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L. GILBERT D1TPUCH, Editor and Proprietor. OFFICE: 44 MARKET BTBIKE Nassau, N. P., Bahamas 'PHONE 200. p. O. BOX 163. PUBLISHED DAILY Monday, Wednesday and Friday single copy ..'. Tuesday, and "Thursday Jl, l,u !" a y—single copy Meekly Monthly ... \" S uarterljr ... a if Yearly... Vearly Id single copy id ... Ijd ... 5 d ... is. 6.1 ..4s. 6d ... 9S. ... 18s. PAyABLB IN ADVANCE Advertising Rates .-Six pence per line lor first insertion; three pence pet line for second insertion ; ami one penny per line lor subsquent insertions. Advertisements under tight lines 4 s. PUBLISHED AT b P.M. XTbe tribune THURSDAY, jt.nua.rv 2H 1915 The session of the Supreme Court closed yesterday. They were rather uneventful, which, is a consummation greatly '.o be desired at all times. Ten informations were filed by the I Ion. the Attorney General, which resulted in 6 Convictions, i Traversed, i Pronounced Insane, 2 Acquittals. No sentence exceeding 12 Mot. imprisonment was inflict. ed#which of itself indicates that the crimes were not of a serious nature. It is regrettable however that two thirds Of the crimimals were juveniles, and suggests that it would be to the best interests of the community if some other form of proceed ings could be possible ot being taken in such cases. We are of the opinion, and we believe it is shared in by the public; though we would re mark in passing that "public opinion" is a phrase both useful and concise and conveys an immense amount of thought, but at the same time it may be a very misleading phrase, because it is an outcome of the Struggle between authority and reason; we say that the concensus of opinion is that we have not yet reached the ultima reels of the best 111 our jury system. It is capable of vast improvement, and we have no hisitation in saying that when the three factors of education, the press, and Christianity are united, though it will not be in our day, man will become more rational, more in keeping with the orthodox views and teachings of the Pulpit. Speaking Generally, there is a great need of education in so for as it is attainable in the Bahamas. The proper and correct administration of the Laws of ones Country, be it remembered, are made by the public for their own benefit primarily, but ultimately for the community at large. Our attention just now is engrossed by thoughts of the War, and it cannot be expected that it should be otherwise, but cannot we spare a little time and thought to our internal affairs? Wc are all prepared to shout for joy when victory follows -->ur arms in this conflict between "Right and Wrong" because our reason points the way, and without egotism, that standard of judgement is lofty and unassailable by the host of our casuistical foes. We are glad to notice from Our Contemporary that the highest expectations of the promotersof 'First Aid Lectures', as to applications to the class have been more than realised, but we regret that the list is likely to be closed to additional applicants. Wc 11 gard it as an inestimable boon, and it is extremely gratifying that the ladies of Nassau are cognisant that Lifeis not all Bridge and Court Golf and some kinds of "Daunces." They have now a rare opportunity of acquiring that knowledge which will enable them to attain to the highest stature of womanhood, . mistake I asked the Ameru My Dearest Mother :— The train is just pulling into Reno, Nev., where people go to get divorced—when they can afford it There are many indi cations that the people here are frivolous. We pased a little place called Coney Island. Up ahead WC bear people shouting. Here is a hotel with a bfg hall adjoin ing in which tliey ina\ \m\, moving pictures or play games of various kinds. I did not see any evidence of anything very unusual about the town. Wc pulled into Salt Lake City about noon yesterday and went up to see the Mormon Temple and Tabernacle. The guide started to show us around but we had to go to the Station just before we got inside the big tabernacle. The guide spent several minutes telling us about Mormonism in the original chapel which was built before the tabernacle. He said among other things that when the Mormons first came to Utah it were infested with grasshoppers, but the Lord sent multitudes of sea gulls, the first that were ever known here and they ate up the grasshoppers. They have never been many sea gulls here since that time. The way in which money is obtained for their religious pui poses is for each Mormon to givea tithe or one-tenth of his yearly income for the churc In this way those buildings have been erected comparatively poor people, I have the utmost respect foi the Mormons even if they d<> like more than one wife, whin I see terrible distance and the gigan tic mountains which lay bemagnificenl can Board for tickets via the Southern Pacific bom Salt Lake to Frisco instead of the Western Pacific, and we are ^oing to miss the finest scenery. The road we are on is the safer at this time of year however, as the other is frequently lioubled with snow We will pass under 40 miles of snow sheds to-day. Just v we are 1 limbing up to the top of the Sii 11.1 Nevada Mountains Our engine burns only keroseneand it is running up the mountain backwards, so that the engineer is on the very front of the train. My evesare weary from looking so long ..t the scenery. This is Effietalking now. Weare still passing through snow sheds They extend for over forty miles You know wc are passing through the Sierra Mountains now. The scenery has been beautiful. These mountains have wonderfully large trees on t lem and they are all covered with snow as lai as we Can see. It looks like fairy land. Now wc have < ome out of the snow sheds for a second to go into another one. The snowsheds have de< p lades along the Bid) s. These sheds cover a distance of nearly fifty miles. 1 have often read stories about the people who live along these sheds and keep them in order. Wc have seen some of their houses to-day. The only exit is out into tlie shed. They seem to hang to the sides of the mountain. Thej must lead very lonely lives. 1 suppose a few trains s'cp but ours hasn't. A little while ago we passed a lake that was not frozen over



