<%BANNER%>

PAGE 1

%  ) Publication began at 3.50 p.m. Gfoe Grtbune Tueaday. November 17, 1914. LORD ROBERTS. "Sic itur ad Astra." H. C. Christie. Hold ere we utter words that grieve our dead. And wound his martial spirit with our fears; He died as he had lived ; war's rugged bed Unsmoothed for him shall bring us to tears. We who have hailed his meteoric star Shining to glorious noon a Kandahar, Rejoice! that in the battle's night, It grandly disappears. THE DEATH OF FIELD MARSHAL EA'RL ROBERTS V. C, K. G., G. C. B.,0. M. G. C. S., I. G. C, I. E„ V. D. The first telegrams which were received here yesterday arrived early, and in a fen minutes the sad intelligence was conveyed that Lord Roberts was dead. At first it did not seem to be realised by those who beard it, and doubt was manifested by nearly all, but as the source was made' known in the very few words used by Sir John French to Earl Kitchener, there was no longer room for doubt, and the sad truth was received in reverent silence. In a few short hours the man who bott the name which was cherishrd. honoured, respected and loved by the whole British Em pire had been calle I upon by the grim monster who respects neither age nor youth, nor posi tion nor talent, nor King nor peasant, to pay the debt which he owed to nature. Already has the message been flashed with lightning speed to the four quarters of the globe, and millions are mourning the removal and the loss to England at perhaps the most critical period in tier whole history, ol a maptdfctinguislied soldier, one whose long and ripe experience could not fail,to be of inestimable value. Amidst the roar of cannon, and the soldier still beats, whether on the battlefields of Europe, or on the march, or en bivouac, or in the quiet of barrack, and mess room; as the sad message reaches his ear; at the drear moment, his pulses stop on their ceaseless flow from artery and vein, his nerves quiver from evey ganglia, and his cheek blanches as he muses—"Bobs" is dead England has lost a great and a good man, the army has lost a valiant soldier, and the chil dren of England a friend, for be loved children, and they loved him. Our pen is too feeble to do justice to his memory, faint indeed can our praise be, but, tie heeds it not, he needs it not; he has gone to his grave "as a shock of corn cometh in his season." There let him rest, with this only his epitaph : "An English gentleman, and a Hritish soldier." Earl Roberts was born in India in 1832, consequently was ighty-two years of age. At the age ot nineteen he served witli the Bengal Artillery, served in the Indian Mutiny, was at the relief of Lucknow and assisted at the siege and capture of Delhi. Saw active service with the Abysinnian Expedition of 1S61-T868 and with tha to Lushai of 1871-1872. In 1879, he was entrusted with the com nand of the Kurarri Field Force. and made his historic march from Kabul to Kandahar in 1880. In 1886 he had command of the Army in Burma In re :ognition of these distinguished services, he was raised to the eerage as Baron Roberts of Kandahar by the late King Edward VII. In 1893.be re turned to England from India, nd two years later succeeded Lord Wolseley in the Irish Comnand. In 1900 he was des>atched th South Africa as Commander in Chief, relieved all besieged places and wn, complete victories over the Boers. He then handed over the command to Lord Kitchener, etumed to England and sue ceeded Lord Wolseley as Gommand in-Chief of the British Ami), and subsequently received a grant of £"100,000 from Parliament. a ; He was Colonel in Chief of the Indi n Troops, of whom some aie now in France aiK stricken down by pneumonia. He died at 8 P. M. on Sunday ast. 9 m MAILS The time for closing Foreign Mails per Frances E. has been Extended to 8 a.m. Thursday Nov. 1 )th. —:o: — Harvest Thanksgiving Services. at St. Matthew's Parish. Will be held on Nov. zand, Last Sunday in Trinity, as fol'them, lows: \t St. Margarets.—7.15. a.m. Holy Communion. AtSt. Matthew's.— n.ooa.m Holy Eucharist— 4.00 p.m Afternoon Service for Jr. and Sr. Catechisms. Evensong. —7. 0 o p.m. MIAMI CHANNEL J. L. Megathhn. superintendent if the Furst-Clark Construction Company, which is to do the ledging in the channel under the direction of Captain Win lyre, stated yesterday that he, in company with Captain M Intyre, had made the prelinii nary soundings, and determined which parts of thechanflel need irig dred'.ing. However, owing to the fact that the weather is still unset teled, and there is still a chain e for a "blow" which might re suit in the filling up again of the newly dredged channels it was ecided to postpone the wor until the hist of tins month, or the first of next. The S. S. Miami will not be gin her Miami-Nassau run until January, so it is considered bv .,. C. Branning, agent of the P. & O. S. S. Co. that there is ilenty of time in which to d the work. 0 the Editor %  lir if Nov if), 1914 The Tribune Since the Board of Works in vited the Public to suggest names for the Street.s lanes, and alleys, in Grants Town and Bains Town your paper has been flooded with them. It is a matter of no mo ment to me what they are called hut since I am a subscriber t ThcTribune I would like to read something worth reading, and I ad gone there to visit and tolled that 1 have a right to sug v^iihtlin.; andSgreet them (how characteristicjt^est that the publication of screaming of *liol and shell," >f him) and was ready to return jsimilar letters be discontinued wherever the heart ol .1 British!home when be was suddenly'They belong to that CTJ^ of sub jects which are' neither fish, nor flesh, nor jjood real herring." At any rate, the public, or I should say the scribes, hay com plied with the request of the Board of Works,and 1 think it should now "call it CAM 1 do not know whether yonrse\/alcorres pondents have also furnished the list of names to the Board of Works, but really Mr Editor, I should be very much surprised if they were to go crazy over them an i hug them to their capacious bosoms. I do not say that some e. the names are in appropriate to the localities but I do say that, neither My thole gist nor Euphonon seem to have' been consulted. Bui briefly and conclusively I say," cut il out" now from your columns. Yours DILLET STREET. 1 Latest War News RADIOGRAMS November 17th 1914. London 16th. Governor, Nassau. November 16th Press Bureau Reports: Fighting in France and Belgium continue satifactorv. The Germaii^gKive been thrown back from tmffeft bank of the Yser Canal and their at tacs south of Ypies repulsed with great loss. The Russians are advancing on Cracow and are also progressing in East Prussia despite desperate resistance. General Botha has attacked rebels under Dewet, capturing 250 prisoners. (Signed) HARCOURT, ^fycridl to the NattOU Guardian The Germans have been flooded out of the trenches at Nienport. The Russian over frozen roads drive the German line on lakes. The Allies annihilate three thousand Gentians south ot Bixschoote, Japanese gunners are on the way to France. The Germans have evacuted Dixjnude. N'nvenuVf 171I1 1914. (From the X. Y. IW'dd l f >>") A Venice desp^tM' says that CfSCtfw, the capitalM^i nlicia IS in flames anil tl.a. tftrmli.ibiunits are fleeing. Petrt.guid diplomatic intelligent* is to the effeci that Austria will



