<%BANNER%>

PAGE 1

Till. TRIBUNE bAS&AV, BAHAMAS G ILBKKT I)UPU< II, liilitor and Vrafrittor. omoH Corner Shirley & Cho-rlotte Sta \aaau, .V. /'., Hahamas THONK 200. P. O. HOX 183. PUBLISHED DAILY Mon.l.iy. Wednesday and Friday— single r.-ifiy Jd Tuesday, an I Thurvlay—jingle crtpjr id Saturday ^single coi y .. 11*1 Weekly s l Monthly I -. i> I Quarto ly .~. 6d HaHY-aily ,-. Yearly ',.. is PAYABLE IN ADVAMOB Advertising Rate*:—Sis penct per line lor first insertion; three |>euce pet line • md iuwrtion i in i one penny pa line la ; lent inserti %  i > -. A Ivertiterneiiti uadei tight linei -t^. Zhc tribune SATURDAY. February 6, I9IJ. #PUBLISHED AT 7 P. M. fi? \UOM Soldiers to horses is an easy transition, in fact men and horses have long been associated, although it lias been madesubsevient to man and the various uses to which it has been applied have rendered it the most useful of all the domestic animals. We can hardly enter any department of labour in which it has been superseded. In strength, in endurance, in intelligence it has proven itself the most successful rival to the mechanical powers; the measure of a horse's power has been used as the unit and standard of the power of machinery, but this is applicable o n 1 v to ill-treated or underfed, but we long to apply the like treatment to the individual who is the author of it. We earnestly wish that all who are associated with the horse, especially the owner, would become so attracted to him as to treat him with the proverbial kindness of the Arab. Horse racing is cf very ancient origin, and in the time of the Virgin Queen is said to have been .anied to such ex<•< ss a4fcto have injured the fortunes of the nobility and in later times has impoverished not the nobility only, but the commoner as well. Horsel.i ing is spurt ; but it is reIgrettable that it has been much abused ; there is a great deal of fraud practiced in the whole business of racing ; and, as in every other species of gambling, those who addict themselves to the sport, generally in the end, become the victims of a host of black-' legs, and their confederate jockies, welchers, touts, and it her sharps who batten upon not only those "to the manner born" but on the hayseeds and green-horns as well. There are few amusements more exhilarating; and the pi i a>d of the races serves as a rendezvous for all classes and conditions and the scene is usually gay. "Dunmore Track" did not appeal to us yesterday afternoon with the force of the days that are gone. It may have been bet ause of the absence of some of the details conspicuous in past events of race, and we hope that their efforts will be rewarded by a "cram jamfull"' Grand Stand next time. We are glad to say, that we understand iii.it the gate moucy and grand stand intakes were quite satisfactory not withstand ing that abi-ul $300 eluded llie Cerberus, which had it liren collected would have raised the total to (8 o. ourselves opinion, OUI those used for the purposes of a similar character. Our old draught or carriage, and diminishes as his speed increases The application of the term horse power to machinery is so universal, that it is used without the slightest knowledge of its meaning by many even of those who are continually using it. Watts, Smeaton, and Desa guliers have considered the friend and furious rider, the Clerk of the course; Jockeys not wearing the colour of the owners, and saddles and bits, which to say the least were not of the racing variety. Considering the size and condition of the ponies, it did not seem that any attempt to "handicap" in the jockies weight had been made. In force of cine horse equal to fact all the ponies in the restliat of five men, but, writers Ipect of weight of jockies were differ on this point. Horse [over weighted. The track itpower is, that he can raise a self might be called iinmaweight of 32,000 pounds to the height of a foot in one minute. Observe that we say horse power, not pony power. The horse lends himself to the sports and pastimes of man with eager and willing not wish readiness, and in racing and hunting, the care, training, and attention which man has bestowed on his truly noble co-adjuter has so developed and improved him that his value has increased to a wonderful degree. If man possessed a pecuniary value, there would be found many horses of far greater value than a great many men. We do not say that the horse receives at all. times the care and attention and kindness to which he is naturally entitled, and the practice of running racehorses at two or three years old, and working them before their limbs are knit, or their strength attained, and cruelly exacting from them services far beyond their powers, are matters which should engage ture and not in good shape. Against these defects may be placed, a fine grand stand from which the entire track could be under observation 'from start to finish." We do to disparage the Track in embryo ; for we believe better things of it in the, and let us hope, near future. A word to the wise, will we are certain be sufficient. As to the riding, with the exception of one race, that for the "Colonial Cup," it was far below the average. Mr. D a v e n p 0 1 t and Mr. French rode well, and we think it was due more to the former's good riding, than to speed that he carried off the trophy, while the two other jockies rode with judgment. The whip seemed to be the only "spur," though on the whole it was used very freely —and unnecessarily. We think however, that the Association are worthy of commendation, and the spur with which We would "prick the Not commit ling to an expression of we nevertheli s> t nder thanks to His Excellency the Administrator foi the following Extract from the Colonial Journal January, 1915. "I he revenue of ihe Bahamas in 19.314 was much above the average, but would be reduced in future by the lowering of the tariff on ad valorem goods from 25 to 20 per cent. Other Acts passed during the session of 1914 increase t!i:expenditure, and the next result is likely to be an expenditure of £20.000 more than the estimated revenue. This excess, the anii'ial report states, 1 .MI be met out of surplus and other funds but it will -.wallow up more than three fourths of the to til reserve fund, "leaving little margin should a hurricane or other unforseeii disaster occur." The unforseen has occurred in tinshape of the war, and the revenue is bound to go dowd : there is also the possibility that it will be necessary to provide food-stuffs lor the people. This situation has not pre vented the Legislature from nobly voting £"10,000." We an glad again to see that Docking facilities, are provided lor our larger crafts. The Marine Railway at Hog Island, has been refitted and the Schr. Salvor, owned by the Abac o, Timber Co., (g hauled out, undergowing repairs. — :o: — We learn t h 10 u g h the Board of Ag iculture, that over 19000 Crates Tomatoes have been shipped up to the present time, which already is far in excess of any previous season. — :o: -I InHospital Commissioners %  ire laving ,i large Sewer pipe down Victoria AM one, into' the sea, and the residents and 1 InS. S. Monttrty sailed fiom New York 011 Friday j p. in. fin Nassau, with 49 passengers and 5500 barrels of cargo. Mr. John W. Knowles, who left us in November last for I ngland, for the express purpose of volunteer ng his services in the present Crisis, we are glad to learn, is in training in Yorkshire, England, for Army services. —:o: — The New Year's Honours List includes the following West Indians. It will be noted with Considerable satisfaction that the West Indies figure much more prominently in the Hon. %  air's List this year than they have done for a considerable lime. Most Distinguished Order oj St. Michael and St. George. George Basil Haddon-Smith C. M G., Governor and Com. mander-in chief of of the Wind, ward Island--. Sir O. B. H&ddon-Smlth K.C.M.C. Has had a career which in J variety and distinction is equal led by few even of Britain's Colonial Administrators. Born in 1861, he entered the Royal Guernsey Militia in 1S79. hi 1886 he became Assistant Inspector of the Logos Constabulary, and later Acting Inspector < ien< ral. He tool; part in the Ji I'u expedition, 180.-., being mentioned in despatches: in 1893 was political officer in Si. Gilbert Carter's mission to Yorubaland; in 1S96 private secretary to Sir I". Si .'.t in the Whanti expedition ; in [900political officer to Si,J. Wilcocks in the Ashanti Expedition, tak ing part in the relief of Kumasi and receiving Special mention m despatches. Various other African appointments have been held, including colonial secretaryships, and the acting governorships of Gambia and sierra Leone. In 1912 he was appointed Governor, where he has initiated several of (he Bahamaa scheme* of great value to the Colony. In the las! position lie gained a comprehensive knowledge of Canada and the United States r.arlyin December Mr. Had don Smith was appointed Gov emorof the Windward Islands, leaving the Bahamas to take up his new position immediatelv afterwards. His ExcellencySI intimate knowledge of Canadian and United Slates com mercial conditions, and also of the steps necessary to yet busi ness here, can be expected to be of great advantage to the Windward Islands. We con having been Govcrnotffcf the Bahamas. In the last^ost in particular heshewed himself ihe possessor of marked business abilitya desideratum always in such colonits as the West Indies, although unforlunatelv one not always possessed— initiating several schemes which promke much for the Bahamas' future. The chief of these, the establishment of a Development Hoard foi the furtherance of the Bahamas' trade and tourists interests, lias a I read v made its benefits felt. It waswbile Governor of the Hahamas that Sir (i. 3. I laddon Smith acquired his comprehensive knowledge of Canada and the Uniied States, and of slips necessary to build Up business with these two countries if business is to I built up at all. Nobody will know bitter ill.in be, therefore, the futility of the laisttM faire attitude displayed by some of the West India adminislrat ions where trade is concerned. The people of the Windward Islands. to which post Sir G. B. AaddonSmith was appointed early 111 '< cernber, are to be congratu. land on securing so capable and enthusiastic a Governor. NATIVE ENTERPRIZE. .. ........... „ v-.^^J,^ • %  ..V. .. VV..V* ^..... ,..Vthe attention of Societies foi d" their ambition,"is the the Prevention of Cruelty to thought that their exploits Animals far more than tln\ do. The Horse attracts our sympathies in an exceptional degree and we never see one were under the smiles and cheers of the largest number of the fair sex that we have seen present at a HorsePn&XZXttotX l """ ""' V %  """ ,IC "* "" for carrying off water &c from their premises. — :o: — We learn that the Rev. II. F. Dann, brother of the Rev. C. A. Hann, has taken charge as pastor, of "Charity Tabernacle" Freetown. Under his ministry, the Church is already showing signs of renewed activity, and seems to be looking forward to brighter days. On Sunday next, the 7th inst, the choir are giving a service of song, at which Mr. Dann will pieside. A good programme, which includes choral singing and recitations will be provided, and all who feel disposed to attend will be made welcome. 'Ihe S. S. "Miami" arrived from Miami, Tla., at 3.45 p.m. to-day with 35 passengers and 32 tons cargo. terprising a Governor. Sir Kobeit S. John.lone K. B. Has occupied many official law positions in Lagos, Bahamas, and Grenada. In the last place he was appointed Chief lust ice in 1909. THE HONOURS LIST. Peculiar gratification will be felt in the West Indies at the New Year's Honours list. It is safe to say that not for a long time have the West Indies figured so prominently in it as they have done this year. The honours are well selected also, and it is further interesting to' note that most of them arc conferred upon men who have more than an elementary knowledge of Canada. Mr. G. B. HiddonSmith, C. M. G. who is created S K. C. M. G. has had a long and distinguished colonial experience, having held many important posts in our leading African possessions as well as If the pineapple industry is to be a feature in the future pros penty of ihe Isle Providence.it will be owing to th. enterprise •'|'d energy ol Walter K. Moore Esq M.L A. His plantation on ibewulf Road will convince the most incredulous that pineap. pies can ha grown 011 this Island and grown profitably. Mr. Moore has not followed in the traditions of pineapple planters of tbe past. His fields are laid out with due regard to regularity and ecoeocny in planting and gathering. Introducing a new fertilizer, he has demonstrated that the old methods and material were not so obsolete as many thought them to be. The Mapes fertilizer superseded Foresters as Jar as Mr. Moore's farm supersedes the farms that have hitherto been considered models. The planter who devotes the whole of his land to cultivation leaves no room for the reapers. To gather the crop they must wade through the dense growth to the end of the field and back again in the same tedious way. I'<> remedy this and to save time Mr. Moore has left footpaths that divide the fields into small sections through which the harvester can reach the fruit easily and bring them, not to the end of the field, but, to cart roads that intersect them and make delivery Speedy and sure. Mr. Moore has came to the con. elusion that before passing judgment it is well to give a fail trial. His farm proves that he has determined to give pineapple growing in Providence a fair trial.To witnesses the writer has, a steam roller making a road on a pineapple held is an ex perience that is without prece-3 dent but that is precisely whaO Mr. Moore is doing. I'ora longtime experiments •a pineapple growing along the Wulf Road have occupied the planters who found that Fleuthera lands were failing, and it was left for Mr. Moore to pre that the "scrub" is as vali_ an asset of the Colony as the lands that were once so h prized. The Tribune wh'hfthe energetic and pains taking planter every success and hopes that the whole of the valley between Fincastleand Bailloii may become one immense pine field in the near future. r



