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L. GILBERT DUPDCH. Editor and Proprietor. •PHONE 2U0. P. O. BOX io:t. % PUBLISHED OA1I.Y missariat department lias worked with the precision of clock ~ work throughout the war, and OFFICE. that the British army in France Comer Shirley Ch.rIolt. St.. | and pj anders js „ )e best fed army that ever took the field. Here is the daily ration of the soldier in the trenches.— i J lb. Fresh meat, (no bone) ii „ Bread. 4 ozs. Bacon. 3 „ Cheese. 4 .. J am 3 „ Sugar. J lb. Vegetables, a oz. Tea, Coffee or Cocca. 2 Tobacco per week. The very thought of having to eat all that every day, gives us the indigestion, but probably the Man at the front, gets i through it quite comfortably. 1'or the ration is scientifically calculated. If a man lies in bed, and undergoes no physical, or mental exertions, lie requires 2,000 "Calories" (heat giving unitsj to keep him alive. If, on the other hand, he walks, sav. 20 miles a day, he needs 4,500 "calorics." The above ration Monday, Wednesday and Friday— single copy id Tuesday, and Thursday—sinfile copy id Saturday—single c< pv ... ijd Weekly 5'' Monthly i s. 6d H uartarly .. 4 s D<| alfYearly a s. Yearly 1 8s. PAYABLE IN ADVANCE Advertising Rates :—Six pence per line for first insertion: three |>ence per line for second insertion : and one penny |>er line for subsquent insertions. Advertisement* under eiuht line-. 4s. Zbc tribune THURSDAY. Ja.nue.ry 4.19li. ** %  PUBLISHED AT S 30 P. M "Who wouldn't sell his farm, and be a soldier, was quite a catchy Music Hall tilt in the Irepresents 5,000 "calorics," 1 years of the American Civil War, and the Commissariat department had little to recommend it to any but those who counted the cause upon which they had embarked the only thing worth fighting for, so that it was not for love of the inner man that the outer man \\ 1 ready to volunteer for the fronl "A' that the British soldier has enough and to spare. It is worth noting that, there is nearly twice as mm h heal and prodm ing p >v\ er in 1 h< 1 -'• as in beefsteak, so that the 3 oz. Cheese is a 1 v important Mem in thtisoldiers daily rations Contrast this with the scant) hoe of thousands ol IHII t.1111 J 1is.' and could they way down South in Dixie.' havi I e en what is now hapAnd when "Marching through penjng, we doubt if many would have been found t >'lav on their native scrub. Our proletariat and agricultural class are great -Georgia" mam of the Boys in blue had to take up their belts a hole or two to the right as the gnawings of nature became more insistent. In the Crimean War, the French were far ahead of the British in the matter of feeding. eaters, and food therefore is an immense consideration, and when it is conspicious by its absence from the festal board, providence smiles upon them and the smoke arising from their I with a blessed compensationCamp.fires and the steam and• they can go without up to a appetising smell of the Potent feu' certain limit, and the pangs of titilated the nostrils of our men I positive hunger are rarely felt, to the verge of distraction, and It will be remarked that spirtwhen a kindly "Zou" invited a! tuous or malt liquors are not in "Bono Johnny" to step across, Tommie's Menu, a grateful wasn't it a red letter day for country treats him well in what him ? The French soldier "sniped" Crimean hares by the ton. John Bull has learnt something taught in the school of adversity, and to day sees him responsible for the best that is feeding his men after a fashion) in him, that these doubtful not approached within 1000 luxuries are not necessary for yards bv any other of the entire him, ami to their opinion can be iist of combatants. ; added that of their leaders. The British Army and Navy j The "daily bread" of the "Man arc well fed, and all observers atihe front" is a prominet facare agreed that the British comtor in the result, that the battle is necessary, but it doesn't run to a "qn.itc in of gin," a "tot of rum," or, "a pint of bitter." Medical science has told those will be to the strong, notwithstanding the ipse dixit of the Wise Man. Every item of his solid diet contains the elements for imparting physical strength and staying power, and it would seem that, throughout this long and terrible campaign, Tommie is going to have it And right here will be one of the secrets of success. The daily rations of our French allies are wc believe of the like quality, the Russian perhaps not quite so, but it is as sure as fate that our foes are in this respect in a sad plight now, and to be in a worse, later. From the humane point of vie" our sympathies go out to those unfortunates who have been compelled by their rulersto engage in this unholy struggle for supremacy, but at the same time, we can but rejoice that the present conditions as to feeding their army are such to point to the means by which the termination of the war will be accomplished and the foe "lie hoist with his own petard." There are several injunctions commanded in the Pauline writings but we do not think that their author himself would enforce the particular one bear ing on thi 1 point—feeding one's enemy, We know that lie was strong in the defence of his rights, and would not yield one inch to the exactions of Roman tyranny. It seem* as if there is a tension being applied by German Public Opinion to the policy of its rulers, but whether it will develop into more than a growl is yet on the Knees of the gods. What was inaugurated by theFrench people from 1771") to 1789 may be remembered by German Socialists, and unquestionably be un grand coup. The eyes of the world are looking for it, the hands of stricken l'.urope are stretching out to the harbinger of I'cace. The Police Band will be 011 the Library Green atS.tj this evening, and enliven the public with the following selections: — PROGRAMME. March "The Whfp" 2. Valse "Song D'Autnmnie" 3. Spanish Serenade "Yo te A mo" 4. Selection 'Love and Laughter" 5. Indian Romance "Hobornoko" 6. Valse "Septembre" 7. Two Step "Sombody's Coming" God Save the King. L \V. COEN. flLidmaster. —.0: — TO BEES We would remind our readers of the Garden Fete in aid of the Funds of Christ Church Cathedral, in Addiugton House Grounds this afternoon. —SO! — The Bahamas Racing and I' do Association will maugu rate the opening of "Track Dunmore' to morrow, at 2 p.m. with Five races as follows: — First Race—|ths Mile. 1st Prise 50s and Prize 20s. Owner Horse Claridge Flash I.mm Vane Cash King George North E. V. Soloman Black Joe Second Class Ra< I. 1st Prize 60s. and Prize 25s, Toote I lilt Wecch Bob! J. W. Green Colonial. First Class Race 1st Prize 100s 2nd Prize 50s. North Kanaka. Degregor Jack Johhson Sands (ii orge. B. R. P. Association Colonial Cups, Owntr Ho M Jockey Chipman Ma) French Davenport Rajah Davenport Kelly Kelly Solomon George Solomon Donkey Race. 1st Prize 20s. 2nd Prize 10s. Johnson Minna. Harding Lincoln. Bartlett Mary Brown Pepper. Pate Jane. War Notes It mustnot be imagined that a daylight charge is made to the accompaniment of frantic yelling and cheering. Not at all Most of us reserve our breath. The favourite cry of the other is, "This way for the early doors,,' or "Front leal sixpence extra." No "Down with the Kaiser" or "Hurrahs!" Several quite amusing things happen even in a bayonet charge. I saw one man, an untameabie wag. get a German bayonet through the leg. Having "stuck" the man who did it, he addressed him, "Say. mite, wh're's your manners? Ain't this your bayonet in my foot? Kindly remove it." Another



