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J i I. f THE TRIBUNE NASSAU. BAHAMAS L. OILBRRT DUFUCH. Editor and Proprietor. OKKICK: 44 MARKET 8TRSBT Kassau, N. P., Bahamas •PHOSK 260. P. O. BOX 163. PUBLISHED DAILY onciay, Wednesday and Friday— le copy ... sn-l Thursday—single copy Hie copy is. 4S9S. 18s. Jd id i |d 6.1 6d because being a Zaccheus in stature, we were overtopped by the sweltering forms hedging us in. We bethought us i of a means of escape, and happy thought—appeal to humanity. Then We shouted, "there's a woman fainted, let's get her out"—the crowd opened and We escaped with a "Jubilate Deo" from the bottom of our heart. And the rain was eomin^down in torrents. We put our best foot forward, and soon reached our Hotel when a warm bath, and something hot was a panacea for all our troubles. But where and to what does this exordium lead ? you will probably ask. In 1909 An Act was passed by the Legislature regulating the Registration of Hackney Carriages &c, The location of "Stands" was provided for under the powers given by j that Act. It must be apparent to any The centre of certain streets man of ordinary judgment was na med, and at the time PAYABLE IN ADVANCE dvfrlising Rates :—Six pence per Ijne for first insertion: three, peugc per 1'ne for second insertion ; and one penny per line for siibsquent insertions. Advertisements under eiuht lines 4s. £be tribune SATURDAY. Ja.nua.ry 23. 1£J5 PUBLISHED AT 5 P.M. that, all things cannot con tinue as they were, that there it seemed good, but certain conditions have since arisen comesa time when all human! W hich decidedly ca n f or a affairs have to be adjusted to i c hange—viz, the" introduction meet changed conditions that have occurred without premonition to the most far sighted and without any prearranged plan. The invisible machinery works, strangely enough, automatically, without design, and those who hold off from accepting the facts and shelter gmselves, be they indiv'du' lering their own selfferes ts, or too lazy to themselves, under the [ted syllogism of what 'O d-enough-for-myler, is-good-enoughwhether it be a porate responsible ..1 of a community, r is the same. Not /ard, is to go backthere is no such tiling >nomy of human aff, or of nature as standing In fact we cannot, if /ould. Take as acorn[lustration an individuIcrowd. He must go Jard with if, if he would 5rve his physical integri10 go back is to be crushbe trampled upon by lie march of the many pressing forward, it may be to an unattainable goal, but yet it invariably follows that the point aimed at is success which they reap. We, well remember a personal and practical example of the difference between progression and retrogression. We happened to be in a large Jfllterican City ou the night of the "Fourth of July," and in common with thousands of others were witnessing the illuminations of the magnificent buildings surrounding a large E ublic square, when the rain egun to fall, and the dense crowd sought the protecting shelter of the surrounding sheds. It was our first expeiience of the horrors of a crowd. We were completely wedged in and being somewhat alarmed, endeavoured to get out of it by going back to the outskirts, but that was humanly impossible, it meant being trampled upon and crushed into a quivering mass. Our only safety lay in moving forward with the crowd, and yet even in this cation was immanent, of Motor Cars, driven in certain limits at a speed not exceeding 10 miles an hour. Owing to the increase of these vehicles and the reckless driving of some Owners and Chauffeurs, and the Cab stands being in the middle of the Street •here is great and increasing danger of serious accidents occurring, such as collisions with cabs and persons being run over. The rate of speed allowed in thoroughfares is bad enough, but when to this is added the incompetency of drivers, it becomes a serious question, and one which demands a strict and rigid surveillance. We have frequently noticed Motor Cars going around corners without any dimunition of speed, and but for the Providence which watches over fools, the accident ward of the D. G. Hospital would ere this have furnished a pretty long list of cases resulting from the carelessness of drivers, and the indifference of the proper authorities. We trust that this matter will engage the attention of the powers that be, before a misdemeanour becomes a felony, and some are left to mourn the loss of beloved relatives and friends. N. B. Just watch the way in which Moto-cars sweep from the Cross streets into Bay Street. engineers, firemen can be provided. HARCOURT. Telegram to Secretary of State. 4th January, 1915. Your telegram second last information received dated eleven December was improbable men would be wanted. Many have dispersed to Out Islands and Florida. Am collecting particulars and will telegraph in a few days. Not likely any engineers. HART-BENNETT. Telegram from Secretary of State 8th January, 1915 Your telegram fourth January employment as Prize Crews now found impracticable as ships will probably be otherwise employed and not be brought direct to United Kingdom. HARCOURT. Telegram to Secretary of State. 9th January, 1915. Your telegram eight January received with regret. We could have provided seventy at least for purpose stated in your tele gram second instant. Fear great disappointment. Is it not possible to utilize their services in some other way. Have I authority to publish correspondence. HART-BENNETT. gathered by a Constable in different parts of the District and this can be considered reliable. 7. Trusting that this information will be considered interesting and important. I have the honour to bo, Sir, Your obedient Servant, (Sdj o. j. MCDONALD, Commissioner. Hon. Acting Col. Secr'y. Nassau, N. P. EMIGRATION TO FLORIDA FROM ARTHURS TOWN, S. S. During the Year 1914 MARRIED UNMARRIED WIDOWED M 6=; I F Telegram from Secretary of State 15th January, 1915. Your telegram ninth Januaryregret disappointment but circumstances have arisen making it necessary that the few ships available in the West Indies should be utilized for other purposes utilization services men other direction apparently impracticable according to your telegram foruth January correspondent begining with my telegram second January may be published. HARCOURT. Through the courtesy of the Hon. T. E. D. Brace, Acting Colonial Secretary, we publish the 2 M 100 I M 2 F 2 %  —JO! — We are indebted to the courtesy of the Management of the Hotel Colonial for the following interesting paragraphs concern ing the "Days Doings" at that renowned hostelrie. Nassau Bahamas, Jan. 21st. The first court goif tournament of the season began yesterday over the Colonial Hotel course, with a two ball mixed foursome to start things going. Considering that many of the players were arrivals of the past few days and had no opportunity for practice, the qualifying scores were remarkably good. Miss Ross and Mr. J. B. Bryan of Rochester N. Y. lead the field with 37, Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Carlin of New York followed with 39, and Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Berdell of New York registered a 41 in their first appearance on the course. Golf on the big links is now in lull swing. Messrs Kent Chambers of Philadelphia, J. Woodwell of Pittsburgh, and Frank N. Doubleday of Oyster Bay L. I., being the most recent additions to the followers of Colonel Bogey. A party of wellknown Long Islanders arrived on Friday from Miami and are stopping at the Colonial. The names include Mr. and Mrs. Frank N. Doubleday, the publisher, of Oyster The Administrator desires us to publish the following telegraphic correspondence which has passed between him and the Secretary of State for the Colonies on the subject of Volunteers foi Naval service. He is still in communication with the Naval authorities, and trusts that some opportunity may yet be found of utilizing the services of the Volunteers. Tglegram from Secretary of State 2nd January, 1915. Your despatch 2nd November have you been able to make arrangements suggested in my despatch 19 October it has been proposed that employment should be offered as Prize Crews) to bring to this country ships condemned m West Indian ports do you consider proposal feasibleif so telegraph whether any specially qualified such as Donald, Esq. Commissioner of Arthur's Town. The report shows a terrible declination of the population at Arthur's Town ; but if reports, i.e., rumours are to be believed, emigration from the Bahamas has sustained a check for the present owing to two causes, "No money to pay passage" and "Things very bad down there." Emigration Report of O F. Mc IJa >'a d N,iss Dorothy Doubleday ; Mrs. A. De Graff of the same town, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Zabriskie, Mr. and Mrs. F. Coit Johnson and Miss Johnson of Glen Cove. The Doubledays have spent many winters at Nassau, and expect to remain the season, the golf, bathing, and horseback.riding appealing to them strongly. Bicycles are coming into It is to be hoped that these! f ? shlon nce more. On Wednesmay not prove unmixed evils j


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r THE TRIBUNE NASSAU. BAHAMAS their financial support was given to the side which was seeking the overthrow of the Little Corporal. Even Lord Rothschilds great-uncle, James, who founded the Trench Rothschilds, was in Paris secretly collecting French coin to forward to Wellington for his advance in Southern France just befoie Napoleon's first abdiction. Since those clays other Germanic families have imitated the Rothschilds with great success, and established bran lies corking together in the leading capitals of the world. It is probable that o wai between England and Germany never entered into their calculations, and cer tainly the man in the street may accept it as a fact that the last thing in the world they, as financiers would d< site would be ftn Anglo-German wai. .Such a conflict "must obviously cause them embarrassment in certain directions. As the bitterness of conflict -deepnis, families and firms may be called upon by the nations to be less international and more national, 01 even entirely national. War Notes There isan element of corned) in the Germans "bagging" Bai on Lambert de Rothschild the head of the B< Igian Rothschilds, and holding him as a hostage for the war indemnity imp on the city 0.1 Brussels. It may be that the cash taken from baron Lambert's pockets will be used to pa> the interest on Baron Anselm's loans to the Austrian Government. In that case the money would still be in the family. Bu\ at the worst, a philosophic and all embracing financier can always console himself with the reflection that what is lost on the swi ng s may be gained on the roundabouts, A British soldier in Belgium was one morning wending his way to camp with a fine rooster in his arms, whi n lie WBSStopped by hiscolo-iel to know if he bad been stealing chickens. "No, colonel," Was tie reply. "1 saw the old fellow sitting on the wall,and I ordered him tocrow for England, and he wouldn't— so 1 just took Inm prisoner." The following grim jest is re corded of a German officer taken prisoner by the f imousregiment of Guards. He was surrounded by a number of his men, and asked to know what Nu Regiment had the honoui of the capture. When he was told he said :—"Then we have got to the next world, have we?" "How so?" hewasasked/'Well, we know," said the Gernittn officer, "that regiment was annihilated long ago with the rest of the Russian Guard regiments. The Emperor William told us so himself." When the truth was borne upon that officer he was the saddest of men for H deeper reason than the mere fortune of war. The folio ving story which shows the kei nm SS of the Colonials to takepart in the fightinj comes from Perth, Western Aus tralia. One young fellow I know very well, an athll te, was refused because one of his toes was mal>smed. It lay right under his other toes. It did not interfere with him at all, as he is a splendid runner, footballer, etc, I la went Straight from the Army doctor to his family doctor, and ,t of pei tiasive arguit amput ited, and is e well again. He was ,; into the Army, and aw.iv with the con tin*s a fiddler. What price Kk>g breed, eh? IN THE SUPREME COIR.T 2oth, Jan. 1915. The following informations were filed, The King vs. Alexander Adderley. r. Unlawfully wounding. 