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ZTbc (Tribune TUESDAY. January 12. I9IS jB-PUBLISHEI) AT 6 P.M. There is a curious mixture of pain, and pleasure, of optimism and pessimism in the social al mosphere oWassau to-day, and it seems to us that it is' very difficult to analyse the compound and apportion the exact proportion of each element. 11 would require the skill of, say the greatest analyst and sociological alchemist to satisfy even himself of the actual conditions We who come into contact d by day perhaps more than any other class excepting ministers of the gospel with the childr of the abyss, can see the gradu il subsidence of the econmic level. None but the supremely fatuous can take but a cursory glance at the situation, when the truth W flashed across his mental vision with lightlning fone. Ask any reasonable man if the Colony is in a position to have another £10,000 draft made <>n its unknown revenue? And 'he reply comes catiegorically—No. Can individuals contribute voluntarily £3000 more ? Perhaps Yes -but we feel assured that it would be by a numerically re duce I contigent. The slogan cry has been heard: "what were Bahamians going to do?" Ask "what have they done ? and what are they yel doing? They have answered nobly. Think you that King George would ask such a ques tion. We honestly believe that if he knows the Bahamas, he stands amazed at theii sacrifice and would not look fur another. It should he clearly under stood taat no sacrifice has been mad* by the elite. Their purses have not been depleted. Incomes of from£400 to£iooo have not been strained, they can stand another turn of the screw, the increasing number of Motor-cars, the erection of new buildings are conclusive proofs that volun tary contributions are not im possible, but if legislators are wise they will not play Monkey any more with the cat's paws One who wishes to gauge the extent of "well t<> doism" can not look for a better indication than is to be found in the dress of the middle classes On Sunday afternoon the eye was not caught by an unusual display of newness a In mode but rather of well preserved neatness. On similar occasions happening a year ago, the reverse would have been apparanent, but now "forewarned is forearmed." The slight improvement in business of a few weeks ago was only "a flash in the pan." It is puerite for a clique to say, "things are not so bad." No, perhaps not with it -yet, but as it was in the days of Noe, so will it be in our day. The flood came and swept them all away. But what is the good of continuing the commonplace. Universal interdependence i-> the law 01 humanity because it is the law of nature and we must obey it whether we will or no We do not wish our people to be carried off their feet and lose their heals as well, by any of the spasmodic hursts of p it riot ic eloquence so brilliantly, corruscating through our troubled firmament, but to weigh well M hat they hear, and to at themselves, "will it wash?" "is it good goods, all wool and a yard wide?" Look at thequal ity %  if the wool. — :o: — The Odd Fellow's Jubilee. Celebration seems to have found a place in the public mind. Lai ge :rogden W. White, Edna White, Herbert Wright, Mrs. Henrietta Wright, Mis. Alii ice Cummer, Oswald, Levitt, Eredk. Madep, Thos. Davis, Mrs Elizabeth Berry, Co|. Geo. Downey. Mrs. Mattie Downey, Richard Thompson, Mis. Pauline Thompson,Master Jarval rbompson, Miss EUjf Thompson, Marcus Bremen, Harry Smith, Misses Ina Steen, Frances Morgan. Mary McGowan, Annie Keame, Lillian Thompson, Mary Rae, {Catherine Eit/.gerald. Second Cabin Misses Virginia Burnside, Emma Anderson, Alice Dutcher, \lie Dykeman, Marv Regan, Eva R. lie. Third Cabin Edw. Thompson, |ohn Eerguson, Win. Hackett, Julius Lee, Pruace Baltimore, Mrs. Ofelia Baltimore, Saml. Armbrister. Harold Roberts, Jas. Hall, Pedro Valdes, Chester Brown, Archibald Hudson, Geo. Chisman Otis Franklin, Roland Robin, son, John Brown, Win. MitchellJacob Grimsky, John Holmes, Robt. Williams, Isidor Currie, Allen Brown, John Baylor, Alex. Saunders, Thos. Stepton, Luther Bowen, John Hipkins, Walter Johnson, Chas. Carring, ton, Jas Heron, Win. Frederick, John Minor, Walter Carev, Herbert Chase, Win. Eord, Emanuel Robinson. -;! — The S. S "Miami" arrived from Miami. Ela this morning with the following (35) passengers:— Mr. and Mrs C. E. Adams, Mr. and MrsSoans, Dr and Mrs. J H. Ktinwl.-k.CJ. Paine. H. C iGreen, T. M. Purdy, Nathaniel j Sears, C. M. Withrow, Mr. and I Mis Hugh toalcomson, Mrs D. L. Dash, Miss Saults, Mrs. Jessie. Scott, W 11. Albury, Sophie O'Niel, Clara O'Nie'l, Berdie O'Niel, L Chiom, Lillian Chiom, Clementina Cooper, Joseph) e \ lderk'3, John Ad Iderley,Clotilda Adderley, Bruce B iwe, \di ien Howe, Jos. Thompson, Mary Thompson. Isadora Dullard, Wtniry Billiard, Edmund l.ulor, Alphouso Ferguson, I stella Davis. Lates l Wa r Ne ws QOVKBNUBNT I'KKSS January 11 th 1915. London —The Russian Black Sea fleet lias struck a hard blow to the Turkish navy and ship ping. The cruiseis Breslau and Hamidieh were damaged and some shipand cargoes burntd. Roumania is on the eve of a great development, asseited a deputy 111 the Roumanian Parliament He declared that Ron manias eniiy into the European war would end the conflict. He said that he spoke unofficially but thai he voiced the sentiments of the people. There has been practically no chaise in the. lighting in the West The I urks have made a stand against the Russian! in the Caucasus London: —A Boulogne despatch to the DAILY EXPRESS says that confirmation has been obtained of the rumours that (iermans had evaluated Liege and that the cih is virtually in the possession of the British. Washington.—Secretary Bryan refuses to comment oh Englands



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Hi reply to l tie protest from the United States against lite holding up of American ships. the principle enunciated by the United States is concurred in hut England holds the right to interfere with contrabands destined to the enemy's country. It aKo believes that there is a misconception as to the extent to which that country has interfered with trade. It will be some time yet before Fnglands detailed reply is ready. Washington:—Administration leaders are fearful that the legislative programme will not be finished by March 4th and they will exert every effort to make progress this week, Re publican tactics have assumed the nature of filibuster and night sessions are threatened. 1 .a redo, Texas: — Carranzas forces under Villareal and Her rera have been decisively defeat edat Saltilla by Villa and are repeating towards Monterey. Defeat is said to have been due to misunderstanding in orders. It is repotted that three battalions of Carranzas troops have deserted and Joined Villa. Washington: -Secretary of War Garrison in a letter to Mi Chamberlain chaiman of the Military Committee endorses (he Chamberlain bill for an increase in the regular army tn on*hundred and nine thousand enlisted men. Amsterdam:— Brussels des patch to the TELEGRAPH says 11 lit t a court martial at Liege sentenced retired General Gus'a Fire Belgian, to life imprisonment, lie is charge I with assit'iug young Belgians to reach Holland. PICKED UP The (ierm ins generally gain in Western Argo-me and the French in Kastern Argonne. In one instance the Germans evacuated a trench which they blew up when it was occupied by the French every man of which was killed. The Turks have paid no attention to Italy's ultimatum, which expired Saturday night. The British replv published in Washington is extremely cordial and Washington officials claim that tt recognises the principles laid down in the American Note. Other authorities think that the reply successfully refuses Americans claims. It agrees that neutral shipping should not be molested except in cases of the greatest necessity. There is no confirmation of the current report of a naval fight