PAGE 1

tf ask for pence independently of $50,000,000 and Servia f 4,ooo,f $5,000,000. his way to the front. Q Winter has practically paialyzPetrograd ^:—The Russia n ( ed troops movement in both he northe rn aj fry has forced the GITIKast and West yesterday was dull man rttpFAugursbuifJ and gains lin the theatre of war. groundwaily. Another army isjj I he tienches in Belgium and Crossing East Prussia and is de-lthe North of France were swept feating stubborn German defenselby blizz irds, bringing gieat sufand has advanced 50 miles alonglferings. the Masurian Lakes The Russians are also advancing to meet itr-Mig German forces at Posen and Breslau. London: — Winter rairs have paralyzed operations in Belgium. German attacks on Ypres continue to be without effec Washington : General Carrann has notified provisional presidtnt (iutteries that he will retire when Secretary Bryan of the United States establishes peace throughout Mexico. Lonon :—Japtnese gunners are expected in France to operate heavy artillery, London: He ivy MIW m the Bosnian mountain lasting over 24 hour' has ma le die movement 0 aitilleiy most dif'icult. The fight ing here is aim >M ai a standstill. Paris:—The decrease in intensity of German assaults in Prance is due to some extent to weather conditions. The flooded section is increasing in area as a result of continued Ijeavy runs The co&ycy between Nieupoit and Dixn^ae iv %  Vit swamp in which abandoned guns md ammunition Wagons lie ernb dded .md on which float countless bodies. The Germans have been washed out of tlie trenches in several places. It is not probable that Germany will make further attempts in this sec lion. 'o lose no time in 'providing a suitable memorial for Lord Roberts, Premier Asquilh will move in the House of Commons tomorrow that King George be asked to direct that a monument to the famous soldier be eiected at the public cost. London:—To modify the secrecy as to what is happening at tlie oattle front is the subject of a plea of Walter Long, UnipnUt, in the House of Commons. He said he believed that the time had come when limited number of correspondents should be allowed to join the army He declared that publicity would increase enthusiasm and augment recruiting. Washington—To widen the field of <'per.ition and increase e.irh in leseive banks, which opener, yesterday, is the plan of the reserve board. The Treasury Department has about $ 110,000,000available. New York—Cotton inaiketopened jp New Orleans and N'ew York but trading w.is decidedly light in imarkot ( P.OKBD UP Heavy snow in Flanders has rendered existence in the trenches almost imp issible resulting in almost complete cessation of bostilities.except at a few points. There are artillery duels also. The Germans were repelled while crossing the Yser at Dis mude and an entire regiment was annihilated. The House of Commons ha Voted £250000.000 as a ori fund, and for a further million men. Germany claims that three British ships were disabled off the coast of Belgium by German guns. MKNT PRESS 1,125,000,000 GOVEM London -A 1,125,' >oo,ooo and 1,000,000 fornhe British army was voted by the House of Commons yesterday without a dissenting voic ah places. N'.iv-il stores • market opened in Savannah but thee the buying was also unusally light, Washington—Depression is rapidly pasaing asserts Secrets, rj Redfiehl in summarizing tie business situation since the European war began, San Antonio, Texas.—Innes and his wife were given their liberty in Texas. They were charged with conspiring to murder the Nelm-. sisters. The prosecution could not establish the death of the women. 1 he Innes* will fight extradition. -:o:— War Notes On the lighter side of the picture is the following anecdote which is current, though i"s absolute truth is not vouched for. On a recent occasion a British tcavalry subaltern who was cut off from his men hid in the edge of a wood by a road. It was not long before he saw an unsuspecting armed German soldier patrolling the road. Ha could have shot the man without warning, but felt that it would be akin to murder to kill him in cold blood. In order to instil a little oJ the spirit of combat into yie affair, therefore, he Fngland will ioan Ueigiumacrapt out of cover, ran up behind iiegiiiiciu. v" •"• %  ..• geant was on outpost duty with fifteen men Nvhen he perceived a number of shadowy forms approaching;. 11 e advanced alona in order not to expose his men to the chance of a mistake ana found that the intruders were Germans, who -were moving forward in the darkness, and were endeavouring to pass themselves off as English. The sergeaxit was suddenly surrounded and disarmed. A German 'officer threatened him with death if he gave the alarm to the post which the German were attempting to surprise. The sergeant did not hesitate an instant. He shouted : Here, friends, fire : These are Germans. A volley laid low the majority of the Germans and their otlirer whilst the sergeant who had been spared by the French bullets as if by a miracle, was able to rejoin hi? men." the "Bosch," as our Allies wouldlis taken from a letter written to call him and gave him a feroci Ihis relatives by a soldier 01 w ous kick. Instead of sl.owingjregiment: "One nighlit 11 *£ fight the staitlcd and pained German gave a yell and ran for dear life, leaving the subal tern laughing too hard to shoot —:o:— UNEMPLOYMENT IN GERMANY Trade Union Returns Show 21 Per Cent. Average. A terrible picture of unem plovment in Germany is given by the "Vorwarts" of October 2 on the strength of the returns supplied by thirty-four Trade Union organizations which count over one and a half mil lion members. Only 1,269,000 members, however, responded to the inquiry, and of these no few er than 268,459 were workless and 2,254 were travelling in search of work ort August 29. This makes over twenty-one per cent, unemployed of the total number of members reported. It is certain that the remaining igliteen Trade Unions, which did not supply the necessary re turns on the census day, were affected by the war still mor deeply. Thus, the Wood Workers' Union counted on Sep tember 19 no fewer than 39,457 neeibers, or twentyfour per ent. of its total membership, unemployed. The percentage of twenty-one is of course, the average figure, The Ii81 makers show over sixty two per cent, of their members unemployed, the lithographers nearly fifty five, the pottery workers fifty-four, the boot makers tlnrlv five, the textile workers twenty eight, and even the metal workers over twenty >ne percent. A remarkable feature of these figures is that the women work ers seem to be more severely affected by the war than the men. .he number of unemployed women workers is over 48,000, r nearly thirty-two per cent, of the total female membership of the Unions making returns. Of Bourse, there is no means of dis •overing the amount of unemployment among the unorganized workers, but it must be still ligher. SHADOWS IN THE NIGHT. How Trnpyed Sergeant Saved Hie Men A sergeant of a French infanry regiment has recently emuated the heroic exploit of Chevalier d'Assas. The following account of his bravery WANTED AT ONCE O BRIGHT BOYS to ^ deliver Eastern District papers. Boys must live Ui the District'between Victoria Ave. and Fowler srteet. Apt >ly "TRInUNr," OFFICE FOR SALE O NE horse and carriage in good condition. Cab No. 40, Driver No. 296. Applv JAMES KfiLLY n^ar Fort Fincastle or "TRIBUNE" OFFICE. Johnson's Artistic Wood Finishes Johnson'. Prepare* W-* gj ,,lete finish and polish for all tuaiitw woodwork and floors. %  — Johnaon'. Wood l>VT***£?* coloriiii; of ail wort, soft or hard JohnW. Under L**-* P* finish, very much superior to shellac oc Jo'hn.on'. ri*t Wood I"'*'*-' 1 beautiful. athatic, hand-rubbed cfletc without the expense of '"**!• Johnwon'.P.owWood FlIMr-for filling toe gmiti ami MM "• wood, propafi.K for the mm. JoWon'.Po^derwd Wax-tor bal ~" "TOR. SALE BY Chas. E. Albury