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u II incident occurred not quite so humorous. ()ne man wlm tmderstauds Gjpjrman came up to inc. "Had a rotteryjo^ just now,*' lie said; "fgot mfjriaii in the dust iuul he started t.) holloa about his wife and kids." "What did ; you do?" I said. "Do?" lie returned, laconically, spitting out a wad of tobacco. "Oh, 1 just fremembered my wife and children, and gave him another for luck" An officer in the East Lenca> %  hire I erritorials, now in Egypt, I fwrititig home, offers one or two i lasons vs h\ the Turks are likej ly to fall in invading Egypt."It j Is apparently not realised in i England, where scares are : numerous on Egyptian affairs." J jie writes, "what difficulties the I (] icstion of transport causes to j Sny invader of Egypt. If he Comes from Suez he ha, too miles of desert to cross Napoleon tried that in 1805 with f.000 men and 23 little guns, Ind almost >st his army in doing it. I le buiit a special road, I'lll existing in places. Ismail I'asha in the thirties tried the lame dodge from the Libyan desen s j ( | e w j(|, camel, and it didn't come off Even if they can arrange for food and water, I don't see the Turks doing anything. H'--ides, even if they do, I don't think the natives would rise.They have too much respect foi the comfort the) have enfcyed under the British rule." At a time when the Scots had considerably less love for their Southern neighbours that these davs a GBMBBAL POST OH-ICK, NASSAU BAHAMAS. 30th Januai v, [91 5. S CHEDULE of sailings >. S. "Miami" and the time for closing mails during the month of February, 1915. To all other Postal Union Countries two pence halfpenny for the lirst ounce and one penny halfpenny for every succeeding ounce. Book rate of postage is a halfpenny for every two ounces. Date of Sailing. Febv. 4 G 9 11 L3 16 18 20 23 'AS 27 Name of Steamer. Destination. I lour of closing Mail at G. P. O. M in 1111 Miami ; Parcels mails for the United States will be made up and closed as follows : Wednesday 3rd at noon. loth 17th 24II1 The letter rate of postage to the tinted Kingdom, Egypt and British Colonies is one penny (id.) per ounce. To the United States of America id. per 2 ounces. 4.en p.m. 5 3" l'">7.30 p.m. 12 noon 1.30 p.m. 2.30 p.m. 4.00 p.m. 5.30 p.m. 6.30 p.m. 11.00 a.m. 12.30 p.m. 1.30 p m. Postage on correspondence posted on board the S. S. Miami while the ship is at Nassau or on the high seas must be prepaid with the postage stamps of the Bahamas. II posted on hoard the steamer at Miami prepayment of postage' must be effected !>\ means of postage Stamps of the United Smtesi>f \merica. CHARLES O. ANDERSON, I *i is' mastei ing active operations iii Alsace but the French maintain and are fortifying positions taken near Ammertzwellcr. The German war office claim that there are no developments on the western battle front but father, "talin'g states that French attacks near leave of his son, said:'"Sa..dv, Perthes were repulsed. Quiet ma bairn, ve're about tae gam; I" evails in East Prussia. up tae London. Tak' a' th' siller Ull ^ ,il lmo|hava won two ye can frae the Englisht ak' important new baises in the everything ye can frae them. Carpathians inflicting heavy Pm mind ye. Sandy, they're a losses on ll "' Austro-German btaw fechtin' people, so be troops. Carefu' wi' them. Never fecht a It is officially bald iiion. fer ve canna catch German torpedo him bv th' hair." •:o:-— stated that a boat destroyer was sunk in the Baltic by a Russian submarines on January 2<)th near the Danish island of test War News Men. ... ,, A report gained currency in l-ebrtiarv 4th 101 s ., ., .. r ~ u. ; 0 :„ PICKED VP New York thai Great Britain I fighting has been renewhad declared cotton contraband fSoissons where Germans Of war. 1111 trying to force a pasthe Aisne. The French advantage in this region. capture of many prisoners. plso repulsed German atear Perthes and wind are prevent* A Roumanian deputy announced that Roiimania has decided to enter the war on the side of the Allies regardless of Italy's attitude. A resolution proposing to submit to the voters of New York State next Fall the privilege of amending the L'ohsti tut ion and leg ilizing w ui.ri to vote, passed the assembly unanimously today. It if expected to meet with opposition in the senate. There was a panic and riot in the Chicago win at pit this morning when wheat dropped nearly ten cents below yesterdays closing then re gained the loss, dropping to 13.J at the close. February 4th 10, 15. London. —(ier 1 nans a re attempt* ing 'he impossible in their eff irt 10 break through Russians hues 10 Warsaw, Russians are exceedingly Strong %  nd hold much better positions hut should i|-e Germain Riu'ceed in crushing the Rawka and Bzuia lines still another Iin** of entrenchment-. mUSI he forced before the I'oli-h Capital can he reached. lathe I'atpathian* ilia \uttro. Cieriiianare offering Vigorous re. sistance to the Russians ,md a decision has not yet been reached in a battle that has raged several days, Germans attempt \ torpedo a British hospital ship condemned. With comparative quiet on Western battle front fighting in the East which is more strenuous and widespread monopolises attention. Notwithstanding that the Russians are on offensive in East Prussia Northwestern Poland and the Carpathians Passes the Germans continue their attacks on the Russian lines along the Mzura and R; \va Rivers in an attempt to re icli Warsa w. Military men here believe that Germans are attempting the impossible. Petrograd 0facially announces to-day thai a Russian submarine sank a German torpedo boat in the Baltic Sea. There lias been another skirmish between British and Turkish scouts east of the Sue/ Canal near Ismalia the lurks were driven off with loss. The British had six men wounded. Washington: — Mexico City menaced by a famine in food. Carranza authorities places on cipher communications. Sofia:—Bulgaria stands for the strictest neutrality Macedonia fugitives are alone giving the government apprehension. New York:—Colorado fuel and Iron refused to deal with labour because the u n ions would farceobeyance of mining laws on toll commission investigating conditions in the mining districts of Colorado. Washington:—The immigration bill conies up today in house. Supporters will try and pass it over the presidents veto. Both sites are confident. Op. ponents of the bill claim it will fall short by twenty votes. Washington:—Co-operation between business and the government for the benefit of all the people is urged by President Wilson. Sassari, Italy: —Riots resulting from the agitation over the high price of DTI ad are assum ing a grave character and crowds today sacked store*. Chit.'igo:—The price of bread was increased to six cents o loaf here today by many more bakerii s. — :o: — The time for closing Foreign Mails pet S S. "Mexico" 11 a.m. Fridav Feby. 5th For Results Advertise in The Tribune