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u It mussj&nvc been either a warm lake or a salt lake. I just told Frank that I thought \vc had seen snow to last us five years. Just now the snow is only nine feet high. Sometimes it gets a> blgh as thirty-five-feet. The people in the valleys botli in Utah and Nevada, like to have plenty of snow on the mountains because that means that they will have water enough to fill their irrigation ditches next summer. Just now wc passed a rather large bouse a short distance from the shed. It bad a tunnel leading to thesbed. I wish we could send you moving pictures of the scenes through which we have passed since we left Benton one we< i. ago. With the exception of Niagara Falls we didn't have anything so very interesting until after we left Pueblo, Colorado. The trip through Kansas was rather uninteresting. Nothing but level ground as far as we could see. They saw the railroad.Santa Fe passes through an uninteresting part of Kansas. We have already told you about our stay at Rocky Ford. It was verv delightful and gave us a good rest. I will be glad to get into a big bed to-night and have %  good sleep. When we left Pueblo the other day iI was snowing very bard and it looked as though wc might get caught in a big snowstorm in the Rockies but it soon cleared ofl and wc ha I a beautiful trip with a gorgoeuS sun and sky. The bareness and the bleak ness of the Rockies were a sui prise to me. There was very little snow except on the high east peaks. These mountains we are going over to day a re covered with trees so do not lopk so bare The snow covers all of the rocks, [n places it is piled in great drifts. I just wish you could see it. It hardly seems possible that at nine o'clock to-night we will *1)e where the Mowers are blooming. If we don't get out of these snow sheds pretty soon I will think they are a hundred miles long. I think the thunder storms along the track. me of the Poconos. My general impression of the Western people is that they are great hustlers. The towns are most progressive and every where are indications of pride in their State and town. Frank will finish this. Goodbye, Effie 3:011 p. 111. Thursday, and we are just 142 miles from Sail Francisco. It is very interesting after we left the 40 miles of snow shedto watch the train gradually sink below the snow line. We had our magnificent view of the most beautiful valley a half mile below us. An hour ago the snow was three feet deep, along the track. Just this minute we passed an orchard with Uie tnes full of the most beautiful apples. There is no snow here and I suppose there never is. Everything looks green and beautiful. We just stopped at ColfaX, and you should see the wonderful lawn in front of then hotel. I can glance back over ni\ shoulder and see the snow capped mountains which we left but it is so warm litre that they had to turn ofl the he.it. On both sides of us tlu're are apples, peach and other orchards I cannot tell what some of the '; are. Just now we aie I Kissing an orchard of little gnarled trees which we never saw before. TheSierrc Nevada mountains aie covered with pine trees, but you see no other kind of lumber until you getbclow the snow line. There is so much water here that I feel sure it must have rained a short time ago. I believe l saw a streak of gold in the rock wc just passed but we .ire going too fast to find out. The railroad is double tracked here and the mad which goes Up winds around under us SO88 to have an easier grade. It is a gie.it piece of engineering. We are going down very slowly though I see no IC.ISOII why we should. We pist passed some llowers in bloom. Yonder go two men out hunting without any coats, and there wo pass another man in his shirt sleeves. Why not when the grass is growing all just passed *ays, "Prohibition will paralyze California." We are passing a little stream full of mundv water as though it had just been raining. Yonder are some women out in the garden with their sun bonnets on. On the other side of us are some beautiful palms, and there are some roses out in bloom. The name of the town at which we arc stopping now is Auburn, <2\ miles from Frisco. It is 1300 feet above sea level, so we have dropped five thousand feet since I began this letter. Yonder is an orange on a tree, though it is not oiangc season The atmosphere is getting so fragrant that it comes through the double panes of glass. There is a tree of oranges. I just saw some mullen, the first thing 1 have seen that I recognized. We just saw a whole grove of fig trees. There is some of tielargest cactus I ever saw. In the distance is a gTOVe of ( ] ,], %  palms. And to think that we had left the snow only a few hours ago. three feet deej). I want to mail this at Sacra mento. with the hope that you may get it before we send our next letter. We will not have go much time to write to-morrow, as we want toseethe exposition grounds. Your loving son and d>*ught< r. Frank and Kffie. — :o: — must be pretty hard up here for 1 see so many trees that have •beep struck by lightning. f Before we got up where the snow was so deep we saw them We do no) know where we will stay in Frisco, 'nit we have the hotel where Harry staid and w e will probably go there. They are lighting booze out filling ice houses. It reminded here too. A big sign which we Latest War News J anua i j J7H1 1915. GOVERN MKNT I'iiKss A big military venture to celebrate the Kaisers birthday which occurs today was planned by the Germans who made a determined effort against the Allies in Flanders but, according to British and French reports, all their attacks failed. The Russians are making another attempt to advance into Fast Prussia. Russian submarines in the Baltic have torpedoed the German cruiser Gazelle which how* ver reached port with the assistance of a Swedish steamer. Sir Edward Grey replies to Dr llollweg relative to the agreeIgiuin and It was officially announced this evening that tfce Lion and the Meteor disabled in Sundays North Sea battle were towed into port. Speedy repairs will be given. Washington:—The $13.5.000. 000 cotton loan is to be abandoned after February 1st unless there is an unexpected demand. The subscriptions of all but the Southern states will be re turned. Washington:—Senator Tillman proposes that the United States await the outcome of the European war before construct ing new battleships. Me b 111 speed more than in pow< 1 and cites the late North Sea fight as an illustration. The Hague:The Dutch are to maintain their entire army as itualities may call the country to aims any moment. "Albany: —It was announced tonight by the attorney generals office that William Jerome had been dismissed as deputy attoiney general to assist in the prosecution ol Harry Thaw, on account of the expenses. Houston, Texas: —A lone boy today robbed the Guaranty St ite Bank of $13,000 afti 1 forcing the cashier and bis assistant into the vault at the point of a pistol. New York: -The Steel Corp .ration paid the s m a lie dividends of one half of # Ope percent ever known in its history. uient between (beat Biitaiu and declares thai the Brussels documents were made purely informal and in case that the British needed to defend lielgian neutrality after Germany had violated it. January a8th 1915. London 27th. Governor, Bahamas. (Uncial news January 27th." Several violent German attacks against our lust division near I.abassce Monday weie lepulsed with severe losses. At one place on the Labassee Road threehunrin d • iermans were killed and fifty five captured. The French government re ports similar attacks Kast of Ypres where the Germans lefi three bundled dead. W< st of Craonne there were violent German attacks and they captured some French tren hes, and regained parts of lost ground fHARCOURT) PICKED UP French and German offiicial Statements indicate heavy lighting on the Western battle line with great losses on both sides Victories claimed by both. "*r



