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THE TRIBUNE NASSAV. BAHAMAS L. GILBKRT DUPUCIi, Editor and Proprietor. & OKFICK: Corner Shirley & Charlotte Sta. Noaau, N. P., Bahama* I'MONK 200. P. O. BOX 183. PUBLISHED DAILY Monday. Wedmxky aod Friday— single COPT Tneslay, anl Thonday—single copy Saturday—single copy Weekly Monthly S nailccly all Yearly Yearly ... irl l|d 5'" is. 6d 4& 6d qi. 18s. PAYABLE IN ADVANCK Advertising Rates-.--vie |>ence |*r line %  for first insertion: three pence per line for second insertion ; and one penny pet line for suhsquent insertions. Advertisements under eight lines 4s. XLbe Gribune SATURDAY. Je.nue.ry 50, I9li fitPUBLISHED AT S 50 P. M. O much depends on the success of the campaign being carried on in the Eastern theatre of the war that one reads with avidit) any aeivs which throws light on the situation. The cable news merely give bare outlines and the information they contain is often conflicting. We reproduce below an article from TRUTH which, to our mind, puts the situation, up to the time of its publication, clearly and in an understandable manner: — "Though the campaign in the Western theatre of war remains in the same condition of stalemate as it was in a week ago, events are beginning to shape themselves somewhat different ly in the Fast, and it looks as though the Grand Duke Nicholas is after all going to get the better of Marshal von Hindenburg, and force him to withdraw his troops once more from Poland. This second invasion of von Hindenburg's has undoubtedly been a masterly exhibition of kensen, deployed his army between the Vistula and Warta rivers on a front of some fifty to sixty miles, his flanks resting on the rivers, which, being both navigable, served the purpose of supplying the army with food and ammunition. Taken by surprise, the Russians, according to their wont, retired before the advancing army, leaving behind many stragglers, most of whom the Germans raked in as prisoners of war. Mackensen made straight for the Kalisz Warsaw railway, two of his corps getting beyond it, and seizing the important railway junction of Koluszki on line leading from Warsaw to Czestochowa. Tnen the Russians turned on the invaders, attacking them with great violence, and isolating the two advanced corps, which were almost sur rounded. How these two corps escaped is a marvel, but they managed to fight their way back to the main army, much to their own credit, and to the discredit of a certain Russian general who came up too late to complete their discomfiture. This took place on November 29 and 30, since when one of the usual siege battles, which accustomed to be beaten in battle that one r^'eat more or less seems to make no difference, and we may expect to hear of another rally of their broken troops when they get back to their frontier. The Servians, however, have established their reputation as first class fighters and the Austrians wil! presently have quite enough on their hands in defending their own territory without wasting their strength in futile attacks on their gallant little neighbour. —:o: — Clarence Town, Long Island, Jan. 19th 1915 To The Editor of The' Tribune" Dear Sir, Please allow me space in your valuable paper to make this short report. At Clarence town there is an experimental plot of Sea Island Cotton which was planted from the lath of September to the 18th of the said month 1914 that plot of cotton up to the present is really line and is boiling fearly well. The plants are giving up to dale from 46 —to 127 bolls. At present there are no bugs and verv few worms, are novel developments of lh th wh


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THE TRIBUNE NASSAV. SAHAM Total British Number German Unavailable for various causes { maii in check is uncertainty iegarding the action Bulgaria would be likely to take. Bulgaria it is asserted is still demanding that part of Macedonia now under Servian rule as the price of her neutrality and this Servia is reported to be net willing to part with. Greece it is stated also objects to Bulgaria extending her boundaries Westward taking the ground that as this would place a wedge between her and her ally, Servia. Thus seemingly the wholeof Balkan States are being involved. It is stated it is not likely to be cleared up until the demands of Bulgaria are satisfied. In East Prussia Russian offensive has developed in the extreme North where the renewed fighting seems to confirm the belief that a definite effort to a Ivance North of the Mazurian Lakes district where Russians \\ re defeated lias been decided on by the Russians General Stall More vital to both sides h >\vever apparently is the campaign in the Carpathians where to the Southwest of the Dukla Pass the Russians have delivered an energetic attack and according to their account of the combat compelled the opposing forces to retreat leaving behind ammunition and stores. Another skirmish with the Turkish advance guard not far from Suez is reported from the British forces in bgypt but it was not of a serious character. On the other hand British marines are said to have hi en landed at Alexandretta in Asia tic Turkey. Petrograd: — The Russian army is advancing rapidly into Ea*i Prussia abjective being Koeniesi ""• %  ".*,""" I,,,,. Gfmans are rushing anal. £?_ ^J&AI 'I'*&* ^ most entire gairison in tint fortress TABLE GIVING THE STATE OF BRITISH AND GERMAN SHIPPING RESPECTIVELY AFTER IB WEEKS OF WAR. No. Of; SteamPer sh ips.cen t •: of over age of: i o o Total! ton sjNu m-j gross : ber Gross i Per centage of Total Tonnage Gross IT o n. • nage (-Captured | Detained in German ports British j Held up in Baltic and I Black Sea 10,123 2,090 491 I 75 1 7'! 100 100 1.9 I Total '95 J German ("Captured I Detained in British or Allied ports J Seeking refuge in neutral ports... In German ports v. Total Plying British Plying or not accounted for Ge rman Known to be at sea .. Ships over 500 tons not accounted for Steam trawlers not accounted for Small coasters not accounted for 80) I 16b I I 646 j 3^9 j 1,38! J 9,928 20,523,706] 5.'34.7'o 535.55' 100 tec 2.9 5S.4 98.1 4o8f,926 §9-3 20,122,173; 97.1 Total I2 5 333 38l 860 41.6 549.794 10.7 with each other less than Chris tian with Christian is no basis for comparing Christianity unfavourably with pagan or other orms of non-Christian faith, If to Front and drawing on Warsaw fronl in SH effort to prevent Russians from landing at Mazurian positions. London:—Copenhagen correspon.ient telegmph thai several German airships have passed several mifes off h.uiish (oast hound East over liahic Sea, German casualties in East Prussia during August 'OMI "September made \n>'. lie tud.iy show losses in B*SI exceeded by far their en<>roi'ms lt forty and five eights to forty whi*li nunimum was left unchanged though some sales at thirty seven were reported, S'eel and Rending were oenters heir attack. Mi stocks suffered somewhat New Haven being driven down to its niin iimiin of forty nine. There is ri i valid reaoon for the decline tea'tionaiy tendency mused bv b ai iiioveinei.i resulted iiwiecline in wheat nnf (he stiingent fit precautions now taken in nil NS* Vorb playhouses was given last night when three thousand persons were cleared from the Academy of Music in three minutes. Shott circuit in electric wires caused a small fiie in which there was nueh sm ike bni little d-tmr.e. tinned From First Page) ization, which is fundamentally Christian, war has continue J, never on account of Christiani ty, the terrible religious wars in contradiction notwithstanding, te of it. That during ndred years none been at war tern civilization lias been more active than the older forms, and that people professing Christianity without being able to prac. tise it have lately dominated the world. What a commentary upon errant man, who can think with the angels and behave like a beast, that (lining nearly two thousand years there is no instance of his having collectively practised pure Christianity, though believing it to be the most beautiful thing he has ever possessed—his one priceless treasure! Now shall he have the courage to ask himself if Christianity |is compatible with the was 01 his own existence > The most destructive philosopher who ever lived wrote : "How very curious it is to see a Nihilistic religion such RS Christianity, sprung from and in keeping with 1 decrepit and wornout people, who have nut* lived all strong instincts, being transferred step bj step to another environment — that is to SBV, fo a land of young people who have not yet lived at all. ["he joy of the final chapter, of the fold, and of the evening preached lo barbarians and CUT mans! How thoroughly all of it must first hive been barbarized, Germanized I To those who had dreamed ot a Walhalla: who found happiness only in war A supernatural reli gion preached in the midst of choas where no nation yet existed even." I le indicted the Christian: "The Christian has never led the life which Jesus commanded him to live." Can he say that he has? "That whieh is wrong with Christianity,*' said this destruc live philospher, "is that it does none of the things that Christ commanded. I le who says to day, 'I reufse to be a soldier," 1 care not for tribunal,' i lay no claim on the services of the police,' I will not do anything to disturb the peace within me, and if I must suffer on that account nothing can so well maintain my inward peace as suffering'such a man would be a Christain." So Frediic Nietzsche—Ger main's Nietzche—ruthlessly defined a Christain. Are then; very many? Are there any? Among th c ninety and nine of us who w is.li and want, who dwell in houses, who strive in business, who compete for suequestions instead of onethat is, the one I started with, and these two more: Do the churches teach Christianity ? Have people professing Christianity ever believed it implicitly ? In the first place I went to a highly intellectual member ol the Roman Catholic laity and showed him this article raw. Of my principal interrogation, "Is man's business consistent with God's business, according to Christ ?" I had written : "It is a cess, who let and hinder, who question to rack the souls of five save and spend, who live this strenuous life at all-is there one ? I simply ask : Is man's business consistent with God's business, according to Christ ? Man's Business i">. God's. When in the writing of this article I had reached the fulness of that interrogation, it became suddenly as personal to me AS 1 had wished to make it to the reader. I fell hound to dispose of it on my own account. 