PAGE 1

and thought he was going to rule the world. That was not just w'at the Vicar said, but it was in his mind ye could see Ruling the world's God's busines not the Kaiseis fez he. And the missus an' me is going back fer more fanksgivin next Sunday." Like A Hundred Years Ago And I passed down the thorough, farewhereamid the relics of the day previous to gas and electricity, which had been unearthed shining their fitful and smoky fleams with varied success, the costers, with raucous cry, invited their customers to "buy, buy, buy! Here was one, more enterprizimg thai) many who had obtained two end lamps from an old horse tramcar.Another old man, a key cutter, was the pioud possessor of a railway guard lamp, changing the color according to his mood. At one time he grated away with his fife on a key under a red glare, giving him a most demoniacal aspect. Then he would switch on the green. It was a better advertismerit than any of the big eletric signs in the West End, now put cut by the WB Office. But it was candles, mostly candles, all the way, candles sputtering and blowing out at I he slightest A'hiff of wind. It was ns if old Father Time had put London back a hundred years; as if agreeing with the costers Vicar, we had been going too fast, and wante pulling back a bit. Good Morning! We Are Introducing American Silk American Cashmere American Cotton-Lisle HOSIERY They have stood the test. Give real foot comfort. No seams to rip. Never beonrie loose or baguy. The shape is knit innot pressed in. GliARANTKF.il for fineness, style, su|>eriority of material and workmanship. Absolutely stainless Will wear 6 months without holes, or new ones free. OUR SPECIAL OFFER to every one sending us 91.00 in currency or postal note, to cover advertising and shipping charges, we will send post paid, with written guarantee, backed by a five million dollar company, either 3 Pairs of our 75c. value American Silk Hosiery, or 4 Pr. Irs of our 50c. v&lue Aineiican Cashmere Hosiery. or 4 I'vlrof our 50c. Vnlue, American Cotton-Lisle Hosiery or KPtvirs of Children's Hosiery. DONT DKLAY—Offer expires when dealer in your locality is selected. THE INTERNATIONAL HOSIERY GO* P. O. Box 224 DAYTON, OHIO. U. S. AOVER 1500 Pairs Boots and Shoes being added to an alreadyreplete stock Williams the Shoeman is again opening up one of those Sample Lots of Boots and Shoes in a limited number of sizes as follows viz:— Men's Boots and Shoes in sizes from 6 to 71 Women's Boots and Shoes in sizes from 3^ to 4J Misses Boots and Shoes in sizes from i2| to 1 The advantage in purchasing from this lot is (as others who have purchased before can attest) that >ou can select the sizes from a very large variety of up-to-date styles at prices considerably cheaper than regular lines kept in stock. CALL EARLY and secure your size at WILLIAMS' WHOLESALE AND RETAIL SHOE ESTABLISHMENT 277 and 289 Bay Street City e Sanitary Cool Reliable Notice W E would call the attention of our friends in Nas sau and on the OUT ISLANDS to the following prices on lumber which will go into effect from to-dav. All ROUGH lumber up to 8 ft. 6/j per ioo. All DRESSED lumber up to 8 ft. 8/4 per 100. 'All ROUGH and DRESSED to 16ft. 10/5 per WO. ANYTHING over 16 It. u/6 per 100. labove up to 8 ins. wide) These prices are for CASH absolutely and being WAR prices are made to help the pub tic and are subject to change without notice. The Bahamas Timber Co. Ltd C0C0ANUTS BAHAMA ISLANDS I I is BOW possible for owners of land with fully bearing trees to prove its value and ob tain rents. For further particulars Applv to J. THEO. FARRINGTON Nassau, N. P. Agent for Bahamas Product Marketing Company 139 Copthnll Hou* Copthall Avenue 3. Mo London, E. C Kerosene 1502 STOP-C60K LISTEN! We have secured Mr. JamM Queen from tl\e%Jnlted Sides, e. thorough OpticiaJK'ivrio will remain here for the eilVrc winter Maaon We are therefore enabled to offer for ONE MONTH only a 32s. pair of either PINCE-:iEZ or SPECTACLES, 14 carat gold filled 00 lenses, soft 1 able wires so that they will notcut the ears, and warranted for twenty years for 8s, Also English Pebble leOM warranted 20 years without changing for a little higher price. Come and have your EYES Fruit of the Loom 36 in. at 7 A per yard. I N New 50 gallon Galvanized Iron Drums at i8cts per Gallon. In to gallon Cans at aocts per. Gallon. Drums and Cans returnable Full particulars at Office "Frances £.," Nassau N. P. C. C. SAUNDEUS BEST GasoCosmopolitan HIQH SCHOOL ( pens on Monday, Oct. 5th in Aurora Hall on Charlotte Street. For particulars apply to Prof. G. G. Coffin, head master, or Mr. J. P. Simms. meis /t^O Tet. We do not sell it. B UT we do sell and will, continue to sell Standard Oil Co. Gasoline fest your Gasoline. We invite c unparis'n with any in the City. Price aactS, per gallon in 50 gallon Drums. Customers using IOO gals, or over per Month 20c gallon. C. C. SA4JNDERS T B. *^|^r^^ undi new piocessFR E E" f ch.rge Hcadnchi'i, Dizziness, ant till 1 roubles of the EYE CMI be < ured ni once. If Glaeaea e. re not aatisfiw-tory e.1 evny lime we change FREE OF CH %RGE. PERSONS desiring Mr. Queen's services can notify him at The City Pha'madm&vhi-u he shall call on them at their residences. Without EXTRA CHARGE. ON ACCOUNT OF HARD TlWtS Mr. Queen, Agent for the Waltham Watch Co., in order to introduce the best known Watch in the world will offer a 14 carat gold lillj ed, 20 years guaranteed, Ladya %  or Gentleman's open or closed face Watch, Waltham or Admiral movement for £2, on the Instalment Plan of Is. or more per week at the Purchaser's Option. CALL AT ONCE and aee the SAMPLES and learn our Terme IJf' These Watches irt told all over the | World at fa>m £4 V> £b each. IF YOU MISS THIS CHANCE YOU MISS THE CHANCE OF A LIFETIME. Get Wise before it is too Late. I CANE SYRUP Can be had at IBrl. Knowles (at IOS. stg.*per. Tin GOOD and THICK. Hast Bay Street .*_