off the coast of Brazil between the Invincible ami the German ship Von der Tana. January 12th 1915 London, nth, Governor, Bahamas, Official news January eleven th: —French government reports advances of some importance including the capture of the village of I'erthes The Germans after being driven from the trenches and losing a hill near ISoissons twice bombarded the 1 town setting the law courts on I fire. The Russians report minor successes in Poland and Gulicia. (Signed) IIA R COURT PIOKID UP lip' armies both in the East and West are deadlocked and neither are able to proceed. In Alsace, by mining and sporadic charges, the French Continus their attempts to force the war nearer the Rhine, but they are greatly handicapped by heavy snow in the Vosges. The Germans have thrown reinforcements into Alsace and apparently have been able to hold the French back. Desparate lighting centres near Soissons, the French claim advances, and the German denying, lite Germans continue to bombard Dunkirk from aeroplanes. The Russians continue to pour into Bukowina which is conceded to be now practically all un der then control. The inhabitants are lleemg to Roumaaia or Vienna. Along the other Russian fronts a deadlock continues Fighting today oil the wesU rn battle line was confined to • heavy artillery duels. The Ger' mans admit the French claims of the capture of two lines of trenches near Soissons, but both announce advantage at the important railway centre of I'erthes, where the fighting was violent. A heavy battle is also going on near Rhiems Both sides are still contesting Strategic points at Slienbach. The! : losses during the past fortnight have been very heavy. The German statement says that French attacks at La Boissil failed utterly and the Germans re-captured some trenches near I'erthes and are progressing in the Argonne. It also states that bad weather is rinsing slow progress in Western Poland. No mention is marie of operations elsewhe.e 111 that zone. The German press bureau announces that Austrian submaiine No. 12 has sunk the French dreadnought COURSAL near Malta and that the I RAN BART was docked at Malta badly damaged. There is no mention of this from any other source. An Italian squadron has sailed from Tarante under sealed orders. From Constantinople comes news that the outer forts of the Dardanelles have been badly damaged, by Allies bombardnicnt. The United States Senate has unauimcusly adopted a resolution requiring the secretary of war to transmit to the senate all details about this country*s preparedness for war. Both Paris and London are concerned and are taking precautions against an air raid following upon the visit yesterday of a large fleet of Zeppelins which departed toward Dover. Five persons were killed at Dun kirk today by bombs dropped from a Zeppelin. Russia claims to have 1.200. oooadditional trained men readyto be placed on the battltield. Washington is apparently not satisfied with Great Britains reply. The response is said to be not specific enough, but it is hoped that further notes tocome will cleare up the matter. An unofficial despatch says that the British have re-captured Lille THB Administrator asks us to announce that, until further notice, the Gardens at Government House will be open every Monday and Thursday from 4 to 6p.m to visitors and residents wishing to view them on payment of one shilling admission. All proceeds will be devoted to The \'n it, and behind some weeping mourners. The British officer in the trench, being a man of sentiment, and no shell firing being on at the moment, ordered his men to stand at the salute as the coffin passed. They did so. The rTriest saluted back. Then he pulled off the pall, and the coffin, which was a Maxim, killed or wounded every British soldier in that trench f" LAUDS THE BANTAM SOLDIER British M4lc&l Journal Say* He la Good for Trench Work. London, Nov. 24—That little men have many advantages in war time over their bigger brothers is an argument advanced m The British Medical Journal. After expressing the view that 30.000 have been lost to the army in the last few weeks owing to the present height standr ard, the Journal savs: "Not a little is I" be said in favor of short inl 1 11 Short men ocrupj l< ss mum in transport They find cover more easily and 1 Bfei a smaller mark to bullets and shrapnel. They are better sheltered in trenches, and require todig less deep trenches, to protect themselves. "It takes lev. khaki to clothe them and less bather to boot them. The army blanket covers them moor amply, and they need ltss food than tall thin men to keep up their body meat and maintain their marching energy. "Those who stand the rigors of cold climates are not always big men, and the sailor, like the wind-swept ttee on the coast, may be a short man Warmth and easv conditions of life rath er tend to the developement of tall men. "The cavalry and artilleryman require to be big and powerful, but as to those who burrow in the trenches, how can it matter whether they are 4 feet q or 5 feet 6 ? We are not out for a snow and a parade, but to win a war of sieges and attrition." MISS LOUISE CADOGAN C ERTIFICATED NURSE from Bahamas General Hospital. Can furnish testimonials. 101 Shirley Street I



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I 'sprang" aod the fugutive w, WALTER K. MO^RE I nil for Map %  < I' rtiliur m the Hahamat. Fresh Onion Seed FROM TF.NERIFFK AND NATIVE SEED CORN Toote's, 4^9 Jiay Street NOTICE API. persons having claims "against tl e I stale of the late John Alfred are requested to rendei the same duly attested, and those indebted thereto to make payment to Kenneth Sol mon one of the Exec utors of his will. KENNETH SOLOMON C. T. FARRINGTON I xecutors. Nassau, t'.th Dec. 0)14. NOTICE T ills 1to inform the public that it anv person or persons are found tresp issing on m\ l< .t nl land situate mi Foi bes Hill in the Island ol Little 1 xuma, they will be deall with according to the Law. F.RNEST CLAK'KL (Owner) JACi >B CLARKE (Overseer) Forties Hill, Little Exuina July 23rd 1915 THE well known Dairyman of the Last THOMAS M. KNOWLES Is now prepared to supply and deliver the purest milk to be. obtained anywhere from his Dairy Farm on fast Shirley Street, opposite Williams Street. < )rders may be delivi n d ai Ins Stoie on L ast Hay St. No. 528, 'Phone No. 116. Delivery at from 7a.m. to IO a.m., and from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. daily in Sanitary Bottles. Many gei ms make milk impure, In Knowles' milk no germs are found : Lookat the bottles in which its s. lid, at KII %  les %  •• ho takt5 'h im all around. Mill like his needs no la< torn eter, In verifn ation of its strength, Liquor pura nee impure Knowles would never go that length. TENDERS 1T7ILL he n <-t\ e >f I 11-dav the list January, ioi f..r t e pun hase ..f the Scl <• .11 %  1 "| lattie 11. Roberts" 11 r fix tures and appurtenances KENNETH SOLOMON C. T. FAKRINGTON Executors Estate John Alfred. 24th Deer 1014. Tenders should be addressed '•KENNETH SOLOM iN "Cha'iil.i is, "Tender for I lattie II. Koherls SPECIAL. Ait S'Miif nf nut Irif.i'ls li iv in11 11 iterl t'< us ihai ike inc •i e 111 pi ice %  •( l'ie San 11.1 iy's I nltune" will di-|Mive them nl the 1..M-11 of leaili'iy it, because borro %  1 pleasures are not to their taste, we shall n >t increase the price, as we had int. tided,bat continue it at \\<\. GASOLINE T \ I minis and 10 (iall .11 !" Cans. Prii i one shilling I r Gallon. All pre\ ions 11! es canci lied 1 C. C. SAUNDKRS Easl Bay St. Nassau X P. Jan. 5111 iqi 5. NOTICE Till-. Business heretofore earried un i.\ the late J..I111 Alfred will be continued under lite same name by the under si lined I in ees and Exeeutort In ins Estate. Mr t.'l.u Thorpe Ftn rington, v\liu has .in interest in the business, will be Managi r tie reof. KENNETH SOLOMON C. T. FARRINGTON Trustees and EXCUIOTS. Nassau, 1st Dec. 1914.