2. Inflicting grievous bodily harm. Found to be insane. Ordered to be conveyed to the Lunatic Ward of the I. (i. Hospital, there to be detained until released by Order of the Governor-in-Conn ciL 21st The King VS. Henry Rahming. Assault occasioning actual bodily harm—Acquitted, aand The King vs. Theophilus Ellis. Indecent Assault -Acquitted. The King VS. Maurice Lightbourn, Ely mas Wood and Peter Johnson 1. Shppbreakhig and Larcen) — 2 Receiving. Lightbourn and Wood pleaded guilty —Sentenced to 12 months imprisonment with hard labour, from 7th Dec. 10,14 and to receive 6 sirol of a tamarind rod at the con.mi neeimnt and6strokes at the termination 1 d Sentence. Johnson, pleaded guilty — Sentenced to 9 months and 5 strokes. The King vs. Wilmore Stubbs 1. Shopbreaking and Larceny z Receiving Convicted.—Sentenced lo 9 months hard labour. The King vs. Georgiaua Major 1 Unlawfully wounding 2 Inflicting grevous bodily barm. Convicted <>f common assault w ith r commendation to mercy. Sentence: £5 o o or 2 mo. ; I labour. chase bill with every resource able one of the commanders to at their command and will carry move a large body of troops, their opposition to .m extra ses-'find a weak spot in the line, and sion of congress if such session surprise his opponent, before be called. Manchester, New Hampshire: —Sheriff Holmes who has been Harry Thaw's guard for a year and a half declared his bcliel that Thaw is quite sane. The latter leaves today for Mattethere will be any change in the European war situation. Position along the Vistula and vicinity of Cracow are unchanged. A stubborn battle has been in progress in Alsace for several wan, the home for criminal in1 days but few details have been sane, from which he escaped some 18 months ago. Washington: -The Hundred Million dollar army bill will come up today for amendment. given. The Russian Black Sea squadron is busy sinking Turkish, sailing ships. London.—A sensational reAfter an all-day discussion ofiport reached here to-day from the national defense committee' Cromcr stating that Zeppelins, the house of representatives tonight completed the general debale on the measure. January 23rd 1915 London, 22nd. Governor,Bahamas. Official news January 32nd The French government reports progress in Champagne district where an ammunition depot of I the enemy was exploded. In Ar in unknown numbers, had passed over there from the seaSt. Louis:—Hill is opposed to the ship purchase bill intimating that such an act would involve the United States in the European war. Washington:—All day caucas on the ship-purchase bill will be held by democrats to-day hoping to reach an agreement on all its features. On this account a recess has been taken gonne an important German at-: u lltl Monday, lack was repulsed. Some German trem hes were carried near St Mihiel. The Russian govern(Continued from First Page One day the old clerk who ment reports that the enemy has use d to wait upon him showed evacuatedSkennt, 34miles East n j m a large opal that had just of I'horn, in face of Russians been imported. It was a beau offensive, also further successes' tiM stone, but in the natural and asked if the opal watch s!,. she said. "1 have an idea," exclaimed the other. "We are near the Belgian Relief Headquarters. Let's give it to the poor Belgians. Surely they couldn't have any worse luck than they have already." So the automobile stopped at the Belgian Relief Relief Headquaters, and the woman had first owned the watch tered the office and would like to have it t or otherwise disposed of gian relief. The altendai' who was the donor, but tne declined to give a name, left. 1 hey continued their drive te the hospital. There a great surgeon was waiting. He gave the patient a thorough examination. "There is absolutely no need for an operation," was his verdict. Immediately the woman seemed better. She went home, and in a.few days told her friendthat she was enjoying bettei health and was happier than she had felt in a long time There is still one chapter in the history of the opal. A day or two ago the woman who had persuaded the owner to part with the opal she had herself given her, went to the Belgian Relief Headquar; in Bukowina. (Sign< dj IIARCOURT FICKEO UP state, and the clerk expatiated upon its beauty and its' possibilities. He su:: that it would make a beautiful case for a watch. Inimi the genThe Germans have apparenttlenian ordered him to S< I a tin) !y checked the French attempt W atch in it, and ih< ...-ailtwas to break their lines between St.L, t.mepicce that awakened the Mihiel and Metz where the admiration and envy W many of heaviest fighting is reported. hi8 w jf e 8 friends: • Official statement from both. Shortly afterward,misfortune sides confirm this. began to beset the p the Germans claim advan-; i. i rst she i ost i, er cn iUl. Not taecNorth of Sinnheim. A bat i l on ^ afterward, Uer %  —* J \ Latest War News January ,22nd 1915. GOVERNMENT PUKHS London: Battle for the trenches in Flanders and France rages with unabated fury. This method of fighting has favoured tne Allies throughout they having (?• %  in< d at almost every point except at Soissons. The Germans are now fighting desperately to protect their line ofcommunicatio'.i with Metz The Russians have, renewed operations against Mlawa at tempting toenvelop the German forces holding the line of the Mn/urian Lakes The Russians are making pro gress against the Austria ns English airmen are busy in B Igiuni and have ventured as far aF.ssen in Rhenish Prussia where they have destroyed Some buildings. Anhduke Francis is visiting Emperor William. Washington: -The steamer 11 .icia, bought fiom the I lamburg American Company since the war. by an American, must not sail with n cargo of cotton for Rotterdam, is the British order. If she docs she will be seized and taken before a pii/.o court. The owners declan thai they will pay no attention to the order and will make a test ease. fieri in:— The German Minis ter of War has stepped out. I le will be succeeded 1 ' "' ml Von Hohnenberg. Washington.' The R< publi cans willjuttU£e the ship purlb still rages nor£easf of 1'ont A-Moussons where the Allies claim slight gains. The French admit the hiss of ground in the Forest of Agrenotand LePetrie. I 1 ice lighting in Alsace is reported in progress. The French made slight gains in Barry au Bee in Argonne. British warships are reported bombarding the Belgian coast agian. The Russians (hum advances on the right bank of the Vistula towards Last Prussia where died. Some time later she I seized with a severe illw which kept her in bed many months. One day, walking with another woman, a relative by marriage, she said : "I believe that opal watch has had something to do with my misfortunes." The other pooh poohed the idea. The first woman persisted. "Anyhow, I shall never wear that watch again," she said. "It seems a shame not to wear a beautiful thing like that when had left had been sold. The woman in charge seemed in great distress. "Madame," she said, "J hardly know how to explain, but the opal is ruined. We have taken the greatest rare of it, and it has not been dropped, nor has it been struck b) anything But this morning two ladies came in and admired I am sure that one or tl of them would have pu it. "But a* 1 was taking it the case, a most cxtrao thing happened. Witho jarred in the slightes the jewel, rigiit b broke into three pie hand." am not superstitious. If you really don't want the watch, give it to me, and I'll wear it." So it changed hands. In a short time the former owner minor counter attacks are goingL ou | iavc it," said the other. "I on Concentration ofconsid Austrian force have been discovered in Bukowina where the Russians have made further advances. Berlin—.No changes in Eastern war zone. London:—The British Steamship "Durward" bound for Rotterdam laden with supplies for Belgian sufferers was torpedoed Anything to do with them. Fiwas ill perfect health, but the Huly Communion IM a.m. second owner encountered mis£ %  SJE^M fortune after misfortune of the same nature as those the first had -been through. Still, she never once believed the opal I by the Gcinian submarine U. i IB depressed, the woman who was operated upon glanced at her watch. "Why," exclaimed the other, "you arewt tring thai miserable opal watch. You must get rid of it immediatelv. I vill ot go to ihr hospit K e "' h a 1.1.1.1) igthefah opal. % "Ai, RELIGIOUS SER SUNDAY, JANUARr 8T. MATTHEW B > HUR< Church and Shirley Sta, 5, LmMl, Hi 7.15 a ni Holy Common! M ittiai and Salmon. 10.15 a m. 290 pin. Junior Cat ISO f>rn. Senior Catechism. Evensong. ST. MAKGAUffS Sunday*, Evaaaonf ami Addieai 1 N Thurs., Evenaot rill kill Ol W AONK V. Grant* Town, liluo Hill Road Rim. Amllry /. Diewm, ] % % %  %  :e>sJ rmon 10 3t Evan song and Samoa 7 pan. Week liny S>r I...nr Mass daily 7.30 except Saturday!. 1 r. Ta > : 1 ban i.'M p.m. v\ ed. and 1 1 .ID. sr. tl..i 7 pin. FUPTIST INIgNCMI Rl I ifnCT*JrM. ;'). U 'ilfArrf Paamr. 1. Scrinou, 11 a.m., 7 p.o. ''. |i rn. LEYAS MKTHOinST CHURCH KIZRR '. t'ainr, I',: %  ; ;:eet 11 ,1 m. an.! 1 pin. CHRISTIAN Sflt ,sau ly prott fa, 11. L of the opinion that the ground I with itjl^fij must harden sufficiently to old not give it: >



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%  THE TRIBUNE NASSAU. BAHAMAS for the mother and health for the baby follow the use of the 'Allenburys* Foods. They resemble healthy human milk in composition, nutritive value and digestibility. Babies fed on the "Allenburys" Foods invariably thrive welL Rest and Comfort iSllenbtmjs B.VQ KSTRtTAILI 'Huinrii MALTED FOOD No. 3. Fro* fi month* upwards. The •Allenburys' RUSKS (Malted) From 10 month* upwards. LK FOOD No. 1. MILK FOOD No. t tartt to 1 monthi From S to month*. TO BE OBTAINED FROM ALL CHEMISTS AND STORE8. mmPamphlet -Infant Feeding and Management" sent free. ALLEN ix HANBUB1S LTD., LONDON. ENGLAND. Mm%mmmMX*JKX^ %  llillllliriiiilii Good Morning! I TAKE NOTICE We Are Introducing "Pin American Silk American Cashmere American Cotton Lisle HOSIERY They have stood the teit. Give real foot comfort. No warns to rip. Never become loose or baggyThe shape is knit in—not pressed in. GUAR.ANTEEI) for fineness, style, superiority of malarial anil workmanship. Absolutely stainless. Will wear 6 months without holes, or new ones free. OUR. SPECIAL, OFFER to everv one sending us $1.00 in currency or postal note, to cover advertising and shipping charges, we will send pott paid) with written guarantee, backed by a live million dollar company, either 3 fairs of our 75c. value American Silk Hofiery, or 4 Pairs of our 50c. value American Cashmere Hosiery, or 4 Pairs of our 50c. Value, American Cotton-Lisle Hosiery. 6 Pairs of Children's Hosiery. LONT DELAY-Offerexpireswhen iler is your locality is selected. NMiOTUL HOISERY CO. O. Box 224 TON. OH,O, U. S. A Parish Boot Shop, own as "The Sign of the Ship" in King's Street, will be closed from Friday Jan. 22. prox., and the entire stock transferred to Charle. Duncombe, F.ast Bay Streets All outstanding debts are to be paid to the said Charles Duncombe, (who alone is authorised to collect the same) or to such person as may be authorised by him in writing. \V. LOWNDES. EMOVAL st February, 1915 ir intention to reinting Establishe Tribune" to the t the Northeast lirley and Charopper Floor consist)f four rooms may be from the 1st January, Terms motivate. One hole. May be viewed cation to GILBERT DUPUCII, "Tribune" Office, g4 Market St. ror Results Advertise in TENDERS VLflLL be received by the undersigned until noon of Thursday the 21st January, 1915 for the purchase of the Schooner "Hattie H. Roberts" her fixtures and appurtenances. KENNETH SOLOMON C. T. FARRINGT0N Executors Estate John Alfred. 