PAGE 1

%  to. THE TRIBUNE NASSAU. BAHAMAS ContliiU'd from First Page. 0 Aiiu^ra's part in the scheme calls for stations at New Brunswick and Belmar, on the New Jersey coast, and Marshall* and Bolinasin California, linking "ig up the powerful ocean. One side of the building is filled with huge dynamos, transformers, and intricate looking switchboards, while the other section isdeovted to storthe Pacific Coast with the Ma waian st itions at Kalnuka and forces. Near the power house is Koko Head; two similiar unit, auxiliary operating building, in Manila, and transmitting and where messages will be recoireceiving Station! at Marion and e(I lf for anv reason, ll(; Belmar receiving station should be Chatham, Mass. Had To Solva Problems. urface acts as a shell inclosing he globe." The lower sections and main portions of these steel masts— i tall and slender, if viewed electrical [from the top, that they api eai to be balanced on needle points—are composed of thirtytwo composite steel cylinders, made in sections, flanged vertically and bolted together.These on! stand in a concrete foundation an Standard Oil Company and enroutc from New York to Rot terdam. "There wrre.ofcour.se, some difficulties experienced," said Frederi< k \l. Sammis,Chief Engineer of tne Marconi Company, in explaining t h e situation. "Every wireless installation pre. scuts a certain number of pro blems, and these naturally increased proportionate!) with the size of the station. Yet most of the difficulties resolve them selves llltO engineering pro blems, and it is only a matter of engineering to overcome them. "Certain methods of pro ;e dureg rvern the removal of most mechanical obsta :les, and their application is mainly a matter of experience. As an instance, take the selection of the sites for the American links in the world chain. As these high powered stations send and receive wireless messages simultaneously, the transmitting and re iving units have to be located more than twenty miles apart "The lay of the land must also permit the erection of the aei ials so that they point toward the distant Station with which com muoication is to be established. The transmitting haJf requires a narrow strip of land about a mile and a half long and at least a tli nisarM feel wide; the receiving half must be located on a T-shaprd tract, each arm of which U anput a mile and a half long ,ind 500 feet wide. In addition to the physical require of commission. Directly in front of tins building rises the first of the thirteen steel masts that support the aerial wires These masts are arranged in pairs and stretch westward for more than a mile, each one towering to a height of 423 feel. or higher than a thirty stony sky-scraper. Sending SliMlnn rvt Belmar. The main operating building where messages will be sent to and received from London is located about fifty miles a way, at Belmar, 111 the heart of the and are stayed with steel cables. The main steel column is surmounted by a wooden topmast, which, according loSupt. R 7 Rossi, is Ihe keynote of the novel system of erection. "In operation," he said "it acts somewhat like a man pulling himself up by Ins bootstraps'. Ihe lower part of the topmast is squared and set in square openings in the plates between the steel cylinders, and the hoisting arm-, attached to the upper end are lit ted with blocks and hoisting cables A square wood ratty announces its intention to'pliia. She* was owned by the proceed against English troopships in the Channel as energetically as possible and neutral \ ( -els are warned not to approach North or West coast of I 1.1 in e. The best route for tha North Sea is around Scotland. Washington:—The White Mouse intimate. I U day that im mi diate protest would be made to Germany against any decree making unsafe the progress of American vessels trading in European waters. Jersey coast Summer resort secncag is suspended from these tion. The sending capacity of each station will be too word a minute. Through ingenious mechanical devices a dozen or a hundred wireless messages can be filed at the same time and received in London a minute or two later. Tracing the course of a dozen transoceanic Marconi grams it is found that the instant these are filed they are distributed among as many operators,and the dots and 'lashes punched in paper tape by a machine which opera tes like a typewriter. The tape is then fed into an automatic sender, and at a speed which is arms,and through chain hoists it can be lowered or raised at will, while the sections are being bolted together. How It la Done. "At a signal from the foreman a huge steel section is raised by .1 steam u inch, pi.iced t %  p i lion, an seVured temporarily bj ctii n below, \ flexil le isd iwn innd attached to the top of the steel and led around a wheel in the foot of the wood) 0 topmast; it is then carried 1 p again oa the other side and around a sheave to the top ofjthe steel, thence to the win< h. By pulling this cable greater than that used by a fast the topmast is lifted the length talk r.thi words come under the cl one ylinder and pinned by stylus it Belmar and instantan eously the high current lea| from the aerial at New tJTUnS wick. Thi dots and dashes car ried over the connection land ments, both sites must have a j line have,through automatic re definite din ctional relation and I ivsjeed the high frequency cur be near the ocean or located on rent in corresponding dots and une waterway affording a dip cl ele< trical connection w ith tl. ( sea. \ Id to tins Medesira bility of locating near the big cities, New Yorlc, San Francisco, and B iston, arid you ha*ve a task of selection (hat might easily discourage the average real estate man. "We were fortunate in having the advantage of Mr. Marconi's invaluable experience and unquestioned ability in the selection of the NewJersey, locations, theie excellent sites having b< n chosen b) the noted inventor h'mself. With New Y011; pro vided for. the search was directad toward the Pacific and New England CoaSIS and many weary miles of insp' ction. and a O nBiderable amount of careful gotiation were covi red by my English engineering associate, C. II. Taylor, an 1 myself before the other sites were required." Some idea of the importance of providing propei transports11 in facilities is revealed in the fact that 22,000 tons of material lV e %  • use I n the New Brunswick transmitting plant alone. The pndepsi is required twerfly-six is of imported glass, which re transported up the Raritan ti rJashes.and in the infinitesimal patf of H second the signal emit ted from the transmilterat Bel mar will have leaped from aerial at New Brunswick ai d bi en re. ceived at the station in W lies The elapsed time between the transmission and reception of the signals is established at one sixth of a second. Messages Speeding through B at the rate of 100 Words a minute naturally have to be received automatically. This will be accomplished through specially designed dictaphones, and as fast as a cylinder is filled with the dots and dashef of mi incoming message it will be handed to an operator and transcribed into a typewritten mes11 sage through aditaphonereproducing machine running at normal speed. I,. II. Peel les, engineer of a corporatian which is construt I illg the high power transoceanic stations, was ask I whether the great height of the masts was to overcome the curvature of the earth. "That question is often ask ed," he said and it is a natural one.In fact, when Marconi find means of holes in both st-el and wooden masts. This pin supports the topmast until it is raised again with the addition of a new ste< 1 cylinder As the section proceeds the stays are attached at the required points. This method of construction is very rapid; we made a record of raising and staying a complete mast 4,33 feet high in eight working da*. announced his intent i >n of trans nal directlv to the site withImitting wireless signals across comparatively little difficulty ; the Atlantic all students of eh c at some of the other stations, trical radiation immediateh however, miles of roadway.hub turned to a consideration of ( |,.,. in ,i,u I. or great expanses whether the oceans curve would l,oal water had to be crossed, I"' circumvi nt< d or pi 1 etrated'. ,„rl \-y ',< %  quantities of mateiial "l-'ortun.at. ly, it is not n< 1 .,1 ,,.. of laborers, ary to raise the masts above the New Brunsw.ick the main obstructions between, or ig is the power house, a ie brick structure, wh re Iricitj is changed in the sixty cycle, 2,400"Tiiirent to tlif high frequen,. v oscillating current lequired to send the dots and dashes thousands of miles across the ,\ wireless stations separated bj the Atlantic would have to 1 masts 125 miles high. The path of the wireless waves is not in a straight line, but follows the curvature of the earth. Scien tists are of the opinion 'hat the rarified air above the earth's Latest War News February 6th 1915. London 5th. (iovernor, Bahamas. Official news February 5th: An official communique form Cairo reports Turkish attempts to cross the can il near Toussoimi by means of pontoons and rafts. After some fighting the enemy lelumed leaving many dead and ahoul three hundred prisoners. An attack was also made on I.I K inlara and the enemv were driven away with a rl tw< Btyoi e killed twenty wound* d and ihirtysix unwounded prisoners were taken. 1'he enemy s forces apparently numbered a I least 13.000 with -IN batti 1 ies. The French govern ment repoi I u sful eng ige ments in district Perfhes and some su at oltvM points. (Signed) II IRCOURT. GOVERNMENT PfiKM The German attempt to break" the Ru< it Borjimow in Poland is the most importMiit news from I battle fronts. Within ad of six miles from III re lll€ I il imans numhei K 10,000 men. The Russian Staff announce advances in Kast Prussia along %  lebanks of the RiverScheserpe. I e Fret war office an nounces unusual activity of :!s 111 IV Igium and the capture of German tranche tweeu Anas and Lille. Berlin: 'I he ii rman \dmiThe state department is inves tigatingthe (ierman Admiralty's ultimatum about British waters from a legal standpoint. London:—It is learned that several German submarines have been sent to Zeebrugge on the Belgian coast which is said to be the base from which the (jer mans will try to sink theenemys merchant ships and British transports in the English Channel. Cairo:—The main body of the Turkish army which is marching on Egypt is repcrted only forty two miles from the Suez Canal on which two advance attacks have already been made by snail forces. New York:—The federal grand jury today indicted six men recently implicated in is suing fraudulent passports to (ierman r servibtS. F< bruary 6th 1915. GOVERNMENT PBttfl London:—Russians break the deadlock in Central Poland by crossing Ikurn River and taking German positions. Vonl lindenbergs flank now in a desperate struggle immediately to the Soutbwi si ie en ( fforl to bn ak down the Russian defensive in the reguli of Borjimow. Russians have also taken a part of the German position near Dakhova which was the point at which the Germans made their original attempt to break the Warsaw line. Russians and Austrians still contend for mastery in the Carpathians. Artillery engagements and small infantry attacks make up the sum of operations inWi st. Allies are appan ntlv piepni iag for an offensive movement in the Arras region. The arrival of Lniperor Nicholas at the front was signal for a renewed Russian offensive directly West of Warsaw according to an official statement which declares that the Russians have crossed Bgura River and captured (ierman positionsOn other points of the Warsaw front there has been no slackening of the lighting attacks of the Germans alternating with those of the Russians. In the meantime the Rus sians are making slow progress in Bast Prussia. In South Poland they are withstanding the attempts of the Austro-Germans to taken the offensive. The Austrians admit the loss of Tarnow in Galicia w hit h is an important centei and Russian i" I SSI ision which insun i the main line ol communication into Western < ialii ia. Cn 1 many ha 1 threatened B submarine blockade of England and Ireland and this 01 cupii • public attention here and in neutral countries which h important shipping interests Shipowners take the situation very calmly The Admiralty has promised to take steps to 1 oun* teract the blockade. It is also pointi d out that if it had be n ; Q lible before this the Germans would have sank transports taking troops to France. N %  York: Oil steamer t u in mid.ocean 1 Ira crew of thirty five scuetl by the steamer Philadel RELIGIOUS SERVICES SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 7 ST. MATTHEWS OHURCH Chinch and Shirley Sts. Rev. IV. S. Lootll, Hector. 7.18 am Holy Communion. II am. Mattins and Sermon. 10.15 .1 m. Sunday S,h.o|. 3SQ pm. Junior Catechism. 1.30 |.m. Senior Catechism. 7 pm. Evensong and Confirmation. ST. MABOAKBT8 a„ n j._ Fvensonit and Address. (> %  > pm. T^T'Eve^onifand Addre*. .**>£. rfliTKCH OF ST. AONEls, v M. "TOWD. Blue Hill RMl ^' 7 IW *VJ.:) a.m. MatlMfJt Holy Umniiinml^: 1 iermon 10 3B a.m. Missa Cantat.i^Hj|^^|.p II i Kw-na.m. Catechism p.m. long and Sermon 7 p.m. '.'. I. 1 %  1 .ices 1. II M iv. daily 7.:i(l UCept Siti:r I f| I n11 Monday, Tuesday and Thurs 'i.'M p.m. Wed. and Friday 7 p.m. ST. FRANCIS XAV/KKS ( UCRCH \\. |l --treet Rev. Chfymtom Schrtintr, O.S.B., Vicar Forant Mis-. D II a.m. Srunon and Bcnediiiion 5 pm. Week days Mass 7 am. BACRCD HEART CHAl'KL East Shirley Street. Mass & Sermon M am. Ilemdic-'ion 4 pm. 'IS. ANDREW'S I'KESBYTKRIAN CHURCH Princes Street Rev. S. J. Iknnetl, Pa Morning 11 a.m ing 7 p.m. ZION BAPTI8T CHI BCH I i-i and Shirley Sis. /•.'. C'/M-. .1. Dana, Pastor. II a m. ;>\u\ 7 p m. BAPTIST 1 NION CHURCH Rarliameol St. Rev. D. l\'il$here, Ptuttr, Singing, Pcayei. SORDOB, II a.m., 7 p.m. Sunday School, 3 p.m. CHART] Y TABERNACLE Ireetnw n Rn // / Damn, Pastor MorninR at 11 a in Evening at 7 pm UKSI.KYW METHODIST CHURCH EBENEZER Rev. F. J. Paint, l\i-: > East Shirley Street Ham. and 7 pm. CHRISTIAN SCIENCE I'.iy Stn (t. all v. I'.ank of Nssau Sunaay 11 am. am v. GOSPEL HALL Dowdeswcll and Christie Streets Gospel Meeting, Evening at 7 GOSPEL MALE Dowdeswcll Street (near Victoria Ave.) W rship meeting at 11 am Sunday School, 3 pm Gospel preaching, 7pm Divorce. IN THE SUPREME COURT OF THE BAHAMAS. 1914 DIVORCE AND MATRIMONIAL SIDE. No. 1 (Divorce) To ALBERT JOSEPH lak oflnagua, one of the Bahama Islands, but whose addtreSS is now unknown. TAKE NOTICE that a Citation has liecn issued on the Divorce and Matrimonial Side of The Supreme Court of The Bahamas citing you to appear and answer the petition of George Henry Russell'of Matin w Town in the Island of loagua praying for a dissolution of marriage. In default (if VOID r) appearing you will not be a I in wed to address the Court and the Court will proceed to hear tbesaid petition proven and prom im{ sent! in'' il) respeel thereto. And take further notice that for the purpose aforesaid w ithin sixty days alter ihe date of this publication an appearance must be entered at th< Regis* try of The Supreme Court on nl livorce and Matrimonial hide in the City of Nassau in the Island ol New Providence cue of the Bahama Islands. Dated th |th day of February IQ15. R. De GLANVILLE Acting Registrar. HARC0UR1 MALC01 \I. Atti TII' v a t I Nassau, N. P. Baham rl II