1 felt that I must go with it to some dark and silent recess, there to answer or to strangle it. However, the direct and logical way one leaves always to the last, dreading to find the truth and hoping secretly to lose the di rection ; and so I went instead to the tea' hers of Christianity. That was quite the obvious thing to do. In choosing to whom I should go, I favored such as had achieved eminence in theological thought over those who would be better known as dignitaries of the Church. And nobody was to be quoted by name, for the sake of unrestraint. The simplicity of my question surprised some, annoyed some, Ixired some, and touched few. I became so involved attheoutset in the; discussion of premises. principles,ami definitions that I bad to COtte back to where I started and begin all over again with the resolve not to debate the general question : "What is Christianity?" In doing so 1 had lost my way. But on setting forth the second time I had three hundred million Christians. It must be answered. It is inconceivable that Christianprog< nj forever or for long will go on pretending to believe the substance though practising but the shadow." He took instant exception to those statements. Why "incoil ceivable" that people should go on doing what tlfey had been doing for near two thousand years ? Why suppose that they were all at once become logical enough to feel the necessity of making any answer at all ? Does The World Move Up? I ha\ BAPTIST OHUROH 1 Tnej Bast and Shirley Sts. Rtv. Chat. A. Dauu, Pastor. II a in. and 7 p m< BAPTIST UNION OHUROH Parliament St. Rev, D. W'iUlurc, Pastor. Singing, Prayer, Samoa, 11 a.m., 7 p.m. Sunday School, 3 p.m. ll AKITY TABERNAOUB I' HI town Rtv H F Dann, Pastor Moraine at 11 1 in Evening at 7 pm WKSLKYAN MKTlfOMST OHUHCII EBRNRZRR Rev. b. J. Paine, Pastor East Shirley Street 11 B in. and 7 pm. CHRISTIAN BCIENCI 1 .iv Street, above Baok of tin in Sunday It am. and Wednesday 8pm GOSPEL HALL Dowdeswcll and Christie Streets Gospel Maeting, Evening it 7, Subject, Awakened at Midnight GOSPEL HALL I'owdeswell Street (near Victoria Ave.) Worship meeting at ll am Sunday School, 3 p m Gospel preaching, T j> m CALE O HO NOTICE OK KURNlTUREand HOUSEHOLD EFFECTS of late Mrs. Slomans. I3y private Bargain on Monday and Tuesday. See Mr. Bertram corner of Christie and Dowdcswell Streets, 2 ins. FOR SALE A whether conduct gains at all toward the ideal—that was the awful thing. "If man has fallen from a high estate, and now, in expiation of his original sin, L struggling back, all the rest is clear," he said.,, lake sway the doctrine of original sin, and all is dark and confused to me. But if man j has risen from a low estate, as 1 science thinks, then leave the explanation of his moral contradictions to science, which pretends to explain everything and has never explained that. He thought 1 should rather airaignscience for its failure to accouot for the paradoxicaliti of ethical man,than Christian! ty for its failure to make biro perfect ; and for the rest, be recommended mc to a Jesuit LOT OF LAND (fonnerly 2 lola) with .1 dwelling the doubt I house, outbuildings,


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I THE TRIBUNE NASSAU. BANANAS Baby's Welfare THE •ALLENBURYS' FOODS being perfectly digestible end closely rei Ri;„ g fcapf milk, give freedom from digestive ailments, promote sound sleep and ensure vigorous health and development. sSllenburgs and the ALLENBURYS FEEDER. Simplest and Best. MALTED FOOD No S fr roat 6 aaaal&a i*mi> MILK rOOO Nn.. TO U OBTAINED FROM ALL CHEMISTS AND STORES. A Paa.pc.iri • lefaaU Feeding -ma Mtufcaut Free. ALLEN A BANBUBYS Ltd. London. E n gland. if Jr..**: §&£ l&Hrfgg -•*.-; "WEfil RUSKS (Mshed) %  10 %  aalsiaswsrde. Good Morning Rupture Cured We Are Introducing! *; The Brooks Appliance Sanitary Reliable Fruit of the Loom 36 in. at 7J per yard. NOTICE American Silk American Casliniere American Cotton Lisle HOSIERY They have stood the test. Give real foot comfort. No seams to riii. Never become loose or bagKyThe shape is knit innot pressed in GUARANTEED for fineness, style. su|riority of material and workmanship. Absolutely stainless. Will wear 6 months without holes, or new ones fre e. OUR. SPECIAL, OFFER to every one tending us stal note, to cover advertising and snipping charges, we will send post paid, with written cui.rantee, backed by a five million dollar c<>mpanv, either t Psvire of our 75c. value American Silk Hosiery. or 1 Pairs of our 50c. value .4111• %  11 %  .ii Cnshmore Hosiery, 4 Palre of our 50c. Value, THE REINDEER is an inhabitant of the Arctic Region, and it is possibly the most useful of all the animals which dwell in this part of the world. Unlike the Reindeer, SUNLIGHT SOAP is to be found in all parts of the civilised world, and its great utility is vouched for by millions of contented housewives who would not lie without it. SUNLIGHT SOAP enjoys a well-merited reputation, it is absolutely pure,and will not harm the mostdelicate fabric. A piece of Sunlight Soap used in your next wash will convince you of its excellence. iai or Attorn*? Oenersl's Port-of-Spain, Trinidad. B. W. L I-IS-'I*. Dear 8trt* I m (ltd to be bl* to Inform you that the "truss" (f> I got from you In September la a complete success. It haa aupported ar rupture perfectly alaoe I llrat were It. I have been ruptured since I can remember and tried at different intervale aeveral makes of trues without success I was beginning to think I should have to undergo an operation, as the rupture was gradually getting worse. Now. however. I conelder myself practically cured. To my mind one of the great points about your Invention Is that one does not feel Its pressure anywhere, although that pressure never actually relaiea. After the nrst few days I have not felt Its pressure any more than I do my trouse.r suspenders. You are quite welcome to make any use you like of this letter. Tours truly. J. H. Whitebeed. THE well known Dairyman of the East THOMAS M. KN0WLES Is now prepared to supply and deliver the purest milk to be obtained anywhere from his Dairy Farm on East Shirley Street^ opposite Williams Street. Orders may be ^delivered at his Store on East Bay St. No. 528, 'Phone No. 116. Delivery at from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m., and from 3 p.m. Ito 5 p.m. daily in Sanitary [Bottles. Many germs make milk impure, In Knowles' milk no germs are found ; Look at the bottles in which its sold, at [nowles who takes them all around. Milk like his needs no lactom eter, In verification of its strength, Liquor pura nee impura Knowles would never go that length. American Cotton-Lisle Hosiery or b Paire of Chlldren'e Hoeiery. * **•<*• Buptare Appliance Co. DON'T DELAY—Offer expncswhen dealer in your locality is selected. THE INTERNATIONAL HOISERY CO. P. O. Box 224 DAYTON, OHIO, U. S. A •TAKE NOTICE T HE Parish Hoot Shop, known as The Sign of the Ship'" in King's Street will be closed from Friday Jan. 22. prox., and the entire stock transferred to Charles Duncombe, Fast Hay Street. All outstanding debts are to be paid to the said Charles Duncombe, (who alone is auyoo hart any friends who suflri from denfhen, discharges of the ear. noises in the head,etc., tell them to write to the BEEBB EAR DRUM CO., IS Park Row, Nsw York City, mentioning this paper, and they will receive FREE, full instructions and directions how to cure themselves at home. The tkorr 1 C. E. Broom, was ha, been raring Huptnrr for oer SO years. If Hupturra. write hiss today. My Appliance Sent on Trial If you hare tried everything else, come to me. I have my greatest success where others fall. 8end attached coupon today and I will eend you. free, my Illustrated book on Rupture and Its cure, giving you the namea of many people who have tried my appliance and are extremely grateful. It gives constant relief where all others fall. I make It to your measure and eend It to you on a strict guarantee of satle. faction or money refunded, and I have thoriSCd to COllett the Same) : put my price so low that anybody, rich or poor, can buy It I send It on W A. MATHER UNDERTAKER D K-IKI • ii. inf.irm his friemK and ill* Public tliat 1 e Ins |U-t 100 ivrcl .1 o.Miplete outfit •' facilities f.-i il" bunf**ol an un• lert'k'r. wr.irli pi ires linn in position in iMnyoiii Fun* ra.1* tli1 o.'iv !><• ciiwii-ti'd to his cat* willi y-ifiii Riifl riespfllrti ; and rf*| %  < %  < 1 'ullv solicit* then p"iironau* (in nvi'iirrv firs! nrrlpiove I hat thes* ire the veiy lowest f'r llie fust class work. T HIS is to inform the public that if any person or persons are found trespassing on my lot of land situate on Forbes Hill in tlie Island ol Little fexuma, they will be dealt with according to the ERNEST CLARKE (Owner l JACOB CLARKE ((>versf er) Forbes Hill. Little Exuma uly 2 ^1(1 1915 REMOVAL The Printing Establishment of the I tibune" has this day been removed to \<>s. 25 and 27 Shirley Sireet, and North-east Comer of Charlotte Street. 20th Jan. '9i 5 Notice r ill*, is 10 inform my Ptnn ami tli** I 'ublir in < intrml ilial I IMV* "i" ii. .I my Public I'lark Sii.iili Sltop; RIM I am now Mtdy In dri Anything 111 1 • line ol (ieni;il ie|i.nr A GREATC