24th Deer 1914. Tenders should he addressed "KENNETH SOLOMAN "Chambers, "Tender for Hattie H. Roberts Napes Fertilizers / now carry in stock the following formulas: Pineapple. — It has been proven that this has no equal and a visit to fields using same will convince you. Vegetable. —Now is the time to use this and increase your yield in Tomatoes, Potatoes, Onions and all other vegetables by 100 per cent. Orange Tree. —To assist the growth of Young Citrus Tree. Fruit and Win*.—Increase the yield and growth of old Citrus trees. For further information and books on the use of these Fertilizers, please apply to WALTER K. MOORE Agent for Mopes Fertilizer in the Bahamas. Sarviti Cool Reliable Sold Win. Hilton, Fruit of the Loom 36 in. at 7 1 per yard. Johnson's Artistic Wood Finishes Johnson's Prepared Wax—a com plete finish and polish for all furniture woodwork and Boon Johnson's Wood Dye—for the artistic coloring of all wood, soft or hard Johnson's Under Lac—a spirit | finish, very much superior to shellac or varnish Johnson's Flat Wood Finish—fora beautiful, artistic, hand-rubbed effete without the expense of rubbing. Johnaon's Paste Wood Filler—for filling the grain and pores of wood, preparing i< for the finish. Johnson's Powdered Wax-for bal room floors. FOR. SALE BV Chas. E. WANTED OLD BAHAMAS POSTAGE STAMPS O ne 6d. grey lilac One 6d. grey lilac surcharged 4d. One od. grey violet One £1 King Edward.— green or black, Address L. GREY care of TRIBUNE—enclosing samples and prices. Cosmopolitan HIQH SCHOOL Opens on Monday, Oct. 5th in Aurora Hall on Charlotte Street, For particulars apply to Prof. G. G. Coffin, head master, or Mr. J. P. himms. OVER 1500 NOTICE THE Business heretofore carried on by the late John Alfred will be continued under the same name by the under signed Trutees and Executors to his Estate. Mr Clarence Thorpe Fairing* ton, who has an interest in the business, will be Manager thereof. KENNETH SOLOMON C. T HARRINGTON Trustees and Excutors. Nassau, ist Dec. 1914. Pairs Boots and Shoes being added to an already replete stock Williams the Shoeman is again opening up one of those Sample Lots of Boots and Shoes in a limited number of sizes as follows viz:— Men's Boots and Shoes in sizes from 6 to 7J Women's Boots and bow in sites from 3J to 4! Misses Boots and Shoes in sizes from ujto 1 The advantage in purchasing from this lot is (as others who have purchased before can attest) th.it you can select the sizes from a very large variety of up-to-date styles at prices considerably cheaper than regular lines kept in stock. CALL EARLY and secure your sire at WILLIAMS' WHOLESALE AND RETAIL SHOE ESTABLISHMENT 277 and 279 Bay St City Albury LOOK: The following Blank forms mavbehad at "ThtTribune" Office. Duty Entry. Free Entry. Warehouse Entries. Sponging Articles. Ship's Reports. In quantities at Special Rates NOTICE T HIS is to inform the public that if any person or persons are found trespassing on my lot of land situate on Forbes Hill in the Island of Little Exuma, they will be dealt with according to the Law. ERNEST CLARKE (Owner) JACOB CLARKE (Overseer) Forbes Hill, Little Exuma July 23rd 1915 Notice T HIS is to intoni) my Patron and the Public in General that I have opened my Public Black Smith Shop; and am BOW rendy to do anything in I e 'ine ol General repair or new vr rk Hocae Shoeing Specially. All v ork done Mechanically. P. A. HUYLER. GASOLINE TN Drums and 10 Gallon Cans. Price one shilling per Gallon. All previous prices cancelled. C. C. SALJNDERS East Bay St. Nassau N. P. Jan. 5th 1915. The Tribune f^ WANTED. GOOD Pemala Cook who can Wend, write and go errands. A middle Aft person of good elm Popular Mechanics Magazine SO YOU CAM UNDIDSTAMO IT" A GREAT Co^teWW, „f ,k. WcU'. ** Prosrau wlWWnuy begin reading %  t any time, andfsthlcb will hold your Interest forever, you are living in the beat H of the p>-Jt wonderful age. of what to itlcee the creates*, world in the universe. taident of Mara would gladly parti Afin FOR ONE YEARS VlfUWt SUBSCRIPTION to t hi magazine, in order to keep Informed ol our progrrM in Engineering and Mechanic*. Are you reading it ? Two milliona of vour naurhbora are, and it to the favorite magahw in thousands of the best American homes. It appeal* to all classes—old and yojag — men and women. Tha "Shop Hstss" DsBartmsnt '90 njrxa) fires r ,j nn to do filing* -how t hint* useful articles lor borne and shop, repairs, etc Ametsar ataani*a '(10 pagne 1 tells how to maaaMisMioti tnr-4 ore. wirt>i,a CeBITs) l^.wna row ra aaiaeta coev TODAY furl iur lor preferred. For nation, apply to SHADRACK T. WOOD West St. South. ] 'Q'5-—4 ins. Kerosene 1502 Brae. IN New 50 gallon Galvaniz" f,> 'I ed Iron Drums at iScts 9lh |any ~) V POPULAR MECHANICS CO. ill VV Waaklasjm Si.. UHCAC.O, UAA. per Gallon. In 10 gallon Cans at aocfife per. Gallon. Drums and Cans returnable Full particulars at' Office "Frances E., M Nassau N. P. C. C. SAUNDERS Shingles Best No. 1 Heart 5in. Cypres Shingles at $9.60 per thoussand of 20 bundles Discounts on lots of over 5000 shingles. Special Price jtSst received complete outfit of! , fncilities for the buisnoss of an unj aiso on r eaper gradS—also dertakrr. which phires him in a I 5>'Cypress at $6.72 per position to carry run Funerals thai thousand of 20 bundles. This may be entrusted to hit rare v.iii, price made possible by a verv system and despatch; and respect laram r.nwho>. fdily solicitstheir patronage CM r large purchase. my Prices fust and prove that thaaa j l r 8 1 stoi;k arnv >g every %  ra the very lowest For the first cl week. work. C. C. SAUNDERS. W A. MATHER UNDERTAKER D ESIRES lo inform his friends and the Public that he has NOTICE ALE persons having claims against the Estate of the late John Alfred are requested to render the same duly attested, and those indebted thereto to make payment to Kenneth Solomon one of the Executors of his will. KENNETH SOLOMON C. T. FAKRINGTON Executors. Nassau, 16th Dec. 1914. NOTICE THE well known Dairyman of the East w FOR RENT A house in Dowdeswell St. (South Side) in two apart* mania, two buildings east of the Gospel Hall. Possession given immediately. Applv to KENNETH SOLOMON or C. T. FARR1NGTON 20 Dec. 1914 WANTED C OPIES of "THE STROM BUS" August 1913 (Exhibition Number) Apply "TphnCiS. -M.ee atella Gaiter—L. THOMAS N. KN0WLES Is now prepared to supply and deliver the purest milk to be obtained anywhere from .his Dairy Farm on East Shirley Street, opposite Williams Street. Orders may be delivered at his Store on East Hay St. No. 528, 'Phone No. 11G. Delivery at from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m., ancLfrom 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. daily in Sanitary Dottles. Many germs make milk impure, In Knowles' milk no germs ace found ; Look at the bottles in which its sold, at Knowles who takes them all around. Milk like his needs no lactometer, In verification of its strength, Liquor pura nee impurafa. Knowles would never go. that length. MISS LOUISE C ERTIFICATE.^ from Bahamas Hospital. Can furnj monials. 101 Shirley A family



PAGE 1

_*: f ? LATEST WAR NEWS NOTI CE TO SUISCR ISERS Subscribers to The Tribune Monthly and upwards are requested not to pay s ,ibscriptions to thecanieis hut only at the Office, or to a Collector from the Office, also to report to the Office any neglect on the part of the carriers to deliver their paper. <>< NulliUS) e-ddlctus |urre In v.rb. ma.gl.trl. Blng bound to stwoo.r to the Do|moi of no N&iisr. "THE TRIBUNE" WANTS ADVTS. FOR RESULT ADVLRT^I IN ""THE TRIBUNE" Special RstM to Yearl Advertisers % % % % % % % % %  Vol. XII. No. S3. NASSAU. N. P.. BAHAMAS. SATURDAY. JANUARY 25. 1915. Price. THREIjThe War's Tragic To-morrow BY URBAIN GOHIER Welt-Known French Author Prophesies That The Present Struggle, Far From Being The Last of Its Kind, As So Many Think, Is Only the First of a Whole Series of Upheavals. Urbain Goheir, the author of the following article, which has Succession of Spain, regulated the situation of the European States for a century; the treaties been translate,! from the orig; y ie ^ a century; the treat.e. inal French, is a FfnckmL ' '^ **""*"<*•*&' who has been prominent in the cause of peace, ami he is the author of^ "Le Peuple du XXe Siecle." This volume has been characterized as "the best book by a foreigner on the United Stales (1U03,) by W. Morton Fullerton, himself an American ter the Jong wars of the Frenc Revolution and of Napoleon; the congress and the treaties of 1915 or 1916 will undertake the same task. But they will not at the first stroke assure universal peace and order. The international and social question which the pieseut war is going to raise are who was formerly on the staff [ ),eSent war ,s K ng 'ora.se are of The London Times and is KjHTH £? SSS* !? si„.. JL .x .>n...n.. be settled beyond appeal and any diplomatic the author Power." of "Problems of W E see at Paris on the motion picture-screen the demonstration -vhich tie women and young girls in the United States art making in favor of peace;they aredresscd in white; they march in procession; they turn loose to the heavens a sym bolicdove hearing a palm branch Their intention is generous; the spectacle is touching. But the war has been unchained for a long time to come among men. No one will suspect me of encouraging violence; I have given enough pledges in the cause of peace. I have been arraigned five times before the criminal court! of France be cause I denounced the excesses of militarism; I have been imprisoned becaused I cursed the scourged of war with vehemence I have been proposed for the Nobel Prize by delegates of the anti-militarist youth of the majority of the countries of Europe. But there is an abyss between our pious wishes and reality After we have expressed what we believe, what we desire; af. ter we have endured persecution for our Faith, there remains for us only to die or to take accouut of facts that cannot be cleared up. If we continue to live, we must adapt ourselves to facts the course of wM;h we have been unable to turn aside. That is the only chance later to exercise useful action. The will ol individuals remains without force against the formidable torrent of ills that is going to roll over the oldconti nent. WILL RAISE COMPLEX QUESTIONS Observe in the first place that this catastrophe repeats itself with a periodicity so regular that it assumes the appearance of a law. Europe has submitted to a general reorganization .every hundred years. The treaties of 1713-1714, terminated the war of the bey irrevocably by agreements whatsoever". The conflict is drenching all Europe with fne and blood, and several parts of Asia and of Africa. Civilized men and savages ate taking part in the fight. Those w 10 still hold off, as does Italy, merely are waiting for a favorable opportunity for deciding on a safe stroke The Allies solemnly engage not to treat for peace except by commwn lienrd. Meanwhile their respective motives and ambitions may diffei greatly. WORSE STRUQOLE MAT FOLLOW From this point to the time when the Germanic pewer shall ha< e been annihilated, and from this point to the time when all the advarsaries of Germany shall have reached complete agreement on all the territorial, economic, dynastic questions, much time will flow past, and much blood will flow. Remember the two Balkan wars. The first was terrible; the second was still more cruel. The allies who had crushed Turkey rent each other in their struggle to divide the booty. After the collapse of the German Empire and the dismenv" berment of the Austro-Hungarian Empire the booty will be richer, the participants 'herein more numerous, the difficulties more -inextricable. While the great congress of 1915 or 10,16 Works for the reorganization of Europe, of Africa, and of a part of Asia on new bases, the combatants of the day before will not lay down their arms for good ; perhaps they will take them up again with greater fury. Within each country formidable disorders will arise. Several millions of men will return home to their hearths with new souls. Their sufferings and perils will have pive_n them other desires.other ideas, other manners. They will not dread violence as yesterday they dreaded it, and they will not have the same respect for human life: they will have seen death from too near by, and will have marched over t he corpses of friends or enemies. Now they will find, in their respective countries, political life, economic life, social life, all turned topsy-turvy. The\ will expect to regulate it anew; but their ideas will not be in concord and harmony. Actually one wishes no long, er to recognize parties or cliquesCommon peril reconciles adversaries, as common hatred of Germany has reconciled the French and the English, the English and the Russians. But these reconciliations are but conditional. They will last as long as the ordeal lasts that determined them. Onthemor. row of the peace England will find herself face to face with Russia, and the Socialists face to face with the conservative parties, the anticlericals face to by insurrection, and that was probably one of the reasons which led Germany to discount the victory. But a't the critical moment the Socialist masses were carried away by the deep instinct of patriotism. The French Socialists wished to beat down German imperialism, the German Socialists wished to beat down Czarism. And their leaders were obliged to follow them, as always, to obey orders in order to escape being lynched. 