77 officers have been appointed bom the ranks to c ..uimissi.ai in the British army OUTWARDS IF:;;. //. Albnry, Pin 11 der, Miami, Passengers because of efficiencj in the field. Cargo. London:—British AmbassaSS Wtatni, sharpley dors cannot live on present salMiami .•( Passengers. arieg though I hey range from Monterey, Smith San tiago 5 Passengers Ballast. Esberanea, Fanning New York Cargo, Miami, Sharpley, Miami, Passengi rs. Latest War News February 12th 1915* GOVERNMENT PRESS London:—The Germans are QOW rushing troops into Fast Prussia and the Lower Vistula while the Austro-Gcrmans in the Eastern uai 1 of the range have been able 1 >l irre the Rus sians from Mil • \ ina. The Russi Hnppeai afti-i fierce battles List Sunday in have almost complete c naod of the middle and Wesiern mountains Fi 1 in a il •<)• %  in 3 irlin ar.reported tn be arranging to $1 joo to $57,500 a year. It is proposed to divide ambassadors into two grades and ministers into three. Wash in>'ton: --"Britannia On tin Western front the (Jermans claim a number ol gains and a.unit one slight hiss. The Kaiser, leaving the war conference in Berlin, has g to the Eastern front again. Petrograd reports that the by, Miss F. C. Ostby, Mr. R. F. (Istby of Providence. The Handicap Golf Tournament for a cup ottered by Mr.II. S. VVeiser of Philadelphia, was won on Wednesday by Miss M. Bundy of Endicott N. Y. Miss Bundy's win was the more re mark-able that there were thirty in tliv field, and during the af terwm of play a high wind mad.low scores extremelv d hcult The best scores were M. Bundy, Gross 96, llai 18, Net 78: Mr. C H. i 1 Q j, Handicap ih, Mr Harold IF Duden C Handicap 10, N. I ~ : M* Brown Gross itel garrison at Przemysl is still ex hausting itself in unsuccessful sorties. London:—Great forces of G.-rmans have The Second Race meetl 'I rack Dunmore attrad gathering. F. ClsJ last little pony flash opening race, and thej teen moving stakes No 2, showed a< Eastward from Belgium preIM c. de Gregory's w L was well :-mtested and ih-iugh Boat nn internal loan of* a quarMr Dav n|ort n .\^w\ Mr. ter of a billion dollars. Ch'ipman's Mav was a close The cost of living again occusecond and gave the contest that pies the attention of England. spice of uncertainty that is one Premier Asquith hat declined to may rule the Wavi s, but for mce she was glad to take refuge uiuler 1 )ld G'OM -m.l a prominent official "f tlie n ivy .lepartmenl in cmmenling on the passage of the Lus tanin through the Iri-h Sen under the Amei 1 ciw MIL; !MS expi Cted 'hat < '<• 1 man will strengthen In r claim lo the riifht of bptck. dim_' the British Isli s fallow in" thisactiitn by Cnpiatn Dow. The' ii r a ins have held that British lien hanlini n W( re masquaradng under the Amci ican Bag. • I c nried neutral passengers and Neutral mails and 1 could I not jeopardize them" i-the captains only statement. It is sai.l that he hoisted the American flag on wireless advi 1 from the British \dmiraltv oil Ireland. sumably on their way to the Eastern front. New York: — Westbound steamers arriving today rep' rt large field-, of ice off ihc N. w foundland Banks Panama: —Another slight earthquake was lelt in the canal sone loday Washington:The United States governn enl today sent a strong protest to the German government against tampering with mails ol I b nrv Vat, I lyke, the United States Ministerto the Netheilands. Brizzle. In the third et Bahama^Ra< ing and sociation Cup, Mr 11. Davenport on Rajah n his performance of the o day, winning by two II from Mr. 11 N. Chipman 1 The Bahama Sweepstake; the best event ol the day and a drtying finish l> J. deGregi brought Black Prince across tl line a winner over K. V. Sand George. Donkey and mi races furnished a great deal amusement and ended a good program. Music was bv the famous Grantstown Ragtime Band. In the Judges stands was Messrs. R. J. Flah h, Artea ga, and French. Mr. Serahp Lillig was starter. February 13th IQ15. London 1 2th. A Sale OF A varied and generous supply of P L \1N and Fancy articles for the benefit of the Sacred Heart School will be held on Monday and Tuesday Feb. 15 and loth at Sacfed Heart School Grounds, Easl Shirley Street. Light :\n(\ Solid Refreshments. Gate open From 1 to 8 p.m. and Miss Eva Hoyt of Stanford 3 ins. Conn. Arrivals at the Colonial on the S, S. "Miami" on Thursday included Mr. Frank H. Patterson. Miss A. II. Patterson, Miss M. II Billings, Miss M. E. Hall, Mrs. I. Philip Kearney of New York ; Mrs. Charles Ii. Gar.hu r. Mr. William C. Geer of Trov ; Mr and Mrs. C B Chase of FJ 11 River, Mass. ; Miss Amelia Baker '.I Pans : Mrs M F PeaMr. \i \. P< avi j of Belfast Mo Mrs. Jeorge H. Hoyt ^•



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I J THE TRIBUNE NASSAU. I AHAMAN IBffllllfl9BBffi S8 V ss&SSSBS5B "SSSE5S5S5SSSSS58B w .. Scientific Ocrtaintics. HaUPDDDDD • nnanDDDDnna "mannannnnnD The 'Allenburys' Foods are based on scientific certainties. Used as directed.'they ere exactly what a baby needs to develop into a healthy and robust child. The •Allenburys' Foods are easily assimilated: digestive and kindred disorders are avoided by their use. Infants fed on these foods are neither fretful nor wakeful % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % %  IDDaDDDUUDQnCDanpiUIIHlU noaandanu %  % % %  jDaOCIDOaDDIIHIl %¡ % % %  %¡% % %  %¡% % %  DIH %¡ % % %  DBBB ammm ammm %¡% % %  ammm %¡ % % %  Dill %¡ % % %  amtim ammm ammm ammi %¡ %  •< Sam i :•" %¡ % %  L. 3""J1 rjT %  cr a • 1.11 %  i %  nonnnnn :nn3nnr3DnnnnnnnDn::; •' %¡ nnnnnnrr.nunnorannnannnr % !i'* iP'in'iTann.iunnnnnnnnn.anuanc jnnnoac'j.in'irsnD: n-rinncno" ".r.a ".• % %  a BOB %  IllllH'lllllllllllIlllUIHIlliKkHailHIIMIIIlllliaiHIIIiliiiiitiiEllllllI .. % %  a I mma % %¡ na •HD %  a • W." -. n :*a %  a %  • %  a % % %  a % % %  i % % %  a %  % %  : % % %  a %  % %  : %  %  *•'. % % %  a %  %  .-' BBS! Baa aw % % %  %  Mllenbtsrgs AT OBTAFf/ED FROM ALL CHEMISTS ilk Food No. 2. Malted Food N i y TO Milk Food No. I. M ium birth lo ) momhi. From 310 6 nontka. Kiom 6n>"nih> 11 wjtu*. amr Pamphlet "Infant Fee .• % %  3 BE countries ol the world, had brown up in a fortnight. not Let us see us history as far as we cai trace it back in England— England, Hie nation of shop keepers, but, ns Napoleon foujid, and RS Napoleon's apology today is finding, a nation of sturdy, heroic fighters as well. Begin in Twelfth Century, Prior to the opening of tlie twelfth century, established shops for the sale and barter of commodities were little known in England. Peddlers, or chap men, traveled from hamlet to hamlet with packs of fine cloth, jewels, wine, salt, spins, tallow and wax, but, as may be judged from their stuck, the traffic of these men was confined almost entirely lo the nobles of the castle and the priests of the monastery. Such necessary articles as salt and tallow were sold to the common people, bul these peddlers found most of] their profits in the sale of lux uries to tlic wealthy Later, as peddlers became more numerous, the Market was de veloped in town, while the I'.iir supplied the country district! with a means lo sell and %  Mcfcange goods. This inner, intitution served the double pur>f providing where gnods pould not be obtained in rn markets were procured also a wider opportuUisposeof ordinar) comliops of that forerunner focer, the "Pepper.-r" or were undoubtedly esIried in London many years his to 1180, asa mention jipperers' Guild of London as early as that year. radesmen dealt in pepper lUtmegS, mace, ginger, inseand other spices, tight across I: urope from idia. Spiced drinks fly spiced foods were 'in Vogue among people llth, as food at that early was coarse and not alnrholesome. This guild rvpperers ceased to exist ortly after 1338, in which year heavy loan was extorted from by Edward the Second. The earliest use of the word jrocer," or "groser," occurs in '1310 in the city record report of London. 1 he term "grocer" probably originated through certain mediaeval traders who "engrossed" large quantities of merchandise. It has also been attributed to the leading merchants of that time who bought only "in gross" (en gros), or in large quantities. The All Powerful Grocers' Guild The fifteenth century in I'.ngland finds nearly all of the various trades formed into guilds, and these guilds were in many Cases provided with full authority to rule the affairs of the occupation. This power was received either directly from the King through a special charter, or, if in London, by a delegation .from the Loid Mayor. Each trade was supposed to be responsible for, and preserve, its "good name am) fame That greatest of all guilds, the Gt HITS' Conipanv of I.on don, was founds! in 1343, and the history of this organization is to a large extent the history of the grocery trad< j in England for over four hundred years. In 1427 this guild was given the exclusive privilege "f superintending the public weighing an.i such manap men! of the King's Beam remained long with them. As far back as 1394, thtr grocers were 1 in powered to "g irble" (inspec t .IIMI cleanse) all groceries 11, the citj of I.on •Ion They were given the right to enter any store and inspect the merchant's stock; and when these official garbles found goods that were impure or spoiled tl.ey had full authority to arrest, try and punish the often der. And punishment of offenders under the Pure Food Laws of that period, and later, did not always stop at a fine; il was often found more effective to place the guilty one in stocks and then bum his corrupt wares in such propinquity to his nose that the full (ISensiveness of his misdemeanor was made powerfully evident lo him. I he Grocer's Guild retained this office of garbling up to the end of the eighteenth century. Canada We^t India Magazine LOST ST A R Set i 11 A 1)1 AM ON I) BROOCH; Platinum. Reward Kelum to '' TRIBUNE'' OFFICE Feb. 8, 1915. MISS LOUISE CADOGAN -t >'. — C ERTIFICATED NURSt from Bahamas General Hospital. Can furnish testimonials. 