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u L. GILBERT DUPUCH, Editor and Proprietor. OFFICE: Corner Shirley & Charlotte Sla Nassau, N. P., Bahamas TrtONK 2(10. P. O. BOX 163. PUBLISHED DAILY Monday, Wednesday and Fridayid SMgle c 'i v Tuesday, and Thursday—single copy td Saturday—single copy Weekly Monthly Quarterly ... HalfYearly Yearly ijd Vl ... !S. fid ... 4s. 6d ...


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vistula^.ths Germans were dislodgedfrom captured trenches, losing ue? r ly two entire ram panys, aldiSprisoners and quick* firing puns. Fighting in Hie Carpathians continues. (Signed) HARCOURT. CALLED DOCTORS "ENGLISH SWINE" Germans Escorted Them to ihe Frontier and Kicked Them Out NO FOOD FOR. roUR DAVS Hald Captive Five Month* With Insufficient Food Flushing, Holland)fan. 13 — "They simply escorted us to the frontier and kicked us out," w.is the casual way in which live British army doctors, who have enjoyed the hospitality of the Kaiser for the past live months, described their release from captivity in Germany to a Daily Chronicle representative. The five officers are Captain C. T. Edmunds, of the Royal Army Medical Corps, attached to the Royal Scots Fusiliers; Captain s. B. Hamilton, R.A.M.C., of the Seventh Field Ambulance Corps; Lieut.S.Danks, R..VM.C, of the Fourteenth Ambulance Corps, and l>r. L .[. Austin, and Dr. A. R. Elliott, Of the First Belgian unit of the the British Red Cross Society. They reached Flushrng,lfttv Monday, having been released from Magdeburg, Prussian Saxony, on Sunday. The two first-named were left behind, attending to British wounded, when they retired from Monson August 33. Captain Edmunds was himself struck in the shoulder by a piece of shrapnel and lay on the field the whole of the night of the 23rd. The next morning he was taken prisoner. Captain Hamiliton told an interesting narrative of his adventures from the time he fell into the hands of his captors. "For about a fortnight ofter being taken prisoner," he said, "I was engaged in attending wounded British and Belgians, and afterwards Germans. When my work was done I fully expected to be sent back to the British lines, never thinking that the Germans would keep British army doctors as prisoners of war. "This expectation was not legalized, for without warning we were told to lake out places in the train together with Othei doctors, and then began our journey into Captivity. Nothing (or "English Swii.e" "Wc occupied four days in reaching Torgau, where we were first interned," said the captain, "and for three or Tour days we had nothing to cat or drink. At several stations were people supplying German troops on their way to the front with food and coffee. I asked for water and food, hut the only reply I ever received was that there was nothing for 'English swine!' The crowds were hostile, and often men came up to our carriage and pushed the muzzles of their revolvers into our faces. One excitable old woman struck me across the head with her umbrella The four days' journey to Torgau, which under ordinary conditions ocupies about 12 hours, was made by these British doctors chiefly in the luxurious aocomodations ol a ratt!.truck. At Torgau they found themselves in the conpany of two hundred British and eight hundred French officers. There they remained for about three months, having a very dull time. Forced to get up at eight o'clock each morning, they spent the whole day in idleness, for nothing was provided for them to do. Their food consisted chiefly of sausages and pork, black bread and margarines, but even of that there was only a limited supply. "At first," remarked Captain Hamilton, "one hundred marks (?3.5) a month was allowed to us for the purpose of buying anything we required, but after that the sum was reduced to 12 cents a day." It was at Torgau that Captain Hamilton and Captain Edmunds made the acquaintance of the other three doctors, and the five of them afterward, in their wanderings thrpugh Germany always made a point of being together, for they formed a card party, and, as one of them remarked, had played bridge every night since their first meeting. Paraded e.nd Searched After three months confinement at Torgau, the party were removed to Burg, hut their stay at that fortress was not of long Jufatlon, and at the pud of in other week, on December jth, they found Ull •"• '' ' !l M-'jidc burg, where for the last month of then captivity wagon room No. q became their temporary abode, and all Were unanimous that It was not a very comfort* able one. There they were treat ed like school children, and on one or two occasions paraded and searched. All rings (other than wedding rings), gold watches and chains and other jewelry were taken from them. The explanation given for this action being that they might use such articles for purpose of bribery. Captain Hamilton had one word of praise for his captors, in that all moneys received from home for the officers were paid over to them. It was last Friday when the first intimation was made to the doctors, who numbered ten, thai some were to be released. On that day the commandant paraded them and stated that half their number were to be sent bade to England, He stipulated that two 'd the five to be relea* ed were, according to Special instructions from Berlin, to be the two Red Cross doctors. Austin and Elliott. The question then arose as to who were to be the other three. After a discussion, Captain Hamilton, as the only married officer, got the third place. The commandant himself settled the question of the two final places. Taking seven matches, he broke two off short, and held the matches Out, the seven doctors each drawing one. The lucky ones in the draw proved to be Captain Edmunds and Liflut. Danks, both of whom avowed their determination to have those fateful bits of wood goldmounted, to be ever cherished as souvenirs of their adventure. Were Tried as Spies Doctors Austin and Elliott were taken prisoners in South Belgium, and almost immediately were tried as spies. After they escaped shooting they were sent to Cologne, where they had a very uncomfortable time. "I was only prevented from falling into the hands of a furious crowd in that city through the protection of mounted police," said Dr. Austin. "Dr. I Elliott and myself suffered fifteen days' solitary confinement, not even being allowed a book torcnd.Then came a series of re* trials on th' charge, ofespiooage but 1 n in medicine surgery gave luffleitn! proof that wc were both doctors, and were anally sent to Torgau. 1 Lieut, Dank, who was taken prisoner on September 9 at Soissons, related a stovy which he dctscribedwith a smile as be^ng somewhat personal."After hems captured, 1 was kept by 'hedcrmannjattending" their wounded, he said and "and during that time I was repeatedly being told I was liable to be shot, Things came to a head, however, one day as I was riding out on a gun carriage to the German lines. A little private who had of t e n spoke of my b e i n v c liable to be shot came up and whispered in mv ear: "If I get a chance of loosing off my rifle to-day, I'll reserve my first bullet for you. I kept my eye on him the whole of that day, and apparently he must have missed his opportunity." —• %  For Hire AUTOMOBILES AND BICYCLES APPLY TO J. P.SIrvlMS 47 MARKET STRERT NASSAU N. P. CHAS. C. LIGHTBObRN\ • ARMSTRONG ST. Hcwkin's Hill. E XPERIENCED Papcrj Hanger. Ceiling Work, a specialty. Al! work carcful-f ly and Artistically performed | Absolute satisfaction guaran teed. The very best references^ -TERMS! MODERATE. Cosmopolitan HIGH SCHOOL Opens on Monday, Oct. 5 th in Aurora Hall on Chariotfe Street. For particulars apply U Prof. G. G. Coffin, head mas ter, or Mr. J. P. Simms.