PAGE 1

•"JW" *T 9^ ( %  Nutllue nddlctua |urre In verb* me.gtetrl. Being bound to • weo.r to tho Dogmata %  >< no Maveter. 02 o 7) 0) 0) •a* VOL.X. N&IMU, N. P.. B&hB.m&i, Tueaday. November 19.1914 No. 240 L. GILBKRT DUPUCH, Editor and Proprietor. OFFICE: 38-44 MARKET STREET Nassau, N. P., Ilahamas "FlIONE 260. P. O. BOX 163. 4 PUBLISHED DAILY Monday,.Wednesdsy an 1 Friday— single copy ... ... 1aavdIng Impeeaible, But Hldaa City From Zeppelina— Coaler Tell* Of Trip To Church. The "Lights of London" diminish more and more each night, and the yellow glare which usually floods the skies above the metropolis has praciiciilly disappeared. Night is life going. Resiurantsand public houses are closing at (en n't clock and before many mnYe weeks have passed they may shut down at nine. Theatres can hardly 'pay, expenses and some of them are giving only two evening performances a week, and matinees every day. Sir Herbert Tree, the chief of the profession, discussing the situation, said: — Life in London has undergope a great change owing to this war, and the darkening of the city. The terror of the night has become a reality, and I believe that people much prefer to stay at home instead of venturing into the density of blackness that London streets present under the new regulations. Traffic also is a difficult matter, and people who wish to go to the theatre are favoring the matinee performances more. So I think the six matinees a week will meet the want better for the present. But Londoners on the whole are accepting altered conditions with resignation, knowing that there is safety in the darkness. They have become used to the searchlights. In fact, trips to the centres where the brilliant beams search and stab the surronding blackness is becoming a part of their evening rambles. Lights Are Becoming Dimmer The lights in tramcars and autobuses are also becoming dimmer. Recently the tramcars travelled with every blind drawn, and they crawled across the bridges in total darkness. Mow new eletric lamps have l)cen installed on the cars. They have a bluish-t)lack glass.and the city workers returning home to the suburbs are ur.able to read their evening papers. They just sit and think of air attacks, and a phase of "tube stare" has devoloped in the semi-darkness as there is nothing else to do. It is in the market places, however where the stills abound, that the change is most notable. Here the c as "id oil flares have been prohibited, and the costers do business under very incongruous conditions! But you never hear a grumble. Take a walk around the busy thoroughfares of North London, where the wives of the working class do their shopping and you Will find the coster and his donah' the cheeriest mortals in all London. The London coster reads his papers. He knows as well as any one what the "dousing" of London's "glim" is for, and quite prepared for a raid ot.German airships, though he has little belief in much harm coming from it. Business is bad with him, but he grants it might be worse. The Coetere Trip To Church "Ho!" said one to whom I stood and chatted, "but we've got much to be thankful for. Say, Guv'nor, d'ye ever go to church? I was there last Sunday. Oh, yuss I was"—as if it was a most incredible circumstances—quite a red letter day in his life. ''Me an' missus went. Ye see it was 'arvest Fanksgivin,' and me and the missus was just curious like to hear whatthe vicar 'ad got ter say by way oy fanksgivin.' Fanksgivin'! Fer w'at? "But it was a bit ov all right, it was. "The Vicar, 'e sez—f cawn't just tell you 'on splendidly e' put it. But 'c sez sez 'e there was much to be thankful for. Just fink 'e sez of our brave Tommies 'oo are fightm' for us as cawn't.wipin' up them cowardly, bullyin' Germans, 'e sez —'e didn't just call 'em* that. That's a bit of my own, but yeu could tell from w'at 'esaid that he meant it all the same. "And there they are, fightin' for us. No fresh meat, no fine sweet vegetables as I'm a sellin' ere, sir. "And then there'our navy, 'e sez an' our syiors, Gawd bless'm, keepirt' the seas clear lor our ships to bring os provisions and keepin' dahn prices like, so that it don't come 'ard on us pore blcks, '• sez. "An' I sez to the missus, 'Gawd, but the Vicar's right. "An" then there's the splendid 'arvest we've 'ad, which all goes to 'elp a bit an' tykin' everyfing altogether, ain't vve got much to be fankful for? "An" then 'e sez—an' 'ere' guvnor 'e made us sit up, the Vicar did—we are doing right in fightin' the Germans, 'e sez may be its just a bit of judgemept on us, too, may be we've just been going a fawst ourselves—I can just guess abit what the Vicar was drivin'at. 'E meant we was just gettin' a bit too fresh, guvn'r, an' tykin, too much for grawnted like ye see. Oh we were goin' on, alright, but we just wanted tykin' dahn a peg or two. An" though we win this war, an' we are going to win orl right, we'll just perhaps tyke it to heart a bit an not forget that we cawn't get on without the grace of God. "I'm not a relijus man, guvnor, an* never was but the Vicar was right, an' my missus, 'oo's a bit* more eddicated than me agreeswiv imand she is a knowing one in my missus bless'er heart. An look at the Kaiser.'He is getting it in the neck all right •because he got the swelled head, •* l i-— i{Continuid on fonrik page)


The Tribune.
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS DOWNLOADS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02304
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Tuesday, November 17, 1914
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02304

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

( PDF )

( PDF )

( PDF )

( PDF )


Full Text
"JW"
*t
9^
* (
Nutllue nddlctua |urre In verb* me.gtetrl.
Being bound to weo.r to tho Dogmata >< no Maveter.
02
o
7)
0)
0)
a*