3ecome patriots by force, they presently exacted a reward— among us, two seats in the Government. Upon the establish ment of the peace they will exact very much rrfore: they will demand economic legislation and political privileges con forming to their most audacious programme. SERIES OF UPHEAVALS PREDICTEO Events, moreover, work in To Certain War-Poets By Richard Le Gallienne. /jrrHe bugles have blown—O have done with your singing \$~f As a gnat's is your song in the roar of the guns, No man's work is this, colored words to be stringing, Deeds are the songs the world asks of its sons ; Too late for the pen paper wars to be fighting When the bayonets in blood are doing the writing. How green are your gardens—how trampled and ruddy Those gardens of swords, with dead faces for flowers, Where the stream 'mid its rushes runs frightened and bloody, And the soft skies of summer rain bullets for showers ; Ah poet, it seems a poor trade to be plying, When all that is left of brave living isdying. When the dead are brought home with a light on their faces, Of your tears, if you will, you shall make us a song, Singing them home to their safe laureled places, With the sweetness of words for the strength of the strong j But now is no time for your musical talking, When deatrrand the war gods are out at their hawking. progress. The war, which the cursed, will have been the powerful instrument in achit ing their success. Since the conservative parti* will not allow themselves to b despoiled without resi&tenct since the men of these partie. will bring back from the field! of battle the same energy a| the Socialists, the social waj will not be carried on solelj •with harangues and pamphlets Then, to sum up, I foresee long battle between the Gci manic block and the Allies, fol| lowed by arduous difficultit among the Allies themselves before the territorial, economh and dynastic reorganization Europe and its dependencies j thereafter, social djsorders o] great violence. Half at least of the comb.\> tants are sure that this war will be the last, and they die enthusiastically, reckoning that their children will enjoy a definite and final peace. I fear they are mistaken. The fallow deer has been let loose ; it will not return for a long time cage. The actual war is not •., but the beginning, tb/£S point and impulse of' upheavals. Humanity a good many others, earth continues to revc — New York Times SPLIT OPAL MAY GIUMS ILLJEWEL THAT LONQ MISFORTUNE BREAKS AT RELIEF HEADQUAR face with the Catholics, and political coteries face toface with their rivals. Even during the truce the leaders of the opposing parties "are keeping their powder dry," noting the arguments, collect ing the documents, that is to say. the cartridges for future battles. They say : "We shall reckon up accounts later on." And the reckoning will be harsh. For example, the Socialists are not expecting the same results of this war as are the other parties. They have always declared themselves to be pacificists at any price. They had even sworn, in France, to prevent the war I made sudden and immeasurable this way. In order to meet the expenses of a gigantic war the States are forced to run heavily into debt. The charges on the loans, the subsidies, pensions, indemnities, which it is necessary to distribute to the families of soldiers and workingmen without employment, bring in their train the establishment of great State monoplies and the confiscation of a part of property. On the other hand, an entire people of unfortunates gets the habit of living at the expense of the community and will hot willingly renounce it. That rs to say, State socialism, collectivism, parasitism, will have BURST Or ITS OWN MA No Hand Nc&r to Jexr Evil Genius Escaped Btvublc of Sorro I N the history of an watch that for a short has been the property of Belgian Relief Fund, and whiv.was offered for sale at its New York headquarters, and suddenly withdrawn the other day, the superstitious will find material for argument, while those who defy superstition may at least find interest. There is a mystery about the watch, a beautiful piece of jeweler's work that must have cost near $5,000. Nobody at the Belgian Relief Headquarters knows who presented it to the fund. The writer happens to know, and here is its story, every detail of which can be vouched for. Some years ago one of the most generous patrons of a fashionable New York jeweler was a man whose family has been identified with this part of the world for many generations. He had a young and beautiful wife, and often he used to drop in at the jeweler's just to see if there wasn't something new or rare that would make a suitable present for her. (Continued on Thud Page.) Wear Armbrister's Shoes


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Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Saturday, January 23, 1915
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Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
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General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Full Text
_*:
f?
LATEST WAR NEWS
NOTICE TO SUISCRISERS
Subscribers to The Tribune
Monthly and upwards are
requested not to pay s,ib-
scriptions to thecanieis hut
only at the Office, or to a
Collector from the Office,
also to report to the Office
any neglect on the part of
the carriers to deliver their
paper. <><
NulliUS) e-ddlctus |urre In v.rb. ma.gl.trl.
Blng bound to stwoo.r to the Do|moi of no N&iisr.
"THE TRIBUNE"
WANTS ADVTS.
. FOR RESULT
ADVLRT^I IN
""THE TRIBUNE"
Special RstM to Yearl
Advertisers

Vol. XII. No. S3.
NASSAU. N. P.. BAHAMAS. SATURDAY. JANUARY 25. 1915.
Price. THREIj-
The War's Tragic To-morrow
BY URBAIN GOHIER


Welt-Known French Author Prophesies That The Present Struggle, Far From Being The Last of Its Kind,
As So Many Think, Is Only the First of a Whole Series of Upheavals.
Urbain Goheir, the author of
the following article, which has
Succession of Spain, regulated
the situation of the European
States for a century; the treaties
been translate,! from the orig- ;yie^a century; the treat.e.
inal French, is a FfnckmL ' '^ **""*"<**&' *
who has been prominent in the
cause of peace, ami he is the au-
thor of^ "Le Peuple du XXe
Siecle." This volume has been
characterized as "the best book
by a foreigner on the United
Stales (1U03,) by W. Morton
Fullerton, himself an American
ter the Jong wars of the Frenc
Revolution and of Napoleon;
the congress and the treaties of
1915 or 1916 will undertake the
same task.
But they will not at the first
stroke assure universal peace
and order. The international
and social question which the
pieseut war is going to raise are
who was formerly on the staff [),eSent war ,sKng 'ora.se are
of The London Times and is KjHTH ? SSS* !?
si- ..JL .x .>n...n.. be settled beyond appeal and
any diplomatic
the author
Power."
of "Problems of
WE see at Paris on the mo-
tion picture-screen the de-
monstration -vhich tie women
and young girls in the United
States art making in favor of
peace;they aredresscd in white;
they march in procession; they
turn loose to the heavens a sym
bolicdove hearing a palm branch
Their intention is generous; the
spectacle is touching. But the
war has been unchained for a
long time to come among men.
No one will suspect me of
encouraging violence; I have
given enough pledges in the
cause of peace. I have been ar-
raigned five times before the
criminal court! of France be
cause I denounced the excesses
of militarism; I have been im-
prisoned becaused I cursed the
scourged of war with vehemence
I have been proposed for the
Nobel Prize by delegates of the
anti-militarist youth of the ma-
jority of the countries of Eu-
rope.
But there is an abyss between
our pious wishes and reality
After we have expressed what
we believe, what we desire; af.
ter we have endured persecution
for our Faith, there remains for
us only to die or to take accouut
of facts that cannot be cleared
up. If we continue to live, we
must adapt ourselves to facts the
course of wM;h we have been
unable to turn aside. That is
the only chance later to exercise
useful action.
The will ol individuals re-
mains without force against the
formidable torrent of ills that is
going to roll over the oldconti
nent.
WILL RAISE COMPLEX QUESTIONS
Observe in the first place that
this catastrophe repeats itself
with a periodicity so regular
that it assumes the appearance
of a law. Europe has submitted
to a general reorganization
.every hundred years.
The treaties of 1713-1714,
terminated the war of the
bey
irrevocably by
agreements whatsoever".
The conflict is drenching all
Europe with fne and blood, and
several parts of Asia and of
Africa. Civilized men and sava-
ges ate taking part in the fight.
Those w 10 still hold off, as does
Italy, merely are waiting for a
favorable opportunity for decid-
ing on a safe stroke The Allies
solemnly engage not to treat
for peace except by commwn
lienrd. Meanwhile their
respective motives and ambi-
tions may diffei greatly.
WORSE STRUQOLE MAT FOLLOW
From this point to the time
when the Germanic pewer shall
ha< e been annihilated, and from
this point to the time when all
the advarsaries of Germany
shall have reached complete
agreement on all the territorial,
economic, dynastic questions,
much time will flow past, and
much blood will flow.
Remember the two Balkan
wars. The first was terrible; the
second was still more cruel. The
allies who had crushed Turkey
rent each other in their struggle
to divide the booty.
After the collapse of the Ger-
man Empire and the dismenv"
berment of the Austro-Hunga-
rian Empire the booty will be
richer, the participants 'herein
more numerous, the difficulties
more -inextricable. While the
great congress of 1915 or 10,16
Works for the reorganization of
Europe, of Africa, and of a part
of Asia on new bases, the com-
batants of the day before will
not lay down their arms for
good ; perhaps they will take
them up again with greater
fury.
Within each country formid-
able disorders will arise. Several
millions of men will return
home to their hearths with new
souls. Their sufferings and perils
will have pive_n them other de-
sires.other ideas, other manners.
They will not dread violence as
yesterday they dreaded it, and
they will not have the same res-
pect for human life: they will
have seen death from too near
by, and will have marched over
t he corpses of friends or enemies.
Now they will find, in their
respective countries, political
life, economic life, social life,
all turned topsy-turvy. The\
will expect to regulate it anew;
but their ideas will not be in
concord and harmony.
