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L. GILBKKT DUPUCH, Editor and Proprietor. OFKICK44 MARKKT 8TRBKT Nassau, N. P., Bahamas •PIIONK 260. P. O. BOX 163. PUBLISHED DAILY Monday, Wednesday and Friday— single copv Jd Tuesday, and Thursday—single copy jd Saturday--single copy ... ild Weekly • 5 <| M.mthly i s. M S narterly .. 4 s. 6d all Yearly o s. Yearly 1 8s. PAYABLE IN ADVANCE Advertising lilies :— Six pence per line for first insertion; three [lence |ier line for second insertion ; ar.j one penny per line for suhv|uent insertions. Advertisements under eiidit lines 4s. Zbc tribune THURSDAY. Ja.nuo.ry 21. 1913 f* PUBLISHED AT b P.M 1 here is Boating uppermost in our mind an idea that we have been lacking in courtesy on the one hand and in an apparent absence of interest on the other in passing by unnoticed the hist Annual Report of the Hon. w. Hart Bennett for 1913—14 when Colonial Secretary, and we unhesitatingly regret our default in the first and primary instance,and we would unfeignedly desire to assure His Excellency I ho Administrator that our laches was due to want of thought anrl not to want of heart As to the other phase of the subject c'ttt un autre chose but as it concerns our public, we acknowledge our dereliction to it also, and venture to hope thai in both rases the old pro^vflrb, '•Confession of a fault, makes half amends for it," will stand us in good stead. The resume of the report in the Nassau Guatdian of the 20th lOSt. reveals a serious financial condition and a complete upheaval of our economies generally, while in some few departments we may claim a concrete gain. The idea is becoming materialized that we have "hung our baskets higher than we can reach" or, "bitten off more than we can chow" in several instances, which doubtloss have attracted the attention of thoughtful men ; not to disguise the fact, they are uppermost in their minds at the pre. sent time, and must sooner or later, we think sooner, bear fruit which will be neither Apples of lstakhar nor yet Apples of Sodom. During the coming legislature our representatives will be sorely put to it to make both ends meet; the problem is rapidly getting out of hand and the process of assimilating the heterogeneous elements must engage the skill of a unique politician. Steamship communication, efficient Electric. Lighting, and Telegraphic Communication are pressing questions, which will demand far gravel consideration than is accorded them in the easy typography of a "leader." The Report is easily entitled to the highest commendation from those whose reading is more than indeterminate, and whose intelligences are bejond those who float in a sea of doubt. From the Mass of statistics, we have B Report which might aptly be comp-tred to the kernel of a cocoa-nut, the husk on one side, though not worthless; and the real value of the fruit on the other, to which the huskhowever is contributory. THE LORD MEATH EMPIRE CHALLENGE CUP. Yesterday was red-lettered in the annals of the Boys' Central School, for the Lord Meath Empire Challenge Cup and personal prize of ttiree guineas were presented to the winner. It has already been explainod in our columns Ihat, this Cup is competed for by pupils under the age of 14 in nearly all the Public schools throughout the Empire. Every year a subject for an essay <>f not more than one thousand words is set bv the Committee of the League of the Empire. Only the best essay is sent from each school and they are most impartially judged in London. The winner of the Prize has his name engraved on the Cup, which his school keeps for one year, and he receives a personal prise of three guineas. Punctually at 11 o'clock His | Excellency the Administrator accompanied by Miss Hart Hen net I and Mr. and Mrs. Richard LeGalliennc arrived and were received by the Acting Chairman of the B ard 01 Education, the Rev. Daniel Wilshere, and T. H. K. Moulder, Esq., M. A., Inspector of Schools. The school stood at the salute and sang the national anthem. His Excellency then addressed the boys, and among other things said that, our Colony should indeed be proud that the Cup had been won twice by Bahamian boys, a distinction which has been attained by no other Colony, large or small. After presenting the Cup and prize to the winner Walter Mc Gregor Albury, His Excellency told the boys that he thought they would like to have Mr.' Le < iallienne to address them. This announcement was greeted by a tremendous clapping of 1S0 pairs of hands, the boys without doubt being delighted to have a real live poet speak to them. To judge from their rapt attention Mr. LeGalliennc would attain quite as much distinction on the platform as he has in woiug the muse Sargeant Albury and Mrs. Albury the parents of the happy recipient of the prize wore pre sent and had the pleasure of seeing their son receive that for which thousands of boys and girls throughout the length and breath of the British Empire had striven their very best to obtain. His Excellency left almost immediately after, and thus end ed a function which though dig nifiod was delightfully informal. Mr. .x\<\ Mrs. LeGalhenne and Miss Hart Bennett remained to hear the boys sing, and to examine the written work of the Upper school. After the school had been dis missed a half-holiday being given, the Visitors were shown around the school garden by the Inspector and they expressed themselves as being' delighted with the boys and their work. I hr Supreme Court mel yrsn rd iy, III n the lion F. ('. W< II Durrani K. C. \tiomey General exhibited and fii.