101 Shirley Street SANITARY COOL RELIABLE HILTON Good Morning! We Are Introducing Telephone f>r Appointments 275 MRS. M. WATSON RUDD BEST'.RETAIL TRADE. TKAOTJ MAItK 11^ BAY 8TREET. OVER 1500 GASOLINE Al Hoiel Nutau e.nd Hotel Coljnle.1 until list March Ch iropodist Cos met icia n Kahler Gn\Marinello Graduate duate New York jN Drums and 10 Gallon Cans. Price one shilling per Gallon. All previous prices cancelled. Pairs Boots and Shoes I Being added to an already replete stock C. C. SAUNDERS Williams the Shoenian is 1 Fast Bay St. again opening up one ol Nassau N P. those Sample Lots of BOOTS Jan. 5th 10.15, and SHOES in a limited number of sizes as follows viz.— CHAS. C. LIGHTBObRN ARMSTRONG ST. Ha. whin's Hill. X P E R I E N C E D Paper Hanger. Ceiling Work", a specialty. Al! work carefully and Artistically perforated. Absolute satisfaction guaran teed. The very best references. -TERMS MODERATE. American Silk American Cashmere American Cotton Lisle HOSIERY They have stood the test. Give real foot comfort. No seams to rip. Never become loose or baggv. The shape is knit innot pressed in. GUARANTEED for fineness, style, superiority of material and Workmanship. Absolutely stainl ss Will wear 6 months without holes, or new OM Iree. OUR SPECIAL OFFER to every one sen linn ns %  *) IHI in currency or postal note, to cover advertising an.I •hipping charge*, we will send post paid, with written guarantee, backed by a five million dollar conipanv, either 5 Pairs of our 75c. va.lue Imencan Silk Hosiery, or U'nirs of ovir illc. v n. Ivie -imerican Cashmere Hosiery, or 4 l*%ln of our 50c. Value. American Cotton-Lisle Hosiery or 6 Peilrs of Children's Hosiery. DONT DELAY-Offerexpireswhen dealer in your locality is %  sleeted. THE INTERNATIONAL HOISERY CO. P. O. Box 224 DAYTON. OHIO. U. S. A NOTICE For Hire AUTOMOBILES AND BICYCLES APPLY TO J. P.SIMMS 47 MARKET STREET NASSAU N. P. MRS. E. L. VARGAS Millet St. Sooth P ANAMA HAT 8 CLEANED SATISFACTION GUARANTEED THE well known Dairyman of the East THOMAS M. KNOWLES Is now prepared to supplv and deliver the purest milk to be obtained anywhere from his Dairy Farm on Mast Shirley Street, opposite Williams Street. Orders may be delivered at his Store on East Bay St. No. 528, 'Phone No. 116. Delivery at from 7a.m. to 10 a.m., and from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. daily in Sanitary Bottles. Many germs make milk impure, In Know If s' milk no germs are found ; Look at the bottles in which its sold, at Know Irs who takes them all around. Milk like his needs no lac torn etcr, In verification of its strength. Liquor pura nee impura Knowles would never go that length. WANTED C OPIES of "THE STROMBUS" August 1913 (Exhibition Number) Apply •' Tribune"Oifice Men's Boots and Shoes 111 sizes from 6 to 7?, Women's Boots and hoes in sizes from 3J to 4I Misses Hoots and Shoes 111 sizes from 12}to r Notice P URSU \NT to instruction? received, Public Notice is hereby given that 1 will, on the 25th day or February, at Noon at the wharf of the Imperial I.ighthoue Department, put up for sale by pubThe advantage in purchns-1 I ic Auction, subject to a reing from this loth (as others 1 serve P ric <". the Motor Pin who have purchased before nace, "KARLSRl'HE" with can attest) that >ou can se< "her sailaandfitttogs. lect the sizes from a very The Motor Pinnace may be large variety ol up-to-date | inspected on application at Styles at prices considerably anytime. cheaper than kept in stock. it gular lines CALL EARLY and secure your size at WILLIAMS' WHOLESALE AND RETAIL SHOE ESTABLISHMENT 277 and 279 Bay St City H. F 6 Feb. 1915 ARMBRISTER NOTICE W A. MATHER UNDERTAKER D ESIRKS lo inform his friends and the Public that Ire has just received a complete outfit of facilities foi the buisness of an undertaker, which plafM Ium 111. A position to rairv out Funerals that may be en 11 listed to his care with system and despatch ; and lespeet fully solicits their patronage (lit my Prices fiist and prove that these are the veiy lowest for Ih first class work. Kerosene 150S I N New 50 gallon Galvanized Iron Drums at i8cts per Gallon. In 10 gallon Cans at 2octs per. Gallon. Drums and Cans returnable Full particulars at Office "Frances E.," Nassau N. P. C. C. SAUNDERS Johnson's Artistic Wood Finishes Johnson's Prepared Wax— a eon plete finish and polish (or .-ill furniture Woodwork ami ft...re. Johnson's Wood Dyefor the artistic coloring of all wuod, soft or hard Johnson's Under Lac a spirit finish, very much superior to shellac or vaimsli Johnson's Fla.t Wood Finish-fora beautiful, artistic, haml-ruhbed effete without '"•• npeiica of rubbing, Johnson's 1'ivst Wood Filler—lor tilling the ^1.1111 and pores of wood, preparing N for the finish Johnson's Powdered Wax -for bal room floors. FOR. SALE BY Chas. E. Albury WANTED OLD BAHAMAS POSTGE STAMPS /Vie 6d. grey lilac V One 6d grev lilac surcharged 4 (1. One 6d. grey violet One £1 King Edward.— green or black. Address I.. GREY vare of 1RIBLNE—enclosing samples and prices. V Williams* T HIS is to inform my Patron and the Public in General that I have opened my Public Black Smith Shop; and am now ready to do anything in 1 e line ol General repair <>i new w rk Horse Shoeing Specially. All 1 ork done Mechanically. '"• A. I1UVLER. ohoe&i U1 J U Uuttei 1



PAGE 1

* LATEST RADIOGRAMS NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS Subscribers to The Tribune Monthly aii'l upward • .ire requested not to pay subscriptions to the carrier! but only at the Office, or to a Collector from the Office, also to repoit to the Office any neglect on the part of thecanieisto deliver their paper. ^< ^ > Nulltua Ctddictus Ivjrare In verb* mo-gleirl. Being bound to iwt&r to the Do|mas of no Mo.er. "THE TRIBUNEWANTS ADVT'S. FOR RESULT ADVERTISE IN "THE TRIBUNE" Specle.1 Ri.i to Yearly Advertisers Vol. XII. No. 70. NASSAU. N. P.. BAHAMAS. SATURDAY. FEBRUARY 13. 1915. Price. THREE CENTS. The West India Regiments A Famous coloured Fighting Force, whose possible entry into the War makes its history singularly interesting at this time. V*vNEof the most remarkable corporate capacity, the name V_^/ events of the whole war chosen being the "Black Corps has been the innumerable maniof Dragons. Pioneers, and Artifestations of loyalty by His Ma | ficers." As for Malcolm's Royal jesty's coloured subjects all over Uangers, these saw service *althe world. From India, from farmost immediately after forma distant Fiji, from Ceylon, the Cape, Gambia, Last Africa, and, i;i fact, from every pait fight side by side in the trenches of trance and Belgium With the white soldiers of Britain and the self-governing Dominions. But nowhere has greater patriotism been evoked than by the people of the West Indies — coloured 1 as well as white. This brings us to the fact that the West Indies possess otlfl of the most famous coloured regiments in the British army, and that verv likely it will be called into service in Europe before the war is over. This, and tinfad that its history for the past nigh on one hundred yiars is in considerable part the history of Britain's iro pical Empire, makes the record of the First and Second West India regiments singularly interesting at this time. Fought in American Rebellion To do full justice to the West India Regiments it is necessary to give some account of the other forces from the nucli of which they were formed. For, as with many another British regiment, 'lie VWsi Indiasat the outset were not Known by thsir present name The First' West Indias was formed in 1705 from the remnants of the South Carolina Regiment, which in 1779 had been raised to support the loyalist cause during the American rebellion. Another body which contributed to the formation of llie regiment war Malcolms Royal Uangers, rais ed in the earlier part of 1795. A fSW months later this was incorporated with 'he South Ciro linas to form the First West Indias. In the first American war, the South'Carolina 8 iendered distinguished services to the British aims. It took put in most of the important battles fought in the South. Ila last engagement was at Eutaw Springs Following the signing of peace in 1 781 the regiment wast sent to Jamaica, where it w is disbanded the following year It is noteworthy of the pride taken in their record, an I of tlie coloured con %  titution of the regiment, that Bconsiderable number of the men, though dish inded, insisted upon the corpi retaining its lion, taking part in General Stewart's operations against St. Lucia, then held by the French. The First Weal India,* Since the formation under its present title the First West India Regiment has seen active service in Dominica, Hayti, Guadeloupe, New Orleans, Ash* anti and Sierra l.eone, drawing praise from all their commanders for gallant conduct. Space forbids the recounting of all the heroic exploits in which the regiment played its part, but one piece of gallantry deserves special mention. When, in 1853, Lt.