VOL.X.
N&imu, N. P.. B&hB.m&i, Tueaday. November 19.1914
No. 240
L. GILBKRT DUPUCH,
Editor and Proprietor.
OFFICE: 38-44 MARKET STREET
Nassau, N. P., Ilahamas
"FlIONE 260. P. O. BOX 163.
4
PUBLISHED DAILY
Monday,.Wednesdsy an 1 Friday
single copy ... ... 1 Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday
sinple copy ... td
Weekly ...... 4i<
Monthly ...... ......IS. 4-1
Quarterly ... HalfYearly...... :::
Yearly ...... ......16s
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
Advertising Rates : Six pence per line
for first insertion; three pence per line
for second insertion ; and one penny per
line for subsquent insertions.
Advertisements under eight lines 4s.
LONDON'S LIGHTS GROW
DIMMER.: ASPECT LIKE 100
YEARS AGO
New Elactrlc Lighta H&ve Blue-
Black Glaaa That me.kee R>aavd-
Ing Impeeaible, But Hldaa City
From Zeppelina Coaler Tell*
Of Trip To Church.
The "Lights of London" dimin-
ish more and more each night, and
the yellow glare which usually
floods the skies above the metro-
polis has praciiciilly disappeared.
Night is life going. Resiurantsand
public houses are closing at (en n't
clock and before many mnYe weeks
have passed they may shut down
at nine. Theatres can hardly 'pay,
expenses and some of them are
giving only two evening perform-
ances a week, and matinees every
day.
Sir Herbert Tree, the chief of
the profession, discussing the situa-
tion, said: Life in London has
undergope a great change owing
to this war, and the darkening of
the city. The terror of the night
has become a reality, and I believe
that people much prefer to stay at
home instead of venturing into the
density of blackness that London
streets present under the new regu-
lations. Traffic also is a difficult
matter, and people who wish to go
to the theatre are favoring the
matinee performances more. So I
think the six matinees a week will
meet the want better for the pre-
sent.
But Londoners on the whole are
accepting altered conditions with
resignation, knowing that there is
safety in the darkness. They have
become used to the searchlights. In
fact, trips to the centres where the .
brilliant beams search and stab
the surronding blackness is becom-
ing a part of their evening rambles.
Lights Are Becoming Dimmer
The lights in tramcars and auto-
buses are also becoming dimmer.
Recently the tramcars travelled
with every blind drawn, and they
crawled across the bridges in total
darkness. Mow new eletric lamps
have l)cen installed on the cars.
They have a bluish-t)lack glass.and
the city workers returning home
to the suburbs are ur.able to read
their evening papers. They just sit
and think of air attacks, and a
phase of "tube stare" has devolop-
ed in the semi-darkness as there
is nothing else to do.
It is in the market places, how-
ever where the stills abound, that
the change is most notable. Here
the cas "id oil flares have been
prohibited, and the costers do
business under very incongruous
conditions! But you never hear a
grumble.
Take a walk around the busy
thoroughfares of North London,
where the wives of the working
class do their shopping and you
Will find the coster and his donah'
the cheeriest mortals in all London.
The London coster reads his pa-
pers. He knows as well as any one
what the "dousing" of London's
"glim" is for, and quite prepared
for a raid ot.German airships,
though he has little belief in much
harm coming from it.
Business is bad with him, but
he grants it might be worse.
The Coetere Trip To Church
"Ho!" said one to whom I stood
and chatted, "but we've got much
to be thankful for. Say, Guv'nor,
d'ye ever go to church? I was there
last Sunday. Oh, yuss I was"as
if it was a most incredible circum-
stancesquite a red letter day in
his life. ''Me an' missus went. Ye
see it was 'arvest Fanksgivin,' and
me and the missus was just curious
like to hear whatthe vicar 'ad got
ter say by way oy fanksgivin.'
Fanksgivin'! Fer w'at?
"But it was a bit ov all right, it
was.
"The Vicar, 'e sezf cawn't
just tell you 'on splendidly e' put
it. But 'c sez sez 'e there was much
to be thankful for. Just fink 'e sez
of our brave Tommies 'oo are
fightm' for us as cawn't.wipin' up
them cowardly, bullyin' Germans,
'e sez 'e didn't just call 'em* that.
That's a bit of my own, but yeu
could tell from w'at 'esaid that he
meant it all the same.
"And there they are, fightin' for
us. No fresh meat, no fine sweet
vegetables as I'm a sellin' ere, sir.
"And then there'our navy, 'e sez
an' our syiors, Gawd bless'm,
keepirt' the seas clear lor our ships
to bring os provisions and keepin'
dahn prices like, so that it don't
come 'ard on us pore blcks, ' sez.
"An' I sez to the missus, 'Gawd,
but the Vicar's right.
"An" then there's the splendid
'arvest we've 'ad, which all goes to
'elp a bit an' tykin' everyfing al-
together, ain't vve got much to be
fankful for?
"An" then 'e sezan' 'ere' guv-
nor 'e made us sit up, the Vicar
didwe are doing right in fightin'
the Germans, 'e sez may be its
just a bit of judgemept on us, too,
may be we've just been going a
fawst ourselvesI can just guess
abit what the Vicar was drivin'at.
'E meant we was just gettin' a bit
too fresh, guvn'r, an' tykin, too
much for grawnted like ye see. Oh
we were goin' on, alright, but we
just wanted tykin' dahn a peg or
two. An" though we win this war,
an' we are going to win orl right,
we'll just perhaps tyke it to heart
a bit an not forget that we cawn't
get on without the grace of God.
"I'm not a relijus man, guvnor,
an* never was but the Vicar was
right, an' my missus, 'oo's a bit*
more eddicated than me agrees-
wiv imand she is a knowing one in
my missus bless'er heart.
An look at the Kaiser.'He is
getting it in the neck all right
because he got the swelled head,
.................................................*li-i-.....
{Continuid on fonrik page)