Actually one wishes no long,
er to recognize parties or cliques-
Common peril reconciles ad-
versaries, as common hatred of
Germany has reconciled the
French and the English, the
English and the Russians. But
these reconciliations are but
conditional. They will last as
long as the ordeal lasts that
determined them. Onthemor.
row of the peace England will
find herself face to face with
Russia, and the Socialists face
to face with the conservative
parties, the anticlericals face to
by insurrection, and that was
probably one of the reasons
which led Germany to discount
the victory. But a't the critical
moment the Socialist masses
were carried away by the deep
instinct of patriotism. The
French Socialists wished to beat
down German imperialism, the
German Socialists wished to
beat down Czarism. And their
leaders were obliged to follow
them, as always, to obey orders
in order to escape being lynch-
ed.
3ecome patriots by force, they
presently exacted a reward
among us, two seats in the Gov-
ernment. Upon the establish
ment of the peace they will
exact very much rrfore: they
will demand economic legisla-
tion and political privileges con
forming to their most audacious
programme.
SERIES OF UPHEAVALS PREDICTEO
Events, moreover, work in
To Certain War-Poets
By Richard Le Gallienne.
/jrrHe bugles have blownO have done with your singing !
\$~f As a gnat's is your song in the roar of the guns,
No man's work is this, colored words to be stringing,
Deeds are the songs the world asks of its sons ;
Too late for the pen paper wars to be fighting
When the bayonets in blood are doing the writing.
How green are your gardenshow trampled and ruddy
Those gardens of swords, with dead faces for flowers,
Where the stream 'mid its rushes runs frightened and bloody,
And the soft skies of summer rain bullets for showers ;
Ah poet, it seems a poor trade to be plying,
When all that is left of brave living isdying.
When the dead are brought home with a light on their faces,
Of your tears, if you will, you shall make us a song,
Singing them home to their safe laureled places,
With the sweetness of words for the strength of the strong j
But now is no time for your musical talking,
When deatrrand the war gods are out at their hawking.
progress.
The war, which the _
cursed, will have been the
powerful instrument in achit
ing their success.
Since the conservative parti*
will not allow themselves to b
despoiled without resi&tenct
since the men of these partie.
will bring back from the field!
of battle the same energy a|
the Socialists, the social waj
will not be carried on solelj
with harangues and pamphlets
Then, to sum up, I foresee
long battle between the Gci
manic block and the Allies, fol|
lowed by arduous difficultit
among the Allies themselves
before the territorial, economh
and dynastic reorganization .
Europe and its dependencies j
thereafter, social djsorders o]
great violence.
Half at least of the comb.\>
tants are sure that this war will
be the last, and they die enthu-
siastically, reckoning that their
children will enjoy a definite
and final peace. I fear they are
mistaken. The fallow deer has
been let loose ; it will not re-
turn for a long time
cage.
The actual war is not .,
but the beginning, tb/S
point and impulse of'
upheavals. Humanity
a good many others,
earth continues to revc
New York Times
SPLIT OPAL MAY
GIUMS ILL-
jewel that lonq .
misfortune breaks
at Relief Headquar
face with the Catholics, and po-
litical coteries face toface with
their rivals.
Even during the truce the
leaders of the opposing parties
"are keeping their powder dry,"
noting the arguments, collect
ing the documents, that is to
say. the cartridges for future
battles. They say : "We shall
reckon up accounts later on."
And the reckoning will be harsh.
For example, the Socialists
are not expecting the same re-
sults of this war as are the other
parties.
They have always declared
themselves to be pacificists at
any price. They had even sworn,
in France, to prevent the war I made sudden and immeasurable
this way. In order to meet the
expenses of a gigantic war the
States are forced to run heavily
into debt. The charges on the
loans, the subsidies, pensions,
indemnities, which it is necess-
ary to distribute to the families
of soldiers and workingmen
without employment, bring in
their train the establishment of
great State monoplies and the
confiscation of a part of proper-
ty. On the other hand, an en-
tire people of unfortunates gets
the habit of living at the expense
of the community and will hot
willingly renounce it. That rs
to say, State socialism, collec-
tivism, parasitism, will have
BURST Or ITS OWN MA
No Hand Nc&r to Jexr
Evil Genius Escaped
Btvublc of Sorro
IN the history of an
watch that for a short
has been the property of .
Belgian Relief Fund, and whiv.-
was offered for sale at its New
York headquarters, and sudden-
ly withdrawn the other day, the
superstitious will find material
for argument, while those who
defy superstition may at least
find interest. There is a mystery
about the watch, a beautiful
piece of jeweler's work that
must have cost near $5,000.
Nobody at the Belgian Relief
Headquarters knows who pre-
sented it to the fund. The writer
happens to know, and here is its
story, every detail of which can
be vouched for.
Some years ago one of the
most generous patrons of a
fashionable New York jeweler
was a man whose family has
been identified with this part of
the world for many generations.
He had a young and beautiful
wife, and often he used to drop
in at the jeweler's just to see if
there wasn't something new or
rare that would make a suitable
present for her.
(Continued on Thud Page.)
Wear Armbrister's Shoes


J
i
I.
f
THE TRIBUNE NASSAU. BAHAMAS
L. OILBRRT DUFUCH.
Editor and Proprietor.
OKKICK: 44 MARKET 8TRSBT
Kassau, N. P., Bahamas
PHOSK 260. P. O. BOX 163.
PUBLISHED DAILY
onciay, Wednesday and Friday
le copy ...
sn-l Thursdaysingle copy
Hie copy
.........is.
.......4S-
.........9S.
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Jd
id
i |d
6.1
6d
because being a Zaccheus in
stature, we were overtopped
by the sweltering forms hedg-
ing us in. We bethought us
i of a means of escape, and
happy thoughtappeal to
humanity. Then We shouted,
"there's a woman fainted,
let's get her out"the crowd
opened and We escaped with
a "Jubilate Deo" from the
bottom of our heart. And the
rain was eomin^- down in
torrents. We put our best
foot forward, and soon reach-
ed our Hotel when a warm
bath, and something hot was
a panacea for all our troubles.
But where and to what
does this exordium lead ? you
will probably ask.
In 1909 An Act was passed
by the Legislature regulating
the Registration of Hackney
Carriages &c, The location
of "Stands" was provided for
under the powers given by
---------------------------------------j that Act.
It must be apparent to any The centre of certain streets
man of ordinary judgment was named, and at the time
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
dvfrlising Rates :Six pence per Ijne
for first insertion: three, peugc per 1'ne
for second insertion ; and one penny per
line for siibsquent insertions.
Advertisements under eiuht lines 4s.
be tribune
SATURDAY. Ja.nua.ry 23. 1J5
PUBLISHED AT 5 P.M.
that, all things cannot con
tinue as they were, that there
it seemed good, but certain
conditions have since arisen
comesa time when all human! Which decidedly can for a
affairs have to be adjusted toichangeviz, the" introduction
meet changed conditions that
have occurred without pre-
monition to the most far
sighted and without any pre-
arranged plan. The invisi-
ble machinery works,
strangely enough, automati-
cally, without design, and
those who hold off from ac-
cepting the facts and shelter
gmselves, be they indiv'du-
' lering their own self-
feres ts, or too lazy to
themselves, under the
[ted syllogism of what
'O d-enough-for-my-
ler, is-good-enough-
whether it be a
porate responsible
..1 of a community,
ris the same. Not
/ard, is to go back-
there is no such tiling
>nomy of human af-
f, or of nature as standing
In fact we cannot, if
/ould. Take as acorn-
[lustration an individu-
Icrowd. He must go
Jard with if, if he would
5rve his physical integri-
10 go back is to be crush-
be trampled upon by
lie march of the many press-
ing forward, it may be to an
unattainable goal, but yet it
invariably follows that the
point aimed at is success
which they reap. We, well
remember a personal and
practical example of the dif-
ference between progression
and retrogression. We hap-
pened to be in a large Jfllteri-
can City ou the night of the
"Fourth of July," and in com-
mon with thousands of others
were witnessing the illumi-
nations of the magnificent
buildings surrounding a large
Eublic square, when the rain
egun to fall, and the dense
crowd sought the protecting
shelter of the surrounding
sheds. It was our first ex-
peiience of the horrors of a
crowd. We were completely
wedged in and being some-
what alarmed, endeavoured
to get out of it by going back
to the outskirts, but that was
humanly impossible, it meant
being trampled upon and
crushed into a quivering
mass. Our only safety lay
in moving forward with the
crowd, and yet even in this
cation was immanent,
of Motor Cars, driven in cer-
tain limits at a speed not ex-
ceeding 10 miles an hour.
Owing to the increase of these
vehicles and the reckless driv-
ing of some Owners and
Chauffeurs, and the Cab
stands being in the middle of
the Street here is great and
increasing danger of serious
accidents occurring, such as
collisions with cabs and per-
sons being run over. The
rate of speed allowed in tho-
roughfares is bad enough, but
when to this is added the in-
competency of drivers, it be-
comes a serious question, and
one which demands a strict
and rigid surveillance. We
have frequently noticed Mo-
tor Cars going around corners
without any dimunition of
speed, and but for the Provi-
dence which watches over
fools, the accident ward of the
D. G. Hospital would ere this
have furnished a pretty long
list of cases resulting from the
carelessness of drivers, and
the indifference of the proper
authorities.
We trust that this matter
will engage the attention of
the powers that be, before a
misdemeanour becomes a
felony, and some are left to
mourn the loss of beloved re-
latives and friends. N. B.
Just watch the way in which
Moto-cars sweep from the
Cross streets into Bay Street.
engineers, firemen can be pro-
vided.
HARCOURT.
Telegram to Secretary of
State.
4th January, 1915.
Your telegram second last in-
formation received dated eleven
December was improbable men
would be wanted. Many have
dispersed to Out Islands and
Florida. Am collecting particu-
lars and will telegraph in a few
days. Not likely any en-
gineers.
HART-BENNETT.
Telegram from Secretary of
State 8th January, 1915
Your telegram fourth January
employment as Prize Crews
now found impracticable as
ships will probably be otherwise
employed and not be brought
direct to United Kingdom.
HARCOURT.
Telegram to Secretary of
State.
9th January, 1915.
Your telegram eight January
received with regret. We could
have provided seventy at least
for purpose stated in your tele
gram second instant. Fear
great disappointment. Is it not
possible to utilize their services
in some other way. Have I
authority to publish correspon-
dence.
HART-BENNETT.
gathered by a Constable in dif-
ferent parts of the District and
this can be considered reliable.
7. Trusting that this infor-
mation will be considered inter-
esting and important.
I have the honour to bo,
Sir,
Your obedient Servant,
(Sdj o. j. McDonald,
Commissioner.
Hon. Acting Col. Secr'y.
Nassau, N. P.
EMIGRATION TO FLORIDA
FROM ARTHURS
TOWN, S. S.
During the Year 1914
Married Unmarried Widowed
M 6=; I F
Telegram from Secretary of
State 15th January, 1915.