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JiSL LATENT WAR NEWS NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS Subscribers tu The Tribune M >nthlv ami upwards are nqoMtad not to pay subsrriptions tn the carriers but onlv at the Office, or to a Collect* fmm the Office, also to report to the Office any neglect on the part ni the carriers to deliver their paper. < ^ itante Nvilltus nddlclus |urare tn verba mnllrl. Being bound to %  woev r to the Dogma.* of no Me>atar. -THE TRIBUNEWANTS ADVTS. FOR RESVLT ADVERTISE IN "THE TRIBUNE Special Rataa to Yearly Advert! aera Vol. XII. No. 59. NASSAU. N. P.. BAHAMAS. SATURDAY. JANUARY 0. 1915. Price. THREE CENTS. When Christians Fight, Are They Christians? Oaret Qarrett By FOLLOWERS of Christianity are legion; and yet who among us is Christian ? It is written that on Thursday night. May 18, .\ n. 30, the disciples who had seen Christ ascend into heaven from Mount Olive to Jerusalem — "And when they come in, they went up into an upper room, where abode both Peter, and James, and John, and Andrew, Philip, and Thomas, Bartholomew, and Matthew,James the son of Alphaeus, and Simon Zelotes, and Judas the brother of James. . These all continued with one accord in prayer .1 ml supplication . and . .! the number of names together' were about an hundred and twenty." Acts, Chapter I, Verses 13,14, 15.1 And so the first Christians. But love ye your enemies, and do good, and lend, hoping for nothing again ;and your reward shall be great, and ye shall be the children of the Highest: for he is kind unto the unthankful and to the evil. LUKE vi 35. Lay not up for yourselves treasures upon earth, where moth and rust doth corrupt, and where thieves break through and steal. MATT. vi. 19. But lay up for yourselves treasures in Heaven, where neither moth nor rust doth corrupt, and where thieves do not break through nor steal : MATT. VI. 30. For where your treasure is, there will your heart be also. MATT VI. 91. Give to every man that asketh ARE ALL THE CHILDREN IN P FROM "THE BOSTON TRANSCRIRT" The darkness falls, the wind is high, Dense Mack clouds fill the western sky; The storm will soon begin; The thunder roars the lightnings flash, I hear the great round raindrops dashAre all the children in? cants are yet Christian, by inSo, of the countries now actuheritance, emotion, thought, and ally at war, Great Britain is 99. Tl softly to my my arm I They had been commanded to of thee ; and of him that taketh wait in Jerusalem for a sign away thy goods ask them not that should send them forth to again. spread the word. It came the LUKE. VI. 30. second Sunday afterward, the. Put up again thy sword into day of Pentecost, and the sign his place: for all thev that take was a gift of tongues with the sword shall perish with the which to teach to all the world sword, these simple things: MATT xxvl 52 Ye have heard that it hath! Such are the rulesof Christian been said, An eye for an eye, and con(klct as t|ie f(Um(]er Q{ C|irjs a tooth for a tooth : tiani|y gave them ntI MA 7.. r .V ; 3 I Now imagine with what But I say unto you, hat ye ^ he )S „ es ()n t )e resist not evil: but whosoever ( ,f Pentecost would have receiv'shall smite thee on thy right cheek, turn to him the other alS()# • r I calling themselves Christ's fol. c M '\ rT v -39-i lowers, from about ahundred And if any man will sue thee L„ d {w ,„ M at the law, and take away hy wou|(J to be fi iundre(j coat, let h.m have thy cloke also. I nlil|jon at the beginning of lhe %  : twentieth century, or more than eyre coining side; Their forms within hide; No other arms are sure; The storm may rage with fury wild, With trusting faith each little child With mother feels secure. But future days are drawing nea r; They'll Kofrom this warm shelter here Out in the world's wild din; The rain will fall, the Colo" winds blow, I'll si; alone and long to know Are all the children in? tradition. And it is so, as we may learn by examining ourselves. Many of us make no confession of faith, attend no church, and have theories and convictions which a churchman would pronounce heretical ; but a little reflection will prove how widely and deeply our every-day thoughts and reactions are governed by Christian precept and council. There fore we are Christian. We were born and we live in a Christian country, think in Christian terms, and have only a very dim conception of the non-Christian state of mind. Thus, both, statistically and psychologically, the people of the world fall into two great groups.Christian and non-Christian, and in 1900, according to Gustav Sunborg, whose figures are standard, there were in the world 494,250,000 Christians and 1,080,000,000 non-Christians, as follows: Christian ed, besides the gift of tongues, the revelation that the number And whosoever shall compel thee to go a mile, go with him twain. MATT. v. 41. Ye have heard that it hath been said, Thou shalt love thy neighbour, and hate thy enemy. MATT. v. 43. But I say unto you, Love your enemies, bless them that curse you, do good to them that hate you, and pray for them despitefully use yojf, and persecute you. MATT. V. 44 For if ye love them which love you, what thank have ye? for siuners also love those that love them. LUKE. vi. 32. And if ye do good to them which do good to you, what thank have ye ? for sinners also do even the same. — LUKE. vi. 33. And if ye lend to them of whom ye hope to receive, what thank have ye? for sinners also lend to sinners, to receive as much again. LUKE. vi. 34. one third of all human beings, and that at this time no civilized tongue of man would be strange to Mis precepts With what passionate certitude Peter, perhaps could have pictured the state of the world, when one-third of it should have learned to love its enemies and to practise non-resistance, "'. ,l c I humanity, simplicity, selfdiscip1 line, and toleration He might have known that the benefits would be unevenly distributed over the face of the earth, owing to the strange perversity of man, but had it been given him to imagine countries and continents and races calling themselves "all Christian," he would have been sure of what to expect in them—and he would have expected of all things peace. And if one had said to him, "Nay, Peter, nineteen hundred years hence your Christian will be more warlike than the pagan, and in Europe, about 1914, though above ninety-five per cent, of the people profess Chrislave shelter then seting strong Will they cure, Where hearts are wa and sure, And love is true when tried? Or, will they find a broken reed, When strength of heart they so mucli need To help them brave the tide? all; His will is yield God knows it best; I'll shield them now, and the rest In His most righteous hands. Sometimes the souls He loves arc riven By tempests wild, and thus are driven Nearer the better land. If He should call us home before The children land on that blest shore. Afar from care and sin, I know that I shall watch and wait, Till He, the keeper of the gate Lets all the children in. Catholic Protestant GreekAbyssinian Armenian Others Confucians and Ancestor Worshippers. I lindoos Mohammedans Budhists Polytheists Jews 240,000,000 150,000,000 100,000,000 3,000,000 1 ,000,000 250,4900 r\ 494,250,000 Non-Christian 340,000,000 220,000,000 200,000,000 200,000,000 110,000,000 10,000,000 tianity, two Christian countries will beat war with three others for advantage, and both sides will be calling upon non-Chris tians to help kill Christians—" what won Id Peter have thought as to the quality of twentiethcentury Christianity ? The Statlatlcal Chriatlexn The state of Christianity in the world to be treated statistically at all must be treated broadly. There would be a very important difference between the number of followers, which alone is statistically reported, and the number of actual communicants, which is a variable ratio. The people of a giver country may be classed as all or nearly all Christian, though the number of church communicants is very much less, the assumption being that the non-communi1,080,000,000 The distribution of Christian population in 1900 was as fol iows : Total Population Kurope* 400,600,000 Asia 904,000,000; Africa 144,700,000 North and South America 147,700,000, r44.600.ooo 97 9 Australasia 6,500.000 5,700,000 87.6 •Jews.Q.ooo.ooo Mohammedans 8,100.000 Others, 900,000 And the state of Christianity in the countries of Europe principally concerned in the present war was in 1900, as follows : Per Christians cent 382,500,000 95.4 30,000,000 3.3 8,600,000 5 9 Total Population United Kingdom France Germany Belgium Austria Hungary 47,100,000 Italy 32,500,000, Russia 109,700,000 Rumania 6,200,000 Other Balkans 9,000,000 42,300,000 J9,ooo.ooo 56,400,000 6.724,000 Christians 42,900,000 38,800,000 55,700,000 6,720,000 44.300,000 32,500,000 100,200,000 5,900,000 Per Cent. 99-5 9 contrasting columns we find that Christian has been at war with Christian forty-two times, Christian at war with nonChristian twenty-eight times, and non-Christian at war with non-Christian only fifteen times. And that is why one might have said to St. Peter that after nearly two thousand years of Christianity, the Christian would be more warlike than pagan. As you go backward through history it swings the other way, the pagan and non-Christian fighting more and the Christian less. But, of course, if you keep going back you come to the beginning of Christianity itself, which was to bring peace on earth, and nothing is proved save that it has failed to do so. In Spue of Chrlatlaxnity With the rise of Western civ (continue J on third page)


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Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Saturday, January 30, 1915
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
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General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Full Text
JiSL
LATENT WAR NEWS
NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS
Subscribers tu The Tribune
M >nthlv ami upwards are
nqoMtad not to pay sub-
srriptions tn the carriers but
onlv at the Office, or to a
Collect* fmm the Office,
also to report to the Office
any neglect on the part ni
the carriers to deliver their
paper. < ^
itante
Nvilltus nddlclus |urare tn verba mnllrl.
Being bound to woev r to the Dogma.* of no Me>atar.
-THE TRIBUNE-
WANTS ADVTS.
FOR RESVLT
ADVERTISE IN
"THE TRIBUNE
Special Rataa to Yearly
Advert! aera

Vol. XII. No. 59.
NASSAU. N. P.. BAHAMAS. SATURDAY. JANUARY 0. 1915.
Price. THREE CENTS.
When Christians Fight,
Are They Christians?
Oaret Qarrett
By
FOLLOWERS of Christianity
are legion; and yet who
among us is Christian ?
It is written that on Thursday
night. May 18, .\ n. 30, the dis-
ciples who had seen Christ as-
cend into heaven from Mount
Olive to Jerusalem
"And when they come in,
they went up into an upper
room, where abode both Peter,
and James, and John, and An-
drew, Philip, and Thomas, Bar-
tholomew, and Matthew,James
the son of Alphaeus, and Simon
Zelotes, and Judas the brother
of James. . These all con-
tinued with one accord in prayer
.1 ml supplication . and . .!
the number of names together'
were about an hundred and
twenty."
Acts, Chapter I, Verses 13,14, 15.1
And so the first Christians.
But love ye your enemies, and
do good, and lend, hoping for
nothing again ;and your reward
shall be great, and ye shall be
the children of the Highest: for
he is kind unto the unthankful
and to the evil.
LUKE vi 35.