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IT IN RE SUNDRIES "LONDON STAR" BREAD FAMINE GROW8 IN GERMAN CITIES. Government may prohibit nil Baking in Private House* Paris, Jan. 13.—The bread famine in Germany appears to borrowing in intensity, according to reports reaching here.The burgomaster of Dortmund, in Westphalia, declared at a meeting cf the city officials: "Extreme economy in the consumption of bread, and particularly the limitation to what is only strictly necessary, as regards both bread and all other bakery wares, is the condition of German victory." The Cologne Gazette, commenting on the situation, calls on the military authorities to forbid the manufacture of all bread except for war purposes. The Copenhagen correspondent of the Temps says the prohibition on night work by Berlin bakers has proved to have no effect, as the housewives are buying enormous stocks of flour and are baking bread themselves He says the Government is therefore, about to prohibit baking in private houses. For Sale A VICTOR Phono %  %  graph in good condition, with 47 Records. For further particulars, Apply TRIBUNE OFFICE. GASOLINE TN Drums and 10 Gallon Cans. Price one shilling per Gallon. All previous prices cancelled. C. C. SAUNDERS East Bay St. Nassau N. P. Jan. 5th 1915. WANTED C OPIES of "THE STROM Wry* August 1913 (Exhibition Number) Apply "Tribunc'Officc REMOVAL The Printing Establishment of the "Tribune" has this day been removed to Nos. 25 and 27 Shirley Street, and North-east Corner of Charlotte Si net. 26th Jan. 191 5Good Morning! We Are Introducing American Silk American Cashmere American Cotton-Lisle HOSIERY They have ftood the test. Give real foot comfort. No seams to rip. Never become loose or baggy* The shape is knit in-not pressed in. GUARANTEED for fineness, style, superiority of material and workmanship. Absolutely stainless. Will wear 6 months withoat holes, or new ones free. OUR. SPECIAL OFFER to every one tending us f 1.00 in currency or postal note, to cover advertising and shipping charges, we will send post paid, with written guarantee, backed by a five million dollar companv, either % Pe-lrs of our 15c. vluo \mencan Silk Hosiery, or IPrvlrs of our 50c. vaJue .American Cashmere Hosiery, or 4 P -v iri of our 50c. Value, American Cotton-Lisle Hosiery or 6 Pairs of Children's Hosiery. PONT DELAY—Oflet cxpireswhen dealer in your locality fselected. THE INTERNATIONAL HOISERY CO. P. O. Box 224 DAYTON. OHIO. U. S. A MAofe NHfflir IB.VQI BEST RETAIL TRADE %  i . <** H HM Of mi Ms^a | ( f Sanitary /V* IVM' s ia Cool fl^ U Win. JU Hilton, Reliable U Be 260 k y St. Fruit of the Loom 36 in. at 7J per yard. NOTICE THE well known Dairyman of the East THOMAS M. KNOWLES Is now prepared to supply and deliver the purest milk to be obtained anywhere from his Dairy Farm on East Shirley Street, opposite Williams Street. Orders maybe delivered at his Store on East Bay St. No. 528, 'Phone No. 116. Delivery at from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m., and from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. daily in Sanitary Dottles. Many germs make milk impure, In Knowles* milk no germs arc found; Look at the bottles in which its sold, at Knowles who takes them all around. Milk like his needs no lactom eter, In verification of its strength, Liquor pura nee impura Knowles would never go that length. Johnson's Artistic Wood Finishes Johnson's Prepared Wax—a com plete finish and polish for all furniture woodwork and floors. Johnson's Wood Dye—for the artistic coloring of all wood, soft or hard Johnson's Under Lac—a spirit finish, very much superior to shellac or varnish Johnson's Fle.t Wood Finish—for a beautiful, artistic, hand-rubbed effetr without the expense of rubbing. Johnson's HastWood Filler—for filling the grain and pores of wood, preparing it for the finish. Johnson's Powdered Wax—for bal room floors. FOR. SALE BY Chas. E. Albury Shingles Best No. 1 Heart 5in. Cypress Shingles at $g.6^)er thoua-1 sand of 20 bundles Discounts on lots of over 5000 shingles. Special Price also on cheaper grades—als< 5in. Cypress at $6.72 per thousand of 20 bundles. This price made possible by a verj large purchase. Fresh stock arriving every/ week. C. C SAUNDERS. MISS LOUISE CADOGAN C ERTIFICATED NURSE from Bahamas General Hospital. Can furnish testimonials. 101 Shirley Street Kerosene 1502 I N New 50 gallon Galvanized Iron Drums at iScts per Gallon. In 10 gallon Cans at 2octs per. Gallon. Drums and Cans returnable Full particulars at Office "Frances E.," Nassau N. P. C. C. SAUNDERS FOR SALE I A LOT OF LAND (formerl 2 lots) with a dwellinl house, outbuildings, and well. eU situate between Market St. ani'. East St. South. Apply to SARAH JANE ALBURY, or KENNETH SOLOMON. Mapes Fertilizer! / now carry in stock t following formulas: Pineapple.— It has been pro en that this has noequi and a visit to fields usin same will convince you Vegetable.— Now is the tim to use this and increase your yield in Tomatoes, Potatoes, Onions and all other vegetables by 100 per cent. Orange Tree.— To assist the growth of Young Citrus Tree. Fruit and Wine. — Increase the yield and growth of old Citrus trees. For further information and books on the use of these Fertilizers, please apply to WALTER K. MOORE Agent for Mapes Fertiliser in the RakattUU, LOOK : The following Blank form* may be had at "TheTribune'' Office. Duty Entry. Free Entry. Warehouse Entries. Sponging Articles. Ship's Reports. In quantities at Special Rates



PAGE 1