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^" THE MOST STRIKING feature of the POLAR BEAR is its beautiful white coat, which is in keeping with the whiteness of its surroundings in the Arctic regions. The snow in those regions, however, is not whiter than clothes washed with SUNLIGHT SOAP. The beauty of SUNLIGHT SOAP is in its purity, and the easy way in which it releases dirt from clothes, without injury to the fabric no matter how fine it may be. It is manufactured with the purest materials and there is £ 1,000 Guarantee of Purity on every bar. Try it on your Nert W*,h-dy. tM( STRAYED Into my Premises on West Hill Street. 1 Turkey Owner will please apply for it and pay cost of advertising, when it will be delivR. BARNES SHEPHERD 2Sth 1915. REMOVAL The Printing Establishment of the "Tribune'" has this day been removed to Nos. 25 and 27 Shirley Street, and North-east Corner of Charlotte Street. 26th Jan Shingles Best No. 1 Heart 5m. Cypres Shingles at 89.60 per thousand of 20 bundles Discounts on lots of over 5000 shingles. Special Price also on rheaper grades—also 5U1. Cypress at $6.72 per thousand of 20 bundles. This price made possible by a very large purchase. Fresh stock arriving every week. C. C SAUNDERS. Good Morning! We Are Introducing American Silk American Cashmere American Cotton-I.isle HOSIERY They have stood the test. Give real foot comfort. No seams to rip. Never become loose or ba>;j;y. The shape is knit innot pressed in. GUAR.ANTEEI) for fineness, style, superiority of material and workmanship. Absolutely stainless. Will wear 6 months without holes, or new ones free. OUR. SPECIAL OFFER to every one tending us si 00 in currency or postal note, to cover advertising arul slii| ping charges, we will send post paid, with written guarantee, backed by a five million dollar com] any, either Pair* of our 75c. value American Silk Hosiery, 'I'fviis of our 50c. vnlue %  American Cnshineie Hosierv, or Pvlr of our 50c. Value. American Cotton-l.isle Hosiery or 6 I'nlrs of Children's Hoeiery. DONT l)KIou can select the sizes from a very large variety of up-to-date styles at prices considerably cheaper than regular lines kept in stock. CALL EARLY and secure your size at WILLIAMS' WHOLESALE AND RETAIL SHOE ESTABLISHMENT 277 and 279 Bay St City Notice T HIS is to inform my Patron and the Public in General that I have opened my Public Black Smith Shop; and am now ready to do anything in l' e line of General repair or new u rk Horte Shoeing Specially. All ork done Mechanically. P. A. HUTLEE. GASOLINE I N Drums and 10 Gallon Cans. Price one shilling per Gallon. All previous prices cancelled. C. C. SAUNDERS East Bay St. Nassau N. P. Jan. 5th 1915. O ne 6d. grey lilac One 6d. grey lilac surcharged 4d. One 6d. grey violet One £1 King Edward.— green or black, Address L. GREY care of TRIBUNE— enclosing samples and prices. WANTED C OPIES of "THE STROMBUS" August 19x3 (Exhibition 1 Number) Apply "Tribune"()ifice W A. MATHER UNDERTAKER D ESIRKS to inform his friends and the Public that re has just received a complete outfit of facilities for the buisness of an undertaker, which places him in a position to carry out Funerals that may be entrusted to his care with system and despatch ; and respect fully solicits their patronage Get my Prices first and prove that theee are the very lowest for the fust class work. T HIS is to inform the public that if any person or persons are found trespassing on mv lot of land situate on Forbes Hill in the Island of Little Exuma, they will be dealt with according to the Law. ERNEST CLARKE (Owner) JACOB CLARKE ((Jverscer) Forbes Hill, Little Exuma July 23rd 1915 WANTED. A GOO I) Female Cook who can Read, write and go errands. A 1'iitldle age person ol good charar. ter preferred. For ft.rthur infoimation, apply to SHADRACK T. WOOD West St. South. 9th Jany i95-—4 ms Kerosene 150^ I N New 50 gallon Galvanized Iron Drums at i8cts per Gallon. In 10 gallon Cans at 20cts per. Gallon. Drums and Cans returnable Full particular*; at Office "Frances E.," Nassau N. P. C. C. SAUNDERS MISS LOUISE CADOGAN C ERTIFICATED NURSE from Hahamas General Hospital. Can furnish testimonials. 101 Shirley Street I 1



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Nulliu* &ddtctu |\irar to vrb mBiry }*, I9IJ NO. 57 A LAW UNTO HER8ELF BY ELLA WHEELER WILCQX There was a man it was said one time, Who went astray in his youthful prime. Can the brain keep cool and the heart keep quiet When the blood like a river is running riot? And boys will be boys, the old folks say. And the man is the better who's had his cay. The sinner repented and the preacher told Of the prodigal so.i who came back to the fold. And Christian people threw open the door With a warmer welcome than ever before. Wealth and honor were his to command And a spotless woman gave him her hand. And the world strewed their pathway with blossoms abloom, Crying "God bless lady and God bless groom." There was a maiden who went astray In the golden dawn of Life's young day She had more passion and heart and head, And she followed blindly where fond Love led And Love is ever a dangerous guide To wander at will by a young girl's side The woman repented and turned from sin, But no door opened to let her in. The preacher prayed that she might be forgiven, But told hea to look for mercy—in heaven. For this is the law of the world we know— That the woman is stoned, While the man may go. A brave man wedded her after all, But the world said, frowning "We shall not call." A young won.an declared she had B moral right to be "a law unto herself;" that it was not the business of society to make rules for her to follow. She beleived each soul must find its own path in life, and seek its development in its own way. That is quiie true, but there are certain laws of life which, if violated,brine unhappinessand misery, as surely as physical distress follows the swallowing of some poisonous substance. One of these laws is the propensity of man to tire of a woman who has hroken a moral principle for his sake. A young woman became "a law Unto herself," and took up her abode with a married man who left his wife on the plea that she was not congenial. He could not ohtain a divoice, so the two were "laws unto themselves." After two years had passed by the pair was encountered by the wife. She asked the man to choose between them. He chose the wife ; he said she was able "to keep up the dignity of his position" better than the unfortunate victim of his passing passion. Then the husband and wife proceeded to force an immediate depariure of the foolish young woman, who9e position should have awakened their sympathy and compassion at least. Hut humiliation and misery of one kind or another usually aie the lot of the woman who becomes "a law unto herself." Everything of material value may be hers for a time, and the man's heait may seem to be whol ly hers, yet as time flies, lawless and hidden passion seeks a free exit, and easily 6nds one. No more unfounded idea ever gained hold upon the minds of the inexperienced' than that foolish theory prevalent in French literature, that a man remains more loy] al to the woman to whom he is not legally tied than to a wife. 