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II Nullivj* B-ddlctus Ivirare in verb* ms.nls.fri. Beinu bound to swear to the Da|m&i of no Mutter. VOL. XII. NivnitU, V l.. KrvliiMi-irws. I viesilfw Jaivmry I >. 1915 ——— I II NO. 42 L. QtXBWtT DUPCCH, Editor ami Proprietor OPFIOI 41 M.\ MEN BTRKBT \a mm, N /', BaeasMu "PHONE 960. P. o. l!o.\ 163. II IW.ISII. I DAILY Monday, Wednesday and Friday— Mnglecopy 1,1 I %  lay, an I I liui %  ly tin) Ic c py i I Saturd ij tingle copy Weekly %  • Monthly i • Quarterlj ... HelfYearly V-> ly i s. PAYABLE IN ADVANOM Advertising Rates:—Sis pence par line f"i first inserti n. I iree penes per line fbrsacond insertii>n ; at. a one penny i et line for lubequenl insertions. \ srtiiemeiits under sight linei i-. 'A BOOFUL S'PRISE l I wish that I could ho a fairy bright, ( The kind thai dances in the wood at night And hai a wand, and gauzy silver iitOh, my, but I would do the motest things! For my swift iteeds I'd catch Iwo dragon (lies— But I am 'fraid I'd he scared of their ''yes I think I'd get two butterflies, instead, [And then, when oilier children were in bed, 'I'd take my wand, and float up through the air And do things that they wouldn't dast to dare: First thing I'd go high, high up to the union. And don't you think I'd find out very oon If in it is a man, as people Saj } But, anyhow, I wouldn't want to stay ; Down through 'lie stars, hackto the earth I'd fly, My silver wand, my butterflies, and I. Now, Dick don't believe that faiies are "for true'' And calls me "silly babj i ause I do I think I'd change him to a yowling cat, The mis'hle boy What would he think ol that ? My mamma's always doing things foi me ; I'd float, and float out to the magic Bea Where hal.ies grow, and mermaids, when they cry, Just sing the little things a hush a-by. I I'd only ask the Stork lor three or four— He'd think I's selfish if I asked for more. I'd choose soft, pinl J vitll shiny ej PS; And wouldn't mamma have a booful s'prise ? CORA LAPHAM HAZARD. THE MAN IN THE BOX 6 FT. GERMAN AS LUGGAGE How a Prisoner's Escape was Discovered An ordinary wooden box was being moved about on the rnmiwepl iJjck of a tender in the Thames parly on Saturday morning when "in of it fi II a German who was Httempting to escape to the Fatheil. nd He had been knocked about in tlie box fur twenty-fine hours, and in a few more minuies lie would have h en shipped m the steamer Batavier V„ hound for Rotteidam. Hut Ihe heavy packing case slipped from the grasp of the deck hands m the tendei and fell. The lul opened nnrl the crouching Ger. iinn came sprawling on to the tender's dark. The name of I he fugitive was O'tO Kelm and he is stated to he B young officer of the Geiman N o > Ariested in the Dutch linei I'olsdam when she put into Fal. mouth during a voypge fiom the ('iiitcd States in ihe early days of the war, lie had been interned at Dorchester, and from there he had come in Tilbury in the innocent' looking box. Cocoa, Biscuits. And Cheese, 1 he full story of this daring escapade which was so nearly sue cessful o'ads like one of those ro mantii epiacdes scattered about i lie pages >>f Dumas. The packing-case, roughly, was jfl, long, jfl. wnl--, and 2ft. 6in. deep. Koehn is a strongly-built young fellow standing more than fcft high I-yinR squeezed in a box and bumped about as a heavy bit of luggage which need not he handled too gently, he must have suffered untold discon foit. He had made ingenious D'ep-ira turns to minimise 111 hardships of die j urney, lie had padded the I) x v ith a rug and also smuggled in a small air pi How. Round l be sides, too, were roughly-contrived hops, sr i v in; as support which he Could giasp to save himself from too violent a humping if the box were being handled with particular lack of ceremony. He had filled his pockess with ha nan, is. chocolate, fines, biscuits, and cheese, and he had a bottle of cold COCoa, Koehn has made the statement that he bought the box at ihe canteen of the camp at Don heater It was an ordinary wooden packing-case, with "M 't. I esnon-poisonou*," stencilled IMI the outside, and had po Iidils none into the camp canteen filled with supplies Boxes of this kind are often used by students foi packing their hooks, and a re. ijue t to purchase one would excite mi suspicion; From Dorchester To Tilbury. The box appears to have attracted no attention Oil its journey from Dcrchestei to I'ilbury. No one reCdUs having noticed it. Hut there is nodoubt as to how it ariived at Tilbury. For a week or so past hatches of Germans and Austnans interned in concentra&f inn camps have been exchanged for I'i i i ISTI subjl CtS released fn>m Germany or Austria Only those not of fighting aee can get home to tin' I'litle Hand III ths way, the pi isnnors re-eased I e ng confined to voting men under 17 and men over 55. I hey have been despatched by the boats of the Batavier bine, which sad nightly from I 11 bury to Rotterdam. I hey are brought from the concentration camps under military escort and remain in chatge of their guards until they are placed on board 'he steamer. On Friday evening MI. h a party of deportees, numbering 5H, arrived at Tilhun from Dorchester. They brought then personal luggage—a large collection ol trunks, bags, and the other impediments for travelling, and there is nodoubt that the packing-case in which Koehn lay concealed came as part • if this luggage. In addition to the 58 pers ns despatched to I'ilbury, several hundred othei prisoners at Dorchester were transferred the same day to another concent) iionrn p. There is III "fore .1 g r< 1 amount %  I lugg< ge to 1 M lisp "', and this p.1, kii.pase, : %  elltru for Hamburg, the u timate destination of ihe I Ibu.) p irty, would readily pass ah the iest, The Bataviei V. loa I. d cargo at the comp.tr. '* wharf near London Bridge, and then went down ths river to pick up her passengers. She did not arrive ofi I'ilbury until paat one o'clock on Saturday morning. I he passengers and then luggage i" I ik< n to h III a tender. The men frem Dorchestei were still under the guard of their military escort, and Government officials were present to scrutinise and interrogate all the passi nger* No unauthorised persons is allowed so approach the gangway, and the strictest watch is maintained*, to prevent anyone slipping on board unobserved. The Final Bump. It was after all the passengers had gone on board the Batavier V., and when only the luggage remained to be transhipped, that the accident occurred which revealed ihe plot. The night wai dark and stormy, with lashing rain. The deck of the tender was slippery, and one of the men liftmil the cast slipped ind lei it fall. When it struck the deck the lid Continued on Fourth Page. Wear Armbrkter's Shoes


The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02316
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Tuesday, January 12, 1915
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02316

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Full Text
II
Nullivj* B-ddlctus Ivirare in verb* ms.nls.fri.
Beinu bound to swear to the Da|m&i of no Mutter.
VOL. XII.
NivnitU, V l.. KrvliiMi-irws. I viesilfw Jaivmry I >. 1915
I II
NO. 42
L. QtXBWtT DUPCCH,
Editor ami Proprietor
OPFIOI 41 M.\ MEN BTRKBT
\a mm, N /', BaeasMu
"PHONE 960. P. o. l!o.\ 163.
II IW.ISII. I DAILY
Monday, Wednesday and Friday
Mnglecopy ......... 1,1
I ' lay, an I I liui ly tin) Ic c py i I
Saturd ij tingle copy
Weekly ............
Monthly ...........i
Quarterlj........ ... .
HelfYearly.........
V-> ly ............is.
PAYABLE IN ADVANOM
, Advertising Rates:Sis pence par line
f"i first inserti n. I iree penes per line
fbrsacond insertii>n ; at.a one penny i et
line for lubequenl insertions.
\ srtiiemeiits under sight linei i-.
'a booful s'prise
l
I wish that I could ho a fairy
bright,
( The kind thai dances in the
wood at night
And hai a wand, and gauzy sil-
ver iit-
Oh, my, but I would do the mo-
test things!
For my swift iteeds I'd catch
Iwo dragon (lies
But I am 'fraid I'd he scared of
their ''yes !
I think I'd get two butterflies,
instead,
[And then, when oilier children
were in bed,
'I'd take my wand, and float up
through the air
And do things that they
wouldn't dast to dare:
First thing I'd go high, high up
to the union.
And don't you think I'd find out
very oon
If in it is a man, as people Saj }
But, anyhow, I wouldn't want
to stay ;
Down through 'lie stars, hack-
to the earth I'd fly,
My silver wand, my butterflies,
and I.
Now, Dick don't believe that
faiies are "for true''
And calls me "silly babj i ause
I do !
I think I'd change him to a
yowling cat,
The mis'hle boy What would
he think ol that ?
My mamma's always doing
things foi me ;
I'd float, and float out to the
magic Bea
Where hal.ies grow, and mer-
maids, when they cry,
Just sing the little things a
hush a-by.
I I'd only ask the Stork lor three
or four
He'd think I's selfish if I asked
for more.
I'd choose soft, pinl J vitll
shiny ej PS;
And wouldn't mamma have a
booful s'prise ?
CORA LAPHAM HAZARD.
THE MAN IN THE BOX
6 ft. German as Luggage
How a Prisoner's Escape was
Discovered
An ordinary wooden box was
being moved about on the rnm-
iwepl iJjck of a tender in the
Thames parly on Saturday morn-
ing when "in of it fi II a German
who was Httempting to escape to
the Fatheil. nd
He had been knocked about in
tlie box fur twenty-fine hours, and
in a few more minuies lie would
have h en shipped m the steamer
Batavier V hound for Rotteidam.
Hut Ihe heavy packing case slip-
ped from the grasp of the deck
hands m the tendei and fell. The
lul opened nnrl the crouching Ger.
iinn came sprawling on to the
tender's dark.
The name of I he fugitive was
O'tO K- elm and he is stated to he
b young officer of the Geiman
N o > Ariested in the Dutch linei
I'olsdam when she put into Fal.
mouth during a voypge fiom the
('iiitcd States in ihe early days of
the war, lie had been interned at
Dorchester, and from there he had
come in Tilbury in the innocent'
looking box.
Cocoa, Biscuits. And Cheese,
1 he full story of this daring es-
capade which was so nearly sue
cessful o'ads like one of those ro
mantii epiacdes scattered about
i lie pages >>f Dumas. The pack-
ing-case, roughly, was jfl, long,
jfl. wnl--, and 2ft. 6in. deep.
Koehn is a strongly-built young
fellow standing more than fcft
high I-yinR squeezed in a box
and bumped about as a heavy
bit of luggage which need not he
handled too gently, he must have
suffered untold discon foit.
He had made ingenious D'ep-ira
turns to minimise 111 - hardships of
die j urney, lie had padded the
I) x v ith a rug and also smuggled
in a small air pi How. Round l be
sides, too, were roughly-contrived
hops, sr i v in; as support which he
Could giasp to save himself from
too violent a humping if the box
were being handled with particu-
lar lack of ceremony.
He had filled his pockess with
ha nan, is. chocolate, fines, biscuits,
and cheese, and he had a bottle of
cold COCoa, Koehn has made the
statement that he bought the box
at ihe canteen of the camp at
Don heater It was an ordinary
wooden packing-case, with
"M 't. I es- non-poisonou*," sten-
cilled imi the outside, and had po .