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1 intensive cultivation would increase, and the general fertility of the land would improve.' Mr. Mills then sketches the use of the hoot industry in continental countries, i vtdently inferring that similar results would attend its establishment in Great Nrit.nn: The French sug u-beet industry wasitscll cradled in war. Napoleon, when ihe cane-uK ir oi the British West Indies was excluded from the Continent of Europe, took advantage of the earl; scientific experiments in extracting sugai from the beet, built a large number of States sugar-factories, and devoted 130,000 acres to the cultivation of the root. The return of peace and of the supplies of cane, sugar interrupted the development of French Migar-growing; but the start had been made, mil France has derived immense profits from the industry, Austria has benefited even more. In January, 1831, Francis I issued and edict declaring the production of becl-sugar in Good Morning! We Are Introducing American Silk American Cashmere Amen..111 Cotton-Lisle HOSIERY They have stood the tea. Give real foot comfort. No seams to rip. Never i become loose or bacuy. The shape is knit in not pressed in. GUARANTEED for fineness style, superiority ol material and workmanship, tbsoluti U stainless. Will wear 6 months without holes, or new OlMi I:.1. OUR SPECIAL OFFER to every one sen.linn us *1 Pairs of our 71c. value Rill H tPa.irs of our 50c. value Aim 1 ican C mi re I losii 1 4 Paira of our 50c. Value. American Cotton-Lisle Hosiery b Pairs ol CKildren's Hosiery. or or or DONT l)KI..VY-Offcrexpiio!.v.liei. Austria free from the payment of llea Pr in ,„ lir ,,,..,,, tv is srU ctr ,|. all industrial taxes for ten years Tue iu T cDsisTinsisi from that cav.Ihatproclamation HE INTkrtMATIONAl evoked one fiuudri d factories as by the wa\e of,1 magic wand. Half a million inns of sugar-beet grown in the STIS first year. In thirty years the consumption of beeUsugar bad trebled, whila its production had, with the increased content ol the beet,risen still 111 ire rapidly. Between 1851 and i8gi the Austrian exports of beet-sugnr increased five-hundredfold, from a thousand tons to ha If a m:llion— a .' £ l 5 %  ,on from £ 1.5,000 to £7,500,000. There have been years since 1891 when 1 he'Austrian s<rums and 10 Gallon | j Cans. Pi ice one shilling per Gallon. Ml previous prii es cancelled. C. C. SAUNDERS I si Bay St. Nassau \. P. Jan. .51 li Mji 5. I N New 50 sallon Galvanized Iron Drums at t8ct per Gallon. In 10 gallon Cans at 2(X'ts per. Gallon. Drums and Cans returnable Pull particulars at Office "Frances K.," Nassau N. P. C. C. SAUNDERS Till'", well known Dairyman or the East THOMAS M. KNOWLES s now prepared to supply and deliver the purest milk to be obtained anywhere from his Dairy Farm on East Shirley Street', opposite Williams Street. ( Orders may be delivered at bis Store on East Bay St. No. 528, 'Phone No. 1 \i>. I lelivery at from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m., and from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. daily in Sanitary Bottles. Many germs make milk impure, In Knowles' milk no germs are found; Look at the bottles in which its sold, at Knowles who takes them all a round. Milk likeliisneedsnolartom eter, In verification of its strength, Liquor pnra nee impura Knowles would never go that length. Shingles Best No. i Heart sin. Cypres Shingles at £9.00 per thoussand of 20 bundles Discounts on lots of ovei 51XK) shingles. Special Price aK. 1 on cheaper grades—also jiij. Cypress at $6.72 per thousand of 20 bundles. This price made possible*by a very large purchase. Fresh stock arriving i very week. C. C SAUNDERS. WANTED C OPIES of "THE STROMBUB" August 1913 (Exhibition Number) Appl y "Tribune"Oiftee Johnson's Artistic Wood Finishes Johnson's Prepared Wax-a com plete finish and polish fi all furnituie Woodwork anil flours. Johnson's Wood Dye— for the art.stic coloring of all wo.ul, soft or hard Johnson's Under Lac -a spirit finish, vary much superior to shell." 01 varnish Johnson's Flo.1 Wood Finish for beautiful, artistic, haud-iublx-d effete without the expense of rnbnini.'. Johnson's Paste Wood Filler -for filling the Rrain and purei at wood, oreiparinti i< l"r the finish Johnson's Powdered Wax for bal room floors. FOR SALE BY Chas. E. Albury. For Results Advertise in The Tribui i



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J Nullivia e.ddictua |virre in verb*, mfegiatri. Balng bound to %  wen.r to tha Uogmo.a of no Ma-aler. m VOL. XII N*.ea.u. N.I*.. Bn.hfnn.vB. Thuraday. February 4. 1915 NO. 62 TO BELGIUM BY RICHARD LEQALLIENNE Our tears—our soups, our laurels— what are these To thee, in thy Gelhsemane of loss Stretched in thv unirnagined agonies On Hell's last engine of the Iron Cross For such a world as this that thou shouldst die Is price too vast—yet, Belgium, hadst thou sold Thyself, O then had lied from out the earth I lonour for ever, and left only Gold. Nor diest thou—for soon shalt thou awake, And, lifted high on our victorious shield's, Watch the new sunrise driving lor your jona The bated German shadow from your fields. PRESIDENT WILSON'S COURSE. To the Editor of I he Mail and Empire: Sir, —I notice that the President of tin' United States gives as a potential ra w S O D for observing what many be characterized is an "obscene neutrality" that the United >tates will he in 1 better position to intervene as totennsof peace. In oilier words, that his tender regard fur the pan derman element will qualify him as a fit arbitrator foi the nations that have expended their 'ife and treasure like water ir. this awful Struggle. It would seem that astronu warn* Ing should he given that, as the United St lies lias chosen to ignore its duties ana obligations voluntarily assumed lev ardsThe Hague agreement, Uncle Sam will not be peimitied to whitewash himself ai the close of the war by putting his long nose into what he now claims is none of Ins business. During his "watchful waiting" peiiod what does he expect lo see or hear '>r know? Me has watched innocent Belgium crucified. He has calmly waited while the sobs of tortured