'Once in a thousand cases such may i be the fact. All the other 999 wo' men who have loved unwisely find the lover seeking some excuse,, sooner or later, to end the associ'ation which has become irksome. Like the husband referred to, he prefeis the comradeship of the un congenial wife when put to the test, because she is the wife, to that of the more pleasing woman. for whom he must abandon respect able society. A man who will be untrue to a wife who trust> him, nnd who will wrong a girl who loves him In compiomising her for life, will, in the natural course of events, be disloyal to her and weary of his rela ions with her. He is like a watch with something the matter with the mainspring. He cannot long run true. To be "a law unto one's self" in religious faith, or in methods of busine-s, or in dress, or in politics, is all very well. Hut when this self-formulated code of lawi dngs others along with it, willy nilly, we must question its right of procedure. A married man oiu:ht to ask himself if he has the righ to place his wife in a position of humil iation, and to jeopatdize the name of another wo.nan before he proceeds to make laws for himself. A woman who thinks she is pri-j vilened to follow her own laws of conduct in these mat tars should facthe possibility of bringing nameten children into the World who will have a right to challenge her claim of a privileged character in being "a law unto hers* If." Meanwhile the wife who makesa triutn. phaiit'exit from a tragic situation, carrying the prodigal husband of! as trophy, ought to think of the desperate situation of the girl he leaves behind him, and soften her hen it toward her erring rival. The victor can alwavs afford to be generous. The woman who has won can afford to be kind to the loser; and she who has mastered can well stoop to wipe away the tears of the sinner. Hut alas "for the rarity of Christian charity !" Think twice, young woman, be fore you become "a law unto yourself, 1 ha man % %  tries t< mas, own moral laws, has an eaeief time when he attempts to return to the arms of society than the woman. It has been the way 01 world since to % %  nBorganiti end Will continue to be the way of the world for centuries to come. —"New York American" LATEST WAR NEWS The French report that tinGermans suffered reverses and re Losset in their attempt to cut the British line betv Labaaseeand BethuncThe German losses in this district alone being estimated at tWO thousand. Fierce counter-assaults continue between Nieuport and \ The Fci nch brought down a G< unao aeroplane in this region. In the region oi Perthea violent German attacks were repulsed and new ('.' %  mi m post* tions were destroyed at St. Mi" hiel. Ouiet prevailes in Lorraine and the Vosges. • The German statement says only artillery duels took place at Neiuportand Ypresend thatthe French assaults in the neighbourhood of Labassee broke down under German fi:e. It also reports the repulse of the Russian forces Northeast of hitmen in East Prussia. There is no change in the situation in Poland. Londoo:—Warships have beeil sent along the Suez Canal to take positions v here attacks are likely from Turks advancing on tinwaterway. New York: -Mother Joni B, of strike fame, todaj .1" epted the iovation of Mr. Rockefellow, Jr. to it accompany him west where the two will endeavour to settle the Colorado miners striki May ami June wheat reached new record prices in Clue. 0 today. Wear Armbrister's Shoes ffl 'I


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Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Thursday, January 28, 1915
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
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General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Full Text
Nulliu* &ddtctu |\irar to vrb mB geing bound to wee.r to tho Dogma.* o( no Mi\tr.
,
VOL XII
Ns-naau. N. P.. BkhKmM, Thursday, Ja.n>iry }*, I9IJ
NO. 57
A LAW UNTO HER8ELF
BY ELLA WHEELER WILCQX
There was a man it was said one
time,
Who went astray in his youth-
ful prime.
Can the brain keep cool and the
heart keep quiet
When the blood like a river is
running riot?
And boys will be boys, the old
folks say.
And the man is the better who's
had his cay.
The sinner repented and the
preacher told
Of the prodigal so.i who came
back to the fold.
And Christian people threw
open the door
With a warmer welcome than
ever before.
Wealth and honor were his to
command
And a spotless woman gave him
her hand.
And the world strewed their
pathway with blossoms
abloom,
Crying "God bless lady and
God bless groom."
There was a maiden who
went astray
In the golden dawn of Life's
young day
She had more passion and
heart and head,
And she followed blindly
where fond Love led
And Love is ever a dangerous
guide
To wander at will by a
young girl's side
The woman repented and
turned from sin,
But no door opened to let her
in.
The preacher prayed that she
might be forgiven,
But told hea to look for mer-
cyin heaven.
For this is the law of the
world we know
That the woman is stoned,
While the man may go.
A brave man wedded her af-
ter all,
But the world said, frowning
"We shall not call."
A young won.an declared she
had b moral right to be "a law un-
to herself;" that it was not the
business of society to make rules
for her to follow. She beleived
each soul must find its own path in
life, and seek its development in its
own way.
That is quiie true, but there are
certain laws of life which, if viol-
ated,brine unhappinessand misery,
as surely as physical distress fol-
lows the swallowing of some poi-
sonous substance. One of these
laws is the propensity of man to
tire of a woman who has hroken a
moral principle for his sake.
A young woman became "a law
Unto herself," and took up her
abode with a married man who
left his wife on the plea that she
was not congenial. He could not
ohtain a divoice, so the two were
"laws unto themselves."
After two years had passed by
the pair was encountered by the
wife. She asked the man to choose
between them.
He chose the wife ; he said she
was able "to keep up the dignity
of his position" better than the un-
fortunate victim of his passing
passion. Then the husband and
wife proceeded to force an imme-
diate depariure of the foolish young
woman, who9e position should
have awakened their sympathy and
compassion at least.