Lay not up for yourselves
treasures upon earth, where
moth and rust doth corrupt, and
where thieves break through and
steal. matt. vi. 19.
But lay up for yourselves trea-
sures in Heaven, where neither
moth nor rust doth corrupt, and
where thieves do not break
through nor steal :
MATT. VI. 30.
For where your treasure is,
there will your heart be also.
MATT VI. 91.
Give to every man that asketh
ARE ALL THE CHILDREN IN P
FROM "THE BOSTON TRANSCRIRT"
The darkness falls, the wind is
high,
Dense Mack clouds fill the wes-
tern sky;
The storm will soon begin;
The thunder roars the lightnings
flash,
I hear the great round raindrops
dash-
Are all the children in?
cants are yet Christian, by in- So, of the countries now actu-
heritance, emotion, thought, and ally at war, Great Britain is 99.
Tl
softly to my
my arm I
They had been commanded to of thee ; and of him that taketh
wait in Jerusalem for a sign away thy goods ask them not
that should send them forth to again.
spread the word. It came the LUKE. VI. 30.
second Sunday afterward, the. Put up again thy sword into
day of Pentecost, and the sign his place: for all thev that take
was a gift of tongues with the sword shall perish with the
which to teach to all the world sword,
these simple things: MATT. xxvl. 52.
Ye have heard that it hath! Such are the rulesof Christian
been said, An eye for an eye, and con(klct as t|ie f(Um(]er q{ C|irjs
a tooth for a tooth : tiani|y gave them
ntI MA7..r.-V; 3 I Now imagine with what
But I say unto you, hat ye ^ ,he )Ses ()n t,)e .
resist not evil: but whosoever (,f Pentecost would have receiv'-
shall smite thee on thy right
cheek, turn to him the other al-
S()# r I calling themselves Christ's fol-
. .c M'\rT-v-39-i lowers, from about a- hundred
And if any man will sue thee Ld {w , M
at the law, and take away hy wou|(J to be fi ,iundre(j
coat, let h.m have thy cloke also. I nlil|jon at the beginning of lhe
-: twentieth century, or more than
eyre coining
side;
Their forms within
hide;
No other arms are sure;
The storm may rage with fury
wild,
With trusting faith each little
child
With mother feels secure.
But future days are drawing
nea r;
They'll Kofrom this warm shel-
ter here
Out in the world's wild din;
The rain will fall, the Colo" winds
blow,
I'll si; alone and long to know
Are all the children in?
tradition.
And it is so, as we may learn
by examining ourselves. Many
of us make no confession of faith,
attend no church, and have
theories and convictions which
a churchman would pronounce
heretical ; but a little reflection
will prove how widely and deep-
ly our every-day thoughts and
reactions are governed by Chris-
tian precept and council. There
fore we are Christian. We were
born and we live in a Christian
country, think in Christian
terms, and have only a very dim
conception of the non-Chris-
tian state of mind.
Thus, both, statistically and
psychologically, the people of
the world fall into two great
groups.Christian and non-Chris-
tian, and in 1900, according to
Gustav Sunborg, whose figures
are standard, there were in the
world 494,250,000 Christians
and 1,080,000,000 non-Chris-
tians, as follows:
Christian
ed, besides the gift of tongues,
the revelation that the number
And whosoever shall compel
thee to go a mile, go with him
twain.
matt. v. 41.
Ye have heard that it hath
been said, Thou shalt love thy
neighbour, and hate thy enemy.
matt. v. 43.
But I say unto you, Love your
enemies, bless them that curse
you, do good to them that hate
you, and pray for them
despitefully use yojf, and perse-
cute you.
matt. v. 44
For if ye love them which
love you, what thank have ye?
for siuners also love those that
love them.
luke. vi. 32.
And if ye do good to them
which do good to you, what
thank have ye ? for sinners also
do even the same.
luke. vi. 33.
And if ye lend to them of
whom ye hope to receive, what
thank have ye? for sinners also
lend to sinners, to receive as
much again.
luke. vi. 34.
one third of all human beings,
and that at this time no civiliz-
ed tongue of man would be
strange to Mis precepts !
With what passionate certi-
tude Peter, perhaps could have
pictured the state of the world,
when one-third of it should
have learned to love its enemies
and to practise non-resistance,
"'.,l.c I humanity, simplicity, selfdiscip-
1 line, and toleration He might
have known that the benefits
would be unevenly distributed
over the face of the earth, ow-
ing to the strange perversity of
man, but had it been given him
to imagine countries and conti-
nents and races calling themsel-
ves "all Christian," he would
have been sure of what to ex-
pect in themand he would
have expected of all things peace.
And if one had said to him,
"Nay, Peter, nineteen hundred
years hence your Christian will
be more warlike than the pagan,
and in Europe, about 1914,
though above ninety-five per
cent, of the people profess Chris-
lave shelter then se-
ting strong
Will they
cure,
Where hearts are wa
and sure,
And love is true when tried?
Or, will they find a broken reed,
When strength of heart they so
mucli need
To help them brave the tide?
all; His will is
yield
God knows it
best;
I'll shield them now, and
the rest
In His most righteous hands.
Sometimes the souls He loves
arc riven
By tempests wild, and thus are
driven
Nearer the better land.
If He should call us home before
The children land on that blest
shore.
Afar from care and sin,
I know that I shall watch and
wait,
Till He, the keeper of the gate
Lets all the children in.
Catholic
Protestant
Greek-
Abyssinian
Armenian
Others
Confucians and
Ancestor
Worshippers.
I lindoos
Mohammedans
Budhists
Polytheists
Jews
240,000,000
150,000,000
100,000,000
3,000,000
1,000,000
250,4900
--------------r\
494,250,000
Non-Christian
340,000,000
220,000,000
200,000,000
200,000,000
110,000,000
10,000,000
tianity, two Christian countries
will beat war with three others
for advantage, and both sides
will be calling upon non-Chris
tians to help kill Christians"
what won Id Peter have thought
as to the quality of twentieth-
century Christianity ?
The Statlatlcal Chriatlexn
The state of Christianity in
the world to be treated statisti-
cally at all must be treated
broadly. There would be a very
important difference between the
number of followers, which
alone is statistically reported,
and the number of actual com-
municants, which is a variable
ratio. The people of a giver
country may be classed as all or
nearly all Christian, though the
number of church communicants
is very much less, the assumption
being that the non-communi-
1,080,000,000
The distribution of Christian
population in 1900 was as fol
iows :
Total
Population
Kurope* 400,600,000
Asia 904,000,000;
Africa 144,700,000
North and South
America 147,700,000, r44.600.ooo 97 9
Australasia 6,500.000 5,700,000 87.6
Jews.Q.ooo.ooo Mohammedans 8,100.000
Others, 900,000
And the state of Christianity
in the countries of Europe prin-
cipally concerned in the present
war was in 1900, as follows :
Per
Christians cent
382,500,000 95.4
30,000,000 3.3
8,600,000 5 9
Total
Population
United
Kingdom
France
Germany
Belgium
Austria
Hungary 47,100,000
Italy 32,500,000,
Russia 109,700,000
Rumania 6,200,000
Other
Balkans 9,000,000
42,300,000
J9,ooo.ooo
56,400,000
6.724,000
Christians
42,900,000
38,800,000
55,700,000
6,720,000
44.300,000
32,500,000
100,200,000
5,900,000
Per
Cent.
99-5
9 987
99-9
94.0
100.0
9-3
95'
8,300,000 q.2
The actual figures, of course,
have increased since igcjo, but
the percentages of Christian to
total population have probably
changed very little if any. In
'iermany religious statistics are
better kept than in other coun-
tries, and have been brought
nearer to date. Those for the
year 1905 showed no decline in
the ratio of Christian to totall
population since 1900.
5 per cent. Christian ; Prance,
199-4 PC" cent; Germany, 98.7
[percent ; Belgium, 99.9 per
cent.; Austria Hungary, 94 per
cent. ;and Russia, 9.13 per cent.
Taking all six of them together,
they are 9.71 percent Christian.
That Russia and Austria-Hun-
gary show a lower percentage
than the others, is owing to the
fact of their having an admix-
ture of Asiatic population.
It is frequently nowadays al-
leged that a great deal of the
hate, unrest, and turmoil in the
world are owing to the decline
in religious faith that has taken
place in recent times, and there
are doubtless many who would
hold that the failure of Christi-
anity to keep peace in Eu-
rope is presumptive evidence of
there being less Christianity
there. Nothing in religious sta-
tistics shows that a decline in
Christianity has taken place.
On the contrary, the statistics
tend to show that the profes-
sion of Christianity has increas-
ed in direct ratio to the growth
of population. That there has
been a weakening of the au-
thority of doctrine is hardly to
be denied. Every one knows
more or less that this has hap-
I pened. And yet, if it were true
[in the highest degree alleged,
and even if it could be proved
statistically (which in the na-
ture of the case would be im
possible), still the failure of
Christianity to keep peace in
Europe, or to diminish either the
intensity or frequency of war in
the world, could not be ascribed
to that cause.
The truth is that Christianity
has never kept peace, in Europe
or elsewhere, against man's in-
stinct to fight for temporal ad-
vantage. The record roproaches
him.
Since the overthrow of the
Turks by the Holy League at
the famous battle of Lepanto,
in 1571, which freed Christen-
dom from the terror and menace
of the Mohammedan invasion
of Europe, the important wars
in the world have been eighty-
five in number, and when we
cast up the record int > contrast-
ing columns we find that Chris-
tian has been at war with
Christian forty-two times,
Christian at war with non-
Christian twenty-eight times,
and non-Christian at war with
non-Christian only fifteen times.
And that is why one might
have said to St. Peter that after
nearly two thousand years of
Christianity, the Christian
would be more warlike than
pagan.