4 Nulliue ivddUtiia lurere In verb* mfeglatrl. Being bound to awae.r to the UoimM oi no Mil§r. VOL XII Nkutu, N. P.. Bhe.m*.a. Tuaedev. Febr.ia. ty 2. 191 NO. feO THE MOTHER JOB. It really isn't haid to be a mother, There really isn't very much to do; The days are just exactly like each other— You simply shut your eyes and wander through! For 6 o'clock is time enough for rising, And getting all the children washed and dressed, And breakfast cooked—it really is surprising, Rut mothers never seem to need a rest! Tlio lunches must be packed and jackets rounded, And everybody soothed and sent to school. To say that mother rushes, is unfounded— She's nothing more to manage as a rule, Unless it is to finish piles ofsewing, And cook and wash and iron and scrub and sweep, To order food and keep the furnace going— And then perhaps to hide herself and weep And when at last she's tucked them under covers, And seen to doors that Dad's forgot to lock, Triumphantly, at midnight, she discovers, She's nothing more to do till 6 o'clock! JANE BURR. KEPT ON GO' AS R.EST CURE Nerveue Woman, Who Sought RepoaaLlvea In Thee.tree. —:o:— The woman from Nebraska, who arrived at the Waldorf a little more than a month ago, and said she was here to ward off a nervous breakdown, has departed for home, and those who know her are wondering what was the actual result of the treatment she took. She told Dr. Adams, the house physician, when she arrived, that she had been so active socially, that she felt she simply must have a rest. She reached here on a Wednesday morning, and immediately sent for the doctor. He prescribed a few days of complete rest. Just before a o'clock in the afternoon he encountered her In the lobby. She was drcsed for going out. "I am just going to a matinee," she told him. "I think that will be a good w;iy to begin the cure." Just before 6 o'clock he encountered her at the newsstand. She was hnving theatre tickets. "I thought] would take in a show tonight," she snid, and she went. The doctor kept prescribing rest, but her idea of what constituted repose was different from his. She went to the opera, she took in concerts, she peeped into the night restaurants, and lived on her nerves. At the end of thirty days she took her departure. Before going, she confided to the doctor that in the thirty days she had been to the theatre and opera just thirty-two times, and that did not take account of the concerts she attended. "And, doctor," she added," I feel now that I can go back fully •quipped to tackle my heavy social duties of the rest of the Winter." Dr. Adams has not figured out the explanation of her case yet. "All I can say is that it must be literally true that 'what is one man's meat is another man's poison, or vice versa," he said. MARRIED WOMAN CAN USE BIRTH NAME Mtaa Puflh Se.ya Law Doe*Not Force Her to Take Huabanda Surname. LAW DECISIONS DIFFER Some Eatabllah Her Right to Execute Obligations In Maiden Na.me The question has been repeadedly raised recently whether a woman upon being married is obliged by law to take her husband's surname. Lucile Pugh, a woman lawyer of 68 William Street, who was asked about the law governing a married woman's use of name, said that, while it is a universal custom for a woman to take her husband's surname, she had a right to retain her maiden name or to assume a different name if she chose. Whether a married woman could sue or be sued in her maiden name, or Jcould use it in singing legal documents, are questions not absolutely settled, according to Miss Pugh, but there are decisions which uphold a married Woman's right to use het maiden name or her HOIK de plume even in legal matters. "At common law," she said, "a man may lawfully change his name, or by general use or habit acquire another name without any intervention of courts, and the common law rule unless changed by statue, of course, obtains in the United States. My custom a woman at maniagc Ivsesher own surname and acquires that of her husband. In Freeman vs. Havlais and other cases it has been held that judgment against a woman's maiden name was invalid. "On tJM contrary, it is held in the case of l.ane vs. Dinchoc that obligations nnd conveyances executed by and to a married woman in her perpetual name are valid. It was held here that Barbara Rhyner (mai len name) is not a fictitious person, but a person in MM, True, since the marriage, she was entitled to the narreof her husband, but the decisions hold that there is no law invalidating obligations executed by her in her baptismal name. "At common law the husband is the head of the family and as such the wife must love, honor r.nd obey him. This doctrine" has not been altered by statutes conferring increased property right on married women, nor da the statutes giving to a married woman the right to carry on any trade or business on her sole and separate account deprive the husband of his common law right to regulate and control his household. In accordance with this doctrine, vesting in the bus band the headship of the family, it is a general rule, fixed by custom at least, that marriage confers up. on the wife the surname of tl.# husband, "On the other hand, it was held in the case of Bell vs.-the Sun Printing Company that 'The law looks only to the identity of the individual.' It often occurs tha*fl person is as well known by one name as another. In literature or the drama, writers and actors being married women are as well known to the public by their maiden names, or by the names they assumes after marriage. I am not sure that this piactice or custom has ever been considered a defect, or want of moral virtue, or neglect of moral duty or obligation. "Surnames did |not come into use until the beginning of the i fourteenth century and even down to the time of Elizabeth they were not considered of controlling importance. In the fourth year of the reign of Edward IV. an act was passed compelling every Irishman who dwelt within the English pale to take an English surname, and enacting that it should be the name of some town or some color, as black or brown, or some art or occupation. Allthis.it will.be seen, was brought about without any provision of law other than referred to. By a usage sufficiently general to be called ^universal, the son now bears the name of his father and in turn transmit* it to his own male descendants. "But though the custom is widespread and universal for all males to bear the name of their parents, there is nothing in the lawprohibiting a man from taking another name. In some countries it is otherwise. In France a law was passed in the second year of the first Revolution and another, which is still in force, forbidding any citizen to bear any first name oi surname than that which is expressed in the registry of his birth, but no enactment of this law has ever been passed in England or this country." —:o:— The S. S. Miami arrived at noon from Miami with 41 pas sengers and 70 barrels of cargo. Wear Armbrister's Shoes


The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02333
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Tuesday, February 02, 1915
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02333

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Full Text
4
Nulliue ivddUtiia lurere In verb* mfeglatrl.