)'
Publication began at 3.50 p.m.
Gfoe Grtbune
Tueaday. November 17, 1914.
LORD ROBERTS.
"Sic itur ad Astra."
H. C. Christie.
Hold ere we utter words that
grieve our dead.
And wound his martial spirit
with our fears;
He died as he had lived ; war's
rugged bed
Unsmoothed for him shall
bring us to tears.
We who have hailed his mete-
oric star
Shining to glorious noon a
Kandahar,
Rejoice! that in the battle's
night,
It grandly disappears.
THE DEATH OF FIELD
MARSHAL EA'RL ROBERTS
V. C, K. G., G. C. B.,0. M.
G. C. S., I. G. C, I. E V. D.
The first telegrams which
were received here yesterday
arrived early, and in a fen
minutes the sad intelligence was
conveyed that Lord Roberts was
dead. At first it did not seem
to be realised by those who
beard it, and doubt was mani-
fested by nearly all, but as the
source was made' known in the
very few words used by Sir John
French to Earl Kitchener, there
was no longer room for doubt,
and the sad truth was received
in reverent silence. In a few
short hours the man who bott
the name which was cherishrd.
honoured, respected and loved
by the whole British Em
pire had been calle I upon by
the grim monster who respects
neither age nor youth, nor posi
tion nor talent, nor King nor
peasant, to pay the debt which
he owed to nature.
Already has the message been
flashed with lightning speed to
the four quarters of the globe,
and millions are mourning the
removal and the loss to England
at perhaps the most critical
period in tier whole history, ol
a maptdfctinguislied soldier, one
whose long and ripe experience
could not fail,to be of inestima-
ble value. Amidst the roar of
cannon, and the
soldier still beats, whether on
the battlefields of Europe, or on
the march, or en bivouac, or in
the quiet of barrack, and mess
room; as the sad message
reaches his ear; at the drear
moment, his pulses stop on their
ceaseless flow from artery and
vein, his nerves quiver from evey
ganglia, and his cheek blanches
as he muses"Bobs" is dead !
England has lost a great and
a good man, the army has lost
a valiant soldier, and the chil
dren of England a friend, for be
loved children, and they loved
him. Our pen is too feeble to
do justice to his memory, faint
indeed can our praise be, but, tie
heeds it not, he needs it not; he
has gone to his grave "as a
shock of corn cometh in his sea-
son." There let him rest, with
this only his epitaph :
"An English gentleman, and a
Hritish soldier."
Earl Roberts was born in In-
dia in 1832, consequently was
ighty-two years of age. At the
age ot nineteen he served witli
the Bengal Artillery, served in
the Indian Mutiny, was at the
relief of Lucknow and assisted
at the siege and capture of
Delhi. Saw active service with
the Abysinnian Expedition of
1S61-T868 and with tha to
Lushai of 1871-1872. In 1879,
he was entrusted with the com
nand of the Kurarri Field Force.
and made his historic march
from Kabul to Kandahar in
1880. In 1886 he had command
of the Army in Burma In re
:ognition of these distinguished
services, he was raised to the
eerage as Baron Roberts of
Kandahar by the late King
Edward VII. In 1893.be re
turned to England from India,
nd two years later succeeded
Lord Wolseley in the Irish Com-
nand. In 1900 he was des-
>atched th South Africa as
Commander in Chief, relieved
all besieged places and wn,
complete victories over the
Boers. He then handed over the
command to Lord Kitchener,
etumed to England and sue
ceeded Lord Wolseley as Gom-
mand in-Chief of the British
Ami), and subsequently receiv-
ed a grant of "100,000 from
Parliament.
a
;
He was Colonel in Chief of
the Indi n Troops, of whom
some aie now in France aiK
stricken down by pneumonia.
He died at 8 P. M. on Sunday
ast.

9
m
MAILS
The time for closing Foreign
Mails per Frances E. has been
Extended to 8 a.m. Thursday
Nov. 1 )th.
:o:
Harvest Thanksgiving
Services.
at St. Matthew's Parish.
Will be held on Nov. zand,
Last Sunday in Trinity, as fol- 'them,
lows:
\t St. Margarets.7.15. a.m.
Holy Communion.
AtSt. Matthew's. n.ooa.m
Holy Eucharist 4.00 p.m
Afternoon Service for Jr.
and Sr. Catechisms.
Evensong. 7. 0 o p.m.
MIAMI CHANNEL
J. L. Megathhn. superintendent
if the Furst-Clark Construction
Company, which is to do the
ledging in the channel under
the direction of Captain Win
lyre, stated yesterday that he,
in company with Captain M
Intyre, had made the prelinii
nary soundings, and determined
which parts of thechanflel need
irig dred'.ing.
However, owing to the fact
that the weather is still unset
teled, and there is still a chain e
for a "blow" which might re
suit in the filling up again of the
newly dredged channels it was
ecided to postpone the wor
until the hist of tins month, or
the first of next.
The S. S. Miami will not be
gin her Miami-Nassau run until
January, so it is considered bv
.,. C. Branning, agent of the P.
& O. S. S. Co. that there is
ilenty of time in which to d
the work.
0 the Editor
.lir
if
Nov if), 1914
The Tribune
Since the Board of Works in
vited the Public to suggest
names for the Street.s lanes, and
alleys, in Grants Town and
Bains Town your paper has been
flooded with them.
It is a matter of no mo
ment to me what they are called
hut since I am a subscriber t
ThcTribune I would like to read
something worth reading, and I
ad gone there to visit and tolled that 1 have a right to sug
v^iihtlin.; andSgreet them (how characteristicjt^est that the publication of
screaming of *liol and shell," >f him) and was ready to return jsimilar letters be discontinued
wherever the heart ol .1 British!home when be was suddenly'They belong to that cTj^ of sub
jects which are' neither fish, nor
flesh, nor jjood real herring."
At any rate, the public, or I
should say the scribes, hay com
plied with the request of the
Board of Works,and 1 think it
should now "call it cAm 1 do not
know whether yonrse\/alcorres
pondents have also furnished the
list of names to the Board of
Works, but really Mr Editor, I
should be very much surprised if
they were to go crazy over them
an i hug them to their capacious
bosoms. I do not say that some
e. the names are in
appropriate to the localities but
I do say that, neither My thole
gist nor Euphonon seem to have'
been consulted.
Bui briefly and conclusively
I say," cut il out" now from your
columns.
Yours
DILLET STREET.
1
Latest War News
RADIOGRAMS
November 17th 1914.
London 16th.
Governor,
Nassau.
November 16th Press Bureau
Reports: Fighting in France
and Belgium continue satifac-
torv. The Germaii^gKive been
thrown back from tmffeft bank
of the Yser Canal and their at
tacs south of Ypies repulsed
with great loss.
The Russians are advancing
on Cracow and are also pro-
gressing in East Prussia despite
desperate resistance.
General Botha has attacked
rebels under Dewet, capturing
250 prisoners.
(Signed)
HARCOURT,
^fycridl to the NattOU Guardian
The Germans have been
flooded out of the trenches at
Nienport.
The Russian over frozen roads
drive the German line on lakes.
The Allies annihilate three
thousand Gentians south ot
Bixschoote,
Japanese gunners are on the
way to France.
The Germans have evacuted
Dixjnude.
N'nvenuVf 171I1 1914.
(From the X. Y. IW'dd lf>>")
A Venice desp^tM' says that
CfSCtfw, the capitalM^inlicia IS
in flames anil tl.a. tftrmli.ibiunits
are fleeing.
Petrt.guid diplomatic intelligent*
is to the effeci that Austria
will