-.l ten information* before Hit Honor Daniel fodor, 1 'tiipf Justice. Fiver.iv". were tried before a Jury win. in '-noli case returned a Ver diet of Guilty. The'Pi iSonera were sentenced, — .'o: — COMMUNICATED. The latest diabolism reported by radio gram yesterday thrill cd us with inconceivable horror It would be impossible to concieve of so dastardly an outrage emanating from any being less than a devil. Germany lias already ^sked for and received the world's condemnation. Is there flwmoN that she can do to entitle her to be called, "Hell upon Earth", Can any man making the greatest possible allowance for the very worst typo of humanity regard the Kaiser as other than a mad incarnate Devil. Oh! my beloved England, when will you wake up. Will not this crowning atrocity urge you to reprisals that will make I your eoemv stand aghast? A QUONDAM I'M HMD —so! — A GREAT YEAR IN HISTORY This year will probably stand out 111 history as one of the roost eventful that the world has ever known. With 1911 it will rank as an epoch mal ing period; with 1914 it may be said to have inaugurated a new era for the world. Take' our minds back a hundred years, to the year 1815, and wo find Europe at the parting of the ways, at the dawn of a development not yet foreseen, at the threshold Ot an order of things which neither statesman nor phili iso|,her saw even faintly adumbrated. Napoleon was af Elba, but Napoleon was still a force to he reckoned with in the affairs of the woild. Eor nearly 1 < ntj 5 ears be had overrun Europe, the greatest personal force of !us tiiin the mightiest mill tary genius. I le was in exile, but more was to bv hoard of him; again the thunder of his cannon was to startle the nations and the armies of France were to rush forward at Ins imperious command. In the spring he went baca to France; in August of that sain-year his System had fallen forever, his reign was at an end. He had hoped, had striven for world dominion, and the principle of nationality, of independence, the spirit of freedom, had defeated him. For two decades he had dominated the thoughts of mankind and spread terror with his name. The end was St. Helena, the bleak and dreary island in the African seas: after a lifetime of victory-this! Napoleon subdued, Europe turned to put its domestic affairs in order. Then began that wonderful industrial expansion, that growth of manufacturing enter-• prise, those triumphs of practical science and discovery, that have changed the face of the globe and have had such far-reaching social and political effects. Tl



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It w%i almost a new birth, it was at /east an awakening, thai tlie wivrtd experienced after 1815 For then arose the strong insurgent demand for new right?. and liberties for the millions of men, the workers, who had hitherto being thought of but little account. Democracy be fjan to lift its voice, and as wealth accumulated the sons of toil demanded with greater cmI phasrs that their share of it should be larger and that in the government of their respeAive countries they should play a larger part. For a hundred years the light between privilege and democracy continued, the battle between capital vested interests, and organised labour, was fought. In some countries the democracy won much ; in others they were beaten again and ain. And thus it wasin 1914 we saw the people, the workers of nearly every European country, arming themselves for another mighty effort. In England the strikes had grown to stupendous proportions. In France there was abroad the spirit of social unrest. In Germany over four million men described ; themselves as Social Democrats, •and in Russia the red spectre of revolution was raising its head our. moi .Then,almost without I warning, the dense war clouds] burst over Europe. Another War Loid had drawn his sword, and Europe saw with eyes of horror that a whole continent was once again to become a scene of carnage ; Europe heard the war trumpets shrilly summoning the reapers to a harvest of death In 1X:4 Europe had united to smite Napoleon down. In 1914 four European nations again were compelled to draw the sword to prevent the hegemony of a power-drunk nation whose aim was to stand so lofty in the sun that only in its shadow could the other nations find a servile peace. Four European nations drew the sword, and those peoples that have remained neutral realise that in the victory of these four lie their guarantees of national freedom. A conflict greater than that waged against Napoledn is the mission of these four. Will the war end in 191.5? Will August of this year find England and her Allies triumphant, or must we wait long to Je the last of a struggle which ill cost so much in blood and I ""*"" tell. We are now en i< sixth month of the war. and the armies are still contending. The German is in Belgium, in France and in Russian Poland; he is still strong, and he speaks as haughtily as of yore. His allies have more than once been beaten, nevertheless it would be a mistake to imagine them crushed: we wish we could believe they were. So we do not enter this Year with any certainty tnat In a few months more peace will once again have returned to wartorn Europe, We can but hope that it will; and it may be that, unknown to us all, there may be f. 1 %  • t< rat work even now which will compel the cessation of war on the part of those who provoked it; it maybe that the close of the present year will witness the ratification of a peace which will leave Europe time to heal her bleeding wounds and reconstruct her shattered fortunes. But it will be a new kind of world that will begin to come into being when the war is ended. A struggle like the present cannot leave life unchanged, cannot leave the people of the globe quite thesame as it found them. There must be recon Struction, a new life.' then common man will know that he and his did much 'o save the State, and from the State he will demand full and ample recognition. What will Russia be after this war? What will Austria be? What will Germany ? Out of these death-throes what sort of life will issue? The Europe of 1815 has almost completely passed awav. In much less than a century—for events. move quickly in these days—1 Europe of 1915 will give place to one much different. Nothing stands eternal; everything changes; and this war will have .1 1 everyrhing into the melting pot. Something new must emerge, new thought new ideals, a new manner of living. This year indeed mav be definitely a turning point in our history. It mav rank as one of the world's greatest years. 