Being bound to awae.r to the UoimM oi no Milr.
VOL XII
Nkutu, N. P.. Bhe.m*.a. Tuaedev. Febr.ia. ty 2. 191
NO. feO
THE MOTHER JOB.
It really isn't haid to be a
mother,
There really isn't very much
to do;
The days are just exactly like
each other
You simply shut your eyes
and wander through!
For 6 o'clock is time enough for
rising,
And getting all the children
washed and dressed,
And breakfast cookedit
really is surprising,
Rut mothers never seem to need
a rest!
Tlio lunches must be packed
and jackets rounded,
And everybody soothed and
sent to school.
To say that mother rushes, is un-
founded
She's nothing more to manage
as a rule,
Unless it is to finish piles ofsew-
ing,
And cook and wash and iron
and scrub and sweep,
To order food and keep the fur-
nace going
And then perhaps to hide her-
self and weep
And when at last she's tucked
them under covers,
And seen to doors that Dad's
forgot to lock,
Triumphantly, at midnight, she
discovers,
She's nothing more to do till
6 o'clock!
JANE BURR.
KEPT ON GO' AS R.EST CURE
Nerveue Woman, Who Sought Re-
poaaLlvea In Thee.tree.
:o:
The woman from Nebraska, who
arrived at the Waldorf a little
more than a month ago, and said
she was here to ward off a nervous
breakdown, has departed for home,
and those who know her are won-
dering what was the actual result
of the treatment she took.
She told Dr. Adams, the house
physician, when she arrived, that
she had been so active socially,
that she felt she simply must have
a rest. She reached here on a
Wednesday morning, and imme-
diately sent for the doctor. He
prescribed a few days of complete
rest. Just before a o'clock in the
afternoon he encountered her In
the lobby. She was drcsed for
going out.
"I am just going to a matinee,"
she told him. "I think that will be
a good w;iy to begin the cure."
Just before 6 o'clock he encoun-
tered her at the newsstand. She
was hnving theatre tickets.
"I thought] would take in a
show tonight," she snid, and she
went.
The doctor kept prescribing rest,
but her idea of what constituted
repose was different from his. She
went to the opera, she took in
concerts, she peeped into the night
restaurants, and lived on her
nerves. At the end of thirty days
she took her departure. Before
going, she confided to the doctor
that in the thirty days she had
been to the theatre and opera just
thirty-two times, and that did not
take account of the concerts she
attended.
"And, doctor," she added," I
feel now that I can go back fully
quipped to tackle my heavy
social duties of the rest of the
Winter."
Dr. Adams has not figured out
the explanation of her case yet.
"All I can say is that it must be
literally true that 'what is one
man's meat is another man's poi-
son, or vice versa," he said.
MARRIED WOMAN CAN USE BIRTH
NAME
Mtaa Puflh Se.ya Law Doe*Not
Force Her to Take Huabanda Sur-
name.
LAW DECISIONS DIFFER
Some Eatabllah Her Right to Exe-
cute ObligationsIn Maiden Na.me
The question has been repeaded-
ly raised recently whether a wo-
man upon being married is obliged
by law to take her husband's sur-
name. Lucile Pugh, a woman
lawyer of 68 William Street, who
was asked about the law governing
a married woman's use of name,
said that, while it is a universal
custom for a woman to take her
husband's surname, she had a
right to retain her maiden name or
to assume a different name if she
chose.
Whether a married woman could
sue or be sued in her maiden name,
or Jcould use it in singing legal
documents, are questions not abso-
lutely settled, according to Miss
Pugh, but there are decisions which
uphold a married Woman's right to
use het maiden name or her hoik
de plume even in legal matters.
"At common law," she said, "a
man may lawfully change his
name, or by general use or habit
acquire another name without any
intervention of courts, and the
common law rule unless changed
by statue, of course, obtains in the
United States. My custom a woman
at maniagc Ivsesher own surname
and acquires that of her husband.
In Freeman vs. Havlais and other
cases it has been held that judg-
ment against a woman's maiden
name was invalid.
"On tJM contrary, it is held in
the case of l.ane vs. Dinchoc that
obligations nnd conveyances exe-
cuted by and to a married woman
in her perpetual name are valid.
It was held here that Barbara
Rhyner (mai len name) is not a
fictitious person, but a person in
MM, True, since the marriage, she
was entitled to the narreof her
husband, but the decisions hold
that there is no law invalidating
obligations executed by her in her
baptismal name.