Your telegram ninth January-
regret disappointment but cir-
cumstances have arisen making
it necessary that the few ships
available in the West Indies
should be utilized for other pur-
poses utilization services men
other direction apparently im-
practicable according to your
telegram foruth January corres-
pondent begining with my tele-
gram second January may be
published.
HARCOURT.
Through the courtesy of the
Hon. T. E. D. Brace, Acting Co-
lonial Secretary, we publish the
2 M 100 I M 2 F 2
JO!
We are indebted to the cour-
tesy of the Management of the
Hotel Colonial for the following
interesting paragraphs concern
ing the "Days Doings" at that
renowned hostelrie.
Nassau Bahamas, Jan. 21st.
The first court goif tourna-
ment of the season began yes-
terday over the Colonial Hotel
course, with a two ball mixed
foursome to start things going.
Considering that many of the
players were arrivals of the past
few days and had no opportuni-
ty for practice, the qualifying
scores were remarkably good.
Miss Ross and Mr. J. B. Bryan
of Rochester N. Y. lead the field
with 37, Mr. and Mrs. W. E.
Carlin of New York followed
with 39, and Mr. and Mrs.
Theodore Berdell of New York
registered a 41 in their first ap-
pearance on the course.
Golf on the big links is now
in lull swing. Messrs Kent
Chambers of Philadelphia, J.
Woodwell of Pittsburgh, and
Frank N. Doubleday of Oyster
Bay L. I., being the most recent
additions to the followers of
Colonel Bogey.
A party of wellknown Long
Islanders arrived on Friday from
Miami and are stopping at the
Colonial. The names include
Mr. and Mrs. Frank N. Double-
day, the publisher, of Oyster
The Administrator desires us
to publish the following telegra-
phic correspondence which has
passed between him and the
Secretary of State for the Col-
onies on the subject of Volun-
teers foi Naval service.
He is still in communication
with the Naval authorities, and
trusts that some opportunity
may yet be found of utilizing
the services of the Volunteers.
Tglegram from Secretary of
State 2nd January, 1915.
Your despatch 2nd November
have you been able to make ar-
rangements suggested in my
despatch 19 October it has been
proposed that employment
should be offered as Prize Crews)
to bring to this country ships
condemned m West Indian
ports do you consider proposal
feasibleif so telegraph whether
any specially qualified such as
Donald, Esq. Commissioner of
Arthur's Town.
The report shows a terrible
declination of the population at
Arthur's Town ; but if reports,
i.e., rumours are to be believed,
emigration from the Bahamas
has sustained a check for the
present owing to two causes,
"No money to pay passage" and
"Things very bad down there."
Emigration Report of O F. Mc IJa>'- a"d N,iss Dorothy Double-
day ; Mrs. A. De Graff of the
same town, Mr. and Mrs. W. H.
Zabriskie, Mr. and Mrs. F. Coit
Johnson and Miss Johnson of
Glen Cove. The Doubledays
have spent many winters at
Nassau, and expect to remain
the season, the golf, bathing,
and horseback.riding appealing
to them strongly.
Bicycles are coming into
It is to be hoped that these! f?shlon nce more. On Wednes-
may not prove unmixed evils j There are many instances where Y.[,k and Mr- Charles I\ Nelson
persons, "go farther and fare [ Montreal reeled off upwards
worse.
Sir,
Commissioner's Office,
Arthur's Town, S. S.,
1 Ith Jany. 1915.
I have the honour to forward
herewith a Return shewing No.
of Persons who emigrated to
Florida during the year ending
31st December 1914.
2. The tide -of Emigration
to Florida since the War broke
out has been greatly increased,
several females as well as men
have left.
3. In some of the settlements
very few men are left, and all
through the District there can
be found but very few of the
younger class.
4. This Return shews emi-
gration for only one year, but
there are many who had gone
previously and not returned.
5. The Census 1911 shewed
the population of the District to
be 2,064 and at present a large
percentage is now in Florida.
6. I have endeavoured to ob-
tain a correct return, which was
of twenty miles over the fine
Bahamas roads. Mr. Sykes was
at one time one of the best
amateur wheelmen in the United
States, and has many century
runs to his credit.
:o:
Arrivals of the past few days
at the Colonial include Mr. and
Mrs. R. Tynes-Smith, and Mas-
ter Tynes Smith of Baltimore
Md., and Mr. Carrol Smith, and
Mr R. W. Parsons, President of
the P. & O. Steamship Line of
New York.
:o:
The S. S. "Esperanza" sail-
ed from New York at 3 p.m.
Friday for Nassau with 75
passengers and 5000 barrels of
cargo.
:o: .
IN THE MAGISTRATE'S COURT
K
13Robert CareyEmbez-
zlement of the moneys of Nathl.
French6 months.
14Estella GaiterLarceny
of 2.8.3 die moneys of ),. C. B.
Albury, the sum of 2 be repaid
to Mr. Albury on or before the
14th day of Tuesday next.
Harvey WoodBreach Cab
Act 2s 6d.
Jos. BainUsing language in
sight and hearing of persons
then being in the neighbour-
hood, towards Harry Kemp
tending to a breach of the peace
Adjourned till Tuesday the
19th Jan. Inst. at 1 o'clock p.m.
:o:
SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE
INWARDS.
9'5-
Jan. 17th S. S. Mexico, O'Keefe,
1 Passengers, Ballast,
ew York.
" 18th Lady Shea, Styles, Bal-
last, Cuba.
19th S. S. Miami, Sharpley,
29 Passengers, General
Cargo, Miami.
" 20th W. II. Albury, Pinder,
27 Passengers, Miami.
22nd S. S. Mexico, O'Keefe,
11 Passengers, Ballast,
Havana.
S. S. Miami Sharpley, 25
Passengers, General
Cargo, Miami.
OUTWARDS.
" 17 S. S. Mexico. O'Keefe, 2
Passengers, Ballast,
Havana.
" 19 S. S. Miami, Sharpley, 9
Passengers, general car-
go, Miami.
22 S. S. Miami, Sharpley,
17 Passengers, Ballast,
Miami.
" 23 S. S. Mexico, O'Keefe
Ballast, New York.
THE R0TH8CHILDS
London, November, 28th 1914.
It is surely a little curious
that the support given by the
Austrian Rotlschilds to the
Austrian War Loan has passed,
if not entirely unnoticed, at
least without public comment.
For it is undoubtedly a fact of
first-class significance that, in
this war, the leading branches
of the Rothschild family find
themselves, politically speaking,
a house divided against itself.
The Austrian Rothschilds sup-
port Austria as they are in duty
bound to do, in making war
against England and France,
which are supported by the Eng-
lish and French Rothschilds, res-
pectively. Anselm Rothschild,
the head of tho Austrian Roths
childs, and Lord Rothschild, the
head of the English Rothschilds,
are both great-grandsons of
Mayer Amschet Rothschild, the
founder of this family. They
aie therefore second coumiis.
But they are even more closely
related than that. For Anselm's
mother was a sister of the late
Baron Lionel de Rothichild,
and thus he is also first cousin
to Lord Rothschild.
The Rothschilds have remain-
ed an absolutely united family,
as witness their extraordinary
series of marriages between first
cousins, unparalleled outside a
few Royal families.It has al-
so been their policywhether
they were Austrian*, or French,
or, English to play more or less
into one another's hands in their
financial operations. But so
far as the financing of this war
is concerned this is no longer
possible. As a financier an Aus-
trian Rothschild must know no-
thing of an English Rothschild.
As head of the British people .
King George takes no count of
the German Emperor,
they are first cousins,
those who are princes
realms of high finance.
The Rothchildslaidt
dations of their stupend
tunes by war loans duri
great struggle aga
A family of Ge
q


r
THE TRIBUNE NASSAU. BAHAMAS
their financial support was
given to the side which was
seeking the overthrow of the
Little Corporal. Even Lord
Rothschilds great-uncle, James,
who founded the Trench Roths-
childs, was in Paris secretly col-
lecting French coin to forward
to Wellington for his advance
in Southern France just befoie
Napoleon's first abdiction. Since
those clays other Germanic
families have imitated the
Rothschilds with great success,
and established bran lies cork-
ing together in the leading capi-
tals of the world. It is proba-
ble that o wai between England
and Germany never entered in-
to their calculations, and cer
tainly the man in the street may
accept it as a fact that the last
thing in the world they, as fi-
nanciers would d< site would be
ftn Anglo-German wai. .Such a
conflict "must obviously cause
them embarrassment in certain
directions. As the bitterness of
conflict -deepnis, families and
firms may be called upon by the
nations to be less international
and more national, 01 even en-
tirely national.
War Notes
There isan element of corned)
in the Germans "bagging" Bai
on Lambert de Rothschild the
head of the B< Igian Rothschilds,
and holding him as a hostage
for the war indemnity imp
on the city 0.1 Brussels. It may
be that the cash taken from
baron Lambert's pockets will
be used to pa> the interest on
Baron Anselm's loans to the
Austrian Government. In that
case the money would still be in
the family. Bu\ at the worst,
a philosophic and all embracing
financier can always console
himself with the reflection that
what is lost on the swings may
be gained on the roundabouts,
A British soldier in Belgium
was one morning wending his
way to camp with a fine rooster
in his arms, whi n lie WBSStopp-
ed by hiscolo-iel to know if he
bad been stealing chickens. "No,
colonel," Was tie reply. "1 saw
the old fellow sitting on the
wall,and I ordered him tocrow
for England, and he wouldn't
so 1 just took Inm prisoner."
The following grim jest is re
corded of a German officer taken
prisoner by the f imousregiment
of Guards. He was surrounded
by a number of his men, and
asked to know what Nu
Regiment had the honoui of the
capture. When he was told he
said :"Then we have got to
the next world, have we?"
"How so?" hewasasked/'Well,
we know," said the Gernittn of-
ficer, "that regiment was anni-
hilated long ago with the rest
of the Russian Guard regiments.
The Emperor William told us
so himself." When the truth
was borne upon that officer he
was the saddest of men for H
deeper reason than the mere
fortune of war.
The folio ving story which
shows the kei nm SS of the Colo-
nials to takepart in the fightinj
comes from Perth, Western Aus
tralia.
One young fellow I know very
well, an athll te, was refused be-
cause one of his toes was mal-
>smed. It lay right under his
other toes. It did not interfere
with him at all, as he is a splen-
did runner, footballer, etc, I la
went Straight from the Army
doctor to his family doctor, and
,t of pei tiasive argu-
it amput ited, and is
e well again. He was
, ,; into the Army, and
aw.iv with the con tin-
*s a fiddler. What price
Kk>g breed, eh?
IN THE SUPREME COIR.T
2oth, Jan. 1915.
The following informations
were filed,
The King
vs.
Alexander Adderley.
r. Unlawfully wounding.
2. Inflicting grievous bodily
harm.
Found to be insane.
Ordered to be conveyed to
the Lunatic Ward of the I.
(i. Hospital, there to be de-
tained until released by Or-
der of the Governor-in-Conn
ciL
21st
The King
VS.
Henry Rahming.
Assault occasioning actual
bodily harmAcquitted,
aand
The King
vs.
Theophilus Ellis.
Indecent Assault -Acquit-
ted.
The King
VS.