-Colonel O'Connor, the commander of the regiment, was Governor of Gambia, the town ofSappagee.ii) possession of the malcontent natives, had given special trouble. Little could, it appeared, be done Bgainst them with the forces at the Governor's disposal. However, under the command of a Cap tain Murray, a detachment of the Firs! West India Regiment was detailed off to rapture the place. How tills force conducted itself won encoiiinins from everyone acquainted with the difficulties. The town was taken by storm, the lenders captured, and tranquility restored in less time, almost, than it takes to tell. A less fortunate exploit was the expedition against the native king .of Malagrah oidered by the Governor of Sierre Leon. The king had long been giving trouble, and finally Captain IT Oyley Fletcher was ordered to proceed against him with 1.50 men of the First West Indias. Captain Fletcher represented to the Governor how utterly inadequate this force was for the work required, that at least 400 men were necessary. These re presentations, however, were of no avail,and the result was as Captain Fletcher had expected. VVhiil with the disease contracted in the West African swamps, and attacks from hostile natives, 'he little force was almost decimated. In the second American war, the West India Regiment was brought over from dies and its services utilised to the full by the British Govern m p nt. rheieprincipal exploit, however, was against New Orleans when that city wasbesieg ed by the British forcer. The valour then diplayed by the West India troops won praise notalons from the British com. manders but from those of the U. S. as well.General Jackson ('afterwards President of the United States), who put himself in command of the New Oileans defence, in particular was loud in his praise of their behaviour in the field, and as near as it was possible for him to do so, did not hesitate to compare their soldierly qualities with those of the various coloured troops raised by the your.g republic, much to the detriment of the latter. Therein wyis seen the marked superiority which has since been commented upon so many times by travellers acquainted with thp negroes of both the West Indies and of the United States. In the attack against New Orleans, although the West India regiment suffered heavily because of their intrepidity against the enemy, greater losses still were caused by the climatic conditions, such as fever and the enervating nature of the atmosphere—conditions to be found in that part of the United States and in Florida to this day. Incidentally Canadian tourists may weir" Jake a lesson from this, that the climate of the West Indies i infinitely superior to that of the much vaunted and so-called health resorts in the southern parts of the United States. The Second West India Regiment Thehistory of the Second West Indias follows much the same lines as the First. Formed in the same year, 1795, like the West Indias it had previouslyexisted under another namethat of "Myers Regiment of Foot,' first stationed at Martinique. Most of the battles which the First West Indias took part in the sister regiment also shared. It was, however, in the Ashanti war that the latter won most renown, Lord Wolseley, thecommander of the British forces, declaring that portions of the regiment had been "in every affair of th? whole war." | One incident connected with! the Ashanti war, as shewing the great courage of the West India coloured soldier, may well be recounted. On one occasion when the British forces bad becu driven back carrying such consternation to our native allies as to amount almost to panic, twosoldiersof theSecond West India K'egiment offered to go alone as far as Prah, a distance of about 16 miles, to find out whether a rumoured report was true that I he enemy bad retired across the river. The courage required for tins actto travel this .distance through trackless swamps and forests abounding with an enemj whn never spared life—was tremendous. Yet these two West In the West In dia soldiers accomplished their task successfully, and the result of the information they brought (hanged the fortunes of the entire expedition From their past record,it can. therefore, be taken for granted that, if the West India Regi menls are called upon for ser vice at the Front, they will I you ou, IF By Rudyard Kipling F you can keep your head when all about are losing theirs and blaming it on you %  If you can trust yourself when all men doubt y< But make allowance for their doubting too • If you can wait and not be tired by waiting, Or being lied about don't deal in lies, Or being hated don't give way to hating, And yet don't look too good, nor talk too wise ; If you can dreams— and not make dreaming your master • If you can think—and not make thoughts your aim %  If you can meet with Triumph and disaster And treat those two imposlers just the same %  if you can bear to hear the truth you've spoken Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools, Or watch the things you gave your life to broken, And stoop and build them up with worn-out tools ; If you can make one of all your winnings And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss And lose, and start again at your beginnings, And never breathe a word about your loss; If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew To serve your turn long after they are gone, And so hold on when there is nothing in you Except the Wfll which says to them : "Hold on .'" • If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue. %  Or walk with Kings—nor lose the common touch ; If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you ; If all men count with you, but none too much ; If you can fill the unforgiving minute With sixty seconds' worth of distance run, Yours is the Earth and everything that's in it, And —which is more—you'll be a Man, my son acquit themselves as valiantly as any of the other regiments fighting tlrere. The desire to be sent to France in order "to serve the King" has many times found expression in both regiments. It may be added that the regiments are mainly re cruited in Jamaica and Barba dos, but all the other West In whose efficiency has many t been commented upon by inspecting generals. All tl have rendered no mean se, in this war, taking their r. all the various measures ed for local defence. W regulars or volunteers, i therefore, be seen that tl oured West India soi dia Colonies are represented in in every way the perfect their ranks. In all the Colonies j loyalty, and forms a most arc volunteer regiments, the 1 able addition to the major portion of the men in army of which British whom are coloured also. In several instances these are commanded by coloured officers, everywhere are so intensely lightly proud. "Canada West India Magazine How the Grocer has helped to make the British Empire. r N O middleman is known so well as the grocer.He it is from whom we get not only most of the things that are useful, but also those that are most delectable. But this apart, the grocer occupies a position almost unique amongst the traders of the world. In his store or warehouse he links together athe uttermost parts of theearth and the middle parts and near parts as well. Even in the humblest village grocery, could but the different articles have depicted on them maps of the places from which they come, we probably find the whole world represented Cocoanuts from frinadad, nutmegs from Grenada, arrowroot from St. Vincent, sugar from Barbados, British Guiana, St. Lucia, St. Kitts, and all the other Saints in the Calendar. All these articles we should find there, not to speak of tea from India and China, canned mutton and rabbit from Australia, dates from Arabia, cheese, bacon and flour from Canada, butter from New Zealand, patent medicines from Canada and England—and so on all through that vast assort ment of wares we see on the grocers' shelves. As can be imagined, a craft which links together in this manner all (CONTINUED ON FOURTH PAGE.) Wear Ar-mbrister s Shoe:


The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02342
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Saturday, February 13, 1915
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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oclc - 9994850
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Full Text
*
LATEST RADIOGRAMS
NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS
Subscribers to The Tribune
Monthly aii'l upward .ire
requested not to pay sub-
scriptions to the carrier! but
only at the Office, or to a
Collector from the Office,
also to repoit to the Office
any neglect on the part of
thecanieisto deliver their
paper. ^< ^ >
Nulltua Ctddictus Ivjrare In verb* mo-gleirl.
Being bound to iwt&r to the Do|mas of no Mo.er.
"THE TRIBUNE-
WANTS ADVT'S.
FOR RESULT
ADVERTISE IN
"THE TRIBUNE"
Specle.1 Ri.i to Yearly
Advertisers
Vol. XII. No. 70.
NASSAU. N. P.. BAHAMAS. SATURDAY. FEBRUARY 13. 1915.
Price. THREE CENTS.
The West India Regiments
A Famous coloured Fighting Force, whose possible
entry into the War makes its history singularly
interesting at this time.
V*vNEof the most remarkable corporate capacity, the name
V_^/ events of the whole war chosen being the "Black Corps
has been the innumerable mani- of Dragons. Pioneers, and Arti-
festations of loyalty by His Ma | ficers." As for Malcolm's Royal
jesty's coloured subjects all over Uangers, these saw service *al-
the world. From India, from far- most immediately after forma
distant Fiji, from Ceylon, the
Cape, Gambia, Last Africa, and,
i;i fact, from every pait Empire has come the same story
a story ol uodyi-ng devotion
to the King tuiperor and Ins
domains. Gifts have followed,
and in many instances armed
forces also i.> fight side by side
in the trenches of trance and
Belgium With the white soldiers
of Britain and the self-govern-
ing Dominions. But nowhere
has greater patriotism been
evoked than by the people of
the West Indies coloured1 as
well as white. This brings us
to the fact that the West Indies
possess otlfl of the most famous
coloured regiments in the Brit-
ish army, and that verv likely it
will be called into service in Eu-
rope before the war is over.
This, and tin- fad that its his-
tory for the past nigh on one
hundred yiars is in considerable
part the history of Britain's iro
pical Empire, makes the record
of the First and Second West
India regiments singularly in-
teresting at this time.
Fought in American Rebellion
To do full justice to the West
India Regiments it is necessary
to give some account of the
other forces from the nucli of
which they were formed. For,
as with many another British
regiment, 'lie VWsi Indiasat the
outset were not Known by thsir
present name The First' West
Indias was formed in 1705 from
the remnants of the South Caro-
lina Regiment, which in 1779
had been raised to support the
loyalist cause during the
American rebellion. Another
body which contributed to the
formation of llie regiment war
Malcolms Royal Uangers, rais
ed in the earlier part of 1795. A
fSW months later this was in-
corporated with 'he South Ciro
linas to form the First West In-
dias.
In the first American war, the
South'Carolina 8 iendered dis-
tinguished services to the British
aims. It took put in most of
the important battles fought in
the South. Ila last engagement
was at Eutaw Springs Follow-
ing the signing of peace in 1 781
the regiment wast sent to Jamai-
ca, where it w is disbanded the
following year It is notewor-
thy of the pride taken in their
record, an I of tlie coloured con
titution of the regiment, that
Bconsiderable number of the
men, though dish inded, insisted
upon the corpi retaining its
lion, taking part in General
Stewart's operations against St.