As you go backward through
history it swings the other way,
the pagan and non-Christian
fighting more and the Christian
less. But, of course, if you keep
going back you come to the be-
ginning of Christianity itself,
which was to bring peace on
earth, and nothing is proved
save that it has failed to do so.
In Spue of Chrlatlaxnity
With the rise of Western civ
(continue J on third page)


THE TRIBUNE NASSAV. BAHAMAS
L. GILBKRT DUPUCIi,
Editor and Proprietor.
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OKFICK:
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XLbe Gribune
SATURDAY. Je.nue.ry 50, I9li
fit- PUBLISHED AT S 50 P. M.
O much depends on the
success of the campaign
being carried on in the
Eastern theatre of the war that
one reads with avidit) any
aeivs which throws light on the
situation. The cable news
merely give bare outlines and
the information they contain is
often conflicting. We repro-
duce below an article from
Truth which, to our mind, puts
the situation, up to the time of
its publication, clearly and in
an understandable manner:
"Though the campaign in the
Western theatre of war remains
in the same condition of stale-
mate as it was in a week ago,
events are beginning to shape
themselves somewhat different
ly in the Fast, and it looks as
though the Grand Duke Nicho-
las is after all going to get the
better of Marshal von Hinden-
burg, and force him to withdraw
his troops once more from Po-
land.
This second invasion of von
Hindenburg's has undoubtedly
been a masterly exhibition of
kensen, deployed his army be-
tween the Vistula and Warta
rivers on a front of some fifty to
sixty miles, his flanks resting on
the rivers, which, being both
navigable, served the purpose
of supplying the army with food
and ammunition. Taken by
surprise, the Russians, accord-
ing to their wont, retired before
the advancing army, leaving
behind many stragglers, most
of whom the Germans raked in
as prisoners of war. Mackensen
made straight for the Kalisz
Warsaw railway, two of his
corps getting beyond it, and
seizing the important railway
junction of Koluszki on line
leading from Warsaw to Czes-
tochowa. Tnen the Russians
turned on the invaders, attack-
ing them with great violence,
and isolating the two advanced
corps, which were almost sur
rounded. How these two corps
escaped is a marvel, but they
managed to fight their way
back to the main army, much
to their own credit, and to the
discredit of a certain Russian
general who came up too late
to complete their discomfiture.
This took place on November
29 and 30, since when one of
the usual siege battles, which
accustomed to be beaten in bat-
tle that one r^'eat more or less
seems to make no difference,
and we may expect to hear of
another rally of their broken
troops when they get back to
their frontier. The Servians,
however, have established their
reputation as first class fighters
and the Austrians wil! presently
have quite enough on their
hands in defending their own
territory without wasting their
strength in futile attacks on
their gallant little neighbour.
:o:
Clarence Town,
Long Island,
Jan. 19th 1915
To The Editor of The' Tribune"
Dear Sir,
Please allow me space in
your valuable paper to make
this short report.
At Clarence town there is an
experimental plot of Sea Island
Cotton which was planted from
the lath of September to the
18th of the said month 1914
that plot of cotton up to the
present is really line and is boil-
ing fearly well. The plants are
giving up to dale from 46 to
127 bolls. At present there are
no bugs and verv few worms,
are novel developments of lh th. wh marvellous war, has been in ; {||V .u)(| e lg t(J s|unv \ d
continuous process, both sides 1 re{..rn
entrenching themselves and! ,, jsreaya KOod S1ht ,
making attacks and counter at- ,,. at it is 011 the whoIe beau.
tacks without any appreciableLifu, We cannot account for
results. 1 he Germans are fight. the bugs or cotton atainner, '.hey
ing for life as defeat in mid C()me verv jcUy an(1 bree;,
winter in the centre of Poland 1 icl{ly and lhe oniy thin t
is not an enviable prospect, and ^ d ., tQ be Iedd to ,
can only end 111 a disastrous re-
treat.
After starting von Mackensen
on his way, Marshal von Hin-
denberg went round to Kalisz,
where he forthwith organised ; knows his business to a
another army with troops taken I have had a good deal
from Silesia, and these be sent
them.
Mr. G. W. Todd the gentle,
man that the Board got to show
us about the planting and grow-
ing of cotton is a man who
finish.
to do
with the man The Board had
witfl all possible despatch across before and be was all talk and
tffe Warta to attack the left [no work, but Mr. Todd is work
flank of the Russians, who were | ing talking and showing how
fighting on the line Lodz-Lowicz the work must be done to nurisl
Ilovo. This flanking army ar-
rived just in time to save von
Mackensen, who was being hard
the plant for it to get its pro-
per growth. A man of this kind
is the kind of man who will suit
strategy, which, considering the pressed, and who but for the ar- the Colony : we can quite 1111
(circumstances under which it|"valof reinforcements would
I was undertaken, reflects the ] have been compelled to retreat
highest credit on the Marshal. | before the superior forces which
During more than four months'
war he is the only German com-
mander who has succeeded in
winning the confidence of the
Emperor and in achieving some
measuie of success, Von Kluck,
Von Bulow, Von Hausen, Prince
Rupprecht of Bavaria, the Duke
of Wurtemberg, and now Count
.Von Moltke, have all fallen in-
to disgrace one after the other,
but Von Hindenberg is still in
favour, and has been given a
free hand to do what he likes
without interference from his
Imperial master. T.iough his
first attempt, made in October,
to reach Warsaw failed, he was
in no way disheartened, and
failure only gave him fresh cou-
rage to make another effort to
redeem the situation and turn
the tables on his adversary.
Leaving his army to get back
to the frontier as best it could,
he hurried to Thorn, summoned
General von Mackensen to his
aid from Danzig, and the two
together rallied the beaten army
under the guns of the fortress.
Using the admirable network
of railways which converge on
Thorn he collected fresh troops
from North, South, and West,
and brought them together with
such speed that before the Rus-
sians had repaired the railways,
which he had ordered to be des-
troyed, they suddenly discover-
ed to their amazement that
General Mackensen at the head
of a new army, reported to be
750,000 strong, was on its way
to Warsaw.
Advancing very rapidly, Mac-
iad been brought up by the
Russians. The effect of this
new movement o f German
troops was to force the Grand
Duke to draw back his left wing
from its position west of Lodz
in order to keep bis communi-
cations open with Warsaw, but
otherwise the situation remain-
ed unchanged,the general bat-
tle line extending from Ilovo on
the Vistula down to the region
of Petrokof. A second German
flank attack directed from
Mlawa, north of the Vistula,
with the object of taking the
right wing of Russian Army in
rear, has been unsuccessful. The
position in Poland is now more
favourable for the Russians
than it was a week ago, and a
stalemate is less likely to be the
result of the murderous fighting
which has been in progress for
the past ten days. Every day
the Germans are held in check
means a day gained for the
Grand Duke who is pouring re-
inforcements into the battle
line from the concentration ren
dezvous on the Bug. The left
flank of the German line is now
von Mackensen's vulnerable
pcint owing to the failure of
the German attack from Mlawa,
and it is quite possible that af-
ter another week's fighting von
derstaud him. We have had
many uplifted amongst us who
were swellhcaded, only looking
for ones money, but a man to
study the wellfare of the Colony
as well as his payment, the man
who takes an interest in the
Colony that's the kind we need
among us.
As regards onions we can grow
them here at Long Island, espe-
cially at Clarence Town; but
we want to find a Market Sisal
we can say is easily grown
in our District and at present
we have plenty, but owing to
the low prices in the Market we
cannot handle it at present, if
anyone were to hire to work
Sisal at 8s. per 100. To pay
his bill he would have to
bonow money from some where
to pay the labour bill. I myself
have not less than forty acres
of Sisal but since this great war
broke out, I have not made any
money from my fields because
there is no Market for it but we
are trusting it will soon advan
ce in price, and things will
again return to the old working
order. The present war has
crippled the Colony in general
but must we stop for that ? Nol
let us go on we are having good
seasons all over the Bahamas,
therefore let us plant everything
according to our Board's advice.
Such as grain products the
Bahamas should never have to
Hindenburg will throw up the [import from America. Our
sponge and retire to some more
genial winter quarters than are
40 be found in the wilds of Cen-
tral Poland.
Meanwhile the Servians have
won what looks like a decisive
victory, but the Austrians are so
laud will bring any vegetable
while we have rain.
It would be a grand thing if
the Board of Agriculture could
keep Mr. Toad on longer and
send him to more of the Islands
to teach Agriculture, and if
many of the out Islands take up
the matter it would benefit the
Colony. Surely this cotton plot
planted at Long Island really
was not planted in the real cot-
ton seasons but still it is fine
and had it been planted at the
proper time it could not look
any better, so my good friends
when even we have a rain fall
plant.
The corn crop at Long Island
for this year is good.
Thanking you Mr. Editor for
your kindness,
1 am Sir,
yours trulv,
VV.C.P MAJOR, J. P.
Clarence Town,
Long Island.
Latest War News
GOVKRNMKNT PKR8S
January 29 1915.
London: French reports say
that theGermansattacksagainst
the Allied lines in Flanders,
Fiance and Alsace during the
first three days of this week cost
the Germans 20.000 men, to
which must be added the losses
suffered in repeated attacks on
the Russians entrenchments in
I Central Poland.
The Allies announcement says
that all German attacks in the
West failed except near Craonne
where it is admitted the French
lost 800 men, and that was due
largely to the collapse of an old
quarry.
On the other hand the Ger-
mans asseit that thev inflicted a
severe defeat to the French at
Craonne and that they repulsed
all French attacks in tneVosges
and Upper Alsace with heavy
losses.
While it is evident that these
attacks and counter attackscost
both sides heavily it made no
great difference in lhe relative
positions of the opposing armies.
They convey the idea, however,
that the Germans have by no
means given up the idea of deli-
vering a smashing blow to the
Allied armies.