Hut humiliation and misery of
one kind or another usually aie
the lot of the woman who becomes
"a law unto herself."
Everything of material value
may be hers for a time, and the
man's heait may seem to be whol
ly hers, yet as time flies, lawless
and hidden passion seeks a free
exit, and easily 6nds one.
No more unfounded idea ever
gained hold upon the minds of the
inexperienced' than that foolish
theory prevalent in French litera-
ture, that a man remains more loy-
] al to the woman to whom he is
not legally tied than to a wife.
'Once in a thousand cases such may
i be the fact. All the other 999 wo-
' men who have loved unwisely find
! the lover seeking some excuse,,
sooner or later, to end the associ-
'ation which has become irksome.
Like the husband referred to, he
prefeis the comradeship of the un
congenial wife when put to the
test, because she is the wife, to
that of the more pleasing woman.
for whom he must abandon respect
able society.
A man who will be untrue to a
wife who trust> him, nnd who will
wrong a girl who loves him In
compiomising her for life, will,
in the natural course of events, be
disloyal to her and weary of his
rela ions with her.
He is like a watch with some-
thing the matter with the main-
spring. He cannot long run true.
To be "a law unto one's self"
in religious faith, or in methods
of busine-s, or in dress, or in poli-
tics, is all very well. Hut when
this self-formulated code of lawi
dngs others along with it, willy
nilly, we must question its right
of procedure.
A married man oiu:ht to ask
himself if he has the righ to place
his wife in a position of humil
iation, and to jeopatdize the name
of another wo.nan before he pro-
ceeds to make laws for himself.
A woman who thinks she is pri-j
vilened to follow her own laws of
conduct in these mat tars should fac-
the possibility of bringing name-
ten children into the World who
will have a right to challenge her
claim of a privileged character in
being "a law unto hers* If." Mean-
while the wife who makesa triutn.
phaiit'exit from a tragic situation,
carrying the prodigal husband of!
as trophy, ought to think of the
desperate situation of the girl he
leaves behind him, and soften her
hen it toward her erring rival.
The victor can alwavs afford to
be generous.
The woman who has won can
afford to be kind to the loser; and
she who has mastered can well
stoop to wipe away the tears of
the sinner.
Hut alas "for the rarity of
Christian charity !"
Think twice, young woman, be
fore you become "a law unto your-
self,
1 ha man ' tries t< mas,
own moral laws, has an eaeief
time when he attempts to return
to the arms of society than the wo-
man. It has been the way 01
world since to nBorganiti
end Will continue to be the way
of the world for centuries to come.
"New York American"

LATEST WAR NEWS ,
The French report that tin-
Germans suffered reverses and
re Losset in their attempt to
cut the British line betv
Labaaseeand BethuncThe Ger-
man losses in this district alone
being estimated at tWO thou-
sand.
Fierce counter-assaults con-
tinue between Nieuport and
\
The Fci nch brought down
a G< unao aeroplane in this re-
gion.
In the region oi Perthea vio-
lent German attacks were re-
pulsed and new ('.'mi m post*
tions were destroyed at St. Mi"
hiel.
Ouiet prevailes in Lorraine
and the Vosges.
The German statement says
only artillery duels took place at
Neiuportand Ypresend thatthe
French assaults in the neigh-
bourhood of Labassee broke
down under German fi:e.
It also reports the repulse of the
Russian forces Northeast of
hitmen in East Prussia.
There is no change in the situ-
ation in Poland.
Londoo:Warships have beeil
sent along the Suez Canal to
take positions v here attacks are
likely from Turks advancing on
tin- waterway.
New York: -Mother Joni B, of
strike fame, todaj .1" epted the
iovation of Mr. Rockefellow, Jr.
to it accompany him west where
the two will endeavour to settle
the Colorado miners striki ,
May ami June wheat reached
new record prices in Clue. 0
today.
Wear
Armbrister's Shoes
ffl
'I


L. GILBERT D1TPUCH,
Editor and Proprietor.
OFFICE: 44 MARKET BTBIKE
Nassau, N. P., Bahamas
'PHONE 200. p. O. BOX 163.
PUBLISHED DAILY
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Advertisements under tight lines 4s.
PUBLISHED AT b P.M.
XTbe tribune
THURSDAY, jt.nua.rv 2H 1915
The session of the Supreme
Court closed yesterday. They
were rather uneventful, which,
is a consummation greatly '.o be
desired at all times.
Ten informations were filed
by the I Ion. the Attorney Gener-
al, which resulted in 6 Convic-
tions, i Traversed, i Pronounced
Insane, 2 Acquittals.
No sentence exceeding 12
Mot. imprisonment was inflict.
ed#which of itself indicates that
the crimes were not of a serious
nature. It is regrettable however
that two thirds Of the crimimals
were juveniles, and suggests
that it would be to the best in-
terests of the community if some
other form of proceed ings could
be possible ot being taken in
such cases.
We are of the opinion, and we
believe it is shared in by the
public; though we would re
mark in passing that "public
opinion" is a phrase both useful
and concise and conveys an im-
mense amount of thought, but
at the same time it may be a
very misleading phrase, because
it is an outcome of the Struggle
between authority and reason;
we say that the concensus of
opinion is that we have not yet
reached the ultima reels of the
best 111 our jury system. It is
capable of vast improvement,
and we have no hisitation in
saying that when the three fac-
tors of education, the press, and
Christianity are united, though '
it will not be in our day, man
will become more rational, more
in keeping with the orthodox
views and teachings of the Pul-
pit. Speaking Generally, there
is a great need of education in
so for as it is attainable in the
Bahamas. The proper and cor-
rect administration of the Laws
of ones Country, be it remem-
bered, are made by the public
for their own benefit primarily,
but ultimately for the commu-
nity at large.
Our attention just now is en-
grossed by thoughts of the War,
and it cannot be expected that
it should be otherwise, but can-
not we spare a little time and
thought to our internal affairs?
Wc are all prepared to shout
for joy when victory follows -->ur
arms in this conflict between
"Right and Wrong" because
our reason points the way, and
without egotism, that standard
of judgement is lofty and un-
assailable by the host of our
casuistical foes.