PAGE 1

J THF. TRIBUNE NASSAU. BAHAMAS Mental and Phys atigue nni When brain or body is weary the digestive powers are weakened and distaste for ordinary food ia often experienced. Under such circumstances the Allouburys' Diet is specially valuable. It ia pleasant to take, easily digested and assimilated and speedily restorative. Thus it helps the system to recover tone and vigour. Tks 'Allsakurys' DIET Is prepared from pars rick milk sad whole vvkest—the two vital food aUsasats—coabiacd ia partially pre-diiensi form. Mad* in a minute — Jldd boiling water only. TO BK c.BTAINKn riOM ALL CHEMISTS AND STORES. ALLEN & HANBURYS LTD. Ym LONDON ENGLAND. *£ [enbum DIET %  A food for Adults sad quite distiact from the wcll-knowsji 'Allcabaryt' Foods for Infants. % %  "-' % % % % % %  > •• %  •","; 'vy?/ty/#''//i''/' '" -' • %  i rim in ^M CHRIST^CHURCH CATHEDRAL, NASSAU OVER A CONCERT ADCI dramatic performance — Shakespeare's "The Merchant of Venice" by the ladies and pupils of St. Hilda's School will be given in ST. ANDREW'S HALL (in the place of the Church Hall) on MONDAY next Feb. 8th at 8.15 p.m. Tickets, 2/and 1/-, may be had at the Diocesan Book Store, 15;iy Street. Proceeds on behalf of the Cathedral Restoration. J'Vb. jtb.—3 ins. Notice P URSUANT to instructions received. Public Notice is hereby given that I will, on the 25th day of February, at Noon at the wharf of the Imperial Lighthoue Depart* meat, put up for sale by public Auction, subject to a reserve price, the Motor Pin nace, "KARLSRUHE" with all her sails and fittings. The Motor Pinnace may be inspected on application at any time. H. F. ARMBRISTRR 1, Feb. 10,15 LOST O N Sunday night, 31st Jan. between Frederick and West Sts., a Brooch—heart shape, lover's knot and hair. Bring to TRIBUNE. 3 ins ~M.sTTou~.SE CAD08AN. C ERTIFICATED NURSE from Bahamas General Hospital. Can furnish testimonials. 101 Shirley Street Telephone foi Appointments 275 MRS. M. WATSON RUDD At Hotel Nassau rvnd Hotel Colonia.1 until Mat March Chiropodist Cosmetician Kahler Gfm* Marinello Graduate duate New York 150U Pairs Boots and Shoes Being added to an already replete stock Williams the Shoeman is again opening up one ol those Sample Lots of BOOTS and SHOES in a limited number of sizes as follows viz: — Men's Boots and Shoes in sizes from 6 to 7I Women's Boots and hoes in sizes from 3', ti 1 4 ', Misses Boots and Shoes in sizes lUin 12J-I0 1 The advantage in purchasing from this lot is (as others who have purchased before can attest) that >ou can select the sizes from a very large variety of up-to-date styles at prices considerably cheaper than regular lines kept in stock. CALL EARLY and secure your size at WILLIAMS' WHOLESALE AND RETAIL SHOE ESTABLISHMENT 277 and 279 Bay St City Rupture Cured %  n The Brooks Appliance Attorn.y General's Chant Port-of-Spain. Trinidad. B. w. I. t-lt-'lO. Dsar Sirs: 1 am (lad to be able to Inform you that ti-.c "truss" t T) I sat from you In Bepumbir la a compute success. It ha* supported my rupture perfectly sine* I first wort It. I have been ruptured sines I can remember and tried st different Intervals several makee of truss without success. I was beslnmna; to think 1 should have to undergo an operation, as the rupture was fradually s>ttlns worse. Now. however. X consider myself prsctlcslly cured. To my mind one of the %  real points about your Invsntlon Is that one does not feel Its pressure anywhere, although that preaaure never actually relaxes. After the first few days I have not felt Its pressure any more than I do my tr user suependers. Tou are quite welcome to make any use you like of this letter. Tours truly. J. U. WhltsnsaO, To Brooks Bupturt Appliance Co. For Hire AUTOMOBILES AND BICYCLES APPLY TO J. P. SIMMS 47 MARKET STREET NASSAU N. P. %  ^d Kerosene 1502 I N New 50 gallon Galvanized Iron Drums at i8cts par Gallon. In TO gallon C&QS*ftt 2octs pr. Gallon. Drums and Cans returnable Full particulars at Office -Frances E.," Nassau N. P. C. C. SAUNDERS NOTICE THE well known Dairyman of the East THOMAS M. KNOWLES Is now prepared to supply and deliver the purest milk to be obtained anywhere from his Dairy Farm on East Shirley Street^ opposite Williams Street. Orders may be delivered at his Stoie 011 East Bay St. No. 528, 'Phone No. 116. Delivery at from 7a.m. to 10 a.m., and from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m., daily in Sanitary Bottles. Many germs make milk impure, In Knowles' milk no germs are found; Look at the bottles in which its sold, at Knowles who takes them all around. Milk like his needs no lactom eter, In verification of its strength, Liquor pura nee impura Knowles would never go that length. LOOK The following Blank forms may be had at "TheTribune" Office. Duty Entry. Free Entry. Warehouse Entries. Sponging Articles. Ship's Reports. In quantities at Special Rates Tfc* shore is < K. Bras Ira, whs >• hern Caring Itupturr tor aver SO yean If Huufurrd, write hiss today. My Appliance Sent on Trial If you have tried every thins; else, coma to me. I have my jrreateat sue* cess where others fall. Bend attached coupon today and I will send you. free, my Illustrated book on Rupture and Its oure. giving you ths names of many people who have tried my appliance and are extremely grateful. It gives constant relief where all others fall. I make It to your measure and send It to you on a strict guarantee of satisfaction or money refunded, and I have put my price so low that anybody, rich or poor, can buy It I send It on trial to prove what I aay Is true. mx OCT FRFF COTTON BELOW AMI POST TODAV Fostsse svi Psnee. or &.-, to C. t. A. IBM INFORMATION COCI*ON C. E. Brooks, t7SS Stats St., Marshall. Michigan. U. 8. A. Plesse send me by post. In plain wrapper, your Illustrsted Book and full Information about your Appliance for lbs cure of rupture. Na write plainly) T HIS is tO inform my Patron ,and the Public in General thnl I have opened my Publii Black Smith Simp; and am now ready to do anything in I e line ol General repair or new w rk llors< Shoeing Specially. All \ ork don* Slechanically. P. A. HUYLER. REMOVAL The Printing Establishment of the "Tribune" has this day been removed to Nos. 25 am! 27 Shirley Street, and North-cast Corner of Charlotte Street. 26th Jan. IQI5For Results Advertise in The Tribune CHAS, C. LIUNI BOURN ARMSTRONG ST. HaLwkln'a Hill. E XPERIENCED Paper Hanger. Ceiling Work, a specialty. Al! work carcfulIv and Artistically performed. Absolute satisfaction lly solicits theii patronage Get my Prices first and prove that these are the very lowest for the first class work. NOTICE T ENDERS will be received at ST. JOHN'S BAPTIST PASONM.K, West Street, not Liter than Monday the 8th inst, for the making <>f 40 centre pewt, for Si. JOHN'S BAPTISI CHURCH. Specimen* can be seen at the Church. Right reserved for refusing an} 01 the whole of the Tenders. Send Tenders to Rev. J. W. Roberts. 1 o shingles. Special Price also on cheaper gnidos—also 51D. Cypress at £0.72 per thousand of 20 bundles. This price made possible by a very large purchase. Fresh stock arriving every week. C. C SAUNDERS, GASOLINE TN Drums and 10 Gallon Cans. Price one shilling per Gallon. All previous prices cancelled. C..C. SAUNDERS East Bay St. Nassau N. P. Jan. 5th 1915. WANTED OLD BAHAMAS P08TABE STAMPS O ne 6d. grey lilac / One 6d. grey lilac s£ charged 4d. One Gd. grey x£ let One £1 King Edward! green or black, Address L. GREY care TRIBUNE—enclosing sar% pies and prices. 1 WANT C OPIES of "THE .BUS" AuguM^ 913 a ^i bition Number) Apply rribune"Oifice Wear Armbrister's Shoes f A