'Yhc Daily Cleaner Latest War News Heavy snow fall in France and Flanders confine the fighting to engagements by artillery only The only exception reported is in the section. Southwest of Verdun when the French troops have appropriated a few hundred yardi of Gi rman front. The Russians are known to be carrj ing on a big movement between East Prussian frontier and the Lower Vistula with the object, it is believed, of preventing Von Hinderbcrg from joining the German trenches in East Prussia Some credit the Russians with crossing the Vistula. The Russians are still pursuing the remnants of the Turkish troops they defeated. Washington:—Villa is planning to withdraw troops from Mexico City and wage a campaign for the mastery of the situation in North Mexico. Harmony prevails between Villa and Zapata. Washington: — W h i 1 e a formal reply by the British govern merit has not yet been made Ambassador Page today said that Great Britain could not agree to the proposal of the United States that pending the decision of questions of international law involved the nteamer Dacia be permitted to proceed to Germany with a cargo of cotton. She is now loading at Galvcston. Washington:—Republican opposition now gives evidence of big filibustering tactics Senator Barton who Talked the rivers and harbours bill to death in the last session led the attack on the ship purchase bill v^sterday and no progress was made. The third caucus on the bid will be held tonight. January 21st 1915. London, 20th. Governor, Bahamas. Official news January 20th : The French government reports snow storms along the front with no special incidents. The Russian government reports continued pursuit of the Turkish army in the Caucasus. The enemy made an air raid on Norfolk coast last night about five persons were killed. Slight damage to property. (Signed) HARCOURT. PICKED UP German aircraft raided the Fast coast of England last night dropping bombs over eight towns in the county of Norfolk. Six persons are reported killed and several injured. Yarmouth suffered most the property damage being £3.000. The raid began a little before eight o'< !o( |< and ended a little before midnight. All the airigotawaj unharmed unless there is truth in the report that one of them was brought down by the guns from a British warship. So far there is no confirmation. The raiding machines were first thought, to be Zeppelis but todays report indicate that they were aeroplanes. The government is silent on the attack. Norfolk county is about one hundred miles north of London. Several bombs were dropped near Sandringham, the kings summer place where the king and queen were visiting onlv a few days ago. The French report the destruction of the German forces which tried to demolish the Vser bridge, and claim other gains at St. Georges and in the La Pt-true forest and around Thann. Violent artillery has occurred over the entire battle line. A fierce battle in La Gurie Forest resulted in the French being driven from their trenches, but they re changed and drove the Germans out of them. The German report briefly states that 300 yards of French trenches were captured yesterday at Notre de Lorctte, Northwest of Arras, and that some trenches were taken intheArgonne. In the Fast there appears no important engagements from the East Prussian frontier to Transylvania* borders. The Turks report English reverses in Arabia. A Dutch naval sloop, was sunk yesterday by a mine while patrolling neutral waters of the Scheldt. 1 wentv deputies were indicta ed for shooting strikers yester• dav at a chemical works near Elizabeth, New Jersey. LOST :o: — A WEDDING RING 00 West Bay or West St., Tuesday Jan. 19, has (initials and date inside. Finder will be rewarded on returning same to the TRIBUNE OFFICE.]



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THE AGILITY and prodigious leaping powers of the KANGAROO are famed all the world over. Its agility, however, is excelled hv the ease and quickness with which SONLIGHT SOAP expels dirt from the clothe in the wash. SUNLIGHT SOAP enjov s well-earned and worldwide distincti< n as a Soap of the first qualit). It^reputation is maintained by the /. 1000 (iuarantee %  >l Puritj given with every bar and by the good repi n of million housewh es \\ ho use it dail) win NOT nr new onai OURSPECIAL OFFER t,i r\ery '>ri' •"' I '*' "' '"i:n or postal n< le, to covet shipping el arges, we willsei I paid, with writti 1 guarantee, 1 million dollat com| %  3 1'a.irs ot o\ir 75c. va.l\ie American Silk I lo*i< rjr, or 4 Paliof our JOc. vivlvie American Cashmere Hosiery, or 4 Pilr of oxir 50c. Value, American C\\ ing Blank forms mav be had at "TheTribune" Office. I >ntv Entry. F n Entry. Warehouse Entries. Sponging Articles. Sliip's Reports.



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p Nvilllus fvtliiicius lUmre li\ verba msvglatrl. Belnrt bound to iwe&r to the UoKmai ol no Mvter. %  ?• VOL. XII. I 1 ' ' N&ni, N. P.. Be>h&ma.a, Thuraday. Jhkn.ia.ry 2t. 1915 %  1NO. 49 Haw a Virginian Snved Her Home From Russians .Mrs. Sftllv BarieU Siegfried. Decondanl of the Washingtone Tells Wh&l Happened on Her Huaban I's East Prussian Estate When He Wti Away Fighting For Germany And Czar's Soldiers Came. ntinued from Tuesday January nth.; Wild Kussian Yarns. Captainthe children call him the Idi > thej find ntcknatw s for ;iii illRussian*i"l t had to listen to nil this nonsense without knowinthow mu 'h <>f il was 1 1 nt11 and in >w much lit s. Thai same d ly •> whole army corps, four divisions, passed through here. AM the roads were black with %  oldiers.On tug. 31, 4,000 men ,.-.i in and about nui court; we had %  j •_ %  111 officeis in the house, They took supper with us. I wo ol them, ..imy doctors, spoke good 1,, nan; one had a 01 Iced .1 } eai in the ( harlty Hospital .-it Berlin. The rest were bj no means atIra live in appeal since In tflfl %  j HI bar. nessing up 1 >n* a Ftet anothei ol our wagon* in the yard and drii away \\ hi n this h ippened to tinfourth, I Ii id %  nmigh of it, so I rushed upstairs, knoi ked on the door of the room occupied by one of tii" doctors, in I begged him to comedown right away and the soldiers from taking the horses and wagons. He was down in .1 few minutes and or.I. red then) t desist, \s -, on .is he was ne Ihtf si. 11 led all ovet again. < hue m< iff [ asked him for help, but bo told roe to gel 10 officer, as the meri won'.I not obey him, I knocked on several doors without waking ..IINfnghl I w ished, 1111. 1 ace Iroin helov him; anyhow, he di | I US lii tin yard Cossacks %  it wrapped ii silk quilts, their heads pillowed on cushions, Hi.'v had btoughl out the be1 '• Coverings and carpet* for bedding. I went out to it 1 rly in the 101 Ding, for thev bad buiIt a fire for making their coffee r ithei close 11 barn, and I fe ired th \ mighl fire i" somethiog, since straw was l\ ing all about I told them to be careful; ihey promised. The pleasant doctor offered to escort metna General, some two kilometers distant, in ordei to ipei fn im him thai w protect us. We drov • aw ty behind two half blind feeble old horses 'o you. You ju s t stay in ilK o •,|....... 1,. ,,
The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02324
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Thursday, January 21, 1915
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02324

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Full Text
p
Nvilllus fvtliiicius lUmre li\ verba msvglatrl.