Iidils none into the camp canteen
filled with supplies Boxes of this
kind are often used by students
foi packing their hooks, and a re.
ijue t to purchase one would excite
mi suspicion;
From Dorchester To Tilbury.
The box appears to have at-
tracted no attention Oil its journey
from Dcrchestei to I'ilbury. No
one reCdUs having noticed it. Hut
there is nodoubt as to how it ar-
iived at Tilbury. For a week or
so past hatches of Germans and
Austnans interned in concentra-
? inn camps have been exchanged
for I'i i i ISTI subjl CtS released fn>m
Germany or Austria Only those
not of fighting aee can get home
to tin' I'litle Hand iii ths way, the
pi isnnors re-eased I e ng confined
to voting men under 17 and men
over 55.
I hey have been despatched by
the boats of the Batavier bine,
which sad nightly from I 11 bury
to Rotterdam. I hey are brought
from the concentration camps un-
der military escort and remain in
chatge of their guards until they
are placed on board 'he steamer.
On Friday evening mi. h a party
of deportees, numbering 5H, arriv-
ed at Tilhun from Dorchester.
They brought then personal lug-
gagea large collection ol trunks,
bags, and the other impediments
for travelling, and there is nodoubt
that the packing-case in which
Koehn lay concealed came as part
if this luggage.
In addition to the 58 pers ns
despatched to I'ilbury, several
hundred othei prisoners at Dor-
chester were transferred the same
day to another concent) iionrn p.
There is III "fore .1 g r< 1
amount I lugg< ge to 1 mlisp "',
and this p.1, kii.p- ase, : elltru for
Hamburg, the u timate destina-
tion of ihe I Ibu.) p irty, would
readily pass ah the iest,
The Bataviei V. loa I. d cargo at
the comp.tr. '* wharf near London
Bridge, and then went down ths
river to pick up her passengers.
She did not arrive ofi I'ilbury un-
til paat one o'clock on Saturday
morning. I he passengers and
then luggage i" I ik< n to h
III a tender.
The men frem Dorchestei were
still under the guard of their mili-
tary escort, and Government offi-
cials were present to scrutinise
and interrogate all the passi nger*
No unauthorised persons is allow-
ed so approach the gangway, and
the strictest watch is maintained*,
to prevent anyone slipping on ,
board unobserved.
The Final Bump.
It was after all the passengers had
gone on board the Batavier V.,
and when only the luggage re-
mained to be transhipped, that
the accident occurred which re-
vealed ihe plot. The night wai
dark and stormy, with lashing
rain. The deck of the tender was
slippery, and one of the men lift-
mil the cast slipped ind lei it fall.
When it struck the deck the lid
Continued on Fourth Page.
Wear Armbrkter's Shoes


ZTbc (Tribune
TUESDAY. January 12. I9IS
jB-PUBLISHEI) AT 6 P.M.
There is a curious mixture of
pain, and pleasure, of optimism
and pessimism in the social al
mosphere oWassau to-day, and
it seems to us that it is' very
difficult to analyse the com-
pound and apportion the exact
proportion of each element. 11
would require the skill of, say
the greatest analyst and sociolo-
gical alchemist to satisfy even
himself of the actual conditions
We who come into contact d
by day perhaps more than any
other class excepting ministers
of the gospel with the childr
of the abyss, can see the gradu il
subsidence of the econmic level.
None but the supremely fatuous
can take but a cursory glance at
the situation, when the truth W
flashed across his mental vision
with lightlning fone. Ask any
reasonable man if the Colony is
in a position to have another
10,000 draft made <>n its un-
known revenue? And 'he reply
comes catiegoricallyNo. Can
individuals contribute volunta-
rily 3000 more ? Perhaps
Yes -but we feel assured that it
would be by a numerically re
duce I contigent.
The slogan cry has been heard:
"what were Bahamians going
to do?" Ask "what have they
done ? and what are they yel
doing? They have answered
nobly. Think you that King
George would ask such a ques
tion. We honestly believe that
if he knows the Bahamas, he
stands amazed at theii sacrifice
and would not look fur an-
other.
It should he clearly under
stood taat no sacrifice has been
mad* by the elite. Their purses
have not been depleted. Incomes
of from400 toiooo have not
been strained, they can stand
another turn of the screw, the
increasing number of Motor-cars,
the erection of new buildings
are conclusive proofs that volun
tary contributions are not im
possible, but if legislators are
wise they will not play Monkey
any more with the cat's paws
One who wishes to gauge the
extent of "well t<> doism" can
not look for a better indication
than is to be found in the dress
of the middle classes On Sunday
afternoon the eye was not
caught by an unusual display
of newness a In mode but rather
of well preserved neatness. On
similar occasions happening a
year ago, the reverse would
have been apparanent, but now
"forewarned is forearmed." The
slight improvement in business
of a few weeks ago was only "a
flash in the pan." It is puerite
for a clique to say, "things are
not so bad." No, perhaps not
with it -yet, but as it was in
the days of Noe, so will it be in
our day. The flood came and
swept them all away.
But what is the good of con-
tinuing the commonplace. Uni-
versal interdependence i-> the law
01 humanity because it is the
law of nature and we must obey
it whether we will or no We
do not wish our people to be
carried off their feet and lose
their heals as well, by any of
the spasmodic hursts of p it riot ic
eloquence so brilliantly, corrus-
cating through our troubled
firmament, but to weigh well
M hat they hear, and to at
themselves, "will it wash?" "is
it good goods, all wool and a
yard wide?" Look at thequal
ity if the wool.
:o:
The Odd Fellow's Jubilee.
Celebration seems to have found
a place in the public mind.
Lai ge :ro point of vantage on Sunday af
terno in last along the route of
procession from their Lodge
Room in Charlotte Street to
the Cathedral wher* an overflow
ing congregation joined in their
Jubilee Thanksgiving Service
while the approaches to the
spacious ridinee were thronged
with great numbers of oidelv
and interested spectators.
The service which was musi
cal throughout struck n de p
note of re.; nee and thausgiv-
ing.
The Choir especially practised
for the occassion, were assisted
by the Cathedral Orchestra, and
conducted by the Rector,whosi
musical abilities are well known
and appreciated in the city
Their rendering of Handel's
Alleluia Chorus from I'he
Messiah;"' was pronounced very
tihly in l""d bj those com -
petent In judge.
The whole si i 1 1 e was of a
in ;h order. I he Litany
was intoned by the UN v. 11. \Y.
Wei gal I, M A the lesson read
by His Honour the Chief Justice,
a very eloquent and impressive
address being delivered by the
Rev. C.Dudley Lampen, Rector.