PAGE 1

LATEST RADIOGRAMS NOT* '. TO SUBSCRIBERS Subscribers :•> The Tribune Munthlyarul upwardsare requested not t" pay subscriptions to the carriers but onlv at the Office, or to a Collector from the Office, glia to report U' the Office anv neclect on the part of the carriers to deliver their pa|ier. > •• "• Nulllua addictue |urare in verba maglatri. Beinn bound to swear to the Dogma.* of no Maater. "THE TRIBUNEWANTS ADVT'S. FOR RESULT ADVERTISE IN "THE TRIBUNE" Special Rales to Yearly Advertiser* Vol. XII. No. 64. NASSAU. N. P.. BAHAMAS, SATURDAY. FEBRUARY fc. 1915. ^JJL Prlce. THREE CENTS. Famous British Regiments are known by Nicknames. SOME OF THE HISTORIC COMMANDS NOW FIQHTINO IN EUROPE BEAR POPULAR TITLES WHICH HAVE ARISEN IN 000 WAYS. OMF. of the most famous of the British regiments now battling in France and Belgium are far better known throughout Great Britain, and to the world at largo, by their nicknames than by ilieir official titles. Their official titles in many instances, indeed, would convey nothing to the average person. Many people in many conn tries, for instance, have heard of the Black Watch ; comparatively few have heard of the Kortvsecond Highlanders; yet the names are of the same regiment. This famed body, the oldest of all Highland regiments, gets its nickname from its tartan. When the regiment was first i formed it was used chiefly to suppress sedition in Scotland, to enforce the disarming act, and to disperse unauthorized assenibiles. A special tartan from which all bright colors were eliminated was designed for regimental use, and this fact together with the police nature of the duties ol early days, led to the name Black Watch. On many fields, in many parts of the world, have the soldiers of the Black Watch up'.eld the glory of this great regiment. The Scots Greys, as famous in the annals of cavalry as is the Black Watch in infantry records began their careei as the Royal, North British Dragoons In 1742 the regiment was landed in the Low Countries. On their disembarkation The Stadlhol der, seeing that they were without mounts, ordered Ins own guards to turn ov< 1 their gray chargers to the Scotchmen. And the Scots Greys, with gray mounts, they have since been, although they held the official name of the Royal North British Dragoons down to the time of the Crimean war. The CohJslream Guards, who also nave won laurels on scores of battlefields,get their name from Coldstream, in Berwickshire. In 1660 Gen. Monk marched to London to aid in securing a free Parliament and, he restoration of the Stuarts, fringing with him his own regi* lent of infantry from Cold stream. The regimental legend has it t h n t when the troops met Pbarlesal Blai kheath the Monk uriment kept some of the din|Ue:ietl soldiers of other units mutin), and the King, on dug rvhence the regiment [come, addressed them as j^oldstieain Guards." The lamexdU'-lv "The Thin Red Line of England" has long lived in song and Story, the name being applied generally to British field forces It is declared by expeits, however, that the name properly belongs to the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, in commemoration of their remarkable repulse of tne flower of the Russian cavalry at Balaclava. Volley after volley of rifie fire was poured by the slender line of scarlet coats into the masses of charging Russian horsemen, until finally the attack was abandoned despite the comparatively slight numerical strength of the British. The "Fighting Fifteenth" are the Fifteenth King's Hussars. Nicy won their title in 1794 in. Inlanders against the French revolutionary troops. They were serving with the Austrians, and in operations near Landrecies they were ordered to rescue the Emperor of Austria, who had been cut off from the main arm;. Two squadrons of the Fifteenth) with a few Austrian hus sars, the whole body not number i n J; more than 300 men, found themselves, through a mistake, facing an entire French army corps. They attacked part of the corps so fiercely that the French thought themselves opposed by a great force. 'I he hussars rode through the outposts, charged the artillery, killed l f aoomen, and took three guns. The Emperor was rescued. I It I.i'er decorated the officers ol the regiment. Hie "D: -Hards" are the Fifty. seventh Foot, the Duke of Cambridge's > vn Middlesex Regi ment. Al \lbuera in l8tl the regiment found itself pressed by a great foi e "Die hard, my men, die hard !" was the cry of Col. lnglis'ohis troops. Backs ton wall,the soldiers did die bard. Theie were 140survivors out of 570W 1 1 began the fight. the dead including Inglis. At Inkermau, where the regi ment was almost wiped out, Capt. Stanley raised the cry, "Die-Hards, remember Albuera" And the regiment again made good its name. The Connaught Rangers were originally called the "Devils ()wn" because of their rascality, but their superb lighting in the Peninsular war 'hanged the term from one of reproach to one of honour. At Fuentcs d' Onoro and at Badajos they fought with amazing fury. T ie everyday gt in | is respon Bible for the nickname of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers—the "Nanny Goats." A goat is the regimental mascot and is led al the head of the column. On St Davids Day, in the officers mess, the goat, escorted by dr u m s and fife, i, marched around the table. The Call of the WEST In the cold and sleet of the Northern street, I stand mid a surging crowd ; And my thoughts go back to the beaten track, Half hid by this wintry shroud. I hear the song of a mighty throng Beyond the city's hum ; From the ocean wide—from the swelling tide, The singers bid me "come." I taste the brine like sparkling wine Tossed high by the waves at play; And my heart leaps up as I quaff tin cup That lures me far away. I see the sheen of dancing green; The blue of a tropic sky ; I long for a spell in its grassv dell, Where the shifting shadows lie. I hear the call of the waterfall ; The coo of the mountain dove, While at my feet like a prelude sweet, The land and sea make love. I breathe the air ol that garden fair; I smell its fragrant bloom, And the fire flies in fancy rise And flicker through the gloom. I see the joy of my native boy As he greets me once again ; I hear the chaff and the happy laugh Re-echoing o'er the main. 0 the wondrous grace of that dusky race, Straight as their native palm Like an anchor cast, it holds me last With a strange compelling charm. 1 wait the flush of day's first blush As she dons her nuptial gown — And silently gaze at the gorgeous rays When the golden sun goes down. Mow can I tell your witching spell Of roft effulgent noon ? Or the langorous ease beneath the trees In the drowsy hour of noon ? I ike emeralds set in a waving net; Like gems on a queenly head, Foi many miles these western isles Repise on their watery bed. I a picture bright with the glowing light That falls from the a/ure dome. It means so mini, and the syren's touch Is gently drawing me home. What do you k n o w, pale Daughter of Snow, < )f that glorious summer land ? Wireless Around the World in 3 Minutes. WHERE ALL LINKS IN THE CHAIN ARE COM. PLETE MESSAGES CAN BE SENT AND RECEIVED AT THE SAME TIME AT THE RATE OF 100 WORDS A MINUTE. I N every department of wireless communication new and striking records have been established dining the year 1914. It is possible to-day to send a wireless message around the world. The distance of transmission has been greatly increased. Practically every seacoast in the civilized world has been brought in wireless communication. The new ilirection finder opens a new era in wireless telegraphy in safeguarding ships at sea. Wireless signals have been perfected with trains running at high speed. And so general and efficient has wireless electricity become in the present European conflict that, as a famous General recently observed, it is hard to conceive of wars being waged without such communication. A number of high-towered stations capable of signaling across the ocean are in actual operation at Sayville, L. I.; Washington, Glace Bay, N. S.; Clifton, Ireland; Pol d h u Nauen, Berlin ; Coltano, Italy ; the Eiffel Tower, and Togo, Africa. A series of still more efficient wireless stations have, been established at Belmar, N. J. ; San Francisco, and Honolulu, vhich serve as links with stations in Europe, completing the a-round-tha-world route. The lines of long-distance wireless communication converge in and about New York to-day much the same as ill roads mice led to Rome. No other city or locality in the world is supplied with so many high-powet stations. The lofty wireless towerat Sawille, L. I., is in direct wireless communication with the station at Nauen, just outside of Berlin, thus linking New York with the German capital. During the past year a powerful station has been completed at Belmar,N, J. Plans have already been made for a station at the MassachuYoiu icy breast has the chill of death. How can you understand ? Not all vour gold can e'er withhold My spirit's onward flight : Or bi tid in chains of sordid gains, My yearning soul tO night. Abo\e the roar of this whi rling floor I hear the voice of the sea ; 'Til the cry of the West— from its heaving breast ; It is calling— calling to rne. B. K. setts coast to communicate with a station in Norway. The Government station at Arlington, just outside of Washington, has established some remarkable records for long-distance work, and has no difficulty in communicating with the Eiffel Tower station. On Sept. 24 connection was established between San Francisco and Honolulu. Similar stations are to connect Japan land India; India is to be linked with Egypt, and Egypt with England, where stations in Wales will connect with the New Jersey pair and complete the world circuit. A supplementary link will also be added to Norway, Sweden, and Russia, transoceanic wireless plants being located near Boston, Mass and Stavanger, in Norway. Continuous message service under all conditions of weather will be maintained, with an estimated capacity at each station of 15 000 messages daily, or more than 5,000 000 a year. The expense of constructing the European and Asiatic links has been shared by the various Governments, each nation contributing its pro rata in subsidies 01 land giants, but the American stations will be operated exclusive of governmental assistance, and as a private enterprise will be owned and controlled by the Marconi CompaiwEach installation will be operated under a duplex system of working, which permits sending and receiving messages at the same time and at a speed of ioo words a minute. It is estimated that a ten-word message could be sent completely around the earth in less than three minutes. Idea Came from England The worldwide wireless circuit was first conceived in England about three years ago, following a conference w Inch gave official recognition to the importance of wireless telegraphy in connecting Great Britain with her colonial possessions. Independence of the submarine • allies was sought primarily, and it was pointed out what a tremendous advantage the wire less chain would be in time of war, when the existing cables might be cut. Nearly a year elapsed before the red tape about the project could be unwound, but when the English Post Office authorities finally completed their exhaustive investigations, a contract for the erection of a British Imperial chain was awarded to Marconi. {cnlimied on third pan) r


The Tribune.
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS DOWNLOADS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02337
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Saturday, February 06, 1915
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02337

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

( PDF )

( PDF )

( PDF )

( PDF )