women and Children appealed to high heaven for justice, fie lias sit back while the red blooded mlions fouuht f'T the liberty of which the United States used to boast itself to be itie heaven-ap pointed pouinlkee|jer. His only protest, ye gods! thai his commerce was suffering. That the nations fighting for life will not allow c< ntraband to be sneaked into Germany. i'here are millions of Americans who are shanted, pained and disgusted with the watchful*wai'inn policy, but are h j I p I e s s. Col, Koosevelt strikes a human chord in Ins published views, and these will be remembered long after the schoo'master has gone back to his hooks. It denotes a decent impulse in a nation ihat would submit to an order that cadeis should not whistle lipperary." A step further and the order might have been to wear muzzles. The President is said to feel sad. It would be a more healthy sign if lie were said to feel mad. I listory will do all patties full and comoleto justice. V.HIIS, etc. II. M EAST. Toronto. I MI o BRITAIN AND THE BEET SUOAR INDUSTRY. Britain imports sugar to the value of over $120,000,000 every year, \bout 90 per cent. >>f this Comet from foreign countries, $85,000,000 of the cargo coming from Seimany and Austria. The danger of this dependence upon foreign coup tries for so important an article of food as sugar has long been urged bv those desirous of seeing the Empire's cane in-I dustty greatly extended. In the past few years another movement has commenced—that of founding a beet industry in the United Kingdom. Discussing the economic and practical side of this in the London Outlook, Mr. .1. Saxon Mills declares the suitability of the British climate and soil for the growth of the. beet Ins been established, and that if less attention had been given to the free import doctrine, Britian might now be producing beev sugar in such quantities as to supply the whole United Kingdom demand: If we bad had a little mote foresight and a littlelessaddiclion to the letter of the freimporting. doctrine, we might by tins lime be producing in this country ever) ounce of heei-'ug'ir we require— and tins to the wry gre it ad Vantage f our agricultural intere>t and oui IUIHI life .. I In* sonability id .air wnl and climate foi the culture "f ihe Migm.beei lias now been psttbiisbwl Iteynnd ah possible que.t!• MI. Expeiin entb in diffeient purls of the <• •re important, getting an industiy going which would ihsnrb a rapidly 1 nc raasing mt of labour when our soldiers r. %  to civil i feat ihe end of he war. The writer then proceeds to discing the wider ecu 10 n caspects of •he question, quoting the opinion of Earl of Denbigh, who has for veers been to the foiefmnt in Ins .. i-.icacv of the establishment of .1 British Dt > t industry : 'If we ourselves only grew one quarter of the ("30,000,0 10 worth ul sugar that we import, we should require over a hundred f.icio.icsol tie si/.e of the one recently con tempi ned atSleaford. Thousands of men would get em. pSoyment, mosl of them unskilled men who now find it had tn obtain work in the wintei 1'iilly £6,000,000 worth of plant alone would be erected, without counting the cost of buddings, Much money would be Spent on upkeep and renewalB.Meclianics, engineers, and lutes would be wanted m large numbers for .1" industry that would rapidly spread and which 10 d.-.v isnon-existent. Engineers would manufacture a highly specialised plant foi which in tins country there is no demand at present. Colliers ->^ *•>• would benefit, whilsl hundreds ol thousands of bags would be wanted for the sugar. Sugai refineries would once more look up aud much emplovinent would he provided in them. New methods of agriculture would be neceisary Continued on fourth Page) Wear Armbrister's Shoes I 1


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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02335
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Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Thursday, February 04, 1915
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
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General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Full Text
J
Nullivia e.ddictua |virre in verb*, mfegiatri.
Balng bound to wen.r to tha Uogmo.a of no Ma-aler.
m
VOL. XII
N*.ea.u. N.I*.. Bn.hfnn.vB. Thuraday. February 4. 1915
NO. 62
TO BELGIUM
BY RICHARD LEQALLIENNE
Our tearsour soups, our laurels what are these
To thee, in thy Gelhsemane of loss
Stretched in thv unirnagined agonies
On Hell's last engine of the Iron Cross !
For such a world as this that thou shouldst die
Is price too vastyet, Belgium, hadst thou sold
Thyself, O then had lied from out the earth
I lonour for ever, and left only Gold.
Nor diest thoufor soon shalt thou awake,
And, lifted high on our victorious shield's,
Watch the new sunrise driving lor your jona
The bated German shadow from your fields.
PRESIDENT WILSON'S
COURSE.
To the Editor of I he Mail and
Empire:
Sir, I notice that the President
of tin' United States gives as a
potential raw sod for observing
what many be characterized is an
"obscene neutrality" that the
United >tates will he in 1 better
position to intervene as totennsof
peace. In oilier words, that his
tender regard fur the pan derman
element will qualify him as a fit
arbitrator foi the nations that have
expended their 'ife and treasure
like water ir. this awful Struggle.
It would seem that astronu warn*
Ing should he given that, as the
United St lies lias chosen to ignore
its duties ana obligations volun-
tarily assumed lev ardsThe Hague
agreement, Uncle Sam will not be
peimitied to whitewash himself ai
the close of the war by putting his
long nose into what he now claims
is none of Ins business. During his
"watchful waiting" peiiod what
does he expect lo see or hear '>r
know? Me has watched innocent
Belgium crucified. He has calmly
waited while the sobs of tortured
women and Children appealed to
high heaven for justice, fie lias sit
back while the red blooded m-
lions fouuht f'T the liberty of
which the United States used to
boast itself to be itie heaven-ap
pointed pouinlkee|jer. His only
protest, ye gods! thai his commerce
was suffering. That the nations
fighting for life will not allow c< n-
traband to be sneaked into Ger-
many.
i'here are millions of Americans
who are shanted, pained and dis-
gusted with the watchful*wai'inn
policy, but are h j I p I e s s. Col,
Koosevelt strikes a human chord
in Ins published views, and these
will be remembered long after the
schoo'master has gone back to his
hooks. It denotes a decent impulse
in a nation ihat would submit to
an order that cadeis should not
whistle lipperary." A step further
and the order might have been to
wear muzzles. The President is
said to feel sad. It would be a
more healthy sign if lie were said to
feel mad. I listory will do all patties
full and comoleto justice.