Lucia, then held by the French.
The First Weal India,*
Since the formation under its
present title the First West In-
dia Regiment has seen active
service in Dominica, Hayti,
Guadeloupe, New Orleans, Ash*
anti and Sierra l.eone, drawing
praise from all their comman-
ders for gallant conduct. Space
forbids the recounting of all the
heroic exploits in which the
regiment played its part, but
one piece of gallantry deserves
special mention. When, in 1853,
Lt.-Colonel O'Connor, the com-
mander of the regiment, was
Governor of Gambia, the town
ofSappagee.ii) possession of the
malcontent natives, had given
special trouble. Little could,
it appeared, be done Bgainst
them with the forces at the
Governor's disposal. However,
under the command of a Cap
tain Murray, a detachment of
the Firs! West India Regiment
was detailed off to rapture the
place. How tills force conduct-
ed itself won encoiiinins from
everyone acquainted with the
difficulties. The town was
taken by storm, the lenders cap-
tured, and tranquility restored
in less time, almost, than it
takes to tell.
A less fortunate exploit was
the expedition against the na-
tive king .of Malagrah oidered
by the Governor of Sierre Leon.
The king had long been giving
trouble, and finally Captain IT
Oyley Fletcher was ordered to
proceed against him with 1.50
men of the First West Indias.
Captain Fletcher represented
to the Governor how utterly in-
adequate this force was for the
work required, that at least 400
men were necessary. These re
presentations, however, were of
no avail,and the result was as
Captain Fletcher had expected.
VVhiil with the disease contract-
ed in the West African swamps,
and attacks from hostile natives,
'he little force was almost deci-
mated.
In the second American war,
the West India Regiment was
brought over from
dies and its services utilised to
the full by the British Govern
mpnt. rheieprincipal exploit,
however, was against New Or-
leans when that city wasbesieg
ed by the British forcer. The
valour then diplayed by the
West India troops won praise
notalons from the British com.
manders but from those of the U.
S. as well.General Jackson ('af-
terwards President of the Unit-
ed States), who put himself in
command of the New Oileans
defence, in particular was loud
in his praise of their behaviour
in the field, and as near as it
was possible for him to do so,
did not hesitate to compare
their soldierly qualities with
those of the various coloured
troops raised by the your.g re-
public, much to the detriment
of the latter. Therein wyis seen
the marked superiority which
has since been commented upon
so many times by travellers ac-
quainted with thp negroes of
both the West Indies and of the
United States. In the attack
against New Orleans, although
the West India regiment suffer-
ed heavily because of their in-
trepidity against the enemy,
greater losses still were caused
by the climatic conditions, such
as fever and the enervating na-
ture of the atmospherecondi-
tions to be found in that part of
the United States and in Florida
to this day. Incidentally Cana-
dian tourists may weir" Jake a
lesson from this, that the clim-
ate of the West Indies i infini-
tely superior to that of the much
vaunted and so-called health
resorts in the southern parts of
the United States.
The Second West India Regiment
Thehistory of the Second
West Indias follows much the
same lines as the First. Formed
in the same year, 1795, like the
West Indias it had previously-
existed under another name-
that of "Myers Regiment of
Foot,' first stationed at Marti-
nique. Most of the battles which
the First West Indias took part
in the sister regiment also shar-
ed. It was, however, in the
Ashanti war that the latter won
most renown, Lord Wolseley,
thecommander of the British
forces, declaring that portions
of the regiment had been "in
every affair of th? whole war." |
One incident connected with!
the Ashanti war, as shewing the
great courage of the West In-
dia coloured soldier, may well
be recounted. On one occasion
when the British forces bad
becu driven back carrying such
consternation to our native al-
lies as to amount almost to
panic, twosoldiersof theSecond
West India K'egiment offered to
go alone as far as Prah, a dis-
tance of about 16 miles, to find
out whether a rumoured report
was true that I he enemy bad
retired across the river. The
courage required for tins act-
to travel this .distance through
trackless swamps and forests
abounding with an enemj whn
never spared lifewas tremen-
dous. Yet these two West In
the West In dia soldiers accomplished their
task successfully, and the result
of the information they brought
(hanged the fortunes of the
entire expedition
From their past record,it can.
therefore, be taken for granted
that, if the West India Regi
menls are called upon for ser
vice at the Front, they will
I
you
ou,
IF
By Rudyard Kipling
F you can keep your head when all about
are losing theirs and blaming it on you
If you can trust yourself when all men doubt y<
But make allowance for their doubting too
If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,
Or being lied about don't deal in lies,
Or being hated don't give way to hating,
And yet don't look too good, nor talk too wise ;
If you can dreams and not make dreaming your master
If you can thinkand not make thoughts your aim
If you can meet with Triumph and disaster
And treat those two imposlers just the same
if you can bear to hear the truth you've spoken
Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,
Or watch the things you gave your life to broken,
And stoop and build them up with worn-out tools ;
If you can make one of all your winnings
And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss
And lose, and start again at your beginnings,
And never breathe a word about your loss;
If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew
To serve your turn long after they are gone,
And so hold on when there is nothing in you
Except the Wfll which says to them : "Hold on .'"

If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue.
Or walk with Kingsnor lose the common touch ;
If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you ;
If all men count with you, but none too much ;
If you can fill the unforgiving minute
With sixty seconds' worth of distance run,
Yours is the Earth and everything that's in it,
And which is moreyou'll be a Man, my son !
acquit themselves as valiantly
as any of the other regiments
fighting tlrere. The desire to
be sent to France in order "to
serve the King" has many times
found expression in both regi-
ments. It may be added that
the regiments are mainly re
cruited in Jamaica and Barba
dos, but all the other West In
whose efficiency has many t
been commented upon by
inspecting generals. All tl
have rendered no mean se,
in this war, taking their r.
all the various measures
ed for local defence. W
regulars or volunteers, i
therefore, be seen that tl
oured West India soi
dia Colonies are represented in in every way the perfect
their ranks. In all the Colonies j loyalty, and forms a most
arc volunteer regiments, the 1 able addition to the
major portion of the men in army of which British
whom are coloured also. In
several instances these are com-
manded by coloured officers,
everywhere are so intensely
lightly proud.
"Canada West India Magazine
How the Grocer has helped to
make the British Empire.
r
NO middleman is known so
well as the grocer.He it is
from whom we get not only
most of the things that are use-
ful, but also those that are most
delectable. But this apart, the
grocer occupies a position al-
most unique amongst the trad-
ers of the world. In his store
or warehouse he links together
athe uttermost parts of theearth
and the middle parts and near
parts as well. Even in the
humblest village grocery, could
but the different articles have
depicted on them maps of the
places from which they come,
we probably find the whole
world represented Cocoanuts
from frinadad, nutmegs from
Grenada, arrowroot from St.
Vincent, sugar from Barbados,
British Guiana, St. Lucia, St.
Kitts, and all the other Saints
in the Calendar. All these ar-
ticles we should find there, not
to speak of tea from India and
China, canned mutton and rab-
bit from Australia, dates from
Arabia, cheese, bacon and flour
from Canada, butter from New
Zealand, patent medicines from
Canada and Englandand so
on all through that vast assort
ment of wares we see on the
grocers' shelves. As can be
imagined, a craft which links
together in this manner all
(Continued on Fourth Page.)
Wear Ar-mbrister s Shoe:


THE TRIBUNE NASSAU. BAHAMAS
L. OILBKRT DUPUCH.
Editor and Proprietor.
OFFICK:
Corner Shirley Che.rlote St.
\assau, -V. P., Bakamas
PHONK2W. P.O. BOX 103.
'published daily
Monday, Wednesday and Friday-
single copy .
Tuesday, and Thursdaysingle copy l
lo
Saturdaysingle copy
WeeVlv ...
Monthly ...
Suarterly ...
alfYearly...
Yearly
... is.
.. 4s.
ud
6.1
6d
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
and we observe tl.ata new fence
said to be Rutt /'roof is being
stretched thereon. This will
add to the appearance of a much
frequented walk for natives and
tourists alike.
We have one criticism how-
ever to nnke, and that is, that
the wire is being put on wrong
edge up. Those of us who are
familiar with wire fencing,
know that the smaller meshes
are intended for the lower edge.
informed that the rooms in
Hotel Colonial are taken,
arrangements are being made
for rooms at the Hotel Royal
Victoria and the sev.eral pri
vale houses are expecting to
fill up.
True this is late in the sea-
son, but "better Late than
never."
On Monday at the opening
of the Legislature when H
Districts, on the Out Islands,
and Key West, Fla.
Although so recently our
Court decided that a Barrel of
Grits wa5 a Barrel within the
meaning of the contract with
the Cuba and Mad Steamship
Company for which a freight
rate at fifty cents only was
chargeable, yet w e .-ire rel.abK
informed that the present steam
er h#n brought down Bills of
idiniE u> cmiffiieee with Grits
w
lich resul
.t^ffa-
In the House of Assembly Excellency The \dministrn- charged at the rate of Sixty
Advertising Rates :Sik pence per line
lor first insertion; three (*nce per line
lofsecood insertion ; ;u..i one penny per
line for sul>-.quent niserti>>i>^.
' .dvertiscmei.ts under eight hn 4s-
TEbe tribune
ATURDAY. February 13. 1915.
PUBLISHED AT 8 P. M.
"Variety is the spice of life"'
so the sages say, and there is
scarcely anything that does
not become uninteresting and
commonplace if persistently
repeated. We hear a good
story, and appreciate it to the
Thursday night, The lion J P.