"At common law the husband is
the head of the family and as such
the wife must love, honor r.nd obey
him. This doctrine" has not been
altered by statutes conferring in-
creased property right on married
women, nor da the statutes giving
to a married woman the right to
carry on any trade or business on
her sole and separate account de-
prive the husband of his common
law right to regulate and control
his household. In accordance with
this doctrine, vesting in the bus
band the headship of the family, it
is a general rule, fixed by custom
at least, that marriage confers up.
on the wife the surname of tl.#
husband,
"On the other hand, it was held
in the case of Bell vs.-the Sun
Printing Company that 'The law
looks only to the identity of the
individual.' It often occurs tha*fl
person is as well known by one
name as another. In literature or
the drama, writers and actors be-
ing married women are as well
known to the public by their
maiden names, or by the names they
assumes after marriage. I am not
sure that this piactice or custom
has ever been considered a defect,
or want of moral virtue, or neglect
of moral duty or obligation.
"Surnames did |not come into
use until the beginning of the
i fourteenth century and even down
to the time of Elizabeth they were
not considered of controlling im-
portance. In the fourth year of the
reign of Edward IV. an act was
passed compelling every Irishman
who dwelt within the English pale
to take an English surname, and
enacting that it should be the
name of some town or some color,
as black or brown, or some art or
occupation. Allthis.it will.be
seen, was brought about without
any provision of law other than
referred to. By a usage sufficient-
ly general to be called ^universal,
the son now bears the name of his
father and in turn transmit* it to
his own male descendants.
"But though the custom is wide-
spread and universal for all males
to bear the name of their parents,
there is nothing in the lawprohib-
iting a man from taking another
name. In some countries it is
otherwise. In France a law was
passed in the second year of the
first Revolution and another, which
is still in force, forbidding any
citizen to bear any first name oi
surname than that which is ex-
pressed in the registry of his birth,
but no enactment of this law has
ever been passed in England or
this country."
:o:
The S. S. Miami arrived at
noon from Miami with 41 pas
sengers and 70 barrels of cargo.
Wear Armbrister's Shoes


u
L. GILBERT DUPUCH,
Editor and Proprietor.
OFFICE:
Corner Shirley & Charlotte Sla
Nassau, N. P., Bahamas
TrtONK 2(10. P. O. BOX 163.
PUBLISHED DAILY
Monday, Wednesday and Friday-
id
SMgle c 'i v
Tuesday, and Thursdaysingle copy td
Saturdaysingle copy
Weekly ......
Monthly ......
Quarterly ...
HalfYearly......
Yearly ......
ijd
Vl
... !S. fid
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PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
Advertising Rates :Six pence per line
for first insertion; three pence per line
for second insertion ; and one penny per
line for subsqucnt insertions.
Advertisements under eight lines 4s.
Zhc tribune
TUESDAY. January 2. 1915.
PUBLISHED AT b 30 P. M.
"What are we going to do
about it ?" is the question which
will have to be faced in the next
few weeks. Ways and means
are being anxiously turned in
and out in order to see how a
good job may be made of a
damaged revenue, and thus far,
additional taxation we hear, is
the only remedy which can be
applied. "Issachar is a strong
asscrouchingdown between two
burdens ;" like hsadiar is the
Bahamas, one burden is that of
an ascending scale of prices of
those articles which we cannot
produce, and the other is
an yiercased tariff, suggested by
the commission appointed by
the late Governor to enquire in-
to the financial condition of the
Colony and the best means of
restoring it to a healthy and
satisfactory basis.
Of course, it is not an easy
task and will necessitate ver'v
much thought on the part of
the concentrated wisdom
brought to bear upon the ques-
tion, and we trust that some
better plan m^y be evolved than
that of additional taxation an-
other burden added to the poor
ass Issachar. He is crouching
now, but what will it be later
on, if suggestions materialize
into actualities.
We understand that the Le-
gislature is convemd for the 8th
instant, and we suppose the
momentous question What are
you going to do about it" will
be "the bolt from the blue,"
from the hill to the plain, and
it will be the duty of the peo-
ple's representatives to keep
watch and ward. Those of us
who are brought daily into con-
tact with the proletariat know
full well where the shoe pinches,
we think even better than those
who bear the pinch. We have
before said "Ask the shopkeep-
ers," and we again say"Ask
them." It is another case of
"No par, no mar, let the kop-
pers come." Aye, but who from?
"Why the poor ass of course."
As we were writing our lead,
er" to day, we came near being
demolished, office and writer
and leader and all, by a motor-
car driven by a chauffeur of
foreign extraction. It came
around the corner at an amaz-
ing speed and had it not been
for the bridge across the street
it might have knocked it self
into scrap iron as well.
We have remarked on the evil
and dangers of rapid and reck-
less driving before, but our gen-
tle hints are disregarded.
Had there been an athlete in
the wav, he would have needed
to show his agility by jumping
into the car as it rushed towards
him, otherwise there would
have been a funeral pretty soon.
We want owners and chauf-
feurs, to regulate the rate of
speed, and the Authorities to en-
force its being done. The chauf-
feur in tins instance is known to
us, and it is a question of "toss
up," whether he is reported or
not. But he and his tribe had
better look sharp. We don't
love our love with an R, because
he is reckless.
:o'.
As Mr. Charles Bethel was
driving down East Hill Street
this forenoon, the horse ran
away and run into the carriage
gate of Mr. J. A. Thomson on
East Street and broke his neck.
Mr. Bethel sustained some slight
injuries and we trust will soon
recover from them.
:o:
Latest War News
February 1st 1915.
London:Assisted by Ger-
mans the Austro-Ilungariansare
attacking Russians in the Car-
pathian Mountains. It is the
fourth time since the war began
that such an event has occurred.
Russians claim advantage in
the preliminary fighting and
capture of many prisoners and
guns, Austro-Germany concent-
rates armies on the Roumanian
Servian frontiers to check any
efforts of those countries to take
part in the fighting. Russians
defeat Turks in Sari Kamysh re-
gion capturing the commanding
general and his staff.