The Benediction at the close
of the service was pronounced
by the Lord Bishop of the Dio-
cese. The rendering of Staiuer's
seven fold Amen immediately-
after the Benediction deserves
special mention The congre-
gation was thoroughly repre-
sentative of the Political,Social
and Business life of the City.
The various Secret Orders were
also represented His Fxcellen-
Icy the Administrator and Miss
Hart Bennett were among the
! worshippers.
We hope to give a full ac-
count of the interesting cere
(rnony which took place on the
Library Green yesterday after-
jnoon when an address of Loyal-
ty was presented to His Excel
lency, in our Thursday's issue.
:o:
The S, S "Monterey" arrived
this morning with the following
94, passengers:
Robert smith, Penry De
Percy, Mrs. Fannie De Percy,
Richard |)e Gallienne, Mrs.
lirma De Gallienne, John A.
Rutherford, Mrs. Cora Ruther-
ford. Miss Edith White, Mrs
Anna M Mnrri*. .las. De Graff,
Mrs. Carrie De ( naff, Mis- Elea-
iv r De Gaff, Robt. De Gaff, Miss
M irie Merchter, Norman Grant,
Mrs Sop e Grant, Miss [Catherine
Grant, to* U\, ides, Edgar Dur
kee, Mis Harriet Durkee,
Master Leroy Durkee, Win.
Stafford Hall, Win Pritchard.
Wm. E Carliu. Mrs. Theod .sia
Carlin, Miss Gennaine Geoffrv,
Kdgai Bryan, Mrs. Hellin Bryan]
Mis Louise White, >gden W.
White, Edna White, Herbert
Wright, Mrs. Henrietta Wright,
Mis. Alii ice Cummer, Oswald,
Levitt, Eredk. Madep, Thos.
Davis, Mrs Elizabeth Berry,
Co|. Geo. Downey. Mrs. Mattie
Downey, Richard Thompson,
Mis. Pauline Thompson,Master
Jarval rbompson, Miss EUjf
Thompson, Marcus Bremen,
Harry Smith, Misses Ina Steen,
Frances Morgan. Mary Mc-
Gowan, Annie Keame, Lillian
Thompson, Mary Rae, {Catherine
Eit/.gerald.
Second Cabin
Misses Virginia Burnside,
Emma Anderson, Alice Dutcher,
\lie Dykeman, Marv Regan,
Eva R. lie.
Third Cabin
Edw. Thompson, |ohn Eer-
guson, Win. Hackett, Julius Lee,
Pruace Baltimore, Mrs. Ofelia
Baltimore, Saml. Armbrister.
Harold Roberts, Jas. Hall, Pedro
Valdes, Chester Brown, Archi-
bald Hudson, Geo. Chisman
Otis Franklin, Roland Robin,
son, John Brown, Win. Mitchell-
Jacob Grimsky, John Holmes,
Robt. Williams, Isidor Currie,
Allen Brown, John Baylor,
Alex. Saunders, Thos. Stepton,
Luther Bowen, John Hipkins,
Walter Johnson, Chas. Carring,
ton, Jas Heron, Win. Frederick,
John Minor, Walter Carev,
Herbert Chase, Win. Eord,
Emanuel Robinson.
-;!
The S. S "Miami" arrived
from Miami. Ela this morning
with the following (35) passen-
gers:
Mr. and Mrs C. E. Adams, Mr.
and MrsSoans, Dr and Mrs. J
H. Ktinwl.-k.CJ. Paine. H. C
iGreen, T. M. Purdy, Nathaniel
j Sears, C. M. Withrow, Mr. and
I Mis Hugh toalcomson, Mrs D.
L. Dash, Miss Saults, Mrs. Jessie.
Scott, W 11. Albury, Sophie
O'Niel, Clara O'Nie'l, Berdie
O'Niel, L Chiom, Lillian
Chiom, Clementina Cooper,
Joseph) e \ lderk'3, John Ad
Iderley,Clotilda Adderley, Bruce
B iwe, \di ien Howe, Jos.
Thompson, Mary Thompson.
Isadora Dullard, Wtniry Billiard,
Edmund l.ulor, Alphouso Fer-
guson, I stella Davis.
Lates l Wa r Ne ws
QOVKBNUBNT I'KKSS
January 11 th 1915.
London The Russian Black
Sea fleet lias struck a hard blow
to the Turkish navy and ship
ping. The cruiseis Breslau and
Hamidieh were damaged and
some ship- and cargoes burntd.
Roumania is on the eve of a
great development, asseited a
deputy 111 the Roumanian Par-
liament He declared that Ron
manias eniiy into the European
war would end the conflict. He
said that he spoke unofficially
but thai he voiced the sentiments
of the people.
There has been practically no
chaise in the. lighting in the
West
The I urks have made a stand
against the Russian! in the
Caucasus
London: A Boulogne des-
patch to the DAILY EXPRESS
says that confirmation has been
obtained of the rumours that
(iermans had evaluated Liege
and that the cih is virtually in
the possession of the British.
Washington.Secretary Bryan
refuses to comment oh Englands


Hi reply to l tie protest from
the United States against lite
holding up of American ships.
the principle enunciated by the
United States is concurred in hut
England holds the right to in-
terfere with contrabands des-
tined to the enemy's country. It
aKo believes that there is a
misconception as to the extent
to which that country has in-
terfered with trade. It will be
some time yet before Fnglands
detailed reply is ready.
Washington:Administration
leaders are fearful that the
legislative programme will not
be finished by March 4th and
they will exert every effort to
make progress this week, Re
publican tactics have assumed
the nature of filibuster and night
sessions are threatened.
1 .a redo, Texas: Carranzas
forces under Villareal and Her
rera have been decisively defeat
edat Saltilla by Villa and are
repeating towards Monterey.
Defeat is said to have been due
to misunderstanding in orders.
It is repotted that three bat-
talions of Carranzas troops have
deserted and Joined Villa.
Washington: -Secretary of
War Garrison in a letter to Mi
Chamberlain chaiman of the
Military Committee endorses
(he Chamberlain bill for an
increase in the regular army tn
on*- hundred and nine thousand
enlisted men.
Amsterdam: Brussels des
patch to the TELEGRAPH says
11 lit t a court martial at Liege
sentenced retired General Gus'a
Fire Belgian, to life imprison-
ment, lie is charge I with as-
sit'iug young Belgians to reach
Holland.
PICKED UP
The (ierm ins generally gain
in Western Argo-me and the
French in Kastern Argonne. In
one instance the Germans evac-
uated a trench which they blew
up when it was occupied by the
French every man of which was
killed.