Belnrt bound to iwe&r to the UoKmai ol no Mvter.
"?
VOL. XII.
........ 'I1..... "' "
N&ni, N. P.. Be>h&ma.a, Thuraday. Jhkn.ia.ry 2t. 1915

1- -
NO. 49
Haw a Virginian Snved Her Home
From Russians
.Mrs. Sftllv BarieU Siegfried. Decondanl of the Washingtone
Tells Wh&l Happened on Her Huaban I's East Prussian
Estate When He Wti Away Fighting For Germany
And Czar's Soldiers Came.
ntinued from Tuesday January nth.;
Wild Kussian Yarns.
Captain- the children call
him the Idi > thej find ntcknatw s
for ;iii ill- Russian*- i"l mosi unbelievable tales, 11" said
Hi,, i Aomi ii in and Italy bad
dared wai on Germany, Italy had
Finally I waked one lu-
ll .aging "ii his
with my fist. I made my plea, pre-
umioui "''K-
were drivi until finally
I shouted up t" him through a
s| eakiog tube to call from Ins w m-
to tin' men that they must
ahe-uiv occupied I inrsip,. and tbej, (h
Ru m mid lake K
in t and [toilin in fi\--; that
Germany would then be div
up an Konigsberg was promised
td the Poll tl capital. V> t
had to listen to nil this nonsense
without knowinthow mu 'h <>f il
was 11 nt11 and in >w much lit s.
Thai same d ly > whole army
corps, four divisions, passed through
here. AM the roads were black with
oldiers.On tug. 31, 4,000 men
. ,.-.i in and about nui court;
we had j _ 111 officeis in the house,
They took supper with us. I wo ol
them, ..imy doctors, spoke good
1,, nan; one had a 01 Iced .1 } eai in
the ( harlty Hospital .-it Berlin.
The rest were bj no means at-
Ira live in appeal since
In tflfl j hi bar.
nessing up 1 >n* a Ftet anothei ol
our wagon* in the yard and drii
away \\ hi n this h ippened to tin-
fourth, I Ii id nmigh of it, so I
rushed upstairs, knoi ked on the
door of the room occupied by one
of tii" doctors, in I begged him to
comedown right away and
the soldiers from taking the horses
and wagons. He was down in .1
few minutes and or.I. red then) t
desist,
\s -, on .is he was ne Ihtf
si.11 led all ovet again. < hue m< iff
[ asked him for help, but bo told
roe to gel 10 officer, as the meri
won'.I not obey him, I knocked on
several doors without waking ..iin-
fnghl
I w ished,
1111-
. 1 ace Iroin helov
him; anyhow, he di
| I US
lii tin yard Cossacks "
it wrapped ii silk quilts,
their heads pillowed on
cushions, Hi.'v had btoughl out
the be1 ' Coverings and
carpet* for bedding. I went out to
it 1 rly in the 101 Ding, for
thev bad buiIt a fire for making
their coffee r ithei close 11
barn, and I fe ired th \ mighl
fire i" somethiog, since straw was
l\ ing all about I told them to be
careful; ihey promised.
The pleasant doctor offered to
escort metna General, some two
kilometers distant, in ordei to
ipei fn im him thai w
protect us. We drov aw ty behind
two half blind feeble old horses
'o you. You just stay in ilK o
,|....... 1,. ,, ii- the
n idiot. Wil-
- .1- w ir. V\ ilhelm and
all the Hohenrollerns will haw
their ht ads cut off, Germany will
be made into a republic, then l
will I
On arriving at the General's
unfortunately, be was not the one
who had Ii d me before be
iper, whii b he 1:
slated into (ii1 man for me and
which ran somewhat as follows:
" \t ] ime of Frau
fe of a DOble land-
no noise or
disorder."
The Uhlans Arrive.
Next 1 il more Russian
i|s .iiiivi d, and aboul ') o clock
the las! of the Ru ide awav
holding bis heipx h
n sndrfle,
I r* ird n.ufn.
three'eu 1 !
out that l ]t infanti
mer. bad just hidden themselves n
OUI coachman's bouse, so they
proa -hoot up the pli
Bullets went through walls, dres-
sers, and clothes until finally one
..I the cuin peeped thtot
the door of the house and saw ;i
dead Russian lying on the floor
with three, bullet holes through Ins
head. Then they went away, -
, , M-ld stay no Ion
since the other two Russians had
probably gone for reinforcements
and would bum up the whole
place and murder everybody tl
Ihey told its to Her toward Be 1 >
through the ditches along the
highroad.
I did not think of

,.;. 1... ._ __. .'..! si.II m, ,n nwaj .' it 1 m; I '"gliders.,
within In stance when some luft it was certainly an a-tul|
German Uhluns gallop. I up.
"i loo I ei ening," they said, "any
Russians here
oui women calli d to them, "only
two minutes ago there were Rus-
sians ab. iul," and al I the time the
women's bra'is leaped with joy,
and they were so exciti could
cely lell us aboul these first
Get 1 ns, Nexl d iy I .......ks were
-till plundering in the vill
took watch' s fro n I '
iged like bandits, and made
one man kneel to be shot, but an
officer came along and ordered
them io let him BO, BS he W is onl\
an old cripple. They tied .-mother
man to a horse, but let him go
w hen lie could m >! w a! I. any more,
I hey also wound a rope iround the
arm of ouroverscet and were ? ling
g It......ay with them, I
heard About n and d isl ed
night, full of worry and fear, andl
children, who until thenI
had bori sel iveIy,|
. Even tliisl
night, h me t" an '
and in ilie morning -. stilll
I all alive,
Between Tvus Fires.