The British deny the report of
loss of any ships in Sundays
North Sea naval battle.
The Germans are bringing up
more troops with the apparent
intention of attacking the An-
glo-French before they can get
ready to meet them.
Washington:Senator Flet-
cher in defending the adminis-
tration dripping bill charged
that Rockefeller-Morgan-Per-
kins interests control 90 Percent
of shipping. He said that the
same interests controlled large
Eastern Newspapers which, he
said, accounted for their stal-
wart opposition to the bill. De-
mocrats will vigorously oppose
Republican contentions.
Washington:There is no
present need for increasing the
revenue was the decision of a
conference which included
President Wilson. At the end of
the year the government will be
better able to estimate the effect
of the European war. Mr Mc
Adoo holds to the belief that
there will be a deficit often
million dollars.
London:In the East interest
centres in the Carpathians
where the Austrians and Ger
mans have brought up a new
army to oppose the Russian in-
vasion of Hungary.
Vienna says they have re-cap-
tured some of the passes which
the Russians have been holding
in strength.
Nothing further has been
heard! from the Turkish army
invading Egypt.
January 30th 1*915.
London 39th.
Governor,
Bahamas.
Official news January 29th:
The French government report
a satisfactory day along the
whole front. South of Lys the
British artillery swept the route
and concentration points of Ger-
man troops.
In the region of Craonne the
French have re-captured whole
dispute ground, their total losses
about 800. German attacks near
St. Mihiel and in Argonne were
completely defeated and pro.
gress was made in Vosgrs and
Alsace.
The enemies losses between
Yprse and Vosges 25th to 27th
appear to exceed 20.000.
The Russian government re-
ports successful offensive north
of Tilsit and in Carpathians, es-
pecially southwest of Doukla
where the enemy abandoned
ammunition and stores.
(Wgwtdi
HARCOURT.
PICKKD UP
The Russians staff announces
renewed advances in East Prus-
sia and direction of railway
stations north of Tilsit, and
marked progress north of Rilka-
en and Gumbinnen.
The aim of the Russians is
the great Koenigsburg fortress.
German advances on the right
and left bank of the Lower Vis
tula have been unsuccessful.
They were driven b*ck with
heavy losses especially near Jid-
omitzo. Artillery skirmishes
continue in Bukowina.
Nearly a million Austro Ger
man troops are reported concen
trating in Southern Hungary
with the object of protecting the ,
Carpathian passes. Military-
experts look lor a great decisive
battle in this region.
On the western front both
German and French announce
gains at various points Ap-
parently the Germans are mov-
ing up heavy forces for a con-
centrated drive against the Al
lies lines between Labasse and
Bethume.
German aircraft last night
bombarded French position
around Dunkirk but amount of
damage is not yet known.
French claim the destruction of
one aerplane during the raid.
Greek despatches published in
London describe Constantinople
as seething with rebellion and
daily witnessing executions of
Turks oppossed to the dictrtor-
ship of Enver Bey.
London military observers see
indications that Germany is
making definite preparations for
withdrawal ol her troops across
the Rhine from the western war
front. Addition il fortifications at
Strasseburg a.e repotted in tele-
grams from Swiss sources.
Consul 'ill ii'.'. 'i; today reported
to the state depirtmenl that Villa
has been serinus'y wounded.
II e formal opining of t lie Pana-
ma Canal has been postponed '" "1
Maich to some date in July. It
was intimated tli.t it might he
unwise to withdraw th Atlantic
lleet 10 send it through the Ml al
at this lime.
January 30th 1915.
From Kegs York Herald.
London: Saturday: A tem-
porary quit in the western zone
and inteiest centers again in the
East where the Germans and
their allies are making every
effoit to induce Rouniania to
withhold her hand.
Military authorities here and
in Petrograd expect to see the
next great offensive move on the
extreme Austrian right in Buko
wina.
German forces have been sent
to this region to reinforce the
Austrians and drive out the Rus-
sian invading army.
Germany is bending every ef-
fort to induce Bucharest go
ment to reconsider
to join the Allies.
The only thing ho!
r*
L


THE TRIBUNE NASSAV. SaHAM
Total British
Number German
Unavailable for
various causes
{
maii in check is uncertainty
iegarding the action Bulgaria
would be likely to take.
Bulgaria it is asserted is still
demanding that part of Mace-
donia now under Servian rule as
the price of her neutrality and
this Servia is reported to be net
willing to part with.
Greece it is stated also objects
to Bulgaria extending her boun-
daries Westward taking the
ground that as this would place
a wedge between her and her
ally, Servia. Thus seemingly the
wholeof Balkan States are being
involved. It is stated it is not
likely to be cleared up until the
demands of Bulgaria are satis-
fied.
In East Prussia Russian offen-
sive has developed in the ex-
treme North where the renewed
fighting seems to confirm the
belief that a definite effort to
a Ivance North of the Mazurian
Lakes district where Russians
\\ re defeated lias been decided
on by the Russians General
Stall
More vital to both sides h >\v-
ever apparently is the campaign
in the Carpathians where to the
Southwest of the Dukla Pass
the Russians have delivered an
energetic attack and according
to their account of the combat
compelled the opposing forces
to retreat leaving behind am-
munition and stores.
Another skirmish with the
Turkish advance guard not far
from Suez is reported from the
British forces in bgypt but it
was not of a serious character.
On the other hand British
marines are said to have hi en
landed at Alexandretta in Asia
tic Turkey.
Petrograd: The Russian army
is advancing rapidly into Ea*i
Prussia abjective being Koenies- i "" * ,-' ".*,"""
I,,,,. Gfmans are rushing anal. ?_ ^J&AI 'I'*- &* ^
most entire gairison in tint fortress
TABLE GIVING THE STATE OF BRITISH AND GERMAN SHIPPING RESPECTIVELY AFTER IB
WEEKS OF WAR.
No. Of;
Steam- Per
sh ips.cen t :
of over age of:
i o o Total!
ton sjNu m-j
gross : ber
Gross
i Per
cent-
age of
! Total
Tonnage Gross
IT o n-
. nage
(-Captured ......
| Detained in German
ports
British j Held up in Baltic and
I Black Sea......
10,123
, 2,090
491
I
75 1
7'!
100
100
1.9
I
Total
'95
J
German
("Captured
I Detained in British or
Allied ports
J Seeking refuge in neu-
tral ports...
In German ports
v.
Total
Plying British
Plying or not
accounted for
Ge
rman
Known to be at sea ..
Ships over 500 tons
not accounted for
Steam trawlers not ac-
counted for
Small coasters not ac-
counted for
80)
I
16b I
I
646 j
3^9 j
1,38! J
9,928
20,523,706]
5.'34.7'o
535.55'
100
tec
2.9
5S.4
98.1
4o8f,926
9-3
20,122,173; 97.1
Total
I25
333
38l
860
41.6
549.794 10.7
with each other less than Chris
tian with Christian is no basis
for comparing Christianity un-
favourably with pagan or other
orms of non-Christian faith,
If
to Front and drawing on Warsaw
fronl in SH effort to prevent Rus-
sians from landing at Mazurian
positions.
London:Copenhagen corres-
pon.ient telegmph thai several
German airships have passed sev-
eral mifes off h.uiish (oast hound
East over liahic Sea, German
casualties in East Prussia during
August 'omI "September made \n>'.
lie tud.iy show losses in B*SI ex-
ceeded by far their en<>roi'ms l es on Western front. he th id m-
fantiv reserve and regiments num-
bers sixty one and one hundred an.I
fifty one no longer exist every
member been killed or wounded.
Bucharest : Via London :
Rou mania is steadily prepiring
for effeciive entrance in'o the
worlds greatest war the Rouma-
nian nrrnv is ready when 1 he trum-
pet sounds ill* call to Brim
F m iacini : In first fifteen min-
utes trading yesterday thiitv three
thousand slimes steel changed
hulls at f.iitli and as mueh inor-
dming remainder of the d.iv :>t
forty and five eights to forty whi*li
nunimum was left unchanged
though some sales at thirty seven
were reported, S'eel and Rending
were oenters heir attack. Mi
stocks suffered somewhat New Ha-
ven being driven down to its niin
iimiin of forty nine. There is ri i
valid reaoon for the decline tea'-
tionaiy tendency mused bv b ai
iiioveinei.i resulted iiwiecline in
wheat nn New York:- A de the efficient \ ->f (he stiingent fit
precautions now taken in nil Ns*
Vorb playhouses was given last
night when three thousand persons
were cleared from the Academy of
Music in three minutes. Shott
circuit in electric wires caused a
small fiie in which there was
nueh sm ike bni little d-tmr.e.
tinned From First Page)
ization, which is fundamental-
ly Christian, war has continue J,
never on account of Christiani
ty, the terrible religious wars in
contradiction notwithstanding,
te of it. That during
ndred years non-
e been at war
tern civilization lias been more
active than the older forms, and
that people professing Christian-
ity without being able to prac.
tise it have lately dominated
the world.
What a commentary upon
errant man, who can think with
the angels and behave like a
beast, that (lining nearly two
thousand years there is no in-
stance of his having collectively
practised pure Christianity,
though believing it to be the
most beautiful thing he has ever
possessedhis one priceless
treasure!
Now shall he have the cou-
rage to ask himself if Christian-
ity |is compatible with the was
01 his own existence >
The most destructive philo-
sopher who ever lived wrote :
"How very curious it is to see
a Nihilistic religion such RS
Christianity, sprung from and
in keeping with 1 decrepit and
wornout people, who have nut*
lived all strong instincts, being
transferred step bj step to ano-
ther environment that is to
SBV, fo a land of young people
who have not yet lived at all.