The Turks have paid no at-
tention to Italy's ultimatum,
which expired Saturday night.
The British replv published in
Washington is extremely cordial
and Washington officials claim
that tt recognises the principles
laid down in the American Note.
Other authorities think that
the reply successfully refuses
Americans claims. It agrees that
neutral shipping should not
be molested except in cases of
the greatest necessity.
There is no confirmation of
the current report of a naval
fight off the coast of Brazil
between the Invincible ami the
German ship Von der Tana.
January 12th 1915
London, nth,
Governor,
Bahamas,
Official news January eleven
th: French government reports
advances of some importance in-
cluding the capture of the vil-
lage of I'erthes The Germans
after being driven from the
trenches and losing a hill near
ISoissons twice bombarded the
1 town setting the law courts on
I fire. The Russians report minor
successes in Poland and Gulicia.
(Signed)
IIA R COURT
PIOKID UP
lip' armies both in the East
and West are deadlocked and
neither are able to proceed.
In Alsace, by mining and spor-
adic charges, the French Con-
tinus their attempts to force the
war nearer the Rhine, but they
are greatly handicapped by
heavy snow in the Vosges.
The Germans have thrown
reinforcements into Alsace and
apparently have been able to
hold the French back.
Desparate lighting centres
near Soissons, the French claim
advances, and the German de-
nying, lite Germans continue
to bombard Dunkirk from aero-
planes.
The Russians continue to pour
into Bukowina which is conced-
ed to be now practically all un
der then control. The inhabi-
tants are lleemg to Roumaaia
or Vienna.
Along the other Russian fronts
a deadlock continues
Fighting today oil the wes-
U rn battle line was confined to
heavy artillery duels. The Ger-
' mans admit the French claims
of the capture of two lines of
trenches near Soissons, but both
announce advantage at the im-
portant railway centre of I'er-
thes, where the fighting was
violent. A heavy battle is also
going on near Rhiems Both
sides are still contesting Strate-
gic points at Slienbach. The!
: losses during the past fortnight
have been very heavy.
The German statement says
that French attacks at La Bois-
sil failed utterly and the Ger-
mans re-captured some trenches
near I'erthes and are progres-
sing in the Argonne. It also
states that bad weather is rins-
ing slow progress in Western
Poland. No mention is marie of
operations elsewhe.e 111 that
zone.
The German press bureau an-
nounces that Austrian submaiine
No. 12 has sunk the French
dreadnought COURSAL near
Malta and that the I RAN BART
was docked at Malta badly
damaged. There is no mention
of this from any other source.
An Italian squadron has sailed
from Tarante under sealed or-
ders.
From Constantinople comes
news that the outer forts of the
Dardanelles have been badly
damaged, by Allies bombard-
nicnt.
The United States Senate has
unauimcusly adopted a resolu-
tion requiring the secretary of
war to transmit to the senate all
details about this country*s pre-
paredness for war.
Both Paris and London are
concerned and are taking pre-
cautions against an air raid fol-
lowing upon the visit yesterday
of a large fleet of Zeppelins
which departed toward Dover.
Five persons were killed at Dun
kirk today by bombs dropped
from a Zeppelin.
Russia claims to have 1.200.
oooadditional trained men ready-
to be placed on the battltield.
Washington is apparently not
satisfied with Great Britains re-
ply. The response is said to be
not specific enough, but it is
hoped that further notes tocome
will cleare up the matter.
An unofficial despatch says
that the British have re-captured
Lille
THB Administrator asks us to
announce that, until further
notice, the Gardens at Govern-
ment House will be open every
Monday and Thursday from 4
to 6p.m to visitors and residents
wishing to view them on pay-
ment of one shilling admission.
All proceeds will be devoted to
The \' Relief Fund.
:o:
We are asked to say that, as
the Administrator and Miss Hart-
Bennett are not living in Gov
eminent House, the Visitors'
Book \n i 11 be found at their
private residence known as
"Colonial Secretary's House."
A REPREHENSIBLE GERMAN
TRICK
The following story is pub-
lished as a fact: "A funeral ap-
proached a British trench at
.In front a priest reading
prayers from a book-, then the
coffin with a p ill >n it, and be-
hind some weeping mourners.
The British officer in the trench,
being a man of sentiment, and
no shell firing being on at the
moment, ordered his men to
stand at the salute as the coffin
passed. They did so. The rTriest
saluted back. Then he pulled off
the pall, and the coffin, which
was a Maxim, killed or wound-
ed every British soldier in that
trench f"
LAUDS THE BANTAM SOLDIER
British M4lc&l Journal Say*
He la Good for Trench Work.
London, Nov. 24That little
men have many advantages in
war time over their bigger bro-
thers is an argument advanced
m The British Medical Journal.
After expressing the view that
30.000 have been lost to the
army in the last few weeks ow-
ing to the present height standr
ard, the Journal savs:
"Not a little is I" be said in
favor of short inl 1 11 Short
men ocrupj l< ss mum in trans-
port They find cover more
easily and 1 Bfei a smaller mark to
bullets and shrapnel. They are
better sheltered in trenches, and
require todig less deep trenches,
to protect themselves.
"It takes lev. khaki to clothe
them and less bather to boot
them. The army blanket cov-
ers them moor amply, and they
need ltss food than tall thin
men to keep up their body meat
and maintain their marching
energy.
"Those who stand the rigors
of cold climates are not always
big men, and the sailor, like the
wind-swept ttee on the coast,
may be a short man Warmth
and easv conditions of life rath
er tend to the developement of
tall men.
"The cavalry and artillery-
man require to be big and pow-
erful, but as to those who bur-
row in the trenches, how can it
matter whether they are 4 feet
q or 5 feet 6 ? We are not out
for a snow and a parade, but to
win a war of sieges and attri-
tion."
MISS LOUISE CADOGAN
CERTIFICATED NURSE
from Bahamas General
Hospital. Can furnish testi-
monials.
101 Shirley Street
I


I
'sprang" aod the fugutive w, disclosed.
Koehn was momentarily dazed
and -tunne.l, in addition to being!
cold, cramped, and Hungary.
Sailors in the tender lifted |,,m t'<.
his feet, and he was immedi ite v
placed under guard. A cup of lint
coffee was hrnught to him, ^nd
this, revived him. In broken Eng-
lish h gay his interrogate.is in-
formaHo#aa to who he was and
where he had coma from, an 1 in
isted that he had concealed l.im-
self in the box unaided.
An eye witness- of the ditcovery
says: "He as a tall, deait-sli iven
young fellow, and from his speecti
and appearance it wassasy i
that he was well to do and well
educate,!. 11 is clothes were
and he had a substantial sum of
money; He looked so comic .1
when he en me sprawling cut on
the deck that for the moment I
could not help laughing."