At tosliarp infantry >;i ing b
.V oar iiutho two squa-
drons of 1 who had just
started to 1 ke soup oul of some
n utton fi us, but when twenty
I ,. ions rode up from
Lenzki..... Hnd began to shoot Jha
Rus 1 ins abandoned everyth g
the fields, behind (air
I jn wild || :': t. thiov ing aw y
I everythit g.
From our win could 1 le
lig, and when the
the Fifth Reciment; he was greeted
the rest, twi nty-eicht of lbem,hari | ,|. \wum w, 11, the pipe, from lh<
been stolen. Our harueis was so old General, but the tears.of his wife
it had to be sewn 1 gether.and we had been sufficient to make them
li ..I 10 t ike along an old man as
driver, because She otheis were
afraid t.. lake the job
ire starting I asked the other
dr> tot t<> p'Otect my daughters, lb-
tool, this v.-i v much in earnest, and
wou'd not even allow oneol them
1.....into the kitchen to get some
Cl I mi.
'I must keep Bit eye oil yon," lie
said in broken German, "otherwise
I shall not know what Cossacks do
1 ol nans rushed up in theiJ
Ihey were welcomed w. ill
mad cheering,
Russians lav hid for veral days
";" inoui peal bog, and the Wolf.
On the jdol September we saw sI| ,,. ,,,,. fuj| ( them.
irassiei ..1 Qu .., ; ,|, First.
i nau htlh ironi
Marienwable, and
, f 1 1 1 .'.Mil linn 11.........,.........,
nth tears of delight, He stopped rhe fii Russian shells fell on our
os chest..ut I.....- under the'
land an.l we heard m inv otbet >
11 nis cnesn.ui 1.....- undei
' ; ,. ,Ger",M|trn imingthrough the 1 ir.
division was behind narten. Four!
issiers t h< n en 1 rode 1 n
'o Wolfshagen, and we learned
nrtilli ik up its post ion n 11
Friedenna and fired toward Skand-
that Ins horse was shot under bun,
but be managed to get back to us,!
Coutinued oq Fourth Page.
Wear
Armbrister's
Shvoes


L. GILBKKT DUPUCH,
Editor and Proprietor.
OFKICK- 44 MARKKT 8TRBKT
Nassau, N. P., Bahamas
PIIONK 260. P. O. BOX 163.
PUBLISHED DAILY
Monday, Wednesday and Friday
single copv ......... Jd
Tuesday, and Thursdaysingle copy jd
Saturday--single copy ... ild
Weekly ............ 5<|
M.mthly ............is. M
Snarterly........ .. 4s. 6d
all Yearly............os.
Yearly ............18s.
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
Advertising lilies : Six pence per line
for first insertion; three [lence |ier line
for second insertion ; ar.j one penny per
line for suhv|uent insertions.
Advertisements under eiidit lines 4s.
Zbc tribune
THURSDAY. Ja.nuo.ry 21. 1913
f* PUBLISHED AT b P.M
1 here is Boating uppermost in
our mind an idea that we have
been lacking in courtesy on
the one hand and in an apparent
absence of interest on the other
in passing by unnoticed the
hist Annual Report of the Hon.
w. Hart Bennett for 191314
when Colonial Secretary, and
we unhesitatingly regret our
default in the first and primary
instance,and we would unfeign-
edly desire to assure His Excel-
lency I ho Administrator that
our laches was due to want of
thought anrl not to want of
heart As to the other phase of
the subject c'ttt un autre chose
but as it concerns our public,
we acknowledge our dereliction
to it also, and venture to hope
thai in both rases the old pro-
^vflrb, 'Confession of a fault,
makes half amends for it," will
stand us in good stead.
The resume of the report in
the Nassau Guatdian of the 20th
lOSt. reveals a serious financial
condition and a complete up-
heaval of our economies gen-
erally, while in some few de-
partments we may claim a con-
crete gain. The idea is becom-
ing materialized that we have
"hung our baskets higher than
we can reach" or, "bitten off
more than we can chow" in
several instances, which doubt-
loss have attracted the attention
of thoughtful men ; not to dis-
guise the fact, they are upper-
most in their minds at the pre.
sent time, and must sooner or
later, we think sooner, bear fruit
which will be neither Apples of
lstakhar nor yet Apples of So-
dom.
During the coming legislature
our representatives will be sore-
ly put to it to make both ends
meet; the problem is rapidly
getting out of hand and the
process of assimilating the
heterogeneous elements must
engage the skill of a unique
politician. Steamship communi-
cation, efficient Electric. Light-
ing, and Telegraphic Communi-
cation are pressing questions,
which will demand far gravel
consideration than is accorded
them in the easy typography of
a "leader."
The Report is easily entitled
to the highest commendation
from those whose reading is
more than indeterminate, and
whose intelligences are bejond
those who float in a sea of doubt.
From the Mass of statistics, we
have B Report which might apt-
ly be comp-tred to the kernel of
a cocoa-nut, the husk on one
side, though not worthless; and
the real value of the fruit on
the other, to which the husk-
however is contributory.
THE LORD MEATH EMPIRE
CHALLENGE CUP.
Yesterday was red-lettered in
the annals of the Boys' Central
School, for the Lord Meath Em-
pire Challenge Cup and personal
prize of ttiree guineas were pre-
sented to the winner.
It has already been explainod
in our columns Ihat, this Cup is
competed for by pupils under
the age of 14 in nearly all the
Public schools throughout the
Empire. Every year a subject
for an essay <>f not more than
one thousand words is set bv the
Committee of the League of the
Empire. Only the best essay is
sent from each school and they
are most impartially judged in
London. The winner of the
Prize has his name engraved on
the Cup, which his school keeps
for one year, and he receives a
personal prise of three guineas.