["he joy of the final chapter, of
the fold, and of the evening
preached lo barbarians and Cut
mans! How thoroughly all of
it must first hive been barbar-
ized, Germanized I To those
who had dreamed ot a Walhal-
la: who found happiness only
in war A supernatural reli
gion preached in the midst of
choas where no nation yet exist-
ed even."
I le indicted the Christian:
"The Christian has never led
the life which Jesus commanded
him to live."
Can he say that he has?
"That whieh is wrong with
Christianity,*' said this destruc
live philospher, "is that it does
none of the things that Christ
commanded. I le who says to
day, 'I reufse to be a soldier," 1
care not for tribunal,' i lay no
claim on the services of the po-
lice,' I will not do anything to
disturb the peace within me,
and if I must suffer on that ac-
count nothing can so well main-
tain my inward peace as suffer-
ing'- such a man would be a
Christain."
So Frediic NietzscheGer
main's Nietzcheruthlessly de-
fined a Christain.
Are then; very many?
Are there any?
Among thc ninety and nine
of us who w is.li and want, who
dwell in houses, who strive in
business, who compete for sue-
questions instead of one- that
is, the one I started with, and
these two more:
Do the churches teach Chris-
tianity ?
Have people professing Chris-
tianity ever believed it impli-
citly ? .
In the first place I went to a
highly intellectual member ol
the Roman Catholic laity and
showed him this article raw. Of
my principal interrogation, "Is
man's business consistent with
God's business, according to
Christ ?" I had written : "It is a
cess, who let and hinder, who question to rack the souls of five
save and spend, who live this
strenuous life at all-is there
one ?
I simply ask : Is man's business
consistent with God's business,
according to Christ ?
Man's Business i">. God's.
When in the writing of this
article I had reached the fulness
of that interrogation, it became
suddenly as personal to me AS 1
had wished to make it to the
reader. I fell hound to dispose
of it on my own account. 1 felt
that I must go with it to some
dark and silent recess, there to
answer or to strangle it. How-
ever, the direct and logical way
one leaves always to the last,
dreading to find the truth and
hoping secretly to lose the di
rection ; and so I went instead
to the tea' hers of Christianity.
That was quite the obvious
thing to do. In choosing to
whom I should go, I favored
such as had achieved eminence
in theological thought over
those who would be better
known as dignitaries of the
Church. And nobody was to be
quoted by name, for the sake of
unrestraint.
The simplicity of my question
surprised some, annoyed some,
Ixired some, and touched few.
I became so involved attheout-
set in the; discussion of premises.
principles,ami definitions that I
bad to COtte back to where I
started and begin all over again
with the resolve not to debate
the general question : "What is
Christianity?" In doing so 1 had
lost my way. But on setting
forth the second time I had three
hundred million Christians. It
must be answered. It is incon-
ceivable that Christianprog< nj
forever or for long will go on
pretending to believe the sub-
stance though practising but the
shadow."
He took instant exception to
those statements. Why "incoil
ceivable" that people should go
on doing what tlfey had been
doing for near two thousand
years ? Why suppose that they
were all at once become logical
enough to feel the necessity of
making any answer at all ?
Does The World Move Up?
I ha Man's moral \ earning,unquench-
able, indestructible, surviving
not only the experience that
conduct falls always short of
precept, but even
scholar who made no difficulty
of the principles of true Chris-
tian faith.
The great advantage of Ro-
man Catholic thought is that at
every point it is consistent with
itself. The teachings of Christ,
the able Jesuit said, taken lit-
erally from the Gospels, were
inconsistent and misleading.
They had been confused by
I many translations and had rest-
ed on tradition and recollection
in the first place. Christianity
was what the Church taught;
and the teachings of the Church
were consistent.
RELIGIOUS SERVICES
SUNDAY, JANUARY 31
ST. MATTHEWS OHUROH
Church and blinlcy St.s.
Rev. It'. S. Lovell, Hector.
7.15 am Holy Communion. 11 am.
Mattins and Sermon. 1U 1 j a ni. Sunday
School- 190 i'hi. Junior Catechism.
4 30 (mi. Senioi Catechism. 7 pa,
Evensong.
ST. mak<;akets
Sundays, EvflBtong and Address, &30 pm.
Thuis., Evensoos and Address, (5.30 piu
OHUROH OK ST. AUNES, V. M.
Grants Town, iilue Hill Road
Rev. Audity J. Brownt, Rector.
Holy Communion 7.30 a.m. Matins S.50
a.m. Miv-a Cantata and sermon 10 3D
a.m. Catechism 4 p.m. Solemn Even-
song and Sermon 7 p.111.
Week Day Services
Low Mass daily 7.30 except Saturdays.
Bveasoog Moo lay, Tuesday and Thurs-
day ,).:io p.m. Wed. and Friday 7 p.n
ST. FKAV.'ls XAVIBKSOHr/BOH
Rev. ChrytMtom Schrtintr, O.S.B.,
Vicar Ftrant
Mass andScrmon 1 1 a.m. Sermon and
Benediction 5 pin. Wvk I a vs Ma ss 7 am
SACRED HEART OHAPBL
I is) Shirley Street.
\l 1-. ,\ s,,,;. n g am. Benediction 1 n,
ST. ANDREWS PRBSBYTERIAH
CHURCH
Princes Street
Rev S. J. Pcnm-l:, Pastor.
Morning 11 a.m. Evening 7 p.m.
Zh>\ BAPTIST OHUROH
1 Tnej Bast and Shirley Sts.
Rtv. Chat. A. Dauu, Pastor.
II a in. and 7 p m<
BAPTIST UNION OHUROH
Parliament St.
Rev, D. W'iUlurc, Pastor.
Singing, Prayer, Samoa, 11 a.m., 7 p.m.
Sunday School, 3 p.m.
ll akity TABERNAOUB
I' hi town
Rtv H F Dann, Pastor
Moraine at 11 1 in Evening at 7 pm
WKSLKYAN MKTlfOMST OHUHCII
EBRNRZRR
Rev. b. J. Paine, Pastor
East Shirley Street
11 B in. and 7 pm.
CHRISTIAN BCIENCI
1 .iv Street, above Baok of tin in
Sunday It am. and Wednesday 8pm
GOSPEL HALL
Dowdeswcll and Christie Streets
Gospel Maeting, Evening it 7, Subject,
Awakened at Midnight
GOSPEL HALL
I'owdeswell Street (near Victoria Ave.)
Worship meeting at ll am Sunday
School, 3 p m Gospel preaching, T j> m
CALE
O HO
NOTICE
OK KURNlTUREand
HOUSEHOLD EFFECTS
of late Mrs. Slomans. I3y pri-
vate Bargain on Monday and
Tuesday. See Mr. Bertram cor-
ner of Christie and Dowdcswell
Streets,
2 ins.
FOR SALE
A
whether conduct gains at all
toward the idealthat was the
awful thing.
"If man has fallen from a
high estate, and now, in expia-
tion of his original sin, L strug-
gling back, all the rest is clear,"
he said.,, lake sway the doctrine
of original sin, and all is dark
and confused to me. But if man j
has risen from a low estate, as1
science thinks, then leave the
explanation of his moral con-
tradictions to science, which
pretends to explain everything
and has never explained that.
He thought 1 should rather
airaignscience for its failure to
accouot for the paradoxicaliti
of ethical man,than Christian!
ty for its failure to make biro
perfect ; and for the rest, be
recommended mc to a Jesuit
LOT OF LAND (fonnerly
2 lola) with .1 dwelling
the doubt I house, outbuildings, situate hetwei'n Muket St. and
East St. Sonth.
Apply to
SARAH JANE ALBURY,
1.1 KENNETH SOLOMON.
WANTED
COPIES of "THE 2TS0M-
BUS" August 1013 (Exhi-
bition Number)
Apply
" Tribune Oil ire
MISS LOUISE CADOGAN
IK' HFICATED NURSE
rom Bahamas General
Hospital. Can furnish testi-
monial--.
101 Shirley Street
CEJ
it
^;


I
THE TRIBUNE NASSAU. BANANAS
Baby's Welfare
THE ALLENBURYS' FOODS being perfectly digestible end closely rei
Ri;g fcapf milk, give freedom from digestive ailments, promote sound
sleep and ensure vigorous health and development.
sSllenburgs
and the ALLENBURYS FEEDER. Simplest and Best.
MALTED FOOD No S
fr roat 6 aaaal&a i*mi>
MILK rOOO Nn..
TO U OBTAINED FROM ALL CHEMISTS AND STORES.
A Paa.pc.iri lefaaU Feeding -ma Mtufcaut Free.
ALLEN A BANBUBYS Ltd. London. England.
if Jr..**: & l&Hrfgg -*.-;
"WEfil
RUSKS (Mshed)
10 aalsiaswsrde.
Good Morning Rupture Cured
We Are Introducing! *; _
The Brooks Appliance
Sanitary
Reliable
Fruit of the Loom 36 in.
at 7J per yard.
NOTICE
American Silk
American Casliniere
American Cotton Lisle
HOSIERY
They have stood the test. Give real
foot comfort. No seams to riii. Never
become loose or bagKy- The shape is
knit in- not pressed in
GUARANTEED for fineness, style.
su|riority of material and workmanship.
Absolutely stainless. Will wear 6 months
without holes, or new ones free.
OUR. SPECIAL, OFFER
to every one tending us or |K>stal note, to cover advertising and
snipping charges, we will send post paid,
with written cui.rantee, backed by a five
million dollar c<>mpanv, either
t Psvire of our 75c. value
American Silk Hosiery.
or 1 Pairs of our 50c. value
.4111 11 .ii Cnshmore Hosiery,
4 Palre of our 50c. Value,
THE REINDEER
is an inhabitant of the Arctic Region, and it is possibly
the most useful of all the animals which dwell in this
part of the world. Unlike the Reindeer,
SUNLIGHT SOAP
is to be found in all parts of the civilised world, and its
great utility is vouched for by millions of contented
housewives who would not
lie without it. Sunlight
Soap enjoys a well-merited
reputation, it is absolutely
pure,and will not harm the
mostdelicate fabric. A piece
of Sunlight Soap used in
your next wash will con-
vince you of its excellence.
iai
or
Attorn*? Oenersl's
Port-of-Spain,
Trinidad. B. W. L
I-IS-'I*.