Russian Black Sea fleet bom-
bard barracks at Trebisond
Risal and sink several Turkish
transport and sailing vessels.The
Russians are pushing their of-
fensive in East Prussia, while
Germans continue their attack
in Central Poland. However
these operations are secondary
to the Carpathian battle. The
outcome of the latter is believed
likely to have a marked effect
on future operations of the war.
Except in neighborhood of
Labasse and Argonne where the
Germans have resumed their at-
tacks artillery alone has been
engaged on Western front. The
Germans claim to have captured
some trenches near Labasse
while the French assert that
British have reoccupied all the
ground temporarily lost. Not-
withstanding this it is cvid( nt
that the Germans are intent on
breaking the lines that guard
the French coast ports. In ad-
dition to the preparations they
are carrying out in many parts
of Africa, the British face an
uprising of the natives of Nyas-
land, where settlers have been
killed. An official report Bays
however that the situation is
well in hand.
Washington:Legislative
struggle over the shipping bill
will be resumed today It ap.
pears destined to have historic
place in Congression at annals
as the democrats are dt termined
to force the issue to a veto even
though the Opposition talks day
and night until the measure is
put on its passage luouse to con-
sider the President's vote immi-
gration bill message.
New York: Herman Aucr-
bach, wealthy real estate oper-
ator murdered wife and two
daughters and then committed
suicide in New York apartment
used repeating magi/.inc lifle
equipped with a silencer. Des-
pondent over business reverses
is believed responsible for the
tragedy which had been care-
fully planned. A son only mem-
ber of the family left alive.
Paris:Su bm a ri n e s deal
death blows: Five British ships
are sent to the bottom; three in
addition to Yen Crauchers and
Linda Blanche reported Satur-
day. Destruction of Tnfcomnru
Icaria and Kilcoan rcpoifea by
the French minister^f Marine
Crews of Tokomarir*and Kil-
coan were rescued others unac-
counted for.
Rome:Troops called to quit
a meeting to forward a move-
ment in faxour of Italy main-
taining neutrality. Many per-
sons, mostly republicans who
oppose neutrality gathered at
the hall and attacked the ncu.
tralists. The ears of Bruno Bel
monte, leader of neutralists
were boxed and some one spat
in his face.
Washington:Will await ac-
tion on shipping measure before
the United States enters into
any discussion over right to buy
\ 1 -els.
New Orleans: Many boys
and girls injured when St. Al-
phonsus orphan asylum collap-
sed during a storm.
Phila:Argentine new war.
ihipswent into commission at
Philadelphia yesterday. Cost
S 11.000.000 named Moreno.
William Waldorf Astor to
daj dropped out of newspaper
world when he turned over to
W. Gardner Sinclair the Pall
Mall Gazette and the Observer.
Miami:According to Oliver
II. Bogue well known Wall St.
broker Uncle Sam is beginning
to reap profits in a financial
way from the tolls established
in Panama Canal and $21,000
represented one single day in-
come Irom this source last week.
Chicago,Lorimer and thir-
teen bank associates to trial to-
day on charges ranging from
embezzelinent to conspiracy-All
were indicated last October
following collapse of Lasalle
Street Trust Co. and four allied
banks constituting the I.orimer
Munday Chicago.
:o:
February 2nd 10,15.
London 1st.
Governor,
Bahamas.
Official news February ist:
Press Bureau repoits enemy at-
tacks Friday near Cuinchy were
easily repulsed and over 200
German dead were counted.
British casualties were small.
The French government con-
firms the enemys heavy losses
near Lombardzyde. Two of the
enemys guns, convoys, etc., were
destroyed by artillery near
Rheims.
The Russian government re-
ports some progress in East Prus-
sia. On the felt bank of the


vistula^.ths Germans were dis-
lodged- from captured trenches,
losing ue?rly two entire ram
panys, aldiSprisoners and quick*
firing puns.
Fighting in Hie Carpathians
continues.
(Signed)
HARCOURT.
CALLED DOCTORS
"ENGLISH SWINE"
Germans Escorted Them to ihe
Frontier and Kicked Them
Out
NO FOOD FOR. roUR DAVS
Hald Captive Five Month*
With Insufficient Food
Flushing, Holland)fan. 13
"They simply escorted us to the
frontier and kicked us out," w.is
the casual way in which live
British army doctors, who have
enjoyed the hospitality of the
Kaiser for the past live months,
described their release from cap-
tivity in Germany to a Daily
Chronicle representative. The
five officers are Captain C. T.
Edmunds, of the Royal Army
Medical Corps, attached to the
Royal Scots Fusiliers; Captain
s. B. Hamilton, R.A.M.C., of
the Seventh Field Ambulance
Corps; Lieut.S.Danks, R..VM.C,
of the Fourteenth Ambulance
Corps, and l>r. L .[. Austin, and
Dr. A. R. Elliott, Of the First
Belgian unit of the the British
Red Cross Society. They reach-
ed Flushrng,lfttv Monday, having
been released from Magdeburg,
Prussian Saxony, on Sunday.
The two first-named were
left behind, attending to Brit-
ish wounded, when they retired
from Monson August 33. Cap-
tain Edmunds was himself
struck in the shoulder by a
piece of shrapnel and lay on
the field the whole of the night
of the 23rd. The next morning
he was taken prisoner.
Captain Hamiliton told an
interesting narrative of his
adventures from the time he
fell into the hands of his cap-
tors. "For about a fortnight of-
ter being taken prisoner," he
said, "I was engaged in attend-
ing wounded British and Bel-
gians, and afterwards Germans.
When my work was done I fully
expected to be sent back to the
British lines, never thinking
that the Germans would keep
British army doctors as prison-
ers of war.