Punctually at 11 o'clock His
| Excellency the Administrator
accompanied by Miss Hart Hen
net I and Mr. and Mrs. Richard
LeGalliennc arrived and were
received by the Acting Chair-
man of the B ard 01 Education,
the Rev. Daniel Wilshere, and
T. H. K. Moulder, Esq., M. A.,
Inspector of Schools. The
school stood at the salute and
sang the national anthem. His
Excellency then addressed the
boys, and among other things
said that, our Colony should in-
deed be proud that the Cup had
been won twice by Bahamian
boys, a distinction which has
been attained by no other Col-
ony, large or small.
After presenting the Cup and
prize to the winner Walter Mc -
Gregor Albury, His Excellency
told the boys that he thought
they would like to have Mr.' Le
< iallienne to address them. This
announcement was greeted by
a tremendous clapping of 1S0
pairs of hands, the boys without
doubt being delighted to have a
real live poet speak to them.
To judge from their rapt atten-
tion Mr. LeGalliennc would
attain quite as much distinction
on the platform as he has in
woiug the muse
Sargeant Albury and Mrs.
Albury the parents of the happy
recipient of the prize wore pre
sent and had the pleasure of
seeing their son receive that for
which thousands of boys and
girls throughout the length and
breath of the British Empire
had striven their very best to
obtain.
His Excellency left almost
immediately after, and thus end
ed a function which though dig
nifiod was delightfully informal.
Mr. .x\<\ Mrs. LeGalhenne and
Miss Hart Bennett remained to
hear the boys sing, and to ex-
amine the written work of the
Upper school.
After the school had been dis
missed a half-holiday being
given, the Visitors were shown
around the school garden by
the Inspector and they expressed
themselves as being' delighted
with the boys and their work.
I hr Supreme Court mel yrsn r-
d iy, III n the lion F. ('. W< II
Durrani K. C. \tiomey General
exhibited and fii.-.l ten information*
before Hit Honor Daniel fodor,
1 'tiipf Justice.
Fiver.iv". were tried before a Jury
win. in '-noli case returned a Ver
diet of Guilty. The'Pi iSonera were
sentenced,
.'o:
COMMUNICATED.
The latest diabolism reported
by radio gram yesterday thrill -
cd us with inconceivable horror
It would be impossible to con-
cieve of so dastardly an out-
rage emanating from any being
less than a devil.
Germany lias already ^sked
for and received the world's
condemnation. Is there flwmoN
that she can do to entitle her to
be called, "Hell upon Earth",
Can any man making the great-
est possible allowance for the
very worst typo of humanity
regard the Kaiser as other
than a mad incarnate Devil.
Oh! my beloved England,
when will you wake up. Will
not this crowning atrocity urge
you to reprisals that will make I
your eoemv stand aghast?
A QUONDAM I'M HMD
so!
A GREAT YEAR IN HISTORY
This year will probably stand
out 111 history as one of the roost
eventful that the world has ever
known. With 1911 it will rank
as an epoch mal ing period; with
1914 it may be said to have in-
augurated a new era for the
world. Take' our minds back a
hundred years, to the year 1815,
and wo find Europe at the part-
ing of the ways, at the dawn of
a development not yet foreseen,
at the threshold Ot an order of
things which neither statesman
nor phili iso|,her saw even faintly
adumbrated. Napoleon was af
Elba, but Napoleon was still a
force to he reckoned with in the
affairs of the woild. Eor nearly
1 < ntj 5 ears be had overrun Eu-
rope, the greatest personal force
of !us tiiin the mightiest mill
tary genius. I le was in exile, but
more was to bv hoard of him;
again the thunder of his cannon
was to startle the nations and
the armies of France were to
rush forward at Ins imperious
command. In the spring he went
baca to France; in August of
that sain-- year his System had
fallen forever, his reign was at
an end. He had hoped, had
striven for world dominion, and
the principle of nationality, of
independence, the spirit of free-
dom, had defeated him. For two
decades he had dominated the
thoughts of mankind and spread
terror with his name. The end
was St. Helena, the bleak and
dreary island in the African seas:
after a lifetime of victory- -this!
Napoleon subdued, Europe turn-
ed to put its domestic affairs in
order. Then began that wonder-
ful industrial expansion, that
growth of manufacturing enter-
prise, those triumphs of practical
science and discovery, that have
changed the face of the globe
and have had such far-reaching
social and political effects.
Tl


It w%i almost a new birth, it
was at /east an awakening, thai
tlie wivrtd experienced after
1815 For then arose the strong
insurgent demand for new right?.
and liberties for the millions of
men, the workers, who had
hitherto being thought of but
little account. Democracy be
fjan to lift its voice, and as
wealth accumulated the sons of
toil demanded with greater cm-
I phasrs that their share of it
should be larger and that in the
government of their respeAive
. countries they should play a
larger part. For a hundred years
the light between privilege and
democracy continued, the battle
between capital vested interests,
and organised labour, was
fought. In some countries the
democracy won much ; in others
they were beaten again and
ain. And thus it wasin 1914
we saw the people, the workers
of nearly every European coun-
try, arming themselves for ano-
ther mighty effort. In England
the strikes had grown to stu-
pendous proportions. In France
there was abroad the spirit of
social unrest. In Germany over
four million men described
; themselves as Social Democrats,
and in Russia the red spectre of
revolution was raising its head
our. moi .Then,almost without I
warning, the dense war clouds]
burst over Europe. Another
War Loid had drawn his sword,
and Europe saw with eyes of
horror that a whole continent
was once again to become a
scene of carnage ; Europe heard
the war trumpets shrilly sum-
moning the reapers to a harvest
of death In 1X:4 Europe had
united to smite Napoleon down.