Koehn remained in custody at
Graves-end, on the other si1, nl
the nver, until to.day, when he
was taken to I torcheftter.
I he Dvily Moll, Dec. i-t'i 4.
OVER
Good Morning!
We Are Introducing
American Silk
American Oahmere
Aineru.ui Cotton Lille
1500
Pairs
Boots and Shoes
feeing added to an already
replete stock
Williams the Slioeman
is again opening up one of
those Sample Lots ol Boots
and Shoes in a limited
number of sizes as follows
viz : -
Men's Boots and Shoes 111 si/' g
from 6 to y\
Women's Boots and lines
in sizes from 3I to .11
Misses Boots and Shoes in sizes
from 12 i' o 1
The advantage in purchas-
ing from this lot is (as others
who have purchased before
can attest) that you can se-
lect the sizes from ;\ ver\
large variety of up-'to-d '
styles at prices considerably
cheaper than regular lines
kept in sti 'i k.
CALL EARLY
and secure your size at
WILLIAMS' WHOLESALE
AND RETAIL
SHOE ESTABLISHMENT
7 and 289 Day Street City
FOR RENT
A house in Dnwdeswell Si
(South Side) in two apart
tncnts, two buildings east of the
Gospel Hall. Possession giveu
immediately.
Apply to
KENNETH SOLOMON
or
C. T. FARRINGTON
I tec. 1014
NOTICE
HOSIERY MaPes Fertilizers
They haveitnod the test. Give real
tool Ciirnfort No ten mi ti rip. N 1
beoune loose or bmugy. The shape is
knit 11. not |iressc,l in.
OVAR.ANTECD for finenen, style,
superiority of mat rial in I workmanship.
AbtolutelV Itainli M Will wear f. 1.....iths
without holes, or new ones free
OUR SI'KCIAL OFFER
1 '" at n ni us |l no in currency
or postal note, 1 1 1 .vei advertisin
hip| 1 1 . will seixl 1 il aid,
with written e itee, bsu ked bj a five
million dollarconi| noy, rither
5 Fa.tr* of o\jr 75c. value
\rherican Silk I hwiery,
*r 4 1'a.irs of our 50c. value
American Cashn 1 rs I Insiery,
or 4 Hairs of r.ur 50c. Value.
American CnttonLitle Hoeiery
or 6 Ha.tr. of Children's Hosiery
I'ONT OKI.AY uii.-i t-vp.iowh.-n
Healer in your InCalit 1 selectnl
The International Hoisery co.
P. O Box 224
DAYTON. OHIO. U. S A
For Sale
GOOD BICYCLE
A cut \:
Apply
"Tribune" Office
/ now catty in stock the
following formula* :
Pineapple. It has been prov-
en that tins has no equal
;iih1 :i visit to fields using
same will convince you.
Vegetable. Now is the time
to use tins and increasi
your yield in I omat< ie .
Potato* s, )nions ind till
other vegetnbl s by kxi
per cent.
Orange Tree. To assist llie
rou th of Voung Citrus
Tree.
Fruit and Wine, Increase the
yield and growth of old
Citl us tree--
For fuither information
and bo< iks on the use of these
I ertilizers, please apph i.>
WALTER K. MO^RE
I nil for Map < I' rtiliur
m the Hahamat.
Fresh Onion Seed
FROM TF.NERIFFK
AND NATIVE SEED CORN
Toote's, 4^9 Jiay Street
NOTICE
API. persons having claims
"against tl e I stale of the late
John Alfred are requested to
rendei the same duly attested,
and those indebted thereto to
make payment to Kenneth Sol
mon one of the Exec utors of his
will.
KENNETH SOLOMON
C. T. FARRINGTON
I xecutors.
Nassau,
t'.th Dec. 0)14.
NOTICE
Tills 1- to inform the pub-
lic that it anv person or
persons are found tresp issing
on m\ l< .t nl land situate mi
Foi bes Hill in the Island ol
Little 1 xuma, they will be
deall with according to the
Law.
F.RNEST CLAK'KL
(Owner)
JACi >B CLARKE
(Overseer)
Forties Hill, Little Exuina
July 23rd 1915
THE well known
Dairyman of the
Last
THOMAS M. KNOWLES
Is now prepared to supply
and deliver the purest milk
to be. obtained anywhere
from his Dairy Farm on fast
Shirley Street, opposite Wil-
liams Street. < )rders may be
delivi n d ai Ins Stoie on L ast
Hay St. No. 528, 'Phone No.
116. Delivery at from 7a.m.
to IO a.m., and from 3 p.m.
to 5 p.m. daily in Sanitary
Bottles.
Many gei ms make milk im-
pure,
In Knowles' milk no germs
are found :
Look- at the bottles in which
its s. lid, at
Kii les ' ho takt5 'h im all
around.
Mill like his needs no la< torn
eter,
In verifn ation of its strength,
Liquor pura nee impure
Knowles would never go
that length.
TENDERS
1T7ILL he n <-t\e dersigned until noun >>f
I 11-dav the list January, ioi
f..r t e pun hase ..f the Scl < .11
. 1 "| lattie 11. Roberts" 11 r fix
tures and appurtenances
KENNETH SOLOMON
C. T. FAKRINGTON
Executors Estate John Alfred.
24th Deer 1014.
Tenders should be addressed
'KENNETH SOLOM iN
"Cha'iil.i is,
"Tender for I lattie II. Koherls
SPECIAL.
Ait S'Miif nf nut Irif.i'ls li iv in-
11 11 iterl t'< us ihai ike inc - i e 111
pi ice ( l'ie San 11.1 iy's I nltune"
will di-|Mive them nl the 1..M-11
of leaili'iy it, because borro 1
pleasures are not to their taste,
we shall n >t increase the price, as
we had int. tided,bat continue it
at \\<\.
GASOLINE
t \ I minis and 10 (iall .11
Cans. Prii i one shilling
I r Gallon. All pre\ ions
11! es canci lied1.
C. C. SAUNDKRS
Easl Bay St.
Nassau X P.
Jan. 5111 iqi 5.
NOTICE
Till-. Business heretofore ear-
ried un i.\ the late J..I111
Alfred will be continued under
lite same name by the under
si lined I in ees and Exeeutort
In ins Estate.
Mr t.'l.u.....- Thorpe Ftn ring-
ton, v\liu has .in interest in the
business, will be Managi r tie re-
of.
KENNETH SOLOMON
C. T. FARRINGTON
Trustees and EXCUIOTS.
Nassau, 1st Dec. 1914.


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