V.hiis, etc.
II. M EAST.
Toronto. I mi o
BRITAIN AND THE BEET SUOAR
INDUSTRY.
Britain imports sugar to the
value of over $120,000,000 every
year, \bout 90 per cent. >>f this
Comet from foreign countries,
$85,000,000 of the cargo coming
from Seimany and Austria. The
danger of this dependence upon
foreign coup tries for so important
an article of food as sugar has
long been urged bv those desirous
of seeing the Empire's cane in-I
dustty greatly extended. In the
past few years another movement
has commencedthat of founding
a beet industry in the United
Kingdom. Discussing the economic
and practical side of this in the
London Outlook, Mr. .1. Saxon
Mills declares the suitability of
the British climate and soil for
the growth of the. beet Ins been
established, and that if less atten-
tion had been given to the free
import doctrine, Britian might now
be producing beev sugar in such
quantities as to supply the whole
United Kingdom demand:
If we bad had a little mote
foresight and a littlelessaddiclion
to the letter of the freimporting.
doctrine, we might by tins lime
be producing in this country ever)
ounce of heei-'ug'ir we require
and tins to the wry gre it ad
Vantage f our agricultural in-
tere>t and oui iuihI life .. I In* son-
ability id .air wnl and climate foi
the culture "f ihe Migm.beei lias
now been psttbiisbwl Iteynnd ah
possible que.t! mi. Expeiin entb in
diffeient purls of the < produced such excelleti' icsulis
1 hat the Iiii 11 d "I Agncultuie Iw*
officially admitted that the de.
uionstralion is now complete.
Nothing but a want of confidence,
due to the bounty system and the
refusal of any fiscal assistance 10
an infant industry, has stood in
the way of the sugar-growing en-
terprise in England. Happily oui
Government at last SWOke, even
before the war, to the importance
of this project from an economic
and defensive point of view. The
Excis has not been imposed upon,
the small quantity of sugar crown
in this cuntry which has thus en.
joyed the benefit of is. |od. dutv
per cwt. laid on the imported
article. A Substantial sum of money-
has been provided for the develop,
ment of the industry, whose pros-
pects are, therefore, beginning to
look much brighter. Progress, how.
ever, has been slow, hs capital is
not attracted to a new industry
very easily in this country. Now
is the Government's opportunity
to establish the industry on a linn
foundation and to ensure it steady
and continuous development dur-
ing the war and when the war is
over. A well-equipped factory for
extracting and refining beetsugai
costs about /", 100,000, and must
have a large area of land in its
neighbourhood available for the
production of the bee is. If the
Government would erect and
equip a feu such factories in
chosen tocalites, the farmers
would soon find itintheii interest
to introduce then-ultute into their
crop rotation. 1 am not Suggesting
that the industry should be carried
on definitely by the State. When
the factories were well started they
might be sold, peihaps when the
war is over, to companies willing
10 carry them on Meantime we
should be increasing to some ex-
the supplt id igar, and, what
is much m>re important, getting
an industiy going which would
ihsnrb a rapidly 1 nc raasing
mt of labour when our soldiers
r. ..... to civil i feat ihe end of
he war.
The writer then proceeds to dis-
cing the wider ecu 10 n caspects of
he question, quoting the opinion
of Earl of Denbigh, who has for
veers been to the foiefmnt in Ins
.. i-.icacv of the establishment of
.1 British Dt > t industry :
" 'If we ourselves only grew one
quarter of the ("30,000,0 10 worth
ul sugar that we import, we
should require over a hundred
f.icio.icsol tie si/.e of the one
recently con tempi ned atSleaford.
Thousands of men would get em.
pSoyment, mosl of them unskilled
men who now find it had tn ob-
tain work in the wintei 1'iilly
6,000,000 worth of plant alone
would be erected, without counting
the cost of buddings, Much money
would be Spent on upkeep and
renewalB.Meclianics, engineers, and
lutes would be wanted m large
numbers for .1" industry that
would rapidly spread and which
10 d.-.v is- non-existent. Engineers
would manufacture a highly
specialised plant foi which in tins
country there is no demand at
present. Colliers ->^ *>
would benefit, whilsl hundreds ol
thousands of bags would be wanted
for the sugar. Sugai refineries
would once more look up aud
much emplovinent would he pro-
vided in them. New methods of
agriculture would be neceisary
Continued on fourth Page)
Wear
Armbrister's Shoes
I1


L. GILBERT DUPDCH.
Editor and Proprietor.
PHONE 2U0.
P. O. BOX io:t.
% PUBLISHED OA1I.Y
missariat department lias work-
ed with the precision of clock
~---------- work throughout the war, and
OFFICE. that the British army in France
Comer Shirley Ch.rIolt. St.. | and pjanders js )e best fed
army that ever took the field.
Here is the daily ration of the
soldier in the trenches.
i J lb. Fresh meat, (no bone)
ii Bread.
4 ozs. Bacon.
3 Cheese.
4 .. Jam-
3 Sugar.
J lb. Vegetables,
a oz. Tea, Coffee or Cocca.
2 Tobacco per week.
The very thought of having
to eat all that every day, gives
us the indigestion, but probably
the Man at the front, gets
i through it quite comfortably.
1'or the ration is scientifically
calculated. If a man lies in bed,
and undergoes no physical, or
mental exertions, lie requires
2,000 "Calories" (heat giving
unitsj to keep him alive. If, on
the other hand, he walks, sav.
20 miles a day, he needs 4,500
"calorics." The above ration
Monday, Wednesday and Friday
single copy ......... id
Tuesday, and Thursdaysinfile copy id
Saturdaysingle c< pv ... ijd
Weekly ............ 5''
Monthly ............is. 6d
Huartarly........ .. 4s- D<|
alfYearly............as.
Yearly ............18s.
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
Advertising Rates :Six pence per line
for first insertion: three |>ence per line
for second insertion : and one penny |>er
line for subsquent insertions.
Advertisement* under eiuht line-. 4s.
Zbc tribune
THURSDAY. Ja.nue.ry 4.19li.