Sands Leader for the Govern-
ment presented 9 Messages from
H. E. the Administrator, 8 of
which were requests for Votes nf
Indemnity for Monies expended
without Authority, amounting
in total to "263.16.1 1.
Mr Cole presented reported
address in reply to 11. E.*Sopen-
ing speech which was read, or-
dered to be printed and noted
for Committal at the next meet-
in l'.
Mr. Albury gave notice of
questions as to the Constitution
ajitv of the Gov. in Council
remitting 10,000 of this
Colony's monies, on the vote of
an informal meeling
01 uttered the words "I con-
gratulate the Colony on hav-
ing at last obtained a boon
which 'he Government has
for years woi ked for, 1 refer to
the mutual penny postage
between America and the Ba-
hamas," the I OuristS on all
sides were seen nodding their
heads in approbation, and
satisfaction.
It has not been so much the
5 cents postage rate which
has annoyed our Tourists, but
rather the penalties i .riposted
for short postages. Their
friends being acctislome I to
their inland 2 cents postagi
Notwithstanding the protests
of the Government, and the pro
posals of the Chamber of Com
merce to pay the additional cost,
at Havana
tally.
We would call the attention
of the public to the Notice in
the ^dvertieing columns of The
Sale in the School Grounds of
"Sacred Hcait'on Monday and
Tuesday 151I1 and 16th insts.,on
liast Shirk's Stuet. We would
bespeak lor it, a laige patron-
age.
FIRE AT THE GROVE
The bush at "The Grove", the
property of the I Ion. T M. Me-
neudez, was discovered to be
mi fire to-day. An alarm was
turned in to* the Central Sta.
Mm', and a part o! the Lire De.
Mr. Turtle gave" notice of! rate usually omitted to add
questions as to the Waul Line's | the additional 3 cents Stamp
proposal! to the Government j for foreign service aid con
f remittance, the Ward
continues to demand the pre-:
, .. . .... succeeded n
payment nt freight, lliisopei-
atesconsiderably to the disad
vantage of Importers; as the
Commission Merchants in New-
York prepay the freight, add
the amount to the Invoice
charges and consequently figun
their Commissions thereon.
Tli- programme for tiansfei
of Commissioners in March this
j eai is as follows :
o
partment immediately proceed*
s ed with the Commandant, and
full, its wit, its humour, its prepayment of freights. I sequently the receivers would
point, but let it be dinned in-1 The House will meet again have to pay the penalties,
to our ears day after day, and [on Monday Evening.
worse than all, by the samr
individual, and we are bore.I
to death and try to avoid the
story-teller, whenever we can,
we "might supply many in-
stances of real good becoming
monotonus and valueless; our
readers we know can them-
selves supply many. But as
this is a private and personal
^opinion, we are ourselves do-
ling what we reprobate in
hers.
the matter of what are
as "editorials," or
," they are principal-
Writers expression of
and we think very
I. the readers whose
ad opinions may be
V are of greater value,
)re we [impose to our
introducing a change
The Sub Committee of the
War Relief Fund are making
another shipment of (>8 Boxes of
fine Grape Fruit to the British
Red Cross Society in England
for use ot the soldiers, by to
day's Steamer. The fruit has scheduled time.
been given gratuitously by
Messrs John Butler, R.M. Light-
W. D. Armbrister, Esq (the
only remaining unassigned
Commissioner), at the present
time in charge of the Harbour
Island District is t 1 be removed
extinguishing the
lire without much damage be-
ing sustained. When turning
Brown's Point a Motor Car with
Mr. Samuel Minns and others
upset. Mr. Minns was injured
and brought up to the B. G.
Hospital. The rest of the oc-
cupants weie unhurt.
COMMUNICATED
class
So far this vear the P. and
O. S S. "Miami" has made Q fi
her trips with great regulan- <3omJUionerj at the present
ty. Almost every trip up to time u, cnargeof the Governor's
present time she has armed | Harbour District is to go to In
an hour or more ahead of her|agUa,
Why is this? Devees O. Johnson, Esq (first
All of us remember how each I class Commissioner) now at
year previously there have I Matthew Town Inagua, is to be
The Schr. "Hatiie H. Rob-
erts" was sol I at Public Auc
tion yesterday by Mr. John But-
ler, This vessel formed part of
the estate of the late John Al-
- beds and was thoroughly re-
to Governor's Harbour, Lieu paired a few months ago at a
cost <>f 300 J 400.
thera.
Messrs joilll uuuei, i\..i. i-i^m- j^"> j..........-y--------- 11 1 1 ,
bourn and W (^Fountain and been sticking in the mud, to transferred to Harbour Islan
other friends hyive also subscrib-
ed the necessary expenses of
shipment.
j*
Owing to the strong winds
the Steamers "Monterey" and
"Esperanza" are around at
South West Bay, transferring
cargo.
When will the Bar be deepened,
to admit our larger ships to
come alongside the wharves?
Is
ture by Dr.
The first art lee
,e beaten track and to McHattie on 1 uesday nigh ...
, what has been our the government House Ball
mtime immemorialr?mwfta largely attended,
the great annoyance, incon-
vience, embarassment, and in
many cases, we fear disgust,
of the tourists.
j
The Motor Schooner
"Frances L" which from her
maiden trip has been running
regularly to Miami, Fla., at
the present time, in conse-
quence of the running of the
S. S. Miami, under contract
with our Government, is ly-
ing at anchor in the Harbour
The occasion however is be-
ing made good use of, as she
The Schooner "Nellie Leo
nora owned by W J. Pinder,
Esq. is undergoing at the pre
sent time a thorough overhaul
ing. The vessel usually per
forms the service of transferring
our Commissioners and their
belongings, from one District on
the Out Islands lo another, and
it is rumoured that in all pro
bability her services will be re-
quired next month for this pin -
p se.
jm time immemorial ,. ".....fti---------,---- ? .------ .1 11 j
fler the spat e as a free a members we have is being painted and cleaned
ie
[lie spiu e us ci 1 ice .
feuilleton which imet nave expressed their great
beg
I may appeal to the
lumber of our readers
rest them more than
the effusions whi h
ir are at times areas dry
stand which they would
iiss.
i 1 this number we
lave to introduce the new
lea, changing the caption
of the series at our will and
leasure.
We want to get the read-
ing public interested in our
work, we want it to be a
literary co-operative society,
and we shall welcome any
contributions of a local char-
acter which it may be pleas-
ed to furnish us, provided, we
are not rendered amenable to
legal proceedings being in-
stituted'against us.
:o:
During the recent summer the
Hotel Colonial authorities, who
lease the Tort Charlotte
grounds, for Golf Links, were
communicated with by thelioardi .
of Worksrelatne to the unsight-M
interest in the work.
We again urge that these
lectures should be thrown
open to the Public generally
and not confined to a limited
number.
.
We learn from the Street
Sweeping Contractor that he
finds difficulty in securing a suit,
able place for d u m piu g
the refuse. Some time ago, it
was suggested that the portion
of Harbour immediately op-
posited the Eastern Abutment be
Idled in. It is now suggested
that the Sweepings of our Streets
be utilized for this pur p o S e.
The Board of Health are now
calling for T e n d e r s for next
year's contract, and the scheme
is well worth considering at this
time.
j
It is roughly estimated that
from 50,000 to 60,000 do/on
pineapples will be reap! d
Irom the fields in the W'ullf!
Road and Ljtl vicinity. It
must be remembered that up
to within the last feu years
were considered
ly looking fence along the Bay
Street frontage, and it is cer-
tainlv refreshing to see that a
new fence is now in course of
erection. Most of the old posts
have been replaced by new ones,
of little value.
j*
The next few weeks promised
to be the record for the season
as far as the number of Tour-
ist are concerning. We are
up anew.
j
At Dun more Town, Har-
bour Island, last week, two
fires were discovered simul-
taneously in two separate
parts of the Island, two UN-
OCCUPIED houses, and both
were totaly destroyed.
It is thought that these
fires are the work of an in-
cendiary, and it is hoped that
the Government will leave
no stone unturned to punish
the wrong doers.
Tomatoes crated for ship
meat, to the United States of
America, are coming in this
week in large quantities from,
the Eleuthera, and Harbour
Island Districts.
S vend I) at8 are here with
cargoes awaiting transship-
ment to the Ward Line and
Miami steamers.
Prices obtained are en-
couraging, we are informed,
but the worm-, arc proving
very disastrous to the vines
and crops.
j*
The Westeyan Methodist Synod,
closed its 1913 business Thurs
The New Residency at liar
hour Island f<>r winch the House
of Assembly In 1913 voted 800
has been completed, and is no I
occupied by I'.W.I) Armbristi 1
Esq the Commissioner and his
family.
Tins building is situated on a
Hill, commandso line view of
the township and Harbour, an I
adds generally to the appear-
ance of the Town from its ap
proaches.
'The property in the City
known formerly as Culmer and
Uussellsopposite the Market has
recently changed hands.
Mr. William F. Harris is the
new owner of the same.
The S. S. "Havana" sailed
'from New York at 11 a.m. for
Nassau to day, with \2 passen-
gers, and is d'le on Tuesday
morning.
:o:
The S. S. "Miami" arrived
from Miami i<> a.m. today,
with 26 passengers and 4 tons
of cargo.
:o:
The Waul Liner S. S. "Mes
ico" is expected to arrive from
Havana to morrow morning at
6 or 7 o'clock.
:o:
The Post Otue will be open
until 2 hours after the arrival
day night, by an Open Session of the mails there.
in Trinity Church. In a day or
two the various ministers will
separate for their respective
.0:
We have heard that there has
been a case of Bubonic Plague
She was purchased by Mr. W.