Full Text
LATEST RADIOGRAMS
NOT* '. TO SUBSCRIBERS
Subscribers :> The Tribune
Munthlyarul upwardsare
requested not t" pay sub-
scriptions to the carriers but
onlv at the Office, or to a
Collector from the Office,
glia to report U' the Office
anv neclect on the part of
the carriers to deliver their
pa|ier. > "
Nulllua addictue |urare in verba maglatri.
Beinn bound to swear to the Dogma.* of no Maater.
"THE TRIBUNE-
WANTS ADVT'S.
FOR RESULT
ADVERTISE IN
"THE TRIBUNE"
Special Rales to Yearly
Advertiser*
Vol. XII. No. 64.
NASSAU. N. P.. BAHAMAS, SATURDAY. FEBRUARY fc. 1915.
^JJL
Prlce. THREE CENTS.
Famous British Regiments are
known by Nicknames.
SOME OF THE HISTORIC COMMANDS NOW FIQHTINO IN EUROPE
BEAR POPULAR TITLES WHICH HAVE ARISEN IN 000 WAYS.
OMF. of the most famous
of the British regiments
now battling in France
and Belgium are far better
known throughout Great Bri-
tain, and to the world at largo,
by their nicknames than by ilieir
official titles. Their official titles
in many instances, indeed,
would convey nothing to the
average person.
Many people in many conn
tries, for instance, have heard of
the Black Watch ; comparative-
ly few have heard of the Kortv-
second Highlanders; yet the
names are of the same regiment.
This famed body, the oldest
of all Highland regiments, gets
its nickname from its tartan.
When the regiment was first i
formed it was used chiefly to
suppress sedition in Scotland, to
enforce the disarming act, and
to disperse unauthorized asseni-
biles. A special tartan from
which all bright colors were eli-
minated was designed for regi-
mental use, and this fact to-
gether with the police nature of
the duties ol early days, led to
the name Black Watch. On
many fields, in many parts of
the world, have the soldiers of
the Black Watch up'.eld the
glory of this great regiment.
The Scots Greys, as famous in
the annals of cavalry as is the
Black Watch in infantry records
began their careei as the Royal,
North British Dragoons In
1742 the regiment was landed
in the Low Countries. On their
disembarkation The Stadlhol
der, seeing that they were with-
out mounts, ordered Ins own
guards to turn ov< 1 their gray
chargers to the Scotchmen. And
the Scots Greys, with gray
mounts, they have since been,
although they held the official
name of the Royal North British
Dragoons down to the time of
the Crimean war.
The CohJslream Guards, who
also nave won laurels on scores
of battlefields,get their name
from Coldstream, in Berwick-
shire. In 1660 Gen. Monk
marched to London to aid in
securing a free Parliament and,
he restoration of the Stuarts,
fringing with him his own regi*
lent of infantry from Cold
stream.
The regimental legend has it
t h n t when the troops met
Pbarlesal Blai kheath the Monk
uriment kept some of the din-
|Ue:ietl soldiers of other units
mutin), and the King, on
dug rvhence the regiment
[come, addressed them as
j^oldstieain Guards." The
lamexdU'-lv
"The Thin Red Line of Eng-
land" has long lived in song and
Story, the name being applied
generally to British field forces
It is declared by expeits, how-
ever, that the name properly
belongs to the Argyll and
Sutherland Highlanders, in
commemoration of their re-
markable repulse of tne flower
of the Russian cavalry at Bala-
clava. Volley after volley of
rifie fire was poured by the slen-
der line of scarlet coats into the
masses of charging Russian
horsemen, until finally the at-
tack was abandoned despite the
comparatively slight numerical
strength of the British.
The "Fighting Fifteenth" are
the Fifteenth King's Hussars.
Nicy won their title in 1794 in.
Inlanders against the French re-
volutionary troops. They were
serving with the Austrians, and
in operations near Landrecies
they were ordered to rescue the
Emperor of Austria, who had
been cut off from the main arm;.
Two squadrons of the Fif-
teenth) with a few Austrian hus
sars, the whole body not num-
ber i n j; more than 300 men,
found themselves, through a
mistake, facing an entire French
army corps. They attacked
part of the corps so fiercely that
the French thought themselves
opposed by a great force. 'I he
hussars rode through the out-
posts, charged the artillery, kill-
ed lfaoomen, and took three
guns. The Emperor was rescu-
ed. I It I.i'er decorated the of-
ficers ol the regiment.
Hie "D: -Hards" are the Fifty.
seventh Foot, the Duke of Cam-
bridge's > vn Middlesex Regi
ment. Al \lbuera in l8tl the
regiment found itself pressed by
a great foi e "Die hard, my
men, die hard !" was the cry of
Col. lnglis'ohis troops. Backs
ton wall,the soldiers did die
bard. Theie were 140survivors
out of 570W 1 1 began the fight.
the dead including Inglis.
At Inkermau, where the regi
ment was almost wiped out,
Capt. Stanley raised the cry,
"Die-Hards, remember Albuera"
And the regiment again made
good its name.
The Connaught Rangers were
originally called the "Devils
()wn" because of their rascality,
but their superb lighting in the
Peninsular war 'hanged the
term from one of reproach to
one of honour. At Fuentcs d'
Onoro and at Badajos they
fought with amazing fury.
T ie everyday gt in | is respon
Bible for the nickname of the
Royal Welsh Fusiliersthe
"Nanny Goats." A goat is the
regimental mascot and is led al
the head of the column. On St
Davids Day, in the officers
mess, the goat, escorted by
dr u m s and fife, i, marched
around the table.
The Call of the
WEST
In the cold and sleet of the Nor-
thern street,
I stand mid a surging crowd ;
And my thoughts go back to the
beaten track,
Half hid by this wintry shroud.
I hear the song of a mighty
throng
Beyond the city's hum ;
From the ocean widefrom the
swelling tide,
The singers bid me "come."
I taste the brine like sparkling
wine
Tossed high by the waves at
play;
And my heart leaps up as I quaff
tin cup
That lures me far away.
I see the sheen of dancing green;
The blue of a tropic sky ;
I long for a spell in its grassv
dell,
Where the shifting shadows lie.
I hear the call of the waterfall ;
The coo of the mountain dove,
While at my feet like a prelude
sweet,
The land and sea make love.
I breathe the air ol that garden
fair;
I smell its fragrant bloom,
And the fire flies in fancy rise
And flicker through the gloom.
I see the joy of my native boy
As he greets me once again ;
I hear the chaff and the happy
laugh
Re-echoing o'er the main.
0 the wondrous grace of that
dusky race,
Straight as their native palm !
Like an anchor cast, it holds me
last
With a strange compelling
charm.
1 wait the flush of day's first
blush
As she dons her nuptial gown
And silently gaze at the gorge-
ous rays
When the golden sun goes down.
Mow can I tell your witching
spell
Of roft effulgent noon ?
Or the langorous ease beneath
the trees
In the drowsy hour of noon ?
I ike emeralds set in a waving
net;
Like gems on a queenly head,
Foi many miles these western
isles
Repise on their watery bed.
I a picture bright with the
glowing light
That falls from the a/ure dome.
It means so mini, and the
syren's touch
Is gently drawing me home.
What do you k n o w, pale
Daughter of Snow,
< )f that glorious summer land ?
Wireless Around the World
in 3 Minutes.
WHERE ALL LINKS IN THE CHAIN ARE COM.
PLETE MESSAGES CAN BE SENT AND RECEIVED
AT THE SAME TIME AT THE RATE OF 100 WORDS
A MINUTE.
IN every department of wire-
less communication new and
striking records have been es-
tablished dining the year 1914.
It is possible to-day to send a
wireless message around the
world. The distance of trans-
mission has been greatly in-
creased. Practically every sea-
coast in the civilized world has
been brought in wireless com-
munication. The new ilirection
finder opens a new era in wire-
less telegraphy in safeguarding
ships at sea. Wireless signals
have been perfected with trains
running at high speed. And so
general and efficient has wire-
less electricity become in the
present European conflict that,
as a famous General recently
observed, it is hard to conceive
of wars being waged without
such communication.
A number of high-towered
stations capable of signaling
across the ocean are in actual
operation at Sayville, L. I.;
Washington, Glace Bay, N. S.;
Clifton, Ireland; Pol d h u
Nauen, Berlin ; Coltano, Italy ;
the Eiffel Tower, and Togo,
Africa. A series of still more
efficient wireless stations have,
been established at Belmar, N.
J. ; San Francisco, and Hono-
lulu, vhich serve as links with
stations in Europe, completing
the a-round-tha-world route.
The lines of long-distance
wireless communication con-
verge in and about New York
to-day much the same as ill
roads mice led to Rome. No
other city or locality in the
world is supplied with so many
high-powet stations. The lofty
wireless towerat Sawille, L. I.,
is in direct wireless communi-
cation with the station at
Nauen, just outside of Berlin,
thus linking New York with the
German capital. During the
past year a powerful station has
been completed at Belmar,N, J.
Plans have already been made
for a station at the Massachu-
Yoiu icy breast has the chill of
death.
How can you understand ?
Not all vour gold can e'er with-
hold
My spirit's onward flight :
Or bi tid in chains of sordid gains,
My yearning soul tO night.
Abo\e the roar of this whi rling
floor
I hear the voice of the sea ;
'Til the cry of the West from
its heaving breast ;
It is callingcalling to rne.
B. K.
setts coast to communicate with
a station in Norway.
The Government station at
Arlington, just outside of Wash-
ington, has established some re-
markable records for long-dis-
tance work, and has no difficul-
ty in communicating with the
Eiffel Tower station.
On Sept. 24 connection was
established between San Fran-
cisco and Honolulu. Similar
stations are to connect Japan
land India; India is to be linked
with Egypt, and Egypt with
England, where stations in
Wales will connect with the
New Jersey pair and complete
the world circuit. A supple-
mentary link will also be added
to Norway, Sweden, and Russia,
transoceanic wireless plants be-
ing located near Boston, Mass
and Stavanger, in Norway. Con-
tinuous message service under
all conditions of weather will
be maintained, with an estimat-
ed capacity at each station of
15 000 messages daily, or more
than 5,000 000 a year.
The expense of constructing
the European and Asiatic links
has been shared by the various
Governments, each nation con-
tributing its pro rata in subsi-
dies 01 land giants, but the
American stations will be oper-
ated exclusive of governmental
assistance, and as a private en-
terprise will be owned and con-
trolled by the Marconi Compaiw-
Each installation will be operat-
ed under a duplex system of
working, which permits sending
and receiving messages at the
same time and at a speed of ioo
words a minute. It is estimated
that a ten-word message could
be sent completely around the
earth in less than three minutes.
Idea Came from England
The worldwide wireless cir-
cuit was first conceived in Eng-
land about three years ago, fol-
lowing a conference w Inch gave
official recognition to the im-
portance of wireless telegraphy
in connecting Great Britain
with her colonial possessions.
Independence of the submarine
allies was sought primarily,
and it was pointed out what a
tremendous advantage the wire
less chain would be in time of
war, when the existing cables
might be cut. Nearly a year
elapsed before the red tape
about the project could be un-
wound, but when the English
Post Office authorities finally
completed their exhaustive in-
vestigations, a contract for the
erection of a British Imperial
chain was awarded to Marconi.
{cnlimied on third pan)
r