** PUBLISHED AT S 30 P. M
"Who wouldn't sell his farm,
and be a soldier, was quite a
catchy Music Hall tilt in the Irepresents 5,000 "calorics," 1
years of the American Civil
War, and the Commissariat de-
partment had little to recom-
mend it to any but those who
counted the cause upon which
they had embarked the only
thing worth fighting for, so that
it was not for love of the inner
man that the outer man \\ 1
ready to volunteer for the fronl
"A'
that the British soldier has
enough and to spare. It is worth
noting that, there is nearly twice
as mm h heal and prodm
ing p >v\ er in 1 h< 1 -' as in beef-
steak, so that the 3 oz. Cheese is
a 1 v important Mem in thtisol-
diers daily rations Contrast this
with the scant) hoe of thousands
ol ihii t.1111 j 1is.' and could they
way down South in Dixie.' havi I e en what is now hap-
And when "Marching through penjng, we doubt if many would
have been found t >'lav on their
native scrub. Our proletariat
and agricultural class are great
-Georgia" mam of the Boys in
blue had to take up their belts
a hole or two to the right as the
gnawings of nature became
more insistent.
In the Crimean War, the
French were far ahead of the
British in the matter of feeding.
eaters, and food therefore is an
immense consideration, and
when it is conspicious by its
absence from the festal board,
providence smiles upon them
and the smoke arising from their I with a blessed compensation-
Camp.fires and the steam and they can go without up to a
appetising smell of the Potent feu' certain limit, and the pangs of
titilated the nostrils of our men I positive hunger are rarely felt,
to the verge of distraction, and It will be remarked that spirt-
when a kindly "Zou" invited a! tuous or malt liquors are not in
"Bono Johnny" to step across, Tommie's Menu, a grateful
wasn't it a red letter day for country treats him well in what
him ? The French soldier "snip-
ed" Crimean hares by the ton.
John Bull has learnt some-
thing taught in the school of
adversity, and to day sees him responsible for the best that is
feeding his men after a fashion) in him, that these doubtful
not approached within 1000 luxuries are not necessary for
yards bv any other of the entire him, ami to their opinion can be
iist of combatants. ; added that of their leaders.
The British Army and Navy j The "daily bread" of the "Man
arc well fed, and all observers atihe front" is a prominet fac-
are agreed that the British com- tor in the result, that the battle
is necessary, but it doesn't run
to a "qn.itc in of gin," a "tot of
rum," or, "a pint of bitter."
Medical science has told those
will be to the strong, notwith-
standing the ipse dixit of the
Wise Man. Every item of his
solid diet contains the elements
for imparting physical strength
and staying power, and it would
seem that, throughout this long
and terrible campaign, Tom-
mie is going to have it And
right here will be one of the
secrets of success. The daily
rations of our French allies are
wc believe of the like quality,
the Russian perhaps not quite so,
but it is as sure as fate that our
foes are in this respect in a sad
plight now, and to be in a worse,
later. From the humane point
of vie" our sympathies go out
to those unfortunates who have
been compelled by their rulersto
engage in this unholy struggle
for supremacy, but at the same
time, we can but rejoice that
the present conditions as to
feeding their army are such to
point to the means by which the
termination of the war will be
accomplished and the foe "lie
hoist with his own petard."
There are several injunctions
commanded in the Pauline
writings but we do not think
that their author himself would
enforce the particular one bear
ing on thi1 pointfeeding one's
enemy, We know that lie was
strong in the defence of his
rights, and would not yield one
inch to the exactions of Roman
tyranny. It seem* as if there
is a tension being applied by
German Public Opinion to the
policy of its rulers, but whether
it will develop into more than
a growl is yet on the Knees of the
gods. What was inaugurated by
the- French people from 1771") to
1789 may be remembered by
German Socialists, and un-
questionably be un grand coup.
The eyes of the world are look-
ing for it, the hands of stricken
l'.urope are stretching out to the
harbinger of I'cace.
The Police Band will be 011
the Library Green atS.tj this
evening, and enliven the public
with the following selections:
PROGRAMME.
March "The Whfp"
2. Valse "Song D'Autnmnie"
3. Spanish Serenade "Yo te
A mo"
4. Selection 'Love and
Laughter"
5. Indian Romance "Hobo-
rnoko"
6. Valse "Septembre"
7. Two Step "Sombody's
Coming"
God Save the King. l
\V. COEN.
flLidmaster.
.0:
TO BEES
We would remind our readers
of the Garden Fete in aid of
the Funds of Christ Church
Cathedral, in Addiugton House
Grounds this afternoon.
SO!
The Bahamas Racing and
I' do Association will maugu
rate the opening of "Track Dun-
more' to morrow, at 2 p.m. with
Five races as follows:
First Race|ths Mile.
1st Prise 50s and Prize 20s.
Owner Horse
Claridge Flash
I.mm Vane
Cash King George
North
E. V. Soloman Black Joe
Second Class Ra< I.
1st Prize 60s. and Prize 25s,
Toote I lilt
Wecch Bob!
J. W. Green Colonial.
First Class Race
1st Prize 100s 2nd Prize 50s.
North Kanaka.
Degregor Jack Johhson
Sands (ii orge.
B. R. P. Association
Colonial Cups,
Owntr Ho M Jockey
Chipman Ma) French
Davenport Rajah Davenport
Kelly Kelly
Solomon George Solomon
Donkey Race.
1st Prize 20s. 2nd Prize 10s.
Johnson Minna.
Harding Lincoln.
Bartlett Mary
Brown Pepper.
Pate Jane.
War Notes
It mustnot be imagined that
a daylight charge is made to the
accompaniment of frantic yell-
ing and cheering. Not at all
Most of us reserve our breath.
The favourite cry of the other is,
"This way for the early doors,,'
or "Front leal sixpence extra."
No "Down with the Kaiser" or
"Hurrahs!" Several quite amus-
ing things happen even in a
bayonet charge. I saw one man,
an untameabie wag. get a Ger-
man bayonet through the leg.
Having "stuck" the man who
did it, he addressed him, "Say.
mite, wh're's your manners?
Ain't this your bayonet in my
foot? Kindly remove it." Another


u
II
incident occurred not quite so
humorous. ()ne man wlm tmder-
stauds Gjpjrman came up to inc.
"Had a rotteryjo^ just now,*' lie
said; "fgot mfjriaii in the dust
iuul he started t.) holloa about
his wife and kids." "What did
; you do?" I said. "Do?" lie re-
turned, laconically, spitting out
a wad of tobacco. "Oh, 1 just
fremembered my wife and chil-
dren, and gave him another for
luck"
An officer in the East Lenca>
hire I erritorials, now in Egypt, I
fwrititig home, offers one or two '
i lasons vs h\ the Turks are like- j
ly to fall in invading Egypt."It j
Is apparently not realised in i
England, where scares are:
numerous on Egyptian affairs." J
jie writes, "what difficulties the I
(] icstion of transport causes to j
Sny invader of Egypt. If he
Comes from Suez he ha, too
miles of desert to cross Napo-
leon tried that in 1805 with
f.000 men and 23 little guns,
Ind almost >st his army in do-
ing it. I le buiit a special road,
I'lll existing in places. Ismail
I'asha in the thirties tried the
lame dodge from the Libyan
desen sj(|e wj(|, camel, and it
didn't come off Even if they can
arrange for food and water, I
don't see the Turks doing any-
thing. H'--ides, even if they do,
I don't think the natives would
rise.They have too much respect
foi the comfort the) have en-
fcyed under the British rule."