.1 Pinder for 28^ and we ex-
p.-ct he Knows what to do with
her. 'The low price which this
line vet.seI brought will give
- ime idea of the state of busi-
ness, 11 doesn't war 1 ant a high
ei tariff at any rate. What say
I you Bay Street ?
COMMUNICATED
18th January 191.S.
The Editor, The Tribune
hear Sir,
The writer of the communi-
cated article in your issue of
2bth December last, signed
"Sibboleth and Shibboleth" is
evidently not a nauiical man.
for Ins meteorology is so mixed
and So different bom that gen-
ei illy accepted, that perhaps it
is a new the 'iv t" which he
had better have attached h.s
name.
He says, "Now a hurricane
does not iieossauW imply a
wind ot f.virai 1 i.nai \ velocity,
but iis spe< ific motii >n, spiral or
rotary and progressive,"
I SH) No Sir, a hurricane docs
imply extraordinary velocit)
and forte, and a storm with a
rotator) and progressive motion
is termed a cyclone ; a cyclone
may or may not be of hurricane
force, and a hurricane is not
necessai ily a cyclone.
He says "The) 1 seamen)
speak of a still bn brisk ga 1%, a strong calc," Aye,
anil of a hurrieane.
I dont think thai I ever heard
of a to'gallant gale, ships dont
usually cany to'gallitut sails in
a gale.
In the table given by your
correspondent, I see that the
highest velocity given is charac-
terized as a hurricane, and yet
he says "a Hurricane does not
necessarily imply a wind of
extraordinan v locity."
'The met In id used by most
English speaking seamen, the
Wo\al Navy, and the Meteoro-
logical Snciet) "f England in
recording the lore* of the wind
is known as the "Beaufort Nota
tion" and is graduated from o
to i2;o representing a calm.and
12 a storm that nothing could
withstand; ami a hurricane is
represented by 1 i.l think,(I have
not the table before me) evident
ly hurricane here implies "a
wind of extraordinary velocity."

' -
*-..-*-.
_J


THE TRIBUNE NASSAU. BAHAMAS
w
I am aware mat it is common
in the Bahamas among would
be weather prophets to speak
recklessly o'
cyclone as one and the same
thing, but in exact meteorology
it is not so by any means, as I
have endeavoured to show.
"Storm" 'in I "hurricane" are
noi interchangeable terms, and
have nev< i been sim e San Sal
vador (Watlings Island] was
discovered In
COLUMBUS
P. S I'.m i\ storm is not a
hurricane, hut every hurricane
is a storm.
.*
of the chief charms of a race.
The order was excellent and
there was no unpleasant inci -
icane and | dents that often spoil the plea-
sure of an event of this kind.
There are many improvements
that could be suggested but as
the racing qualities of our po-
nies develop, we have no doubt
that tli: Committee will add
these and revive on Dunmore
Track the memories of the old
racing days of Hobby Horse.
We publish a list of the win
ners below :
i. FIRST CLASS RACE.
i. Black Prince, D J. DeCne-
goryWinner, B. R.
2, Kanacke, \Y. North-
Winner, R. R
George, I.. V, Sands.
OPEN
assent to fixing minimum prices]Governor,
joth .Ian 1915.
I he 11 ibuue
3-
The Edito
Dear Sir,
Will you kindlj permit mel*
through the colums uf your valu-
ed aewspapei lo saj 1 few words
to, The S. h >l Chil iren 0) the
Bahamas,
M\ de.u young friends, B >ya
and Girls,
1 presunx that all your teach-
ers have already told you of the
great tflu nph of our Public
Schools, in winni ig to years in
succession, Lord deaths, Empire
Day Challenge Cup, in com pet i
lion with the School Children ol
the hole British Empire, it is a
victoi y l w in h even one of
you may justly be proud, t<> me
it has been the si >ur< e ol the
greatest pl< isure.
It isnot 11'1 ssai) thai 1 should
explain to \ 011 v. lint tins Cbal
lenged Cup 1-, us I am sure that
v an teacln rs have dune so, and
t< r than I ran
As you kn*w Francis Bruce
Sands <'i the i\irpum Ba\ (Eleu-
thera) Public School was the
w inner the yeui before the last,
and Walter McGregor Albury\2 !;,.r,'/"-
- ., ,- . \\ inner, B K
of the Boj s Central School,
(Nassau) was the winner last
year; Sands did so well again
last year that received Honour-
able Mention; that isgrand isn't
BLUR RIBBON loos.
R* D RIBBON I IS,
3. SWEEPSTAKES.
1. Shamrock. .1 V Bethel,
j Maw F. North,
Winner, R. R.
; Drizzle C DeGregory
Winner, IV R
1 nnpariel, F. Claridge
5 Flint, T l'ooie,
But It Corn, .1. \\ Green,
BLOB RIBBON 40S.
RBI RIBBON
.,. ASSt M "I \TI< >N R VCES.
1. May, H. N Chipman, -
Chipman, R. I\.
2 Rajah, 11 \l I >avenport,
\\ inner Cup
3 George, K V Solomon,
4 Sudan, K < i Malcolm,
HI if. R1BB IN CUP
RRD RIBBON
7 SMALL I" ?MIES
i Sultan. O Buinsidc,
Winner, R R
Cash,
ii? I am proud ui those two
bovs, are yoi.....t?
Now uiiat I want to say gnls
and bo\> is this, that I want to
see that cup won by the Ba
hamas again ii i- year, will you
doit?
// tkoul i be the girlt turn thit
year. .
Now, jus to make it a little
moreencouragmg. I will plan- in
the hands i if ill Editor of The
Tribune! >NE GU1NE \ for the
winner in addition to the I'lii ee
Guineas that goes \ ith the cup
Will School teachers pleas.
read thiSCom iiiiniiatioii to then
schools :
Now girls and boys there you
are, and I am a
B. C. S. of '6t.
This i'lc.i of supplimeuting
Lord Meath's prize as an incen-
tive t o winning t h B c u p
again this y at -'tans tn us <
good one.
Might n. ol p.ipnlai etlui ation make it up
to rHREK GUINEAS. ( Eo.
COMMUNICATED.
THE FRIDAY'S RACES.
The race me< t at Dumm n
Track was one uf those enthusi-
astic spoiling I'Mn!s that wede
sire to see i -pc ited.
Though i he crowd was not sn
large on as the previous Kriday,
due no doubt lo the high .orth
wind, yet the spectators mad.'
up in appr.i i 11 ion for la' k of
numb, is, espe :ially interesting
was the No sweepstakes in
whichsix ponirs ran Mr. F,
North's |"> n V developed fine
qualities b ii we must give the
praise to the Jockey Mr. Degre
gory who ii nn exciting finish
lifted his mount to victory
The \ -.a in..a Ra N i ;
I J.' lo s, Ma
4 Star, McQuay,
Blub Ribbon 30 s.
Red 15^.
SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE
INWARDS
but steps are being taken to im-
prove the situation. The govern-
ment isalso considering means
to carry on a more stringent
campaign against German
trade.
Petrograd:A Russian state
in.-lit tonight says that the Rus
sians are retiring in Easl Prussia
towards the Russian frontier be
cause of the concentration of a
great ( ei man force in the Mazu-
rian Lakes. I he stati meat says
that the enemy is being held
in check as the Russians rein at.
Washington: < irent Britain
and German have been warned
most emphatically against
menacing vessels and lives of
American citizens travelling in
the recently proclaimed war
/ me at sea. The Impel ial Ger-
man government will be held
strictly accountable lor any acts
of its naval authorities resulting
in destruction of American livi
The publication tonight of
the t.'xt of both notes sent yes-
terday to Great Britain and
Germany revealed that both
were warned most emphatically,
I rermanj was ad\ ised that the
United States "Would be ?on
strained to hold the Imperi il
I ierman government to strict
accountability Should a deplo-
rable situation arise" the Ameri-
111 government "Would take
any steps it maydei m necessary
to 5 ifeguard its' citizens livi s
and property."
Vumiden, Netherlands: -The
G< nn.m submarine L" 2. yester-
.I i) attempted to torpedo the
British steamer Laertes which
\\ ed here today from Java.
The vessel escaped by fast
steaming. The Dutch authori
ties will make an inquiry, as it
1- su Jgested thai the attempt
was m-ale within Dutch territo-
rial waters
I ie I lague: United States
Ministei Van D\ ke has appeal
jed to tin- Washington goverm
men' saying that hiscommuni-
Bahamas.
Official new- February 12th:
The French government reports
violent fighting in Argonne near
Bagatelle. The German attack
was broken by infantry and ar-
tillery lire. Heavy losses occur-
red on both sides.
The Russian government re-
ports four new German army
n -.concentrated in Fast Prus-
sia. The Russians are retiring
holding the enemy. In the Car-
pathians enemy attacks were re-
pulsed and more pris uiers were
captured
(Signed)
HARCOURT.
London: The Admiralty an-
nouuees '.hat during the last
[4 hours combined aeroplane
and seaplane operations have
been carried on by the naval de-
partment in the Balnki nberge,
Zeebuigge and Ostend districts
with a view of preventing the
Germans establishing submarine
bases.
54 aeroplanes and seaplanes
look part. Great damage is re-
ported to the railway station at
Ostend which was probably
burned to the ground.
The railway station at
Blankenberge wasdamaged and
the railwa\ line torn up in many
placi
Bombs were dropped on the
Middl
COMMUNICATED
Nassau Bahamas
Feb. 13th.
The brisk cool weather of the
past few days, when the ther-
mometer dropped into the six-
ties and native Nassauvians
looked confident each morning
for snow, has been much enjoy-
ed by visitors from the States.
Entertainments outdoors and in
are being run off with a rapidi-
ty that is positively breath tak-
ing.