Till. TRIBUNE bAS&AV, BAHAMAS
G ILBKKT I)UPU< II,
liilitor and Vrafrittor.
omoH
Corner Shirley & Cho-rlotte Sta
\aaau, .V. /'., Hahamas
THONK 200. P. O. HOX 183.
PUBLISHED DAILY
Mon.l.iy. Wednesday and Friday .
single r.-ifiy ......... Jd
Tuesday, an I Thurvlayjingle crtpjr id
Saturday ^single coi y .. 11*1
Weekly ...... ...... sl
Monthly ...........I-. i> I
Quarto ly........ .~. 6d
HaHY-aily..............,-.
Yearly ......... ',.. is
PAYABLE IN ADVAMOB
Advertising Rate*:Sis penct per line
lor first insertion; three |>euce pet line
md iuwrtion i in i one penny pa
line la ; lent inserti i > -.
A Ivertiterneiiti uadei tight linei -t^.
Zhc tribune
SATURDAY. February 6, I9Ij.
#- PUBLISHED AT 7 P. M.
fi?
\UOM Soldiers to horses
is an easy transition, in
fact men and horses
have long been associated, al-
though it lias been madesub-
sevient to man and the vari-
ous uses to which it has been
applied have rendered it the
most useful of all the domes-
tic animals. We can hardly
enter any department of la-
bour in which it has been su-
perseded. In strength, in
endurance, in intelligence it
has proven itself the most
successful rival to the mecha-
nical powers; the measure of
a horse's power has been used
as the unit and standard of
the power of machinery, but
this is applicable o n 1 v to
ill-treated or underfed, but
we long to apply the like
treatment to the individual
who is the author of it. We
earnestly wish that all who
are associated with the horse,
especially the owner, would
become so attracted to him
as to treat him with the pro-
verbial kindness of the Arab.
Horse racing is cf very an-
cient origin, and in the time
of the Virgin Queen is said to
have been .anied to such ex-
<< ss a4fcto have injured the
fortunes of the nobility and
in later times has impoverish-
ed not the nobility only, but
the commoner as well. Horse-
l.i ing is spurt ; but it is re-
Igrettable that it has been
much abused ; there is a great
deal of fraud practiced in the
whole business of racing ;
and, as in every other species
of gambling, those who ad-
dict themselves to the sport,
generally in the end, become
the victims of a host of black-'
legs, and their confederate
jockies, welchers, touts, and
' it her sharps who batten upon
not only those "to the man-
ner born" but on the hay-
seeds and green-horns as well.
There are few amusements
more exhilarating; and the
pi i a>d of the races serves as a
rendezvous for all classes and
conditions and the scene is
usually gay.
"Dunmore Track" did not
appeal to us yesterday after-
noon with the force of the
days that are gone. It may
have been bet ause of the ab-
sence of some of the details
conspicuous in past events of
race, and we hope that their
efforts will be rewarded by a
"cram jamfull"' Grand Stand
next time.
We are glad to say, that we
understand iii.it the gate moucy
and grand stand intakes were
quite satisfactory not withstand
ing that abi-ul $300 eluded llie
Cerberus, which had it liren
collected would have raised the
total to (8 o.
ourselves
opinion,
OUI
those used for the purposes of a similar character. Our old
, draught or carriage, and di-
minishes as his speed in-
creases The application of
the term horse power to ma-
chinery is so universal, that
it is used without the slight-
est knowledge of its meaning
by many even of those who
are continually using it.
Watts, Smeaton, and Desa
guliers have considered the
friend and furious rider, the
Clerk of the course; Jockeys
not wearing the colour of
the owners, and saddles and
bits, which to say the least
were not of the racing varie-
ty. Considering the size and
condition of the ponies, it did
not seem that any attempt
to "handicap" in the jockies
weight had been made. In
force of cine horse equal to fact all the ponies in the res-
tliat of five men, but, writers Ipect of weight of jockies were
differ on this point. Horse [over weighted. The track it-
power is, that he can raise a self might be called iinma-
weight of 32,000 pounds to
the height of a foot in one
minute. Observe that we say
horse power, not pony power.
The horse lends himself to
the sports and pastimes of
man with eager and willing not wish
readiness, and in racing and
hunting, the care, training,
and attention which man has
bestowed on his truly noble
co-adjuter has so developed
and improved him that his
value has increased to a won-
derful degree. If man posses-
sed a pecuniary value, there
would be found many horses
of far greater value than a
great many men. We do not
say that the horse receives at
all. times the care and atten-
tion and kindness to which
he is naturally entitled, and
the practice of running race-
horses at two or three years
old, and working them before
their limbs are knit, or their
strength attained, and cruelly
exacting from them services
far beyond their powers, are
matters which should engage
ture and not in good shape.
Against these defects may be
placed, a fine grand stand
from which the entire track
could be under observation
'from start to finish." We do
to disparage the
Track in embryo ; for we
believe better things of it in
the, and let us hope, near
future. A word to the wise,
will we are certain be suffi-
cient. As to the riding, with
the exception of one race,
that for the "Colonial Cup,"
it was far below the average.
Mr. D a v e n p 0 1 t and Mr.
French rode well, and we
think it was due more to the
former's good riding, than to
speed that he carried off the
trophy, while the two other
jockies rode with judgment.
The whip seemed to be the
only "spur," though on the
whole it was used very freely
and unnecessarily. We
think however, that the As-
sociation are worthy of com-
mendation, and the spur with
which We would "prick the
Not commit ling
to an expression of
we nevertheli s> t nder
thanks to His Excellency the
Administrator foi the follow-
ing Extract from the Colo-
nial Journal January, 1915.
"I he revenue of ihe Baha-
mas in 19.3- 14 was much
above the average, but would
be reduced in future by the
lowering of the tariff on ad
valorem goods from 25 to 20
per cent. Other Acts passed
during the session of 1914
increase t!i:expenditure, and
the next result is likely to be
an expenditure of 20.000
more than the estimated
revenue. This excess, the an-
ii'ial report states, 1 .mi be met
out of surplus and other funds
but it will -.wallow up more
than three fourths of the to
til reserve fund, "leaving
little margin should a hurri-
cane or other unforseeii dis-
aster occur." The unforseen
has occurred in tin- shape of
the war, and the revenue is
bound to go dowd : there is
also the possibility that it
will be necessary to provide
food-stuffs lor the people.
This situation has not pre
vented the Legislature from
nobly voting "10,000."
We an glad again to see
that Docking facilities, are
provided lor our larger crafts.
The Marine Railway at Hog
Island, has been refitted and
the Schr. Salvor, owned by
the Abac o, Timber Co., (g
hauled out, undergowing re-
pairs.
:o:
We learn t h 10 u g h the
Board of Ag iculture, that
over 19000 Crates Tomatoes
have been shipped up to the
present time, which already
is far in excess of any previous
season.
:o: --
I In- Hospital Commissioners
ire laving ,i large Sewer pipe
down Victoria Am one, into'
the sea, and the residents and
1 In- S. S. Monttrty sailed fiom
New York 011 Friday j p. in.
fin Nassau, with 49 passengers
and 5500 barrels of cargo.
Mr. John W. Knowles, who
left us in November last for
I ngland, for the express pur-
pose of volunteer ng his ser-
vices in the present Crisis, we
are glad to learn, is in train-
ing in Yorkshire, England, for
Army services.
:o:
The New Year's Honours List
includes the following West In-
dians. It will be noted with
Considerable satisfaction that
the West Indies figure much
more prominently in the Hon.
air's List this year than they
have done for a considerable
lime.
Most Distinguished Order oj
St. Michael and St. George.
George Basil Haddon-Smith
C. M G., Governor and Com.
mander-in chief of of the Wind,
ward Island--.
Sir O. B. H&ddon-Smlth K.C.M.C.
Has had a career which in J
variety and distinction is equal
led by few even of Britain's
Colonial Administrators. Born
in 1861, he entered the Royal
Guernsey Militia in 1S79. hi
1886 he became Assistant In-
spector of the Logos Constabu-
lary, and later Acting Inspector
< ien< ral. He tool; part in the
Ji I'u expedition, 180.-., being
mentioned in despatches: in
1893 was political officer in Si.
Gilbert Carter's mission to
Yorubaland; in 1S96 private
secretary to Sir I". Si .'.t in the
Whanti expedition ; in [900po-
litical officer to Si,- J. Wilcocks
in the Ashanti Expedition, tak
ing part in the relief of Kumasi
and receiving Special mention
m despatches. Various other
African appointments have been
held, including colonial secre-
taryships, and the acting gov-
ernorships of Gambia and sierra
Leone. In 1912 he was appoint-
ed Governor, where he has ini-
tiated several of (he Bahamaa
scheme* of great value to the
Colony. In the las! position lie
gained a comprehensive know-
ledge of Canada and the
United States
r.arlyin December Mr. Had
don Smith was appointed Gov
emorof the Windward Islands,
leaving the Bahamas to take up
his new position immediatelv
afterwards. His ExcellencySI
intimate knowledge of Cana-
dian and United Slates com
mercial conditions, and also of
the steps necessary to yet busi
ness here, can be expected to be
of great advantage to the
Windward Islands. We con
having been Govcrnotffcf the
Bahamas. In the last^ost in
particular heshewed himself ihe
possessor of marked business
ability-a desideratum always
in such colonits as the West
Indies, although unforlunatelv
one not always possessed ini-
tiating several schemes which
promke much for the Bahamas'
future. The chief of these, the
establishment of a Development
Hoard foi the furtherance of the
Bahamas' trade and tourists in-
terests, lias a I read v made its
benefits felt. It waswbile Gov-
ernor of the Hahamas that Sir
(i. 3. I laddon Smith acquired
his comprehensive knowledge of
Canada and the Uniied States,
and of slips necessary to build
Up business with these two
countries if business is to I -
built up at all. Nobody will
know bitter ill.in be, therefore,
the futility of the laisttM faire
attitude displayed by some of
the West India adminislrations
where trade is concerned. The
people of the Windward Islands.
to which post Sir G. B. Aaddon-
Smith was appointed early 111
! '< cernber, are to be congratu.
land on securing so capable
and enthusiastic a Governor.
NATIVE ENTERPRIZE.
..----------,-------............-------- v-.^^J,^ ....... ..V. .. VV..V* ^..... ,..V-
the attention of Societies foi d" their ambition,"is the
the Prevention of Cruelty to thought that their exploits
Animals far more than tln\
do. The Horse attracts our
sympathies in an exceptional
degree and we never see one
were under the smiles and
cheers of the largest number
of the fair sex that we have
seen present at a Horse-
Pn&XZXttotX l"""!""'V """",IC "* ""
for carrying off water &c from
their premises.
:o:
We learn that the Rev. II. F.
Dann, brother of the Rev. C. A.
Hann, has taken charge as pas-
tor, of "Charity Tabernacle"
Freetown. Under his ministry,
the Church is already showing
signs of renewed activity, and
seems to be looking forward to
brighter days.
On Sunday next, the 7th inst,
the choir are giving a service of
song, at which Mr. Dann will
pieside.
A good programme, which
includes choral singing and re-
citations will be provided, and
all who feel disposed to attend
will be made welcome.
'Ihe S. S. "Miami" arrived
from Miami, Tla., at 3.45 p.m.
to-day with 35 passengers and
32 tons cargo.
terprising a Governor.
Sir Kobeit S. John.lone K. B.
Has occupied many official
law positions in Lagos, Baha-
mas, and Grenada. In the last
place he was appointed Chief
lust ice in 1909.
THE HONOURS LIST.
Peculiar gratification will be
felt in the West Indies at the
New Year's Honours list. It is
safe to say that not for a long
time have the West Indies
figured so prominently in it as
they have done this year. The
honours are well selected also,
and it is further interesting to'
note that most of them arc con-
ferred upon men who have more
than an elementary knowledge
of Canada. Mr. G. B. Hiddon-
Smith, C. M. G. who is created
S K. C. M. G. has had a long
and distinguished colonial ex-
perience, having held many im-
portant posts in our leading
African possessions as well as
If the pineapple industry is to
be a feature in the future pros
penty of ihe Isle Providence.it
will be owing to th. enterprise
'|'d energy ol Walter K. Moore
Esq M.L A. His plantation on
ibewulf Road will convince the
most incredulous that pineap.
pies can ha grown 011 this Island
and grown profitably.
Mr. Moore has not followed in
the traditions of pineapple
planters of tbe past. His fields
are laid out with due regard to
regularity and ecoeocny in
planting and gathering.
Introducing a new fertilizer,
he has demonstrated that the
old methods and material were
not so obsolete as many thought
them to be. The Mapes fertiliz-
er superseded Foresters as Jar as
Mr. Moore's farm supersedes the
farms that have hitherto been
considered models.
The planter who devotes the
whole of his land to cultivation
leaves no room for the reapers.
To gather the crop they must
wade through the dense growth
to the end of the field and back
again in the same tedious way.
I'<> remedy this and to save time
Mr. Moore has left footpaths
that divide the fields into small
sections through which the har-
vester can reach the fruit easily
and bring them, not to the end
of the field, but, to cart roads
that intersect them and make
delivery Speedy and sure.
Mr. Moore has came to the con.
elusion that before passing
judgment it is well to give a
fail trial. His farm proves that
he has determined to give pine-
apple growing in Providence a
fair trial.To witnesses the writer
has, a steam roller making a road
on a pineapple held is an ex
perience that is without prece-3
dent but that is precisely whaO
Mr. Moore is doing.
I'ora longtime experiments
a pineapple growing along the
Wulf Road have occupied the
planters who found that Fleu-
thera lands were failing, and it
was left for Mr. Moore to pre
that the "scrub" is as vali_
an asset of the Colony as the
lands that were once so h
prized. The Tribune wh'hf-
the energetic and pains taking
planter every success and hopes
that the whole of the valley be-
tween Fincastleand Bailloii may
become one immense pine field
in the near future.
r