We are glad to notice from
Our Contemporary that the
highest expectations of the pro-
motersof 'First Aid Lectures', as
to applications to the class have
been more than realised, but we
regret that the list is likely to be
closed to additional applicants.
Wc 11 gard it as an inestim-
able boon, and it is extremely
gratifying that the ladies of
Nassau are cognisant that Life-
is not all Bridge and Court Golf
and some kinds of "Daunces."
They have now a rare oppor-
tunity of acquiring that know-
ledge which will enable them to
attain to the highest stature of
womanhood, asking the promoters all round,
to admit all who will come We
appeal to Miss I lai I Bennett, to
Miss Wells-lJurrant to Miss
Ailse Lee, and to Dr. Mc Hattie
to continue the good work, and
to remember that it will be" tlie
truesl realization of "Inasmuch
as ye have done it unto ope of
the least of these, ye have done
it unto me."
:o:
We publish in another column
from the"13enton Argus," a let-
lerfrom the Rev. Frank C I.au
bach whom our readers will re-
member occupied the pulpit of
Si Andrew's Presbyterian
Church in this City during the
vacation of the Rev. 11. A
Brown two years ago. Mi. Lau-
bach isnowenroutetothe Philli-
pine Islands where he will be
engaged in Missionary work.
The S. S. '"Monterey" sailed
to-day with Mails, Cargo, and
13 passengers.
-:o:
TRIP ACROSS CONTINENT
Rev. Frank Laubach Writes
Beautiful Story of Trip,
Which We Give Our Readers
The following letter was re-
ceived by Mrs. J. B. Laubauch
of town, from her son, Rev.
Frank C. Laubach, in which he
beautifully describes his trip
across the continent. Before
Rev. and Mrs. Laubach left
town, we asked the former to
keep his many friends and The
Argus readers posted of their
travels.
tween them and %e valley in
which they finally settled. I do
not see how they ever got over
the Rocky mountains. 1 cannot
understand where they found
food enough to eat while thev
were on the way. II there had
been only two or three it might
have been possible for them to
live on the game they might
shoot, but for a hundred and
fifty men, women and children
to have done it is more than I
can understand. I suppose the
Indians showed them trails.
Well, 1 take off my hat to the
Mormons. It is curious that one
morning we come into a city
where the people want many
wives and the next morning we
wake up in Reno where the peo-
ple arc trving to get rid of even
Sacamento, Oil..Jan. 7th, .9.5 the wives,hey have.
I>. mistake I asked the Ameru
My Dearest Mother :
The train is just pulling into
Reno, Nev., where people go to
get divorcedwhen they can
afford it There are many indi
cations that the people here are
frivolous.
We pased a little place called
Coney Island. Up ahead WC
bear people shouting. Here is
a hotel with a bfg hall adjoin
ing in which tliey ina\ \m\,
moving pictures or play games
of various kinds. I did not see
any evidence of anything very
unusual about the town.
Wc pulled into Salt Lake City
about noon yesterday and went
up to see the Mormon Temple
and Tabernacle. The guide
started to show us around but
we had to go to the Station just
before we got inside the big
tabernacle. The guide spent
several minutes telling us about
Mormonism in the original
chapel which was built before
the tabernacle. He said among
other things that when the Mor-
mons first came to Utah it
were infested with grasshoppers,
but the Lord sent multitudes of
sea gulls, the first that were
ever known here and they ate
up the grasshoppers. They have
never been many sea gulls here
since that time.
The way in which money is
obtained for their religious pui
poses is for each Mormon to
givea tithe or one-tenth of his
yearly income for the churc
In this way those
buildings have been erected
comparatively poor people,
I have the utmost respect foi
the Mormons even if they d<> like
more than one wife, whin I see
terrible distance and the gigan
tic mountains which lay be-
magnificenl
can Board for tickets via the
Southern Pacific bom Salt Lake
to Frisco instead of the Western
Pacific, and we are ^oing to
miss the finest scenery. The
road we are on is the safer at
this time of year however, as the
other is frequently lioubled with
snow We will pass under 40
miles of snow sheds to-day. Just
.....v we are 1 limbing up to the
top of the Sii 11.1 Nevada Moun-
tains Our engine burns only
keroseneand it is running up
the mountain backwards, so that
the engineer is on the very front
of the train.
My evesare weary from look-
ing so long ..t the scenery. This
is Effietalking now. Weare
still passing through snow sheds
They extend for over forty miles
You know wc are passing
through the Sierra Mountains
now. The scenery has been
beautiful. These mountains
have wonderfully large trees on
t lem and they are all covered
with snow as lai as we Can see.
It looks like fairy land.
Now wc have < ome out of the
snow sheds for a second to go
into another one. The snow-
sheds have de< p lades along the
Bid) s. These sheds cover a dis-
tance of nearly fifty miles. 1
have often read stories about
the people who live along these
sheds and keep them in order.
Wc have seen some of their
houses to-day. The only exit is
out into tlie shed. They seem
to hang to the sides of the
mountain. Thej must lead very
lonely lives. 1 suppose a few
trains s'cp but ours hasn't. A
little while ago we passed a
lake that was not frozen over


u
It mussj&nvc been either a warm
lake or a salt lake. I just told
Frank that I thought \vc had
seen snow to last us five years.
Just now the snow is only nine
feet high. Sometimes it gets a>
blgh as thirty-five-feet. The
people in the valleys botli in
Utah and Nevada, like to have
plenty of snow on the moun-
tains because that means that
they will have water enough to
fill their irrigation ditches next
summer.
Just now wc passed a rather
large bouse a short distance
from the shed. It bad a tunnel
leading to thesbed. I wish we
could send you moving pictures
of the scenes through which we
have passed since we left Ben-
ton one we< i. ago. With the
exception of Niagara Falls we
didn't have anything so very
interesting until after we left
Pueblo, Colorado. The trip
through Kansas was rather un-
interesting. Nothing but level
ground as far as we could see.
They saw the railroad.Santa Fe
passes through an uninteresting
part of Kansas.