"This expectation was not leg-
alized, for without warning we
were told to lake out places in
the train together with Othei
doctors, and then began our
journey into Captivity.
Nothing (or "English Swii.e"
"Wc occupied four days in
reaching Torgau, where we were
first interned," said the captain,
"and for three or Tour days we
had nothing to cat or drink. At
several stations were people
supplying German troops on
their way to the front with food
and coffee. I asked for water
and food, hut the only reply I
ever received was that there
was nothing for 'English swine!'
The crowds were hostile, and
often men came up to our car-
riage and pushed the muzzles
of their revolvers into our faces.
One excitable old woman struck
me across the head with her
umbrella
The four days' journey to
Torgau, which under or-
dinary conditions ocupies about
12 hours, was made by these
British doctors chiefly in the
luxurious aocomodations ol a
ratt!.- truck. At Torgau they
found themselves in the con-
pany of two hundred British
and eight hundred French offi-
cers. There they remained for
about three months, having a
very dull time. Forced to get
up at eight o'clock each morn-
ing, they spent the whole day
in idleness, for nothing was
provided for them to do.
Their food consisted chiefly
of sausages and pork, black
bread and margarines, but even
of that there was only a limited
supply.
"At first," remarked Captain
Hamilton, "one hundred marks
(?3.5) a month was allowed to
us for the purpose of buying
anything we required, but af-
ter that the sum was reduced to
12 cents a day."
It was at Torgau that Cap-
tain Hamilton and Captain Ed-
munds made the acquaintance of
the other three doctors, and the
five of them afterward, in their
wanderings thrpugh Germany
always made a point of being
together, for they formed a card
party, and, as one of them re-
marked, had played bridge
every night since their first
meeting.
Paraded e.nd Searched
After three months confine-
ment at Torgau, the party were
removed to Burg, hut their stay
at that fortress was not of long
Jufatlon, and at the pud of in
other week, on December jth,
they found Ull " '' ' !l M-'jidc
burg, where for the last month
of then captivity wagon room
No. q became their temporary
abode, and all Were unanimous
that It was not a very comfort*
able one. There they were treat
ed like school children, and on
one or two occasions paraded
and searched. All rings (other
than wedding rings), gold
watches and chains and other
jewelry were taken from them.
The explanation given for this
action being that they might
use such articles for purpose of
bribery.
Captain Hamilton had one
word of praise for his captors,
in that all moneys received from
home for the officers were paid
over to them.
It was last Friday when the
first intimation was made to the
doctors, who numbered ten, thai
some were to be released. On
that day the commandant par-
aded them and stated that half
their number were to be sent
bade to England, He stipulated
that two 'd the five to be relea*
ed were, according to Special in-
structions from Berlin, to be the
two Red Cross doctors. Austin
and Elliott. The question then
arose as to who were to be the
other three. After a discussion,
Captain Hamilton, as the only
married officer, got the third
place. The commandant him-
self settled the question of the
two final places. Taking seven
matches, he broke two off short,
and held the matches Out, the
seven doctors each drawing one.
The lucky ones in the draw
proved to be Captain Edmunds
and Liflut. Danks, both of whom
avowed their determination to
have those fateful bits of wood
goldmounted, to be ever cherish-
ed as souvenirs of their adven-
ture.
Were Tried as Spies
Doctors Austin and Elliott
were taken prisoners in South
Belgium, and almost immedi-
ately were tried as spies. After
they escaped shooting they
were sent to Cologne, where
they had a very uncomfortable
time.
"I was only prevented from
falling into the hands of a furi-
ous crowd in that city through
the protection of mounted
police," said Dr. Austin. "Dr.
I Elliott and myself suffered fif-
teen days' solitary confinement,
not even being allowed a book
torcnd.Then came a series of re*
trials on th' charge, ofespiooage
but 1 n in medicine
surgery gave luffleitn! proof that
wc were both doctors, and were
anally sent to Torgau.1
Lieut, Dank, who was taken
prisoner on September 9 at Sois-
sons, related a stovy which he
dctscribedwith a smile as be^ng
somewhat personal."After hems
captured, 1 was kept by 'hedcr-
mannjattending" their wounded,
he said and "and during that
time I was repeatedly being told
I was liable to be shot, Things
came to a head, however, one
day as I was riding out on a
gun carriage to the German
lines. A little private who had
of t e n spoke of my b e i n vc
liable to be shot came up and
whispered in mv ear: "If I get
a chance of loosing off my rifle
to-day, I'll reserve my first bul-
let for you. I kept my eye on
him the whole of that day, and
apparently he must have miss-
ed his opportunity."

For Hire
AUTOMOBILES
AND
BICYCLES
APPLY TO
J. P.SIrvlMS
47 MARKET STRERT
NASSAU N. P.
CHAS. C. LIGHTBObRN\
____
ARMSTRONG ST.
Hcwkin's Hill.
EXPERIENCED Papcrj
Hanger. Ceiling Work,
a specialty. Al! work carcful-f
ly and Artistically performed |
Absolute satisfaction guaran
teed. The very best references^
-Terms! moderate.
Cosmopolitan
HIGH SCHOOL
Opens on
Monday, Oct. 5 th
in Aurora Hall
on Chariotfe Street.
For particulars apply U
Prof. G. G. Coffin, head mas
ter, or Mr. J. P. Simms.


IT

IN RE SUNDRIES
"LONDON STAR"
BREAD FAMINE GROW8
IN GERMAN CITIES.
Government may prohibit nil
Baking in Private House*
Paris, Jan. 13.The bread
famine in Germany appears to
borrowing in intensity, accord-
ing to reports reaching here.The
burgomaster of Dortmund, in
Westphalia, declared at a meet-
ing cf the city officials:
"Extreme economy in the con-
sumption of bread, and particu-
larly the limitation to what is
only strictly necessary, as re-
gards both bread and all other
bakery wares, is the condition of
German victory."