A large tea at the Victoria
Tea Gardens was given on
Thursday by Mr. and Mrs. Hail-
man and Mrs. Joseph R. Wood-
well of Pittsburg. The Colonial
Tango orchestra played through
out the afternoon, and dancing
was indulged in b\ a few irre-
pressibleson a platform high up
in a great silk cotton tree.Many]
guests were present from the
lish official colony, Hon.
F. C. Wells-Durrant K. C. Mrs.
Durrani and Miss I hirrant, I Ion.
Ilanourt Malcolm and Mrs.
Malcolm, His Honor Chief Jus-
tice Tudor, among them. Those
present from the American colo-
ny included Mi. and Mrs. A. Van
Winkle of Newark, Mr. and Mrs.
W. F, Carliu of New York, Mr.
and Mrs. !'.. I I. Brown of Minn-
. apolis, Mr. and Mrs. Frank N.
Double.lay and Miss Dorothy
Doubleday, Mr. and Mrs. F. Coit
German positions at Middle- [0hnson of Oyster Bay L. L, Miss
:.-er.*e and also on the railway Betty Wood well, Mr. Rees Scul
Iv of Pittsburg,Miss II R.Ost-
Station and the German mine
sweepiog vessels at Zeebrugge.
During the attacks the machines
ehcountared heavy banks ol
--now. No submarines were seen.
Flight commander Gral am
White fell into the sea off Nieu-
port and was rescued by a
French vessel.
Germany says they have taken
26.000 prisoner! and pushed
back the Russian rapidly in
Fast Prussia-
Paris announcs that the Rus
sians have completely beaten
the Germans in Poland killing
'9>5
Feb. 8, Admiral, rhompson, mandjer at I rier becattse thej
Miami 26 Passengers were sealed with the stamp of
and Cargo. the American Legation.
.,, S S. Mi'.iihi. Sharpley,] Ottawa:-A drastic tax has
iiii-ii'. scsi '"( *im* lit- uwiiiinuui" 1
cation with Luxemburg has been more than 40.000 men among
cutoff by the German Com_ I the German im aders.
Miami, 25 Passengers,
and Cargo.
10 Eefteranta, Fanning,
Guantanamo 2 Passen-
gers
" Cienj \e , Mangumlla
an.I Sautiago. cargo
11 Miami. Sharpley, Mia
been inaugurated by the Domi-
nion Government and the free
1 is-t has practically been wiped
out b) its Stringent orders. Ta-
riffs on imports, governments
banks, railroads telegraphs and
all industries areaffecb d
London: I he latest supple
Feb. 9
mi, a j Passengers cargo, meat of the !.onion Gazette
shows that 77 officers have been
appointed bom the ranks to
c ..uimissi.ai in the British army
OUTWARDS
IF:;;. //. Albnry, Pin
11
der, Miami, Passengers because of efficiencj in the field.
Cargo. London:British Ambassa-
SS Wtatni, sharpley dors cannot live on present sal-
Miami .( Passengers. arieg though I hey range from
Monterey, Smith San
tiago 5 Passengers
Ballast. "
Esberanea, Fanning
New York Cargo,
Miami, Sharpley,
. Miami, Passengi rs.
Latest War News
February 12th 1915*
GOVERNMENT PRESS
London:The Germans are
qow rushing troops into Fast
Prussia and the Lower Vistula
while the Austro-Gcrmans in
the Eastern uai 1 of the range
have been able 1 >l irre the Rus
sians from Mil \ ina.
The Russi H- nppeai afti-i
fierce battles List Sunday in
have almost complete c......naod
of the middle and Wesiern
mountains
Fi 1 in a il <), in 3 irlin
ar.- reported tn be arranging to
$1 joo to $57,500 a year. It is
proposed to divide ambassadors
into two grades and ministers
into three.
Wash in>'ton:--"Britannia
On tin Western front the
(Jermans claim a number ol
gains and a.unit one slight hiss.
The Kaiser, leaving the war
conference in Berlin, has g
to the Eastern front again.
Petrograd reports that the
by, Miss F. C. Ostby, Mr. R. F.
(Istby of Providence.
The Handicap Golf Tourna-
ment for a cup ottered by Mr.II.
S. VVeiser of Philadelphia, was
won on Wednesday by Miss M.
Bundy of Endicott N. Y. Miss
Bundy's win was the more re
mark-able that there were thirty
in tliv field, and during the af
terwm of play a high wind
mad.- low scores extremelv d
hcult The best scores were
M. Bundy, Gross 96, llai
18, Net 78: Mr. C H.
i 1 q j, Handicap ih,
Mr Harold IF Duden C
Handicap 10, N. I ~ : M*
Brown Gross itel
garrison at Przemysl is still ex
hausting itself in unsuccessful
sorties.
London:Great forces of
G.-rmans have
The Second Race meetl
'I rack Dunmore attrad
gathering. F. ClsJ
last little pony flash
opening race, and thej
teen moving stakes No 2, showed a<
Eastward from Belgium pre- IM c. de Gregory's w
L
was well :-mtested and ih-iugh Boat nn internal loan of* a quar-
Mr Dav n|ort n .\^w\ Mr. ter of a billion dollars.
Ch'ipman's Mav was a close The cost of living again occu-
second and gave the contest that pies the attention of England.
spice of uncertainty that is one Premier Asquith hat declined to
may rule the Wavi s, but for
. mce she was glad to take refuge
uiuler 1 )ld G'om -m.l a promi-
nent official "f tlie n ivy .lepart-
menl in cmmenling on the
passage of the Lus tanin through
the Iri-h Sen under the Amei 1
ciw Mil; !ms expi Cted 'hat < '< 1
man will strengthen In r claim
lo the riifht of bptck. dim_' the
British Isli s fallow in" thisac-
tiitn by Cnpiatn Dow. The' ii r
a ins have held that British
lien hanlini n W( re masquarad-
ng under the Amci ican Bag.
I c nried neutral passengers
and Neutral mails and 1 could
I not jeopardize them" i-- the
captains only statement. It is
sai.l that he hoisted the Ameri-
can flag on wireless advi 1
from the British \dmiraltv oil
Ireland.
sumably on their way to the
Eastern front.
New York: Westbound
steamers arriving today rep' rt
large field-, of ice off ihc N. w -
foundland Banks
Panama: Another slight
earthquake was lelt in the
canal sone loday
Washington:- The United
States governn enl today sent a
strong protest to the German
government against tampering
with mails ol I b nrv Vat, I lyke,
the United States Ministerto
the Netheilands.
Brizzle. In the third et
Bahama^- Ra< ing and
sociation Cup, Mr 11.
Davenport on Rajah n
his performance of the o
day, winning by two II
from Mr. 11 N. Chipman1
The Bahama Sweepstake;
the best event ol the day and
a drtying finish l> J. deGregi
brought Black Prince across tl
line a winner over K. V. Sand
George. Donkey and mi
races furnished a great deal
amusement and ended a good
program. Music was bv the fa-
mous Grantstown Ragtime
Band. In the Judges stands
was Messrs. R. J. Flah h, Artea
ga, and French. Mr. Serahp
Lillig was starter.
February 13th IQ15.
London 1 2th.
A Sale
OF
A varied and generous
supply of
PL \1N and Fancy articles
for the benefit of the Sa-
cred Heart School will be
held on Monday and Tuesday
Feb. 15 and loth at Sacfed
Heart School Grounds, Easl
Shirley Street.
Light :\n(\ Solid Refresh-
ments.
Gate open From 1 to 8 p.m. and Miss Eva Hoyt of Stanford
3 ins. Conn.
Arrivals at the Colonial on
the S, S. "Miami" on Thursday
included Mr. Frank H. Patter-
son. Miss A. II. Patterson, Miss
M. II Billings, Miss M. E. Hall,
Mrs. I. Philip Kearney of New
York ; Mrs. Charles Ii. Gar.hu r.
Mr. William C. Geer of Trov ;
Mr and Mrs. C B Chase of
Fj 11 River, Mass. ; Miss Amelia
Baker '.I Pans : Mrs M F Pea-
Mr. \i \. P< avi j of Bel-
fast Mo Mrs. Jeorge H. Hoyt
^


I
J
THE TRIBUNE NASSAU. I AHAMAN

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Scientific Ocrtaintics.
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The 'Allenburys' Foods are based on scientific certainties. Used as directed.'they
ere exactly what a baby needs to develop into a healthy and robust child. The
Allenburys' Foods are easily assimilated: digestive and kindred disorders are
avoided by their use. Infants fed on these foods are neither fretful nor wakeful

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Mllenbtsrgs
AT OBTAFf/ED FROM ALL CHEMISTS
ilk Food No. 2. Malted Food N i y
TO
Milk Food No. I. M
' ium birth lo ) momhi. From 310 6 nontka. Kiom 6n>"nih> 11 wjtu*.
amr Pamphlet "Infant Fee ALLEN & HANBUir LTD., LONDON,
AND STORKS.
Tha 'Allenburys' Ruaks 'Mulled).
Fion I" hi i ill' unwinls.
BW Tree. -**3
ENGLAND.
?nnoo 11 :innnn.>
.3 BE
countries ol the world, had
brown up in a fortnight.
not
Let
us see us history as far as we
cai trace it back in England
England, Hie nation of shop
keepers, but, ns Napoleon foujid,
and rs Napoleon's apology to-
day is finding, a nation of sturdy,
heroic fighters as well.