to.
THE TRIBUNE NASSAU. BAHAMAS
ContliiU'd from First Page.
0
Aiiu^ra's part in the scheme
calls for stations at New Bruns-
wick and Belmar, on the New
Jersey coast, and Marshall* and '
Bolinasin California, linking "ig up the powerful
ocean. One side of the building
is filled with huge dynamos,
transformers, and intricate look-
ing switchboards, while the
other section isdeovted to stor-
the Pacific Coast with the Ma
waian st itions at Kalnuka and
forces.
Near the power house is
Koko Head; two similiar unit, auxiliary operating building,
in Manila, and transmitting and where messages will be recoi-
receiving Station! at Marion and e(I lf. for anv reason, 'll(; Belmar
receiving station should be
Chatham, Mass.
Had To Solva Problems.
urface acts as a shell inclosing
he globe."
The lower sections and main
portions of these steel masts
- i tall and slender, if viewed
electrical [from the top, that they api eai
to be balanced on needle
pointsare composed of thirty-
two composite steel cylinders,
made in sections, flanged verti-
cally and bolted together.These
on! stand in a concrete foundation
an
Standard Oil Company and
enroutc from New York to Rot
terdam.
"There wrre.ofcour.se, some
difficulties experienced," said
Frederi< k \l. Sammis,Chief En-
gineer of tne Marconi Company,
in explaining t h e situation.
"Every wireless installation pre.
scuts a certain number of pro
blems, and these naturally in-
creased proportionate!) with
the size of the station. Yet most
of the difficulties resolve them
selves llltO engineering pro
blems, and it is only a matter of
engineering to overcome them.
"Certain methods of pro ;e
dureg rvern the removal of most
mechanical obsta :les, and their
application is mainly a matter
of experience. As an instance,
take the selection of the sites
for the American links in the
world chain. As these high
powered stations send and re-
ceive wireless messages simul-
taneously, the transmitting and
re iving units have to be locat-
ed more than twenty miles apart
"The lay of the land must also
permit the erection of the aei ials
so that they point toward the
distant Station with which com
muoication is to be established.
The transmitting haJf requires a
narrow strip of land about a
mile and a half long and at least
a tli nisarM feel wide; the re-
ceiving half must be located on
a T-shaprd tract, each arm of
which U anput a mile and a
half long ,ind 500 feet wide. In
addition to the physical require
of commission. Directly in
front of tins building rises the
first of the thirteen steel masts
that support the aerial wires
These masts are arranged in
pairs and stretch westward for
more than a mile, each one
towering to a height of 423 feel.
or higher than a thirty stony
sky-scraper.
Sending SliMlnn rvt Belmar.
The main operating building
where messages will be sent to
and received from London is
located about fifty miles a way,
at Belmar, 111 the heart of the
and are stayed with steel cables.
The main steel column is sur-
mounted by a wooden topmast,
which, according loSupt. R 7
Rossi, is Ihe keynote of the no-
vel system of erection.
"In operation," he said "it
acts somewhat like a man pull-
ing himself up by Ins bootstraps'.
Ihe lower part of the topmast
is squared and set in square
openings in the plates between
the steel cylinders, and the hoist-
ing arm-, attached to the upper
end are lit ted with blocks and
hoisting cables A square wood
ratty announces its intention to'pliia. She* was owned by the
proceed against English troop-
ships in the Channel as energe-
tically as possible and neutral
\ ( -els are warned not to ap-
proach North or West coast of
I 1.1 in e. The best route for tha
North Sea is around Scotland.
Washington:The White
Mouse intimate.I U day that im
mi diate protest would be made
to Germany against any decree
making unsafe the progress of
American vessels trading in
European waters.
Jersey coast Summer resort sec- ncag is suspended from these
tion.
The sending capacity of each
station will be too word a
minute. Through ingenious
mechanical devices a dozen or
a hundred wireless messages can
be filed at the same time and
received in London a minute or
two later.
Tracing the course of a dozen
transoceanic Marconi grams it is
found that the instant these are
filed they are distributed among
as many operators,and the dots
and 'lashes punched in paper
tape by a machine which opera
tes like a typewriter. The tape
is then fed into an automatic
sender, and at a speed which is
arms,and through chain hoists
it can be lowered or raised at
will, while the sections are be-
ing bolted together.
How It la Done.
"At a signal from the foreman
a huge steel section is raised by
.1 steam u inch, pi.iced t p i
lion, an seVured temporarily bj
ctii n below,
\ flexil le isd iwn in-
nd attached
to the top of the steel and led
around a wheel in the foot of
the wood) 0 topmast; it is then
carried 1 p again oa the other
side and around a sheave to the
top ofjthe steel, thence to the
win< h. By pulling this cable
greater than that used by a fast the topmast is lifted the length
talk r.thi words come under the cl one ylinder and pinned by
stylus it Belmar and instantan
eously the high current lea| -
from the aerial at New tJTUnS
wick. Thi dots and dashes car
ried over the connection land
ments, both sites must have a j line have,through automatic re
definite din ctional relation and I ivsjeed the high frequency cur
be near the ocean or located on rent in corresponding dots and
, une waterway affording a
dip cl ele< trical connection w ith
tl.( sea. \ Id to tins Me- desira -
bility of locating near the big
cities, New Yorlc, San Francisco,
and B iston, arid you ha*ve a task
of selection (hat might easily
discourage the average real es-
tate man.
"We were fortunate in having
the advantage of Mr. Marconi's
invaluable experience and un-
questioned ability in the selec-
tion of the New- Jersey, locations,
theie excellent sites having b< n
chosen b) the noted inventor
h'mself. With New Y011; pro
vided for. the search was direct-
ad toward the Pacific and New
England CoaSIS and many weary
miles of insp' ction. and a O n-
Biderable amount of careful
gotiation were covi red by my
English engineering associate,
C. II. Taylor, an 1 myself before
the other sites were required."
Some idea of the importance
of providing propei transports-
11 in facilities is revealed in the
fact that 22,000 tons of material
lVe use I n the New Brunswick
transmitting plant alone. The
pndepsi is required twerfly-six
is of imported glass, which
re transported up the Raritan
ti
rJashes.and in the infinitesimal
patf of H second the signal emit
ted from the transmilterat Bel
mar will have leaped from aerial
at New Brunswick ai d bi en re.
ceived at the station in W lies
The elapsed time between the
transmission and reception of
the signals is established at one
sixth of a second.
Messages Speeding through
B at the rate of 100 Words a
minute naturally have to be re-
ceived automatically. This will
be accomplished through speci-
ally designed dictaphones, and
as fast as a cylinder is filled
with the dots and dashef of mi
incoming message it will be
handed to an operator and tran-
scribed into a typewritten mes-
11 sage through aditaphonerepro-
ducing machine running at nor-
mal speed.
I,. II. Peel les, engineer of a
corporatian which is construt I -
illg the high power transoceanic
stations, was ask I whether the
great height of the masts was to
overcome the curvature of the
earth.
"That question is often ask
ed," he said and it is a natural
one.In fact, when Marconi find
means of holes in both st-el and
wooden masts. This pin sup-
ports the topmast until it is
raised again with the addition
of a new ste< 1 cylinder As the
section proceeds the stays are
attached at the required points.
This method of construction is
very rapid; we made a record
of raising and staying a com-
plete mast 4,33 feet high in eight
working da*.
announced his intent i >n of trans
nal directlv to the site withImitting wireless signals across
comparatively little difficulty ; the Atlantic all students of eh c
at some of the other stations, trical radiation immediateh
however, miles of roadway.hub turned to a consideration of
(|,.,. in ,i,u I. or great expanses whether the oceans curve would
l,oal water had to be crossed, I"' circumvi nt< d or pi 1 etrated'.
,rl \-y ',< quantities of mateiial "l-'ortun.at. ly, it is not n< 1
.,1 ,,.. of laborers, ary to raise the masts above the
New Brunsw.ick the main obstructions between, or
ig is the power house, a
ie brick structure, wh re
Iricitj is changed in
the sixty cycle, 2,400-
"Tiiirent to tlif high frequen-
,.v oscillating current lequired
to send the dots and dashes
thousands of miles across the
,\
wireless stations separated bj
the Atlantic would have to 1
masts 125 miles high. The path
of the wireless waves is not in a
straight line, but follows the
curvature of the earth. Scien
tists are of the opinion 'hat the
rarified air above the earth's
Latest War News
February 6th 1915.
London 5th.
(iovernor,
Bahamas.
Official news February 5th:
An official communique form
Cairo reports Turkish attempts
to cross the can il near Tous-
soimi by means of pontoons and
rafts. After some fighting the
enemy lelumed leaving many
dead and ahoul three hundred
prisoners. An attack was also
made on I.I K inlara and the
enemv were driven away with a
rl tw< Btyoi e killed twenty
wound* d and ihirtysix un-
wounded prisoners were taken.
1'he enemy s forces apparently
numbered a I least 13.000 with
-in batti 1 ies. The French govern
ment repoi I u sful eng ige
ments in district Perfhes and
some su at oltvM points.
(Signed)
II IRCOURT.
GOVERNMENT PfiKM
The German attempt to break"
the Ru< it Borjimow
in Poland is the most impor-
tMiit news from I battle fronts.
Within ad of six miles
from III re lll I il imans numhei
K 10,000 men.
The Russian Staff announce
advances in Kast Prussia along
le- banks of the RiverSchese-
rpe.
I e Fret war office an
nounces unusual activity of
:!s 111 IV Igium and the
capture of German tranche
tweeu Anas and Lille.
Berlin: 'I he ii rman \dmi-
The state department is inves
tigatingthe (ierman Admir-
alty's ultimatum about British
waters from a legal standpoint.
London:It is learned that
several German submarines have
been sent to Zeebrugge on the
Belgian coast which is said to
be the base from which the (jer
mans will try to sink theenemys
merchant ships and British
transports in the English Chan-
nel.
Cairo:The main body of
the Turkish army which is
marching on Egypt is repcrted
only forty two miles from the
Suez Canal on which two ad-
vance attacks have already been
made by snail forces.
New York:The federal
grand jury today indicted six
men recently implicated in is
suing fraudulent passports to
(ierman r servibtS.
F< bruary 6th 1915.
GOVERNMENT PBttfl
London:Russians break the
deadlock in Central Poland by
crossing Ikurn River and taking
German positions. Vonl linden-
bergs flank now in a desperate
struggle immediately to the
Soutbwi si ie en ( fforl to bn ak
down the Russian defensive in
the reguli of Borjimow.
Russians have also taken a
part of the German position
near Dakhova which was the
point at which the Germans
made their original attempt to
break the Warsaw line.
Russians and Austrians still
contend for mastery in the Car-
pathians. Artillery engagements
and small infantry attacks make
up the sum of operations inWi st.
Allies are appan ntlv piepni iag
for an offensive movement in
the Arras region.
The arrival of Lniperor Nicho-
las at the front was signal for a
renewed Russian offensive di-
rectly West of Warsaw accord-
ing to an official statement
which declares that the Rus-
sians have crossed Bgura River
and captured (ierman positions-
On other points of the War-
saw front there has been no
slackening of the lighting at-
tacks of the Germans alternat-
ing with those of the Russians.
In the meantime the Rus
sians are making slow progress
in Bast Prussia. In South Po-
land they are withstanding the
attempts of the Austro-Germans
to taken the offensive.
The Austrians admit the loss
of Tarnow in Galicia w hit h is
an important centei and Rus-
sian i"issi ision which insun i
the main line ol communica-
tion into Western < ialii ia.
Cn 1 many ha 1 threatened b
submarine blockade of England
and Ireland and this 01 cupii
public attention here and in
neutral countries which h
important shipping interests
Shipowners take the situation
very calmly The Admiralty has
promised to take steps to 1 oun*
teract the blockade.
It is also pointi d out that if
it had be n ; Q lible before this
the Germans would have sank
transports taking troops to
France.
N York: Oil steamer
t u in mid.ocean
1 Ira crew of thirty five
scuetl by the steamer Philadel
RELIGIOUS SERVICES
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 7
ST. MATTHEWS OHURCH
Chinch and Shirley Sts.
Rev. IV. S. Lootll, Hector.
7.18 am Holy Communion. II am.
Mattins and Sermon. 10.15 .1 m. Sunday
S,h.o|. 3SQ pm. Junior Catechism.
1.30 |.m. Senior Catechism. 7 pm.
Evensong and Confirmation.
ST. MABOAKBT8
anj._ Fvensonit and Address. (>> pm.
T^T'Eve^onifand Addre*..**>.
rfliTKCH OF ST. AONEls, v M.
"towd. Blue Hill RMl
^'7IW*VJ.:) a.m. MatlMfJt
Holy Umniiinml^: 1 iermon 10 3B
a.m. Missa Cantat.i^Hj|^^|.pIIi Kw-n-
a.m. Catechism p.m.
long and Sermon 7 p.m.
'.'. I. 1 1 .ices
1. II M iv. daily 7.:i(l UCept Siti:r I f|
I n- 11 Monday, Tuesday and Thurs
'i.'M p.m. Wed. and Friday 7 p.m.
ST. FRANCIS XAV/KKS ( UCRCH
\\. |l --treet
Rev. Chfymtom Schrtintr, O.S.B.,
Vicar Forant
Mis-. d II a.m. Srunon and
Bcnediiiion 5 pm. Week days Mass 7 am.
BACRCD HEART CHAl'KL
East Shirley Street.
Mass & Sermon M am. Ilemdic-'ion 4 pm.
'IS. ANDREW'S I'KESBYTKRIAN
CHURCH
Princes Street
Rev. S. J. Iknnetl, Pa
Morning 11 a.m ing 7 p.m.
ZION BAPTI8T CHI BCH
I i-i and Shirley Sis.
/.'. C'/m-. .1. Dana, Pastor.
II a m. ;>\u\ 7 p m.
BAPTIST 1 NION CHURCH
Rarliameol St.
Rev. D. l\'il$here, Ptuttr,
Singing, Pcayei. Sordob, II a.m., 7 p.m.
Sunday School, 3 p.m.
CHART] Y TABERNACLE
I- reetnw n
Rn // / Damn, Pastor
MorninR at 11 a in Evening at 7 pm
UKSI.KYW METHODIST CHURCH
EBENEZER
Rev. F. J. Paint, l\i-: >
East Shirley Street
Ham. and 7 pm.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
I'.iy Stn (t. all v. I'.ank of Nssau
Sunaay 11 am. am v.
GOSPEL HALL
Dowdeswcll and Christie Streets
Gospel Meeting, Evening at 7
GOSPEL MALE
Dowdeswcll Street (near Victoria Ave.)
W rship meeting at 11 am Sunday
School, 3 pm Gospel preaching, 7pm
Divorce.
IN THE SUPREME COURT OF
THE BAHAMAS. 1914
DIVORCE AND MATRIMONIAL SIDE.
No. 1
(Divorce)
To ALBERT JOSEPH lak
oflnagua, one of the Baha-
ma Islands, but whose ad-
dtreSS is now unknown.
TAKE NOTICE that a
Citation has liecn issued on
the Divorce and Matrimonial
Side of The Supreme Court
of The Bahamas citing you
to appear and answer the
petition of George Henry
Russell'of Matin w Town in
the Island of loagua praying
for a dissolution of mar-
riage. In default (if Void r)
appearing you will not be
a I in wed to address the Court
and the Court will proceed
to hear tbesaid petition prov-
en and prom im- { sent! in'' il)
respeel thereto. And take
further notice that for the
purpose aforesaid w ithin six-
ty days alter ihe date of this
publication an appearance
must be entered at th< Regis*
try of The Supreme Court on
nl livorce and Matrimonial
hide in the City of Nassau
in the Island ol New Provi-
dence cue of the Bahama Is-
lands.
Dated th |th day of Feb-
ruary IQ15.
R. De GLANVILLE
Acting Registrar.
HARC0UR1 MALC01 \I.
Atti tii'vat I
Nassau, N. P. Baham
rl
II