We have already told you
about our stay at Rocky Ford.
It was verv delightful and gave
us a good rest. I will be glad
to get into a big bed to-night
and have good sleep.
When we left Pueblo the
other day iI was snowing very
bard and it looked as though wc
might get caught in a big snow-
storm in the Rockies but it soon
cleared ofl and wc ha I a beau-
tiful trip with a gorgoeuS sun
and sky.
The bareness and the bleak
ness of the Rockies were a sui
prise to me. There was very
little snow except on the high
east peaks. These mountains we
are going over to day a re
covered with trees so do not
lopk so bare The snow covers
all of the rocks, [n places it is
piled in great drifts. I just wish
you could see it.
It hardly seems possible that
at nine o'clock to-night we will
*1)e where the Mowers are bloom-
ing.
If we don't get out of these
snow sheds pretty soon I will
think they are a hundred miles
long.
I think the thunder storms along the track.
me of the Poconos. My general
impression of the Western peo-
ple is that they are great hust-
lers. The towns are most pro-
gressive and every where are
indications of pride in their
State and town.
Frank will finish this. Good-
bye,
Effie
3:011 p. 111. Thursday, and we
are just 142 miles from Sail Fran-
cisco.
It is very interesting after we
left the 40 miles of snow shed-
to watch the train gradually
sink below the snow line. We
had our magnificent view of
the most beautiful valley a half
mile below us. An hour ago
the snow was three feet deep,
along the track. Just this minute
we passed an orchard with Uie
tnes full of the most beautiful
apples. There is no snow here
and I suppose there never is.
Everything looks green and
beautiful. We just stopped at
ColfaX, and you should see the
wonderful lawn in front of then
hotel. I can glance back over
ni\ shoulder and see the snow
capped mountains which we
left but it is so warm litre that
they had to turn ofl the he.it.
On both sides of us tlu're are
apples, peach and other orchards
I cannot tell what some of the
'; are. Just now we aie
I Kissing an orchard of little
gnarled trees which we never
saw before.
TheSierrc Nevada mountains
aie covered with pine trees, but
you see no other kind of lumber
until you getbclow the snow
line. There is so much water here
that I feel sure it must have
rained a short time ago. I be-
lieve l saw a streak of gold in
the rock wc just passed but we
.ire going too fast to find out.
The railroad is double track-
ed here and the mad which goes
Up winds around under us SO88
to have an easier grade. It is a
gie.it piece of engineering. We
are going down very slowly
though I see no ic.isoii why we
should.
We pist passed some llowers
in bloom. Yonder go two men
out hunting without any coats,
and there wo pass another man
in his shirt sleeves. Why not
when the grass is growing all
just passed *ays, "Prohibition
will paralyze California."
We are passing a little stream
full of mundv water as though it
had just been raining. Yonder
are some women out in the gar-
den with their sun bonnets on.
On the other side of us are some
beautiful palms, and there are
some roses out in bloom.
The name of the town at
which we arc stopping now is
Auburn, <2\ miles from Frisco.
It is 1300 feet above sea level, so
we have dropped five thousand
feet since I began this letter.
Yonder is an orange on a tree,
though it is not oiangc season
The atmosphere is getting so
fragrant that it comes through
the double panes of glass. There
is a tree of oranges.
I just saw some mullen, the
first thing 1 have seen that I
recognized.
We just saw a whole grove of
fig trees. There is some of tie-
largest cactus I ever saw. In the
distance is a gTOVe of (] ,],
palms.
And to think that we had left
the snow only a few hours ago.
three feet deej).
I want to mail this at Sacra
mento. with the hope that you
may get it before we send our
next letter. We will not have go
much time to write to-morrow,
as we want toseethe exposition
grounds.
Your loving son and d>*ught< r.
Frank and Kffie.
:o:
must be pretty hard up here for
1 see so many trees that have
beep struck by lightning.
f Before we got up where the
snow was so deep we saw them
We do no) know where we
will stay in Frisco, 'nit we have
the hotel where Harry staid and
w e will probably go there.
They are lighting booze out
filling ice houses. It reminded here too. A big sign which we
Latest War News
Januai j J7H1 1915.
GOVERN MKNT I'iiKss
A big military venture to
celebrate the Kaisers birthday
which occurs today was planned
by the Germans who made a
determined effort against the
Allies in Flanders but, accord-
ing to British and French re-
ports, all their attacks failed.
The Russians are making an-
other attempt to advance into
Fast Prussia.
Russian submarines in the
Baltic have torpedoed the Ger-
man cruiser Gazelle which how-
* ver reached port with the as-
sistance of a Swedish steamer.
Sir Edward Grey replies to Dr
llollweg relative to the agree-
Igiuin and
It was officially announced
this evening that tfce Lion and
the Meteor disabled in Sundays
North Sea battle were towed in-
to port. Speedy repairs will be
given.
Washington:The $13.5.000.
000 cotton loan is to be aban-
doned after February 1st unless
there is an unexpected demand.
The subscriptions of all but
the Southern states will be re
turned.
Washington:Senator Till-
man proposes that the United
States await the outcome of the
European war before construct
ing new battleships. Me b
111 speed more than in pow< 1
and cites the late North Sea
fight as an illustration.
The Hague:- The Dutch are
to maintain their entire army as
itualities may call the coun-
try to aims any moment.
"Albany: It was announced
tonight by the attorney generals
office that William Jerome had
been dismissed as deputy at-
toiney general to assist in the
prosecution ol Harry Thaw, on
account of the expenses.
Houston, Texas: A lone boy
today robbed the Guaranty
St ite Bank of $13,000 afti 1
forcing the cashier and bis as-
sistant into the vault at the
point of a pistol.
New York: -The Steel Cor-
p .ration paid the s m a lie '
dividends of one half of#Ope
percent ever known in its his-
tory.
uient between
(beat Biitaiu and declares thai
the Brussels documents were
made purely informal and in
case that the British needed to
defend lielgian neutrality after
Germany had violated it.
January a8th 1915.
London 27th.
Governor,
Bahamas.