Maurice Lightbourn,
Ely mas Wood and Peter
Johnson
1. Shppbreakhig and Larcen)
2 Receiving.
Lightbourn and Wood plead-
ed guilty Sentenced to 12
months imprisonment with hard
labour, from 7th Dec. 10,14 and
to receive 6 sirol - of a tama-
rind rod at the con.mi neeimnt
and6strokes at the termination
1 d Sentence.
Johnson, pleaded guilty
Sentenced to 9 months and 5
strokes.
The King vs. Wilmore Stubbs
1. Shopbreaking and Larceny
z Receiving
Convicted.Sentenced lo 9
months hard labour.
The King vs. Georgiaua Major
1 Unlawfully wounding
2 Inflicting grevous bodily
barm.
Convicted <>f common assault
w ith r commendation to mercy.
Sentence: 5 o o or 2 mo.
; I labour.
chase bill with every resource able one of the commanders to
at their command and will carry move a large body of troops,
their opposition to .m extra ses-'find a weak spot in the line, and
sion of congress if such session surprise his opponent, before
be called.
Manchester, New Hampshire:
Sheriff Holmes who has been
Harry Thaw's guard for a year
and a half declared his bcliel
that Thaw is quite sane. The
latter leaves today for Matte-
there will be any change in the
European war situation.
Position along the Vistula
and vicinity of Cracow are un-
changed.
A stubborn battle has been in
progress in Alsace for several
wan, the home for criminal in-1 days but few details have been
sane, from which he escaped
some 18 months ago.
Washington: -The Hundred
Million dollar army bill will
come up today for amendment.
given.
The Russian Black Sea squa-
dron is busy sinking Turkish,
sailing ships.
London.A sensational re-
After an all-day discussion ofiport reached here to-day from
the national defense committee' Cromcr stating that Zeppelins,
the house of representatives to-
night completed the general de-
bale on the measure.
January 23rd 1915
London, 22nd.
Governor,-
Bahamas.
Official news January 32nd
The French government reports
progress in Champagne district
where an ammunition depot of I
the enemy was exploded. In Ar
in unknown numbers, had pass-
ed over there from the sea-
St. Louis:Hill is opposed to
the ship purchase bill intima-
ting that such an act would in-
volve the United States in the
European war.
Washington:All day caucas
on the ship-purchase bill will
be held by democrats to-day
hoping to reach an agreement
on all its features. On this ac-
count a recess has been taken
gonne an important German at-:ulltl Monday,
lack was repulsed. Some Ger-
man trem hes were carried near
St Mihiel. The Russian govern-
(Continued from First Page
One day the old clerk who
ment reports that the enemy has used to wait upon him showed
evacuatedSkennt, 34miles East njm a large opal that had just
of I'horn, in face of Russians been imported. It was a beau
offensive, also further successes' tiM stone, but in the natural and asked if the opal watch s!,.
she said.
"1 have an idea," exclaimed
the other. "We are near the
Belgian Relief Headquarters.
Let's give it to the poor Belgians.
Surely they couldn't have any
worse luck than they have al-
ready."
So the automobile stopped at
the Belgian Relief Relief Head-
quaters, and the woman
had first owned the watch
tered the office and
would like to have it t
or otherwise disposed of
gian relief. The altendai'
who was the donor, but tne
declined to give a name,
left.
1 hey continued their drive te
the hospital. There a great
surgeon was waiting. He gave
the patient a thorough exami-
nation. "There is absolutely no
need for an operation," was his
verdict.
Immediately the woman seem-
ed better. She went home, and
in a.few days told her friend-
that she was enjoying bettei
health and was happier than she
had felt in a long time
There is still one chapter in
the history of the opal.
A day or two ago the woman
who had persuaded the owner
to part with the opal she had
herself given her, went to the
Belgian Relief Headquar;
in Bukowina.
(Sign< dj
IIARCOURT
FICKEO UP
state, and the clerk expatiated
upon its beauty and its' possibil-
ities. He su:: that it
would make a beautiful case for
a watch. Inimi the gen-
The Germans have apparent- tlenian ordered him to S< I a tin)
!y checked the French attempt Watch in it, and ih< ...-ailtwas
to break their lines between St.L, t.mepicce that awakened the
Mihiel and Metz where the admiration and envy W many of
heaviest fighting is reported. hi8 wjfe8 friends:
Official statement from both. Shortly afterward,misfortune
sides confirm this. began to beset the p
the Germans claim advan-; i.irst she iost i,er cniUl. Not
taecNorth of Sinnheim. A bat ilon^ afterward, Uer *----J \
Latest War News
January ,22nd 1915.
GOVERNMENT pukhs
London: Battle for the
trenches in Flanders and France
rages with unabated fury. This
method of fighting has favoured
tne Allies throughout they hav-
ing (? in< d at almost every point
except at Soissons. The Germans
are now fighting desperately to
protect their line ofcommuni-
catio'.i with Metz
The Russians have, renewed
operations against Mlawa at
tempting toenvelop the German
forces holding the line of the
Mn/urian Lakes
The Russians are making pro
gress against the Austrians
English airmen are busy in
B Igiuni and have ventured as
far a- F.ssen in Rhenish Prussia
where they have destroyed Some
buildings.
Anhduke Francis is visiting
Emperor William.
Washington: -The steamer
11.icia, bought fiom the I lam-
burg American Company since
the war. by an American, must
not sail with n cargo of cotton
for Rotterdam, is the British or-
der. If she docs she will be seized
and taken before a pii/.o court.
The owners declan thai they
will pay no attention to the or-
der and will make a test ease.
fieri in: The German Minis
ter of War has stepped out. I le
will be succeeded 1 ' "' ml
Von Hohnenberg.
Washington.' The R< publi
cans willjuttUe the ship pur-
lb still rages noreasf of 1'ont
A-Moussons where the Allies
claim slight gains. The French
admit the hiss of ground in the
Forest of Agrenotand LePetrie.
I 1 ice lighting in Alsace is re-
ported in progress.
The French made slight gains
in Barry au Bee in Argonne.
British warships are reported
bombarding the Belgian coast
agian.
The Russians (hum advances
on the right bank of the Vistula
towards Last Prussia where
died. Some time later she I
seized with a severe illw
which kept her in bed many
months.
One day, walking with ano-
ther woman, a relative by mar-
riage, she said : "I believe that
opal watch has had something
to do with my misfortunes."
The other pooh poohed the
idea. The first woman persisted.
"Anyhow, I shall never wear
that watch again," she said.
"It seems a shame not to wear
a beautiful thing like that when
had left had been sold.
The woman in charge seemed
in great distress.
"Madame," she said, "J hard-
ly know how to explain, but
the opal is ruined. We have
taken the greatest rare of it,
and it has not been dropped,
nor has it been struck b) any-
thing But this morning two
ladies came in and admired
I am sure that one or tl
of them would have pu
it.
"But a* 1 was taking it
the case, a most cxtrao
thing happened. Witho
jarred in the slightes
the jewel, rigiit b
broke into three pie
hand."
am not superstitious. If you
really don't want the watch,
give it to me, and I'll wear it."
So it changed hands. In a
short time the former owner
minor counter attacks are goingLou |iavc it," said the other. "I
on
Concentration ofconsid
Austrian force have been discov-
ered in Bukowina where the
Russians have made further ad-
vances.
Berlin.No changes in Eastern
war zone.
London:The British Steam-
ship "Durward" bound for Rot-
terdam laden with supplies for
Belgian sufferers was torpedoed Anything to do with them. Fi-
was ill perfect health, but the Huly Communion IM a.m.
second owner encountered mis- SJE^M
fortune after misfortune of the
same nature as those the first
had -been through. Still, she
never once believed the opal
I by the Gcinian submarine U. i yi terday twenty four miles off
the Hook 'if I lolland. According
to an official statement the en
were all saved.
Petrograd:Bad weather has
halted operations in the Carpa-
thians but Russia still holds the
principal passes.
nally, a few weeks ago she. too,
was seized with a serious illness.
Her physician shook his head.
"An operation is absolutely
nei essary," he told her.
(he day about two weeks
ago, accompanied by the rela-
tive who had first owned the
watch and had given it lo her.
It is asserted that Roumania the lady set Out in her automt)-
will send, forces into Tran- 1 Dlie to drive to the hospital. The
sylvanla in February, not as a j operation (bought necessary
formal launching of war against
Austria but to protect Rouma-
ma's interests.
Washington: An explosion
on the United States warship
Sandiego killed four and injured
nine according to B message
from Admiral Howard. The ves-
sel is patrolling the Pa<
I oast.
January 23rd 1915.
GOVERNMENT 1
London. Military experts are I
was difficult and dangerous.
As they drove along Fifth
Avenue, both feeling vcr> IB
depressed, the woman who was
operated upon glanced at her
watch.
"Why," exclaimed the other,
"you arewt tring thai miserable
opal watch. You must get rid
of it immediatelv. I vill
ot go to ihr hospit Ke"'
h a 1- .1.1.1)
igthefah
opal. %
"Ai,
RELIGIOUS SER
SUNDAY, JANUARr
8T. MATTHEW B > HUR<
Church and Shirley Sta,
. 5, LmMl, Hi
7.15 a ni Holy Common!
M ittiai and Salmon. 10.15 a m.
290 pin. Junior Cat
ISO f>rn. Senior Catechism.
Evensong.
ST. MAKGAUffS
Sunday*, Evaaaonf ami Addieai 1 N
Thurs., Evenaot
rill kill Ol W AONK V.
Grant* Town, liluo Hill Road
Rim. Amllry /. Diewm, ]
" :e>sJ
rmon 10 3t
. Evan
song and Samoa 7 pan.
Week liny S>r
I...nr Mass daily 7.30 except Saturday!.
1 r. Ta > : 1 ban
i.'M p.m. v\ ed. and 1 1 .id.
sr. tl Wut sticel
Rev. Chry* .r Vorane
trmoa II a.m. Sarmoa ami
iiciionai efc-daya Mam 7 am.
IQBMD HEART CHAPEL
Bait Mi'.1 ley Street.
\ Sermon 1 DRI PRR8BTTKR1AM
CHURCH
f 1 ..:(.i Street
Rev S. J. Bmw
Morning II a.m. inp 7 pan.
ZION BAPTIST CHI R
ni East and Slurlcv
Kn: C'tas. A. Danr., Paal
II 11111. ar>..i 7 pin.
FUPTIST INIgNCMI Rl I
ifnCT*JrM.
;'). U'ilfArrf, Paamr.
1. Scrinou, 11 a.m., 7 p.o.
''. |i rn.
LEYAS MKTHOinST CHURCH
KIZRR
'. t'ainr, I',:
- ';;:eet
11 ,1 m. an.! 1 pin.
CHRISTIAN Sflt
,sau
ly prott
fa, 11.


L
of the opinion that the ground I with itjl^fij
must harden sufficiently to old not give it: >


-
THE TRIBUNE NASSAU. BAHAMAS
for the mother and health for the baby
follow the use of the 'Allenburys* Foods.
They resemble healthy human milk in composition, nutritive value and digestibility.
Babies fed on the "Allenburys" Foods invariably thrive welL
Rest and Comfort
iSllenbtmjs
B.VQ
KSTRtTAILI
'Huinrii
MALTED FOOD No. 3.