tf
ask for pence independently of $50,000,000 and Servia f 4,ooo, Germany. without irteicst. Great Britain
London :The Prince of Wales? lias 1,200,000 men in the field at a
crossed to Boulogne last nigllt on .daily cost <>f $5,000,000.
his way to the front. Q Winter has practically paialyz-
Petrograd ^:The Russia n (ed troops movement in both he
northern ajfry has forced the Git- IKast and West yesterday was dull
man rttpFAugursbuifJ and gainslin the theatre of war.
groundwaily. Another army isjj I he tienches in Belgium and
Crossing East Prussia and is de-lthe North of France were swept
feating stubborn German defenselby blizz irds, bringing gieat suf-
and has advanced 50 miles alonglferings.
the Masurian Lakes
The Russians are also advancing
to meet itr-Mig German forces at
Posen and Breslau.
London: Winter rairs have
paralyzed operations in Belgium.
German attacks on Ypres continue
to be without effec .
Washington : General Carrann
has notified provisional presidtnt
(iutteries that he will retire when
Secretary Bryan of the United
States establishes peace through-
out Mexico.
Lonon :Japtnese gunners are
expected in France to operate
heavy artillery,
London: He ivy miw m the
Bosnian mountain lasting over 24
hour' has ma le die movement 0
aitilleiy most dif'icult. The fight
ing here is aim >M ai a standstill.
Paris:The decrease in inten-
sity of German assaults in Prance
is due to some extent to weather
conditions. The flooded section is
increasing in area as a result of
continued Ijeavy runs
The co&ycy between Nieupoit
and Dixn^ae iv Vit swamp in
which abandoned guns md ammu-
nition Wagons lie ernb dded .md on
which float countless bodies. The
Germans have been washed out of
tlie trenches in several places. It is
not probable that Germany will
make further attempts in this sec
lion.
'o lose no time in 'providing a
suitable memorial for Lord Rob-
erts, Premier Asquilh will move in
the House of Commons tomorrow
that King George be asked to
direct that a monument to the
famous soldier be eiected at the
public cost.
London:To modify the secrecy
as to what is happening at tlie
oattle front is the subject of a plea
of Walter Long, UnipnUt, in the
House of Commons. He said he
believed that the time had come
when limited number of corres-
pondents should be allowed to join
the army He declared that pub-
licity would increase enthusiasm
and augment recruiting.
WashingtonTo widen the
field of <'per.ition and increase
e.irh in leseive banks, which open-
er, yesterday, is the plan of the re-
serve board. The Treasury Depart-
ment has about $ 110,000,000avail-
able.
New YorkCotton inaiket-
opened jp New Orleans and N'ew
York but trading w.is decidedly
light in
imarkot (
P.OKBD UP
Heavy snow in Flanders has
rendered existence in the trench-
es almost imp issible resulting in
almost complete cessation of
bostilities.except at a few points.
There are artillery duels also.
The Germans were repelled
while crossing the Yser at Dis
mude and an entire regiment
was annihilated.
The House of Commons ha
Voted 250000.000 as a ori
fund, and for a further million
men.
Germany claims that three
British ships were disabled off
the coast of Belgium by German
guns.
MKNT PRESS
1,125,000,000
GOVEM
London -A 1,125,' >oo,ooo and
1,000,000 fornhe British army was
voted by the House of Commons
yesterday without a dissenting
voic
, ah places. N'.iv-il stores
market opened in Savannah but
thee the buying was also unusally
light,
WashingtonDepression is
rapidly pasaing asserts Secrets, rj
Redfiehl in summarizing tie busi-
ness situation since the European
war began,
San Antonio, Texas.Innes and
his wife were given their liberty in
Texas. They were charged with
conspiring to murder the Nelm-.
sisters. The prosecution could not
establish the death of the women.
1 he Innes* will fight extradition.
-:o:
War Notes
On the lighter side of the
picture is the following anecdote
which is current, though i"s ab-
solute truth is not vouched for.
On a recent occasion a British
tcavalry subaltern who was cut
off from his men hid in the edge
of a wood by a road. It was
not long before he saw an un-
suspecting armed German soldi-
er patrolling the road. Ha could
have shot the man without
warning, but felt that it would
be akin to murder to kill him
in cold blood. In order to in-
stil a little oJ the spirit of com-
bat into yie affair, therefore, he
Fngland will ioan Ueigiumacrapt out of cover, ran up behind
iiegiiiiciu. v" "" ..
geant was on outpost duty with
fifteen men Nvhen he perceived
a number of shadowy forms ap-
proaching;. 11 e advanced alona
in order not to expose his men
to the chance of a mistake ana
found that the intruders were
Germans, who -were moving for-
ward in the darkness, and were
endeavouring to pass themselves
off as English. The sergeaxit
was suddenly surrounded and
disarmed. A German 'officer
threatened him with death
if he gave the alarm to the post
which the German were attemp-
ting to surprise. The sergeant
did not hesitate an instant. He
shouted :
Here, friends, fire : These are
Germans. A volley laid low
the majority of the Germans
and their otlirer whilst the ser-
geant who had been spared by
the French bullets as if by a
miracle, was able to rejoin hi?
men."
the "Bosch," as our Allies wouldlis taken from a letter written to
call him and gave him a feroci Ihis relatives by a soldier 01 w
ous kick. Instead of sl.owingjregiment: "One nighlit 11 *
fight the staitlcd and pained
German gave a yell and ran
for dear life, leaving the subal
tern laughing too hard to shoot
:o:
UNEMPLOYMENT IN GER-
MANY
Trade Union Returns Show 21
Per Cent. Average.
A terrible picture of unem
plovment in Germany is given
by the "Vorwarts" of October 2
on the strength of the returns
supplied by thirty-four Trade
Union organizations which
count over one and a half mil
lion members. Only 1,269,000
members, however, responded to
the inquiry, and of these no few
er than 268,459 were workless
and 2,254 were travelling in
search of work ort August 29.
This makes over twenty-one per
cent, unemployed of the total
number of members reported.
It is certain that the remaining
igliteen Trade Unions, which
did not supply the necessary re
turns on the census day, were
affected by the war still mor
deeply. Thus, the Wood Work-
ers' Union counted on Sep
tember 19 no fewer than 39,457
neeibers, or twenty- four per
ent. of its total membership,
unemployed.
The percentage of twenty-one
is of course, the average figure,
The Ii81 makers show over sixty
two per cent, of their members
unemployed, the lithographers
nearly fifty five, the pottery
workers fifty-four, the boot
makers tlnrlv five, the textile
workers twenty eight, and even
the metal workers over twenty
>ne percent.
A remarkable feature of these
figures is that the women work
ers seem to be more severely af-
fected by the war than the men.
.he number of unemployed
women workers is over 48,000,
r nearly thirty-two per cent, of
the total female membership of
the Unions making returns. Of
Bourse, there is no means of dis
overing the amount of unem-
ployment among the unorganiz-
ed workers, but it must be still
ligher.
SHADOWS IN THE NIGHT.
How Trnpyed Sergeant Saved
Hie Men
A sergeant of a French infan-
ry regiment has recently emu-
ated the heroic exploit of
Chevalier d'Assas. The fol-
lowing account of his bravery
WANTED AT ONCE
O BRIGHT BOYS to
^ deliver Eastern Dis-
trict papers.
Boys must live Ui the Dis-
trict'between Victoria Ave.
and Fowler srteet.
Apt >ly ___
"TRInUNr," OFFICE
FOR SALE
ONE horse and carriage in
good condition. Cab
No. 40, Driver No. 296.
Applv
JAMES KfiLLY
n^ar Fort Fincastle
or "TRIBUNE" OFFICE.
Johnson's
Artistic Wood
Finishes
Johnson'. Prepare* W-* gj
,,lete finish and polish for all tuaiitw
woodwork and floors. --
Johnaon'. Wood l>VT***?*
coloriiii; of ail wort, soft or hard
JohnW. Under L**-* P*
finish, very much superior to shellac oc
Jo'hn.on'. ri*t Wood I"'*'*-'1"
beautiful. athatic, hand-rubbed cfletc
without the expense of '"**! .
Johnwon'.P.owWood FlIMr-for
filling toe gmiti ami MM " wood,
propafi.K for the mm.
JoWon'.Po^derwd Wax-tor bal
~" "Tor. sale by
Chas. E. Albury