In 1914 four European nations
again were compelled to draw
the sword to prevent the hege-
mony of a power-drunk nation
whose aim was to stand so lofty
in the sun that only in its sha-
dow could the other nations
find a servile peace. Four Euro-
pean nations drew the sword,
and those peoples that have
remained neutral realise that in
the victory of these four lie their
guarantees of national freedom.
A conflict greater than that
waged against Napoledn is the
mission of these four.
Will the war end in 191.5?
Will August of this year find
England and her Allies trium-
phant, or must we wait long to
Je the last of a struggle which
ill cost so much in blood and
I........""*""
tell. We are now en i<
sixth month of the war. and the
armies are still contending. The
German is in Belgium, in France
and in Russian Poland; he is
still strong, and he speaks as
haughtily as of yore. His allies
have more than once been beat-
en, nevertheless it would be a
mistake to imagine them crush-
ed: we wish we could believe
they were. So we do not enter
this Year with any cer-
tainty tnat In a few months
more peace will once again
have returned to wartorn Eu-
rope, We can but hope that it
will; and it may be that, un-
known to us all, there may be
f. 1 t< r- at work even now which
will compel the cessation of war
on the part of those who provok-
ed it; it maybe that the close
of the present year will witness
the ratification of a peace which
will leave Europe time to heal
her bleeding wounds and re-
construct her shattered fortunes.
But it will be a new kind of
world that will begin to come
into being when the war is end-
ed. A struggle like the present
cannot leave life unchanged,
cannot leave the people of the
globe quite thesame as it found
them. There must be recon
Struction, a new life.' then com-
mon man will know that he and
his did much 'o save the State,
and from the State he will de-
mand full and ample recogni-
tion. What will Russia be af-
ter this war? What will Aus-
tria be? What will Germany ?
Out of these death-throes what
sort of life will issue? The Eu-
rope of 1815 has almost com-
pletely passed awav. In much
less than a centuryfor events.
move quickly in these days1
Europe of 1915 will give place
to one much different. Nothing
stands eternal; everything
changes; and this war will have
.1 1 everyrhing into the melting
pot. Something new must
emerge, new thought new ideals,
a new manner of living. This
year indeed mav be definitely a
turning point in our history. It
mav rank as one of the world's
greatest years.
'Yhc Daily Cleaner
Latest War News
Heavy snow fall in France
and Flanders confine the fighting
to engagements by artillery only
The only exception reported is in
the section. Southwest of Verdun
when the French troops have
appropriated a few hundred
yardi of Gi rman front.
The Russians are known to
be carrj ing on a big movement
between East Prussian frontier
and the Lower Vistula with the
object, it is believed, of preven-
ting Von Hinderbcrg from join-
ing the German trenches in East
Prussia Some credit the Rus-
sians with crossing the Vistula.
The Russians are still pursu-
ing the remnants of the Turkish
troops they defeated.
Washington:Villa is plan-
ning to withdraw troops from
Mexico City and wage a cam-
paign for the mastery of the sit-
uation in North Mexico. Har-
mony prevails between Villa
and Zapata.
Washington: W h i 1 e a for-
mal reply by the British govern
merit has not yet been made
Ambassador Page today said
that Great Britain could not
agree to the proposal of the
United States that pending the
decision of questions of interna-
tional law involved the nteam-
er Dacia be permitted to pro-
ceed to Germany with a cargo
of cotton. She is now loading
at Galvcston.
Washington:Republican op-
position now gives evidence of
big filibustering tactics Senator
Barton who Talked the rivers and
harbours bill to death in the
last session led the attack on the
ship purchase bill v^sterday and
no progress was made. The
third caucus on the bid will be
held tonight.
January 21st 1915.
London, 20th.
Governor,
Bahamas.
Official news January 20th :
The French government reports
snow storms along the front
with no special incidents.
The Russian government re-
ports continued pursuit of the
Turkish army in the Caucasus.
The enemy made an air raid
on Norfolk coast last night
about five persons were killed.
Slight damage to property.
(Signed)
HARCOURT.
PICKED UP
German aircraft raided the
Fast coast of England last night
dropping bombs over eight
towns in the county of Norfolk.
Six persons are reported killed
and several injured.
Yarmouth suffered most the
property damage being 3.000.
The raid began a little before
eight o'< !o( |< and ended a little
before midnight. All the air-
igotawaj unharmed unless
there is truth in the report that
one of them was brought down
by the guns from a British war-
ship. So far there is no con-
firmation.
The raiding machines were
first thought, to be Zeppelis but
todays report indicate that they
were aeroplanes.
The government is silent on
the attack. Norfolk county is
about one hundred miles north
of London. Several bombs were
dropped near Sandringham, the
kings summer place where the
king and queen were visiting
onlv a few days ago.
The French report the des-
truction of the German forces
which tried to demolish the
Vser bridge, and claim other
gains at St. Georges and in the
La Pt-true forest and around
Thann.
Violent artillery has occurred
over the entire battle line. A
fierce battle in La Gurie Forest
resulted in the French being
driven from their trenches, but
they re changed and drove the
Germans out of them.
The German report briefly
states that 300 yards of French
trenches were captured yester-
day at Notre de Lorctte, North-
west of Arras, and that some
trenches were taken intheAr-
gonne. In the Fast there appears
no important engagements from
the East Prussian frontier to
Transylvania* borders.
The Turks report English re-
verses in Arabia.
A Dutch naval sloop, was sunk
yesterday by a mine while pat-
rolling neutral waters of the
Scheldt. .
1 wentv deputies were indict- a
ed for shooting strikers yester-
dav at a chemical works near
Elizabeth, New Jersey.
LOST
- :o:
A WEDDING RING
00 West Bay or West
St., Tuesday Jan. 19, has (ini-
tials and date inside. Finder
will be rewarded on return-
ing same to the
TRIBUNE OFFICE.]