The Cologne Gazette, com-
menting on the situation, calls
on the military authorities to
forbid the manufacture of all
bread except for war purposes.
The Copenhagen correspon-
dent of the Temps says the pro-
hibition on night work by Ber-
lin bakers has proved to have
no effect, as the housewives are
buying enormous stocks of flour
and are baking bread themselves
He says the Government is
therefore, about to prohibit
baking in private houses.
For Sale
A VICTOR Phono
** graph in good condi-
tion, with 47 Records. For
further particulars,
Apply
TRIBUNE OFFICE.
GASOLINE
TN Drums and 10 Gallon
* Cans. Price one shilling
per Gallon. All previous
prices cancelled.
C. C. SAUNDERS
East Bay St.
Nassau N. P.
Jan. 5th 1915.
WANTED
COPIES of "THE STROM -
Wry* August 1913 (Exhi-
bition Number)
Apply
"Tribunc'Officc
REMOVAL
The Printing Establish-
ment of the "Tribune" has
this day been removed to
Nos. 25 and 27 Shirley Street,
and North-east Corner of
Charlotte Si net. 26th Jan.
191 5-
Good Morning!
We Are Introducing
American Silk
American Cashmere
American Cotton-Lisle
HOSIERY
They have ftood the test. Give real
foot comfort. No seams to rip. Never
become loose or baggy* The shape is
knit in-not pressed in.
GUARANTEED for fineness, style,
superiority of material and workmanship.
Absolutely stainless. Will wear 6 months
withoat holes, or new ones free.
OUR. SPECIAL OFFER
to every one tending us f 1.00 in currency
or postal note, to cover advertising and
shipping charges, we will send post paid,
with written guarantee, backed by a five
million dollar companv, either
% Pe-lrs of our 15c. vluo
\mencan Silk Hosiery,
or IPrvlrs of our 50c. vaJue
.American Cashmere Hosiery,
or 4 P -v iri of our 50c. Value,
American Cotton-Lisle Hosiery
or 6 Pairs of Children's Hosiery.
PONT DELAYOflet cxpireswhen
dealer in your locality f- selected.
THE INTERNATIONAL HOISERY CO.
P. O. Box 224
DAYTON. OHIO. U. S. A

MAofe NHfflir
IB.VQI
BEST RETAIL TRADE
i . <** H HM Of mi Ms^a |
( f Sanitary /V* IVm' sia
Cool fl^ U Win. JU Hilton,
Reliable U Be 260 ky St.
Fruit of the Loom 36 in.
at 7J per yard.
NOTICE
THE well known
Dairyman of the
East
THOMAS M. KNOWLES
Is now prepared to supply
and deliver the purest milk
to be obtained anywhere
from his Dairy Farm on East
Shirley Street, opposite Wil-
liams Street. Orders maybe
delivered at his Store on East
Bay St. No. 528, 'Phone No.
116. Delivery at from 7 a.m.
to 10 a.m., and from 3 p.m.
to 5 p.m. daily in Sanitary
Dottles.
Many germs make milk im-
pure,
In Knowles* milk no germs
arc found;
Look at the bottles in which
its sold, at
Knowles who takes them all
around.
Milk like his needs no lactom
eter,
In verification of its strength,
Liquor pura nee impura
Knowles would never go
that length.
Johnson's
Artistic Wood
Finishes
Johnson's Prepared Waxa com
plete finish and polish for all furniture
woodwork and floors.
Johnson's Wood Dyefor the artistic
coloring of all wood, soft or hard
Johnson's Under Laca spirit
finish, very much superior to shellac or
varnish
Johnson's Fle.t Wood Finishfor a
beautiful, artistic, hand-rubbed effetr
without the expense of rubbing.
Johnson's Hast- Wood Fillerfor
filling the grain and pores of wood,
preparing it for the finish.
Johnson's Powdered Waxfor bal
room floors.
FOR. SALE BY
Chas. E. Albury
Shingles
Best No. 1 Heart 5in. Cypress
Shingles at $g.6^)er thoua-1
sand of 20 bundles
Discounts on lots of over
5000 shingles.
Special Price
also on cheaper gradesals<
5in. Cypress at $6.72 per
thousand of 20 bundles. This
price made possible by a verj
large purchase.
Fresh stock arriving every/
week.
C. C SAUNDERS.
MISS LOUISE CADOGAN
CERTIFICATED NURSE
from Bahamas General
Hospital. Can furnish testi-
monials.
101 Shirley Street
Kerosene
1502
IN New 50 gallon Galvaniz-
ed Iron Drums at iScts
per Gallon.
In 10 gallon Cans at 2octs
per. Gallon.
Drums and Cans returnable
Full particulars at Office
"Frances E.," Nassau N. P.
C. C. SAUNDERS
FOR SALE
I
A LOT OF LAND (formerl
2 lots) with a dwellinl
house, outbuildings, and well. eU
situate between Market St. ani'.
East St. South.
Apply to
SARAH JANE ALBURY, '
or KENNETH SOLOMON.
Mapes Fertilizer!
/ now carry in stock t
following formulas:
Pineapple. It has been pro
en that this has noequi
and a visit to fields usin
same will convince you
Vegetable.Now is the tim
to use this and increase
your yield in Tomatoes,
Potatoes, Onions and all
other vegetables by 100
per cent.
Orange Tree.To assist the
growth of Young Citrus
Tree.
Fruit and Wine. Increase the
yield and growth of old
Citrus trees.
For further information
and books on the use of these
Fertilizers, please apply to
WALTER K. MOORE
Agent for Mapes Fertiliser
in the RakattUU,
LOOK :
The following Blank form*
may be had at "TheTribune''
Office.
Duty Entry.
Free Entry.
Warehouse Entries.
Sponging Articles.
Ship's Reports.
In quantities at Special Rates


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