Dear 8trt*
I m (ltd to be bl* to Inform you that
the "truss" (f> I got from you In September
la a complete success. It haa aupported ar
rupture perfectly alaoe I llrat were It. I
have been ruptured since I can remember
and tried at different intervale aeveral makes
of trues without success I was beginning
to think I should have to undergo an opera-
tion, as the rupture was gradually getting
worse. Now. however. I conelder myself
practically cured. To my mind one of the
great points about your Invention Is that
one does not feel Its pressure anywhere, al-
though that pressure never actually relaiea.
After the nrst few days I have not felt Its
pressure any more than I do my trouse.r
suspenders. You are quite welcome to make
any use you like of this letter.
Tours truly.
J. H. Whitebeed.
THE well known
Dairyman of the
East
THOMAS M. KN0WLES
Is now prepared to supply
and deliver the purest milk
to be obtained anywhere
from his Dairy Farm on East
Shirley Street^ opposite Wil-
liams Street. Orders may be
^delivered at his Store on East
Bay St. No. 528, 'Phone No.
116. Delivery at from 7 a.m.
to 10 a.m., and from 3 p.m.
Ito 5 p.m. daily in Sanitary
[Bottles.
Many germs make milk im-
pure,
In Knowles' milk no germs
are found ;
Look at the bottles in which
its sold, at
[nowles who takes them all
around.
Milk like his needs no lactom
eter,
In verification of its strength,
Liquor pura nee impura
Knowles would never go
that length.
American Cotton-Lisle Hosiery
or b Paire of Chlldren'e Hoeiery. * **<* Buptare Appliance Co.
DON'T DELAYOffer expncswhen
dealer in your locality is selected.
The International Hoisery co.
P. O. Box 224
DAYTON, OHIO, U. S. A
TAKE NOTICE
THE Parish Hoot Shop,
known as The Sign of
the Ship'" in King's Street
will be closed from Friday
Jan. 22. prox., and the entire
stock transferred to Charles
Duncombe, Fast Hay Street.
All outstanding debts are to
be paid to the said Charles
Duncombe, (who alone is au-
yoo hart any friends who suflri
from denfhen, discharges of the
ear. noises in the head,etc., tell
them to write to the BEEBB
EAR DRUM CO., IS Park Row,
Nsw York City, mentioning this
paper, and they will receive
FREE, full instructions and
directions how to cure themselves at home.
The tkorr 1 C. E. Broom, was ha,
been raring Huptnrr for oer SO years.
If Hupturra. write hiss today.
My Appliance Sent on Trial
If you hare tried everything else,
come to me. I have my greatest suc-
cess where others fall. 8end attached
coupon today and I will eend you. free,
my Illustrated book on Rupture and
Its cure, giving you the namea of many
people who have tried my appliance
and are extremely grateful. It gives
constant relief where all others fall. I
make It to your measure and eend It
to you on a strict guarantee of satle-
. faction or money refunded, and I have
thoriSCd to COllett the Same) : put my price so low that anybody,
' rich or poor, can buy It I send It on
W A. MATHER
UNDERTAKER
DK-IKI ii. inf.irm his friemK
and ill* Public tliat 1 e Ins
|U-t 100 ivrcl .1 o.Miplete outfit '
facilities f.-i il" bunf**ol an un-
lert'k'r. wr.irli pi ires linn in
position in iMnyoiii Fun*-ra.1* tli1
o.'iv !>< ciiwii-ti'd to his cat* willi
y-ifiii Riifl riespfllrti ; and rf*| << 1
'ullv solicit* then p"iironau* (in
nvi'iirrv firs! nrrlpiove I hat thes*
ire the veiy lowest f'r llie fust class
work.
THIS is to inform the pub-
lic that if any person or
persons are found trespassing
on my lot of land situate on
Forbes Hill in tlie Island ol
Little fexuma, they will be
dealt with according to the
ERNEST CLARKE
(Owner l
JACOB CLARKE
((>versf er)
Forbes Hill. Little Exuma
uly 2 ^1(1 1915
REMOVAL
The Printing Establish-
ment of the I tibune" has
this day been removed to
\<>s. 25 and 27 Shirley Sireet,
and North-east Comer of
Charlotte Street. 20th Jan.
'9i 5
Notice
rill*, is 10 inform my Ptnn
ami tli** I 'ublir in < intrml
ilial I Imv* "i" ii. .I my Public
I'lark Sii.iili Sltop; rim I am now
Mtdy In dri Anything 111 1 line ol
(ieni;il ie|i.nr ^hoeing -i"." Ily \li orji dime
Meilianic.rllv.
P. K. \W\ I EH,
WANTED
OLD BAHAMAS POSTAOE
STAMPS
1. I. prey VlO
I Edward
Telephone for Appointments 275
MRS. M. WATSON RUDD
At Hotel Nassau
tand Hotel Colonle.1
until Slat March
Chiropodist Cosmetician
Kahler Gra- Marinello Gra-
duate duate
New York
Kerosene
1502
IN New 50 gallon Galvaniz-
ed Iron Drums at i8cts
par Gallon.
In 10 gallon Cans at sorts
per. Gallon.
Drums and Cans returnable
Full particulars at Office
"Frances E.," Nassau N. P.
C. C. SAUNDERS
or to such person as may be
authorised bv him in writing.
W. LOWNDES.
Cosmopolitan
HIGH SCHOOL
Opens on
Monday, Oct. 5th
in Aurora Hall
on Charlotte Street.
For particulars apply to
Prof. G. G. Coffin, head mas-
ter, or Mr. J. P. Simms.
Johnson's
Artistic Wood
Finishes
Johnaon'a Prepared Waxa com
pletc finish and polish for all furniture
woodwork ami floors.
Johnaon'a Wood Dyefor the artistic
Coloring of all wood, soft or hard
Johnson's tinder Laca spirit
finish, very much superior to shellac or
vainish
Johnaon'a FIrvi Wood Finish I m
beautiful, artistic, hand-rubbed effete
without the excuse of rubbing.
Johnaon'a Ptaete Wood Fillerfor
tillni.' the grain and pores of wood,
preparing i< for the finish.
Johnaon'a Powdered Waxfor bal
room floors.
FOR SALE BY
trial to prove what
nu
orr tof.b corpoy*
ANII POST TODAY.
Postage tV4 Penes, or te. to P.
say le true.
BELOW
9. A.
FKBE INFORMATION COUPON
C. B. Brooks. State St..
Marshall. Michigan. U. S. A.
Please send me by pest. In plain wrap-
per, your Illustrated Book snd full In-
formation about your Appllancs for ih.
curs of rupture.
Nam*
Addrsss
YplVaas writ* plainly)
One Od. grey lilac
One 6d grey lilac sur-
charged ^d. One1
I't One \ King
green or black,
Address I- GREY .are 'of
TRIBUNEenclosing sam-
ples and prices.
I he f.
look:
lllnwillj'
Blank form*
be had at "The'! i ibiine'

Chas. E. Albury
For Results
Advertise in
The Tribune
Mapes Fertilizers
/ ho-lv carry in stock the
following formulas:
Pine&ppie. lt has been prov-
en that this has no equal
and a visit to fields using
same will convince you.
Vegetable.Now is the time
to use this and increase
your yield in Tomatoes,
Potatoes, Onions and all
other vegetables by ioo
per cent.
Orange Tree.To assist the
growth of Young Citrus
Tree.
Fruit and Wine.Increase the
yield and growth of old
Citrus trees.
For further information
and books on the use of these
Eertilizers, please apply to
WALTER K. MOORE
Agent for Mapes Fertilizer
in tht Bahama*.
if
mav he
Ofifice.
Duty Entry.
Eree Entry.
Warehouse Entries.
Sponging Articles.
Ship's Reports.
In quantities at Special Rates-
Shingles
Rest No. i Heart 51 n. Cypren
Shingles at 99.60 per thous
sand of 20 bundles
Discounts on lots of over
5000 shingles.
Special Price
also on cheaper grades also
jin. Cypress at 96.7a per
thousand of 20 bundles. This
price made possible by a very
large purchase.
Fresh stock arriving every
week.
C. C SAUNDERS.
GASOLINE
I
N Drums and to Gallon
Cans. Price one shilling
per Gallon. All previous
prices cancel I ed.
C. C. SAUNDERS
East Bay St.
Nassau N. P.
Jan. 5th 1915.
WANTED.
A GOOD Ferrule Cook who can
Read, write and go errands. A
middle age person of good charac
ter preferred. For furthur infoi-
mation, apply 10
SHADRACK T. WOOD
West St. Souih.
9th jany., 1915.4 ins-
Popular Mechanics
Magazine
WsBTTSN SO VOU CAM umoihstamd rr*>
AGREATC Pleas 11 which you may begin reading
Bany time, and which wUl hold your
lores* forever. You are living in the Mat
year, of the most wonderful age. of what le
doubtless the greatest world In the universe.
A resident of Mars would gladly par
$1,000 S^SiVrttr,
to thiamigarine.in order to keep Informed
our progress in Engineering and Mi
Are you reeding It r Two mill
neighbors sre, snd at jo the Jm
cine in
homes.-----..
young men and
the beet Ai
to an rises re
A^tavatssesaJee'-UO
SIX,
.sages llolle bow M
wtrsleeoouiflw. boast.
POPULAR]

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