THE AGILITY
and prodigious leaping powers of the KANGAROO are
famed all the world over. Its agility, however, is
excelled hv the ease and quickness with which
Sonlight Soap expels dirt
from the clothe in the wash.
SUNLIGHT
SOAP
enjov s well-earned and world-
wide distincti< n as a Soap of
the first qualit). It^- reputation
is maintained by the /. 1000
(iuarantee >l Puritj given
with every bar and by the
good repi n of million
housewh es \\ ho use it dail)
win NOT n Mapes Fertilizers
/ time carry in stock the
following formulas:
Pineapple. It has born prov-
en that this has no equal
and a visit to fields usi. g
same will convince you.
Vegetable.--Kow is the time
to use this and increase
your yield in Tomatoes,
Potatoes, Onions and all
other vegetables by too
per cent.
Orange Tree. To assisl the
growth of Young Citrus
Tree.
Fruit and Wine.- Increase the
yield and growth of old
Citrus trees.
For Further inform;
and hooks on the use of tl
Fertilizers, please apply to
NOTICE ?
aek and Wolfshagen. We lay ex,
actly between; H was i iracle
th.it we came through unharmed.
r rom our tower we could see tho
bursting of eve.y shell from friend
and foe. Five seriously woundedI
cavalrymen were broupril to usdur-j
ing iIip dav, and we took can
then as well as we were able. The
thundering of cannon lasted two
days and a half
1'roops were quartered on u- in
big numbers, but we received them
joyfully, for wen they not our
troops? The last detachments
sometimes arrived at ra^oatnight,
the first marched off at 3:30 in the
morning. Every mom in the house
wss packed and hundreds lay in
' yard.
I hanks, thanks any nnnv times
thanks, to Hmdpnburg and liis
army!
New York Times.

* 1 MADE retfTi
B.VD
[ Br ST RETAIL TRA DcJ
* **<-Ufcifc <<*.
Sanitary Jbf Sold by
rW W,n.
Cool rn Hilton,
v rm 260
Reliable Bay Si.
,
Fruit of the Loom 36 in.
at 7J per yard.
Good Morning!
We Are Introducing
American Bilk
American Cashmere
American Cotton-Litle
HOSIERY
They have stood the teat foot comfort. to rip. N
become louse ot baggy. The inapt
knit in nut pressed in,
GUARANTEED for fineness, style,
superiority of material and workman
Aosolatwy itainli m Will wear 6 m<
without holes ->r new onai
OUR- SPECIAL OFFER
t,i r\ery '>ri' "' I '*' "' '"i:n
or postal n< le, to covet
shipping el arges, we willsei I paid,
with writti 1 guarantee, 1
million dollat com|
3 1'a.irs ot o\ir 75c. va.l\ie
American Silk I lo*i< rjr,
or 4 Pali- of our JOc. vivlvie
American Cashmere Hosiery,
or 4 Pilr of oxir 50c. Value,
American C or 6 Pe-irs of Children's Hosiery.
IIONT DELAY Offer i
i!<'.iler in your 1 ('.!Iitv i- v I ( led.
The International Hoisery co.
P. O. Box 224
DAYTON. OHIO. U. S. A
Cosmopolitan
man school
('pens on
Monday. Oct. 5th
in Aurora Hall
on Charlotte Street.
For particulars apply to
Prof. G. G. Coffin, head mas-
ter, or Mr. J. P. bimms.
OVER
1500
Pairs
Boots and Shoes
being added to an already-
replete stock
Williams the Shoeman
is again opening up one ol
those Sample Lots ot Boots
and Shoes in a limited
of sizes as follows
THE well known
Dairyman of the
East
THOMAS M. KNOWLES
Is now prepared to supply
and deliver the purest milk
to be obtained anywhere
from his Dairy Farm on East
Shirley Street, opposite Wil-
liams Stnct. Orders maybe!
delivt red at his Store on East
Bay St. No. 528, 'Phone No.
116. Deliver) al from 7 a.m.
to 10 a.in., and From 3 p.m. I
to 5 p.m. daily in Sanitary j
Bottles.
Many germs make milk im
pure,
In Knowles' milk no germi
found ;
Look at the bottles in which
its sold, at
Knowles who 1 iki th< tn all
an 'mid.
Milk like hisnei dsnolactora
eter,
In verificationof its strength,
Liquor pura nee impura
Kii' Wli i would never fo
that length.
REMOVAL
-,
numoei
viz:
Men's Boots and Shoes in sizes -~\ the 1 si February, 1915
from 6 to 7$ \j it is our intention t
Women Boots and hoes move The Printing Establish-
u ,;|;;/' l'""; '.''' menl of'The Iribune" to the
Misses Boots and Shoes in size; ,. ,. v ., .
from taitoi Building at the Northea
The advantage in purchas- ( "n1"1' ol Shirley and
iog I rom this lot is fas others l"',;,i stJ
who have purchased before
I bar-
can attesl / thai you can se-
ll i t the sizes from a 1 r)
large variety ol up-to-date
stvi, s at prii es o m id rably
cheaper than regular lines
kept in Stock.
CALL EARLY
and secure your size at
WILLIAMS' WHOLESALE
AND RETAIL
SHOE ESTABLISHMENT
277 and 279 Bay St City
Fresh Onion Seed
The Upper Floor consist-
ing of lour rooms maj be
1st January, f
FROM TENER1FFE
AND NATIVE SEED CORN
Toote's, 499 Bay Street In quantities at Special Ra
rented from the
1915. T< 1 ms moderate. One f
or the whole. May be viewed }
on application to
L. GILBERT DUPUCH,
"Tribune" Office,
44 Market St
look:
The foil- >\\ ing Blank forms
mav be had at "TheTribune"
Office.
I >ntv Entry.
F n Entry.
Warehouse Entries.
Sponging Articles.
Sliip's Reports.


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