Fro* fi month* upwards.
The Allenburys' RUSKS (Malted)
From 10 month* upwards.
LK FOOD No. 1. MILK FOOD No. t
tartt to 1 monthi From S to month*.
TO BE OBTAINED FROM ALL CHEMISTS AND STORE8.
mm- Pamphlet -Infant Feeding and Management" sent free.
ALLEN ix HANBUB1S LTD., LONDON. ENGLAND.
Mm%mmmMX*JKX^
llillllliriiiilii
Good Morning! I take notice
We Are Introducing "Pin
American Silk
American Cashmere
American Cotton Lisle
HOSIERY
They have stood the teit. Give real
foot comfort. No warns to rip. Never
become loose or baggy- The shape is
knit innot pressed in.
GUAR.ANTEEI) for fineness, style,
superiority of malarial anil workmanship.
Absolutely stainless. Will wear 6 months
without holes, or new ones free.
OUR. SPECIAL, OFFER
to everv one sending us $1.00 in currency
or postal note, to cover advertising and
shipping charges, we will send pott paid)
with written guarantee, backed by a live
million dollar company, either
3 fairs of our 75c. value
American Silk Hofiery,
or 4 Pairs of our 50c. value
American Cashmere Hosiery,
or 4 Pairs of our 50c. Value,
American Cotton-Lisle Hosiery.
6 Pairs of Children's Hosiery.
LONT DELAY-Offerexpireswhen
iler is your locality is selected.
NMiOTUL HOISERY CO.
O. Box 224
Ton. oh,o, u. s. a
Parish Boot Shop,
own as "The Sign of
the Ship" in King's Street,
will be closed from Friday
Jan. 22. prox., and the entire
stock transferred to Charle.
Duncombe, F.ast Bay Streets
All outstanding debts are to
be paid to the said Charles
Duncombe, (who alone is au-
thorised to collect the same)
or to such person as may be
authorised by him in writing.
\V. LOWNDES.
EMOVAL
st February, 1915
ir intention to re-
inting Establish-
e Tribune" to the
t the Northeast
lirley and Char-
opper Floor consist-
)f four rooms may be
from the 1st January,
Terms motivate. One
hole. May be viewed
cation to
GILBERT DUPUCII,
"Tribune" Office,
g4 Market St.
ror Results
Advertise in
TENDERS
VLflLL be received by the un-
dersigned until noon of
Thursday the 21st January, 1915
for the purchase of the Schoon-
er "Hattie H. Roberts" her fix-
tures and appurtenances.
KENNETH SOLOMON
C. T. FARRINGT0N
Executors Estate John Alfred.
24th Deer 1914.
Tenders should he addressed
"KENNETH SOLOMAN
"Chambers,
"Tender for Hattie H. Roberts
Napes Fertilizers
/ now carry in stock the
following formulas:
Pineapple. It has been prov-
en that this has no equal
and a visit to fields using
same will convince you.
Vegetable.Now is the time
to use this and increase
your yield in Tomatoes,
Potatoes, Onions and all
other vegetables by 100
per cent.
Orange Tree.To assist the
growth of Young Citrus
Tree.
Fruit and Win*.-Increase the
yield and growth of old
Citrus trees.
For further information
and books on the use of these
Fertilizers, please apply to
WALTER K. MOORE
Agent for Mopes Fertilizer
in the Bahamas.
Sarviti
Cool
Reliable
Sold
Win.
Hilton,
Fruit of the Loom 36 in.
at 71 per yard.
Johnson's
Artistic Wood
Finishes
Johnson's Prepared Waxa com
plete finish and polish for all furniture
woodwork and Boon
Johnson's Wood Dyefor the artistic
coloring of all wood, soft or hard
Johnson's Under Laca spirit |
finish, very much superior to shellac or
varnish
Johnson's Flat Wood Finishfora
beautiful, artistic, hand-rubbed effete
without the expense of rubbing.
Johnaon's Paste Wood Fillerfor
filling the grain and pores of wood,
preparing i< for the finish.
Johnson's Powdered Wax-for bal
room floors.
FOR. SALE BV
Chas. E.
WANTED
OLD BAHAMAS POSTAGE
STAMPS
One 6d. grey lilac
One 6d. grey lilac sur-
charged 4d. One od. grey vio-
let One 1 King Edward.
green or black,
Address L. GREY care of
TRIBUNEenclosing sam-
ples and prices.
Cosmopolitan
HIQH SCHOOL
Opens on
Monday, Oct. 5th
in Aurora Hall
on Charlotte Street,
For particulars apply to
Prof. G. G. Coffin, head mas-
ter, or Mr. J. P. himms.
OVER
1500
. NOTICE
THE Business heretofore car-
ried on by the late John
Alfred will be continued under
the same name by the under
signed Trutees and Executors
to his Estate.
Mr Clarence Thorpe Fairing*
ton, who has an interest in the
business, will be Manager there-
of.
KENNETH SOLOMON
C. T HARRINGTON
Trustees and Excutors.
Nassau, ist Dec. 1914.
Pairs
Boots and Shoes
being added to an already
replete stock
Williams the Shoeman
is again opening up one of
those Sample Lots of Boots
and Shoes in a limited
number of sizes as follows
viz:
Men's Boots and Shoes in sizes
from 6 to 7J
Women's Boots and bow
in sites from 3J to 4!
Misses Boots and Shoes in sizes
from ujto 1
The advantage in purchas-
ing from this lot is (as others
who have purchased before
can attest) th.it you can se-
lect the sizes from a very
large variety of up-to-date
styles at prices considerably
cheaper than regular lines
kept in stock.
CALL EARLY
and secure your sire at
WILLIAMS' WHOLESALE
AND RETAIL
SHOE ESTABLISHMENT
277 and 279 Bay St City
Albury
look:
The following Blank forms
mavbehad at "ThtTribune"
Office.
Duty Entry.
Free Entry.
Warehouse Entries.
Sponging Articles.
Ship's Reports.
In quantities at Special Rates
NOTICE
THIS is to inform the pub-
lic that if any person or
persons are found trespassing
on my lot of land situate on
Forbes Hill in the Island of
Little Exuma, they will be
dealt with according to the
Law.
ERNEST CLARKE
(Owner)
JACOB CLARKE
(Overseer)
Forbes Hill, Little Exuma
July 23rd 1915
Notice
THIS is to intoni) my Patron
and the Public in General
that I have opened my Public
Black Smith Shop; and am bow
rendy to do anything in I e 'ine ol
General repair or new vr rk Hocae
Shoeing Specially. All v ork done
Mechanically.
P. A. HUYLER.
GASOLINE
TN Drums and 10 Gallon
* Cans. Price one shilling
per Gallon. All previous
prices cancelled.
C. C. SALJNDERS
East Bay St.
Nassau N. P.
Jan. 5th 1915.
The Tribune f^
WANTED.
GOOD Pemala Cook who can
Wend, write and go errands. A
middle Aft person of good elm
Popular Mechanics
Magazine
SO YOU CAM UNDIDSTAMO IT"
A GREAT Co^teWW, f ,k. WcU'.
** Prosrau wlWWnuy begin reading
t any time, andfsthlcb will hold your
Interest forever, you are living in the beat
H, of the p>-Jt wonderful age. of what to
itlcee the creates*, world in the universe.
taident of Mara would gladly par-
ti Afin FOR ONE YEARS
VlfUWt SUBSCRIPTION
to t hi magazine, in order to keep Informed ol
our progrrM in Engineering and Mechanic*.
Are you reading it ? Two milliona of vour
naurhbora are, and it to the favorite maga-
hw in thousands of the best American
homes. It appeal* to all classesold and
yojag men and women.
Tha "Shop Hstss" DsBartmsnt '90 njrxa)
fires r ,j nn to do filing* -how t hint*
useful articles lor borne and shop, repairs, etc
" Ametsar ataani*a '(10 pagne 1 tells how to
maaaMisMioti tnr-4 ore. wirt>i, engines, magic, &J all the tilings a buy lores.
a.ao eta run. sinuli copies >a CeBITs)
l^.wna row ra aaiaeta coev today
furl
iur
lor preferred. For
nation, apply to
SHADRACK T. WOOD
West St. South. ]
'Q'5-4 ins.
Kerosene
1502
Brae. IN New 50 gallon Galvaniz-
"f,>'- I ed Iron Drums at iScts
9lh |any


~)
V
POPULAR MECHANICS CO.
ill VV Waaklasjm Si.. UHCAC.O, UAA.
, per Gallon.
In 10 gallon Cans at aocfife
per. Gallon.
Drums and Cans returnable
Full particulars at' Office
"Frances E.,M Nassau N. P.
C. C. SAUNDERS
Shingles
Best No. 1 Heart 5in. Cypres
Shingles at $9.60 per thous-
sand of 20 bundles
Discounts on lots of over
5000 shingles.
Special Price
jtSst received complete outfit of! .
fncilities for the buisnoss of an un- j aiso. on reaper gradSalso
dertakrr. which phires him in a I 5>'- Cypress at $6.72 per
position to carry run Funerals thai thousand of 20 bundles. This
may be entrusted to hit rare v.iii, price made possible by a verv
system and despatch; and respect laram r.nwho>.
fdily solicitstheir patronage Cm r. large purchase.
my Prices fust and prove that thaaa j l r*8*1 stoi;k arnv>g every
ra the very lowest For the first cl week.
work. C. C. SAUNDERS.
W A. MATHER
UNDERTAKER
DESIRES lo inform his friends
and the Public that he has
NOTICE
ALE persons having claims
against the Estate of the late
John Alfred are requested to
render the same duly attested,
and those indebted thereto to
make payment to Kenneth Solo-
mon one of the Executors of his
will.
KENNETH SOLOMON
C. T. FAKRINGTON
Executors.
Nassau,
16th Dec. 1914.
NOTICE
THE well known
Dairyman of the
East
w
FOR RENT
A house in Dowdeswell St.
(South Side) in two apart*
mania, two buildings east of the
Gospel Hall. Possession given
immediately.
Applv to
KENNETH SOLOMON
or
C. T. FARR1NGTON
20 Dec. 1914
WANTED
COPIES of "THE STROM -
BUS" August 1913 (Exhi-
bition Number)
Apply
"TphnCiS. -M.ee
atella GaiterL.
THOMAS N. KN0WLES
Is now prepared to supply
and deliver the purest milk
to be obtained anywhere
from .his Dairy Farm on East
Shirley Street, opposite Wil-
liams Street. Orders may be
delivered at his Store on East
Hay St. No. 528, 'Phone No.
11G. Delivery at from 7 a.m.
to 10 a.m., ancLfrom 3 p.m.
to 5 p.m. daily in Sanitary
Dottles.
Many germs make milk im-
pure,
In Knowles' milk no germs
ace found ;
Look at the bottles in which
its sold, at
Knowles who takes them all
around.
Milk like his needs no lactom-
eter,
In verification of its strength,
Liquor pura nee impurafa.
Knowles would never go.
that length.
MISS LOUISE
CERTIFICATE.^
from Bahamas
Hospital. Can furnj
monials.
101 Shirley
A family .


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