J
THF. TRIBUNE NASSAU. BAHAMAS
Mental and Phys
atigue nni
When brain or body is weary the digestive powers are weakened and distaste for
ordinary food ia often experienced. Under such circumstances the Allouburys'
Diet is specially valuable. It ia pleasant to take, easily digested and assimilated
and speedily restorative. Thus it helps the system to recover tone and vigour.
Tks 'Allsakurys' DIET Is prepared from pars rick milk sad whole vvkestthe two vital
food aUsasatscoabiacd ia partially pre-diiensi form.
Mad* in a minuteJldd boiling water only.
TO BK c.BTAINKn riOM ALL CHEMISTS AND STORES.
ALLEN & HANBURYS LTD.
Ym
......
LONDON ENGLAND.
*
[enbum
DIET

A food for Adults sad quite distiact from the wcll-knowsji
'Allcabaryt' Foods for Infants.
"-'.......> ","; 'vy?/ty/#''//i''/' '" -' '
i rim in
^M
CHRIST^CHURCH
CATHEDRAL, NASSAU
OVER
A CONCERT
AdcI dramatic performance
Shakespeare's "The Mer-
chant of Venice" by the la-
dies and pupils of St. Hilda's
School will be given in
ST. ANDREW'S HALL
(in the place of the Church
Hall)
on MONDAY next Feb. 8th
at 8.15 p.m.
Tickets, 2/- and 1/-, may be
had at the Diocesan Book
Store, 15;iy Street.
Proceeds on behalf of the
Cathedral Restoration.
J'Vb. jtb.3 ins.
Notice
PURSUANT to instructions
received. Public Notice is
hereby given that I will, on
the 25th day of February, at
Noon at the wharf of the
Imperial Lighthoue Depart*
meat, put up for sale by pub-
lic Auction, subject to a re-
serve price, the Motor Pin
nace, "KARLSRUHE" with
all her sails and fittings.
The Motor Pinnace may be
inspected on application at
any time.
H. F. ARMBRISTRR
1, Feb. 10,15
LOST
ON Sunday night, 31st Jan.
between Frederick and
West Sts., a Broochheart
shape, lover's knot and hair.
Bring to
TRIBUNE.
3 ins-
~M.sTTou~.SE CAD08AN.
CERTIFICATED NURSE
from Bahamas General
Hospital. Can furnish testi-
monials.
101 Shirley Street
Telephone foi Appointments 275
MRS. M. WATSON RUDD
At Hotel Nassau
rvnd Hotel Colonia.1
until Mat March
Chiropodist Cosmetician
Kahler Gfm* Marinello Gra-
duate duate
New York
150U
Pairs
Boots and Shoes
Being added to an already
replete stock
Williams the Shoeman is
again opening up one ol
those Sample Lots of BOOTS
and SHOES in a limited
number of sizes as follows
viz:
Men's Boots and Shoes in sizes
from 6 to 7I
Women's Boots and hoes
in sizes from 3', ti 1 4 ',
Misses Boots and Shoes in sizes
lUin 12J-I0 1
The advantage in purchas-
ing from this lot is (as others
who have purchased before
can attest) that >ou can se-
lect the sizes from a very
large variety of up-to-date
styles at prices considerably
cheaper than regular lines
kept in stock.
CALL EARLY
and secure your size at
WILLIAMS' WHOLESALE
AND RETAIL
SHOE ESTABLISHMENT
277 and 279 Bay St City
Rupture Cured
n
The Brooks Appliance
Attorn.y General's Chant
Port-of-Spain.
Trinidad. B. w. I.
t-lt-'lO.
Dsar Sirs:
1 am (lad to be able to Inform you that
ti-.c "truss" t T) I sat from you In Bepumbir
la a compute success. It ha* supported my
rupture perfectly sine* I first wort It. I
have been ruptured sines I can remember
and tried st different Intervals several makee
of truss without success. I was beslnmna;
to think 1 should have to undergo an opera-
tion, as the rupture was fradually s>ttlns
worse. Now. however. X consider myself
prsctlcslly cured. To my mind one of the
real points about your Invsntlon Is that
one does not feel Its pressure anywhere, al-
though that preaaure never actually relaxes.
After the first few days I have not felt Its
pressure any more than I do my tr user
suependers. Tou are quite welcome to make
any use you like of this letter.
Tours truly.
J. U. WhltsnsaO,
To Brooks Bupturt Appliance Co.
For Hire
AUTOMOBILES
AND
BICYCLES
APPLY TO
J. P. SIMMS
47 MARKET STREET
NASSAU N. P.
^d
Kerosene
1502
IN New 50 gallon Galvaniz-
ed Iron Drums at i8cts
par Gallon.
In to gallon C&QS*ftt 2octs
pr. Gallon.
Drums and Cans returnable
Full particulars at Office
-Frances E.," Nassau N. P.
C. C. SAUNDERS
NOTICE
THE well known
Dairyman of the
East
THOMAS M. KNOWLES
Is now prepared to supply
and deliver the purest milk
to be obtained anywhere
from his Dairy Farm on East
Shirley Street^ opposite Wil-
liams Street. Orders may be
delivered at his Stoie 011 East
Bay St. No. 528, 'Phone No.
116. Delivery at from 7a.m.
to 10 a.m., and from 3 p.m.
to 5 p.m., daily in Sanitary
Bottles.
Many germs make milk im-
pure,
In Knowles' milk no germs
are found;
Look at the bottles in which
its sold, at
Knowles who takes them all
around.
Milk like his needs no lactom
eter,
In verification of its strength,
Liquor pura nee impura
Knowles would never go
that length.
LOOK !
The following Blank forms
may be had at "TheTribune"
Office.
Duty Entry.
Free Entry.
Warehouse Entries.
Sponging Articles.
Ship's Reports.
In quantities at Special Rates
Tfc* shore is < K. Bras Ira, whs >
hern Caring Itupturr tor aver SO yean
If Huufurrd, write hiss today.
My Appliance Sent on Trial
If you have tried every thins; else,
coma to me. I have my jrreateat sue*
cess where others fall. Bend attached
coupon today and I will send you. free,
my Illustrated book on Rupture and
Its oure. giving you ths names of many
people who have tried my appliance
and are extremely grateful. It gives
constant relief where all others fall. I
make It to your measure and send It
to you on a strict guarantee of satis-
faction or money refunded, and I have
put my price so low that anybody,
rich or poor, can buy It I send It on
trial to prove what I aay Is true.
mx OCT FRFF COTTON BELOW
AMI POST TODAV
. Fostsse svi Psnee. or &.-, to C. t. A.
IBM INFORMATION COCI*ON
C. E. Brooks, t7SS Stats St.,
Marshall. Michigan. U. 8. A.
Plesse send me by post. In plain wrap-
per, your Illustrsted Book and full In-
formation about your Appliance for lbs
cure of rupture.
Na
write plainly)
THIS is tO inform my Patron
,and the Public in General
thnl I have opened my Publii
Black Smith Simp; and am now
ready to do anything in I e line ol
General repair or new w rk llors<
Shoeing Specially. All \ ork don*
Slechanically.
P. A. HUYLER.
REMOVAL
The Printing Establish-
ment of the "Tribune" has
this day been removed to
Nos. 25 am! 27 Shirley Street,
and North-cast Corner of
Charlotte Street. 26th Jan.
IQI5-
For Results
Advertise in
The Tribune
CHAS, C. LIUNI BOURN
ARMSTRONG ST.
HaLwkln'a Hill.
EXPERIENCED Paper
Hanger. Ceiling Work,
a specialty. Al! work carcful-
Iv and Artistically performed.
Absolute satisfaction teed. The very best references.
-Terms moderate.
For Sale
A Gents Bicycle
in good condition.
Apply to
MR. BERTRAM
Cor. Christie and Dovvdes-
well Sts.
Johnson's
. Artistic Wood
Finishes
Johnson'* Prepared Wax-a com
plate finish and polish for all faroitnM
Woodwork anil floors.
I oh n son's Wood Dyefor the artistic
coloring of all wood, soft or hard
Johnson's Under Lac -a spirit
finish, very much superior to shellac or
vainish
Johnson's Flrvt Wood Finishforn
beautiful, artistic, hand-rubbed effete
without the expen'e of rubbinu.
Johnaon's Paste Wood Fillerfor
filling the (.'rain and pores of wood,
preparing U fur the finish.
Johnson's Powdered Waxfor bal
room floors.
FOR. SALE BY
Chas. E. Albury
NOTICE
W A. MATHER
UNDERTAKER
DESIRES to inform his friends
and the Public that he has
just received a complete outfit of
facilities for the buisness of an un-
dertaker, which places him in a
position to carry out Funerals that
may be entrusted to his care with
system and despatch ; and respect
fi>lly solicits theii patronage Get
my Prices first and prove that these
are the very lowest for the first class
work.
NOTICE
TENDERS will be received
at St. John's BAPTIST
Pasonm.k, West Street, not Liter
than Monday the 8th inst, for
the making <>f 40 centre pewt,
for Si. John's Baptisi Church.
Specimen* can be seen at the
Church.
Right reserved for refusing
an} 01 the whole of the Tenders.
Send Tenders to Rev. J. W.
Roberts.
1 Shingles
Hest No. 1 Heart 5m. Cypees
Shingles at $9.60 per thous-
sand of 20 bundles
Discounts on lots of ovei
5o shingles.
Special Price
also on cheaper gnidosalso
51D. Cypress at 0.72 per
thousand of 20 bundles. This
price made possible by a very
large purchase.
Fresh stock arriving every
week.
C. C SAUNDERS,
GASOLINE
TN Drums and 10 Gallon
* Cans. Price one shilling
per Gallon. All previous
prices cancelled.
C..C. SAUNDERS
East Bay St.
Nassau N. P.
Jan. 5th 1915.
WANTED
OLD BAHAMAS P08TABE
STAMPS
One 6d. grey lilac /
One 6d. grey lilac s
charged 4d. One Gd. grey x
let One 1 King Edward!
green or black,
Address L. GREY care
TRIBUNEenclosing sar%
pies and prices.
1
WANT
COPIES of "THE _
.BUS" AuguM^913a^i
bition Number)
Apply
" rribune"Oifice
Wear Armbrister's Shoes
f
A


University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2011 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Powered by SobekCM