Begin in Twelfth Century,
Prior to the opening of tlie
twelfth century, established
shops for the sale and barter of
commodities were little known
in England. Peddlers, or chap
men, traveled from hamlet to
hamlet with packs of fine cloth,
jewels, wine, salt, spins, tallow
and wax, but, as may be judged
from their stuck, the traffic of
these men was confined almost
entirely lo the nobles of the
castle and the priests of the
monastery. Such necessary
articles as salt and tallow were
sold to the common people, bul
these peddlers found most of]
their profits in the sale of lux
uries to tlic wealthy
Later, as peddlers became more
numerous, the Market was de
veloped in town, while the I'.iir
supplied the country district!
with a means lo sell and m-
cfcange goods. This inner, in-
titution served the double pur-
>f providing where gnods
pould not be obtained in
rn markets were procur-
ed also a wider opportu-
Uisposeof ordinar) com-
liops of that forerunner
focer, the "Pepper.-r" or
were undoubtedly es-
Iried in London many years
his to 1180, asa mention
jipperers' Guild of London
as early as that year.
radesmen dealt in pepper
lUtmegS, mace, ginger,
inseand other spices,
tight across I: urope from
idia. Spiced drinks
fly spiced foods were
'in Vogue among people
llth, as food at that early
was coarse and not al-
nrholesome. This guild
rvpperers ceased to exist
ortly after 1338, in which year
heavy loan was extorted from
by Edward the Second.
The earliest use of the word
jrocer," or "groser," occurs in
'1310 in the city record report of
London. 1 he term "grocer"
probably originated through
certain mediaeval traders who
"engrossed" large quantities of
merchandise. It has also been
attributed to the leading mer-
chants of that time who bought
only "in gross" (en gros), or in
large quantities.
The All Powerful Grocers' Guild
The fifteenth century in I'.ng-
land finds nearly all of the vari-
ous trades formed into guilds,
and these guilds were in many
Cases provided with full authori-
ty to rule the affairs of the occu-
pation. This power was receiv-
ed either directly from the King
through a special charter, or, if
in London, by a delegation
.from the Loid Mayor. Each
trade was supposed to be res-
ponsible for, and preserve, its
"good name am) fame "
That greatest of all guilds,
the Gt hits' Conipanv of I.on
don, was founds! in 1343, and
the history of this organization
is to a large extent the history
of the grocery trad for over four hundred years. In
1427 this guild was given the
exclusive privilege "f superin-
tending the public weighing
an.i such manap men! of the
King's Beam remained long
with them. As far back as 1394,
thtr grocers were 1 in powered to
"g irble" (inspec t .iimi cleanse)
all groceries 11, the citj of I.on
Ion They were given the right
to enter any store and inspect
the merchant's stock; and when
these official garbles found
goods that were impure or spoil-
ed tl.ey had full authority to
arrest, try and punish the often
der. And punishment of offen-
ders under the Pure Food Laws
of that period, and later, did
not always stop at a fine; il
was often found more effective
to place the guilty one in stocks
and then bum his corrupt wares
in such propinquity to his nose
that the full (ISensiveness of his
misdemeanor was made power-
fully evident lo him. I he Gro-
cer's Guild retained this office
of garbling up to the end of the
eighteenth century.
Canada We^t India Magazine
LOST
ST A R
Set i 11
A 1)1 AM ON I)
BROOCH;
Platinum. Reward
Kelum to
'' TRIBUNE'' OFFICE
Feb. 8, 1915.
MISS LOUISE CADOGAN
-t >'.
CERTIFICATED NURSt
from Bahamas General
Hospital. Can furnish testi-
monials.
101 Shirley Street
SANITARY
COOL
RELIABLE
HILTON
Good Morning!
We Are Introducing
Telephone f>r Appointments 275
MRS. M. WATSON RUDD
BEST'.RETAIL TRADE.
TKAOTJ MAItK
11^
BAY 8TREET.
OVER
1500 GASOLINE
Al Hoiel Nutau
e.nd Hotel Coljnle.1
until list March
Ch iropodist Cos met icia n
Kahler Gn\- Marinello Gra-
duate duate
New York
jN Drums and 10 Gallon
Cans. Price one shilling
per Gallon. All previous
prices cancelled.
Pairs
Boots and Shoes
I
Being added to an already
replete stock C. C. SAUNDERS
Williams the Shoenian is 1 Fast Bay St.
again opening up one ol Nassau N P.
those Sample Lots of BOOTS Jan. 5th 10.15,
and SHOES in a limited
number of sizes as follows
viz.-
CHAS. C. LIGHTBObRN
ARMSTRONG ST.
Ha. whin's Hill.
X P E R I E N C E D Paper
Hanger. Ceiling Work",
a specialty. Al! work careful-
ly and Artistically perforated.
Absolute satisfaction guaran
teed. The very best references.
-Terms moderate.
American Silk
American Cashmere
American Cotton Lisle
HOSIERY
They have stood the test. Give real
foot comfort. No seams to rip. Never
become loose or baggv. The shape is
knit in- not pressed in.
GUARANTEED for fineness, style,
superiority of material and Workmanship.
Absolutely stainl ss Will wear 6 months
without holes, or new OM Iree.
OUR SPECIAL OFFER
to every one sen linn ns *) IHI in currency
or postal note, to cover advertising an.I
hipping charge*, we will send post paid,
with written guarantee, backed by a five
million dollar conipanv, either
5 Pairs of our 75c. va.lue
Imencan Silk Hosiery,
or U'nirs of ovir illc. v n. Ivie
-imerican Cashmere Hosiery,
or 4 l*%ln of our 50c. Value.
American Cotton-Lisle Hosiery
or 6 Peilrs of Children's Hosiery.
DONT DELAY-Offerexpireswhen
dealer in your locality is sleeted.
The International Hoisery co.
P. O. Box 224
DAYTON. OHIO. U. S. A
NOTICE
For Hire
AUTOMOBILES
AND
BICYCLES
APPLY TO
J. P.SIMMS
47 MARKET STREET
NASSAU N. P.
MRS. E. L. VARGAS
Millet St. Sooth
PANAMA HAT 8 CLEANED
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED
THE well known
Dairyman of the
East
THOMAS M. KNOWLES
Is now prepared to supplv
and deliver the purest milk
to be obtained anywhere
from his Dairy Farm on Mast
Shirley Street, opposite Wil-
liams Street. Orders may be
delivered at his Store on East
Bay St. No. 528, 'Phone No.
116. Delivery at from 7a.m.
to 10 a.m., and from 3 p.m.
to 5 p.m. daily in Sanitary
Bottles.
Many germs make milk im-
pure,
In Know If s' milk no germs
are found ;
Look at the bottles in which
its sold, at
Know Irs who takes them all
around.
Milk like his needs no lac torn
etcr,
In verification of its strength.
Liquor pura nee impura
Knowles would never go
that length.
WANTED
COPIES of "THE STROM-
BUS" August 1913 (Exhi-
bition Number)
Apply
' Tribune"Oifice
Men's Boots and Shoes 111 sizes
from 6 to 7?,
Women's Boots and hoes
in sizes from 3J to 4I
Misses Hoots and Shoes 111 sizes
from 12}to r
Notice
PURSU \NT to instruction?
received, Public Notice is
hereby given that 1 will, on
the 25th day or February, at
Noon at the wharf of the
Imperial I.ighthoue Depart-
ment, put up for sale by pub-
The advantage in purchns-1Iic Auction, subject to a re-
ing from this loth (as others 1 serve Pric<". the Motor Pin
who have purchased before nace, "KARLSRl'HE" with
can attest) that >ou can se< "her sailaandfitttogs.
lect the sizes from a very The Motor Pinnace may be
large variety ol up-to-date | inspected on application at
Styles at prices considerably anytime.
cheaper than
kept in stock.
it gular lines
CALL EARLY
and secure your size at
WILLIAMS' WHOLESALE
AND RETAIL
SHOE ESTABLISHMENT
277 and 279 Bay St City
H. F
6 Feb. 1915
ARMBRISTER
NOTICE
W A. MATHER
UNDERTAKER
DESIRKS lo inform his friends
and the Public that Ire has
just received a complete outfit of
facilities foi the buisness of an un-
dertaker, which plafM Ium 111. A
position to rairv out Funerals that
may be en 11 listed to his care with
system and despatch ; and lespeet
fully solicits their patronage (lit
my Prices fiist and prove that these
are the veiy lowest for Ih first class
work.
Kerosene
150S
IN New 50 gallon Galvaniz-
ed Iron Drums at i8cts
per Gallon.
In 10 gallon Cans at 2octs
per. Gallon.
Drums and Cans returnable
Full particulars at Office
"Frances E.," Nassau N. P.
C. C. SAUNDERS
Johnson's
Artistic Wood
Finishes
Johnson's Prepared Wax a eon
plete finish and polish (or .-ill furniture
Woodwork ami ft...re.
Johnson's Wood Dye- for the artistic
coloring of all wuod, soft or hard
Johnson's Under Lac a spirit
finish, very much superior to shellac or
vaimsli
Johnson's Fla.t Wood Finish-fora
beautiful, artistic, haml-ruhbed effete
without '" npeiica of rubbing,
Johnson's 1'ivst Wood Fillerlor
tilling the ^1.1111 and pores of wood,
preparing N for the finish
Johnson's Powdered Wax -for bal
room floors.
FOR. SALE BY
Chas. E. Albury
WANTED
OLD BAHAMAS POSTGE
STAMPS
/Vie 6d. grey lilac
V One 6d grev lilac sur-
charged 4(1. One 6d. grey vio-
let One 1 King Edward.
green or black.
Address I.. GREY vare of
1RIBLNEenclosing sam-
ples and prices.
V Williams*
THIS is to inform my Patron
and the Public in General
that I have opened my Public
Black Smith Shop; and am now
ready to do anything in 1 e line ol
General repair <>i new w rk Horse
Shoeing Specially. All 1 ork done
Mechanically.
'" A. I1UVLER.
ohoe&i U1JU Uuttei
1


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