(Uncial news January 27th."
Several violent German attacks
against our lust division near
I.abassce Monday weie lepulsed
with severe losses. At one place
on the Labassee Road threehun-
rin d iermans were killed and
fifty five captured.
The French government re
ports similar attacks Kast of
Ypres where the Germans lefi
three bundled dead.
W< st of Craonne there were
violent German attacks and they
captured some French tren hes,
and regained parts of lost
ground
fHARCOURT)
PICKED UP
French and German offiicial
Statements indicate heavy light-
ing on the Western battle line
with great losses on both sides
Victories claimed by both.
"*r


^"
THE MOST STRIKING
feature of the Polar Bear is its beautiful white coat,
which is in keeping with the whiteness of its sur-
roundings in the Arctic regions. The snow in those
regions, however, is not whiter than clothes washed with
SUNLIGHT
SOAP.
The beauty of Sunlight
Soap is in its purity, and
the easy way in which it
releases dirt from clothes,
without injury to the fabric
no matter how fine it may
be. It is manufactured with
the purest materials and
there is 1,000 Guarantee
of Purity on every bar.
Try it on your Nert W*,h-dy. tM(
STRAYED
Into my Premises on West
Hill Street.
1 Turkey
Owner will please apply
for it and pay cost of adver-
tising, when it will be deliv-
R. BARNES SHEPHERD
2Sth 1915.
REMOVAL
The Printing Establish-
ment of the "Tribune'" has
this day been removed to
Nos. 25 and 27 Shirley Street,
and North-east Corner of
Charlotte Street. 26th Jan
Shingles
Best No. 1 Heart 5m. Cypres
Shingles at 89.60 per thou-
sand of 20 bundles
Discounts on lots of over
5000 shingles.
Special Price
also on rheaper gradesalso
5U1. Cypress at $6.72 per
thousand of 20 bundles. This
price made possible by a very
large purchase.
Fresh stock arriving every
week.
C. C SAUNDERS.
Good Morning!
We Are Introducing
American Silk
American Cashmere
American Cotton-I.isle
HOSIERY
They have stood the test. Give real
foot comfort. No seams to rip. Never
become loose or ba>;j;y. The shape is
knit in- not pressed in.
GUAR.ANTEEI) for fineness, style,
superiority of material and workmanship.
Absolutely stainless. Will wear 6 months
without holes, or new ones free.
OUR. SPECIAL OFFER
to every one tending us si 00 in currency
or postal note, to cover advertising arul
slii| ping charges, we will send post paid,
with written guarantee, backed by a five
million dollar com] any, either
Pair* of our 75c. value
American Silk Hosiery,
'I'fviis of our 50c. vnlue
American Cnshineie Hosierv,
or Pvlr of our 50c. Value.
American Cotton-l.isle Hosiery
or 6 I'nlrs of Children's Hoeiery.
DONT l)KI dealer in your locality is selected.
The International Hoisery co
P. O. Box 224
DAYTON. OHIO. U. S. A-
or
WANTED
OLD BAHAMAS POSTAGE
STAMPS
OVER 1500
Pairs
. Boots and Shoes
being added to an already
replete stock
Williams the Shoeman
s again opening up one of
those Sample Lots of Boots
and Shoes in a limited
number of sizes as follows
viz:
Men's Boots and Shoes in sizes |
from 6 to 7I
Women's Boots and hoes
in sizes from 3J to 4J
Misses Hoots and Shoes in sizes
from iaito i
The advantage in purchas-
ing from this lot is (as others
who have purchased before
can attest) that >ou can se-
lect the sizes from a very
large variety of up-to-date
styles at prices considerably
cheaper than regular lines
kept in stock.
CALL EARLY
and secure your size at
WILLIAMS' WHOLESALE
AND RETAIL
SHOE ESTABLISHMENT
277 and 279 Bay St City
Notice
THIS is to inform my Patron
and the Public in General
that I have opened my Public
Black Smith Shop; and am now
ready to do anything in l' e line of
General repair or new u rk Horte
Shoeing Specially. All ork done
Mechanically.
P. A. HUTLEE.
GASOLINE
IN Drums and 10 Gallon
Cans. Price one shilling
per Gallon. All previous
prices cancelled.
C. C. SAUNDERS
East Bay St.
Nassau N. P.
Jan. 5th 1915.
One 6d. grey lilac
One 6d. grey lilac sur-
charged 4d. One 6d. grey vio-
let One 1 King Edward.
green or black,
Address L. GREY care of
TRIBUNE enclosing sam-
ples and prices.
WANTED
COPIES of "THE STROM-
BUS" August 19x3 (Exhi-
bition1 Number)
Apply
"Tribune"()ifice
W A. MATHER
UNDERTAKER
DESIRKS to inform his friends
and the Public that re has
just received a complete outfit of
facilities for the buisness of an un-
dertaker, which places him in a
position to carry out Funerals that
may be entrusted to his care with
system and despatch ; and respect
fully solicits their patronage Get
my Prices first and prove that theee
are the very lowest for the fust class
work.
THIS is to inform the pub-
lic that if any person or
persons are found trespassing
on mv lot of land situate on
Forbes Hill in the Island of
Little Exuma, they will be
dealt with according to the
Law.
ERNEST CLARKE
(Owner)
JACOB CLARKE
((Jverscer)
Forbes Hill, Little Exuma
July 23rd 1915
WANTED.
A GOO I) Female Cook who can
Read, write and go errands. A
1'iitldle age person ol good charar.
ter preferred. For ft.rthur infoi-
mation, apply to
SHADRACK T. WOOD
West St. South.
9th Jany i95-4 ms-
Kerosene
150^
IN New 50 gallon Galvaniz-
ed Iron Drums at i8cts
per Gallon.
. In 10 gallon Cans at 20cts
per. Gallon.
Drums and Cans returnable
Full particular*; at Office
"Frances E.," Nassau N. P.
C. C. SAUNDERS
MISS LOUISE CADOGAN
CERTIFICATED NURSE
from Hahamas General
Hospital. Can furnish testi-
monials.
101 Shirley Street
I
1


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