At a time when the Scots had
considerably less love for their
Southern neighbours that
these davs a
GbmbbAL Post Oh-ick,
Nassau Bahamas.
30th Januai v, [91 5.
SCHEDULE of sailings >. S.
"Miami" and the time for
closing mails during the month
of February, 1915.
To all other Postal Union
Countries two pence halfpenny
for the lirst ounce and one pen-
ny halfpenny for every suc-
ceeding ounce.
Book rate of postage is a half-
penny for every two ounces.
Date of
Sailing.
Febv.
4
G
9
11
L3
16
18
20
23
'AS
27
Name of
Steamer.
Destination.
I lour of
closing
Mail at
G. P. O.
M in 1111
Miami
;
Parcels mails for the United
States will be made up and
closed as follows :
Wednesday 3rd at noon.
' loth
17th
24II1
The letter rate of postage to
the tinted Kingdom, Egypt and
British Colonies is one penny
(id.) per ounce.
To the United States of
America id. per 2 ounces.
4.en p.m.
5 3" l'">-
7.30 p.m.
12 noon
1.30 p.m.
2.30 p.m.
4.00 p.m.
5.30 p.m.
6.30 p.m.
11.00 a.m.
12.30 p.m.
1.30 p m.
Postage on correspondence
posted on board the S. S. Miami
while the ship is at Nassau or
on the high seas must be prepaid
with the postage stamps of the
Bahamas.
II posted on hoard the steam-
er at Miami prepayment of
postage' must be effected !>\
means of postage Stamps of the
United Smtesi>f \merica.
CHARLES O. ANDERSON,
I *i is' mastei
ing active operations iii Alsace
but the French maintain and
are fortifying positions taken
near Ammertzwellcr.
The German war office claim
that there are no developments
on the western battle front but
father, "talin'g states that French attacks near
leave of his son, said:'"Sa..dv, Perthes were repulsed. Quiet
ma bairn, ve're about tae gam; I"
evails in East Prussia.
up tae London. Tak' a' th' siller Ull^,il" lmo|hava won two
ye can frae the English-tak' important new baises in the
everything ye can frae them. Carpathians inflicting heavy
Pm mind ye. Sandy, they're a losses on ll"' Austro-German
btaw fechtin' people, so be troops.
Carefu' wi' them. Never fecht a It is officially
bald iiion. fer ve canna catch German torpedo
him bv th' hair."
:o:-
stated that a
boat destroyer
was sunk in the Baltic by a
Russian submarines on January
, 2<)th near the Danish island of
test War News Men.
... ,, A report gained currency in
l-ebrtiarv 4th 101 s ., ., .. r~ u.;,0:
picked vp New York thai Great Britain
I fighting has been renew- had declared cotton contraband
fSoissons where Germans Of war.
1111 trying to force a pas-
the Aisne. The French
advantage in this region.
capture of many prisoners.
plso repulsed German at-
ear Perthes-
and wind are prevent*
A Roumanian deputy an-
nounced that Roiimania has de-
cided to enter the war on the
side of the Allies regardless of
Italy's attitude.
A resolution proposing to
submit to the voters of New
York State next Fall the privi-
lege of amending the L'ohsti
tut ion and leg ilizing w ui.ri to
vote, passed the assembly unan-
imously today. It if expected to
meet with opposition in the sen-
ate.
There was a panic and riot
in the Chicago win at pit this
morning when wheat dropped
nearly ten cents below yester-
days closing then re gained the
loss, dropping to 13.J at the
close.
February 4th 10,15.
London. (ier 1 nans a re attempt*
ing 'he impossible in their eff irt
10 break through Russians hues 10
Warsaw,
Russians are exceedingly Strong
nd hold much better positions hut
should i|-e Germain Riu'ceed in
crushing the Rawka and Bzuia
lines still another Iin** of entrench-
ment-. mUSI he forced before the
I'oli-h Capital can he reached.
lathe I'atpathian* ilia \uttro.
Cieriiian- are offering Vigorous re.
sistance to the Russians ,md a de-
cision has not yet been reached in
a battle that has raged several
days,
Germans attempt \ torpedo a
British hospital ship condemned.
With comparative quiet on
Western battle front fighting in
the East which is more strenuous
and widespread monopolises at-
tention.
Notwithstanding that the Rus-
sians are on offensive in East
Prussia Northwestern Poland and
the Carpathians Passes the Ger-
mans continue their attacks on the
Russian lines along the Mzura and
R; \va Rivers in an attempt to
re icli Warsa w.
Military men here believe that
Germans are attempting the im-
possible. Petrograd 0facially an-
nounces to-day thai a Russian
submarine sank a German tor-
pedo boat in the Baltic Sea.
There lias been another skirm-
ish between British and Turkish
scouts east of the Sue/ Canal
near Ismalia the lurks were
driven off with loss.
The British had six men
wounded.
Washington: Mexico City
menaced by a famine in food.
Carranza authorities places on
cipher communications.
Sofia:Bulgaria stands for
the strictest neutrality Mace-
donia fugitives are alone giv-
ing the government apprehen-
sion.
New York:Colorado fuel
and Iron refused to deal with
labour because the u n ions
would farceobeyance of mining
laws on toll commission inves-
tigating conditions in the min-
ing districts of Colorado.
Washington:The immigra-
tion bill conies up today in
house. Supporters will try and
pass it over the presidents veto.
Both sites are confident. Op.
ponents of the bill claim it will
fall short by twenty votes.
Washington:Co-operation
between business and the gov-
ernment for the benefit of all
the people is urged by Presi-
dent Wilson.
Sassari, Italy: Riots result-
ing from the agitation over the
high price of DTI ad are assum
ing a grave character and
crowds today sacked store*.
Chit.'igo:The price of bread
was increased to six cents o loaf
here today by many more
bakerii s.
:o:
The time for closing Foreign
Mails pet S S. "Mexico" 11 a.m.
Fridav Feby. 5th
For Results
Advertise in
The Tribune


1
intensive cultivation would in-
crease, and the general fertility of
the land would improve.' "
Mr. Mills then sketches the use
of the hoot industry in continental
countries, i vtdently inferring that
similar results would attend its
establishment in Great Nrit.nn:
The French sug u-beet industry
wasitscll cradled in war. Napoleon,
when ihe cane-uK ir oi the British
West Indies was excluded from
the Continent of Europe, took
advantage of the earl; scientific
experiments in extracting sugai
from the beet, built a large num-
ber of States sugar-factories, and
devoted 130,000 acres to the cul-
tivation of the root. The return of
peace and of the supplies of cane,
sugar interrupted the development
of French Migar-growing; but the
start had been made, mil France
has derived immense profits from
the industry, Austria has benefited
even more. In January, 1831,
Francis I issued and edict declaring
the production of becl-sugar in
Good Morning!
We Are Introducing
American Silk
American Cashmere
Amen..111 Cotton-Lisle
HOSIERY
They have stood the tea. Give real
foot comfort. No seams to rip. Never i
become loose or bacuy. The shape is
knit in not pressed in.
GUARANTEED for fineness style,
superiority ol material and workmanship,
tbsoluti U stainless. Will wear 6 months
without holes, or new OlMi I:.1.
OUR SPECIAL OFFER
to every one sen.linn us *1 at postal note, t.. covei advertising and
shipping charges, we will send post paid,
with written guarantee, hacked by a five
million dollar Com| any, either
> Pairs of our 71c. value
Rill H
tPa.irs of our 50c. value
Aim 1 ican C mi re I losii 1 .
4 Paira of our 50c. Value.
American Cotton-Lisle Hosiery
b Pairs ol CKildren's Hosiery.
or
or
or
. DONT l)KI..VY-Offcrexpiio!.v.liei.
Austria free from the payment of llea,Pr in ,lir ,,,..,,,tv is srU.ctr,|.
all industrial taxes for ten years Tue iuTcDsisTinsisi
from that cav.- Ihatproclamation "HE INTkrtMATIONAl
evoked one fiuudri d factories as by
the wa\e of,1 magic wand. Half
a million inns of sugar-beet
grown in the stis first year. In
thirty years the consumption of
beeUsugar bad trebled, whila its
production had, with the increased
content ol the beet,risen still 111 ire
rapidly. Between 1851 and i8gi
the Austrian exports of beet-sugnr
increased five-hundredfold, from
a thousand tons to ha If a m:llion
a.' l5 ,on. from 1.5,000 to
7,500,000. There have been years
since 1891 when 1 he'Austrian s< of beet-sugar beyond the from
have been as much as ten millions
sterling.
"Canadia West India Magazine"
HOISERY CO.
P. O. Box 224
DAYTON. OHIO, U. S. A
For Hire
AUTOMOBILES
AND
BICYCLES
APPLY TO
J. P. SIMMS
47 MARKET STREET
NASSAU N. P.
A
FOR
LOT OK
SALE
LAND (formerly
2 lots) with a dwelling
house, outbuildings, and well. etc.
situate betsveen Muket St. and
East St. South.
Apply to
SARAH MNF. ALRU.RY.
..r KENNETH SOLOMON.
CHAS. C. LIQHTBOLRN
ARMSTRONG ST.
How kin's Hill.
EX P E R C N C E 1) Paper
ll.mger. Ceiling Work,
a specialty. Al! work careful-
ly ami Artistically performed.
A I.solid c satisfaction guaran
teed. The very best references.
-Terms moderate.
Kerosene
1502
THE TIGER
is one
of the most destructive of
a source of much danger
animalsound
to life.
is
SUNLIGHT SOAP
preserves and lengthens the life of your clothes, but
it is a source of destruction to all dirt and unclean-
liness. The amount of destruction wrought by a tiger
in a single night, cannot
be compared to the amount
of destruction wrought by
inferior soap in a single
wash-day. Sunlight Soap
is an absolutely pure Soap,
that saves your clothes,

#:^1
time, money,
TRY
and labour.
IT.
MM
NOTICE
GASOLINE
IN' I >rums and 10 Gallon | j
Cans. Pi ice one shilling
per Gallon. Ml previous
prii es cancelled.
C. C. SAUNDERS
I si Bay St.
Nassau \. P.
Jan. .51 li Mji 5.
IN New 50 sallon Galvaniz-
ed Iron Drums at t8ct
per Gallon.
In 10 gallon Cans at 2(X'ts
per. Gallon.
Drums and Cans returnable
Pull particulars at Office
"Frances K.," Nassau N. P.
C. C. SAUNDERS
Till'", well known
Dairyman or the
East
THOMAS M. KNOWLES
s now prepared to supply
and deliver the purest milk
to be obtained anywhere
from his Dairy Farm on East
Shirley Street', opposite Wil-
liams Street. ( Orders may be
delivered at bis Store on East
Bay St. No. 528, 'Phone No.
1 \i>. I lelivery at from 7 a.m.
to 10 a.m., and from 3 p.m.
to 5 p.m. daily in Sanitary
Bottles.
Many germs make milk im-
pure,
In Knowles' milk no germs
are found;
Look at the bottles in which
its sold, at
Knowles who takes them all
a round.
Milk likeliisneedsnolartom
eter,
In verification of its strength,
Liquor pnra nee impura
Knowles would never go
that length.
Shingles
Best No. i Heart sin. Cypres
Shingles at 9.00 per thous-
sand of 20 bundles
Discounts on lots of ovei
51XK) shingles.
Special Price
aK. 1 on cheaper gradesalso
jiij. Cypress at $6.72 per
thousand of 20 bundles. This
price made possible*by a very
large purchase.
Fresh stock arriving i very
week.
C. C SAUNDERS.
WANTED
COPIES of "THE STROM-
BUB"August 1913 (Exhi-
bition Number)
Appl y
"Tribune"Oiftee
Johnson's
Artistic Wood
Finishes
Johnson's Prepared Wax-a com
plete finish and polish fi all furnituie
Woodwork anil flours.
Johnson's Wood Dyefor the art.stic
coloring of all wo.ul, soft or hard
Johnson's Under Lac-a spirit
finish, vary much superior to shell." 01
varnish '
Johnson's Flo.1 Wood Finish for
beautiful, artistic, haud-iublx-d effete
without the expense of rnbnini.'.
Johnson's Paste Wood Filler-for
filling the Rrain and purei at wood,
oreiparinti i< l"r the finish
Johnson's Powdered Wax for bal
room floors.
FOR SALE BY
Chas. E. Albury.
For Results
Advertise in
The Tribui
i


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