and thought he was going to rule
the world. That was not just w'at
the Vicar said, but it was in his
mind ye could see Ruling the
world's God's busines not the
Kaiseis fez he. And the missus an'
me is going back fer more
fanksgivin next Sunday."
Like A Hundred Years Ago
And I passed down the thorough,
farewhereamid the relics of the day
previous to gas and electricity,
which had been unearthed shining
their fitful and smoky fleams with
varied success, the costers, with
raucous cry, invited their custom-
ers to "buy, buy, buy! Here was
one, more enterprizimg thai) many
who had obtained two end lamps
from an old horse tramcar.Another
old man, a key cutter, was the
pioud possessor of a railway guard
lamp, changing the color accord-
ing to his mood. At one time he
grated away with his fife on a key
under a red glare, giving him a
most demoniacal aspect. Then he
would switch on the green. It was
a better advertismerit than any of
the big eletric signs in the West
End, now put cut by the Wb
Office.
But it was candles, mostly can-
dles, all the way, candles sputter-
ing and blowing out at I he slight-
est A'hiff of wind. It was ns if old
Father Time had put London
back a hundred years; as if agree-
ing with the costers Vicar, we
had been going too fast, and
wante pulling back a bit.
Good Morning!
We Are Introducing
American Silk
American Cashmere
American Cotton-Lisle
HOSIERY
They have stood the test. Give real
foot comfort. No seams to rip. Never
beonrie loose or baguy. The shape is
knit in- not pressed in.
GliARANTKF.il for fineness, style,
su|>eriority of material and workmanship.
Absolutely stainless Will wear 6 months
without holes, or new ones free.
OUR SPECIAL OFFER
to every one sending us 91.00 in currency
or postal note, to cover advertising and
shipping charges, we will send post paid,
with written guarantee, backed by a five
million dollar company, either
3 Pairs of our 75c. value
American Silk Hosiery,
or 4 Pr. Irs of our 50c. v&lue
Aineiican Cashmere Hosiery.
or 4 I'vlrof our 50c. Vnlue,
American Cotton-Lisle Hosiery
or KPtvirs of Children's Hosiery.
DONT DKLAYOffer expires when
dealer in your locality is selected.
The International Hosiery go*
P. O. Box 224
DAYTON, OHIO. U. S. A-
OVER
1500
Pairs
Boots and Shoes
being added to an already-
replete stock
Williams the Shoeman
is again opening up one of
those Sample Lots of Boots
and Shoes in a limited
number of sizes as follows
viz:
Men's Boots and Shoes in sizes
from 6 to 71
Women's Boots and Shoes
in sizes from 3^ to 4J
Misses Boots and Shoes in sizes
from i2| to 1
The advantage in purchas-
ing from this lot is (as others
who have purchased before
can attest) that >ou can se-
lect the sizes from a very
large variety of up-to-date
styles at prices considerably
cheaper than regular lines
kept in stock.
CALL EARLY
and secure your size at
WILLIAMS' WHOLESALE
AND RETAIL
SHOE ESTABLISHMENT
277 and 289 Bay Street City
____________e
Sanitary
Cool
Reliable
Notice
WE would call the atten-
tion of our friends in Nas
sau and on the OUT ISLANDS
to the following prices on lum-
ber which will go into effect
from to-dav.
All ROUGH lumber up to 8 ft.
6/j per ioo. All DRESSED
, lumber up to 8 ft. 8/4 per 100.
'All ROUGH and DRESSED to
16ft. 10/5 per WO. ANYTHING
over 16 It. u/6 per 100. labove
up to 8 ins. wide)
These prices are for CASH
! absolutely and being WAR
prices are made to help the pub
tic and are subject to change
without notice.
The Bahamas Timber Co. Ltd
C0C0ANUTS
BAHAMA ISLANDS
II is bow possible for owners
of land with fully bearing
trees to prove its value and ob
tain rents.
For further particulars
Applv to
J. THEO. FARRINGTON
Nassau, N. P.
Agent for
Bahamas Product Marketing
Company
139 Copthnll Hou*
Copthall Avenue
3. Mo London, E. C
Kerosene
1502
STOP-C60K
LISTEN!
We have secured Mr. JamM
Queen from tl\e%Jnlted Sides,
e. thorough OpticiaJK'ivrio will
remain here for the eilVrc winter
Maaon
We are therefore enabled to
offer for ONE MONTH only
a 32s.
pair of either PINCE-:iEZ
or SPECTACLES, 14 carat
gold filled 00 lenses, soft 1 able
wires so that they will not-
cut the ears, and warranted
for twenty years
for 8s,
Also English Pebble leOM
warranted 20 years without
changing for a little higher
price.
Come and have
your EYES
Fruit of the Loom 36 in.
at 7 A per yard.
IN New 50 gallon Galvaniz-
ed Iron Drums at i8cts
per Gallon.
In to gallon Cans at aocts
per. Gallon.
Drums and Cans returnable
Full particulars at Office
"Frances .," Nassau N. P.
C. C. SAUNDEUS
BEST
Gaso-
Cosmopolitan
HIQH SCHOOL
('pens on
Monday, Oct. 5th
in Aurora Hall
on Charlotte Street.
For particulars apply to
Prof. G. G. Coffin, head mas-
ter, or Mr. J. P. Simms.
meis /t^O
Tet. We do not sell it.
BUT we do sell and will,
continue to sell
Standard Oil Co.
Gasoline fest your Gaso-
line. We invite c unparis'n
with any in the City.
Price aactS, per gallon in
50 gallon Drums. Customers
using IOO gals, or over per
Month 20c gallon.
C. C. SA4JNDERS
T B.
*^|^r^^ undi
new piocessFR E E"f ch.rge
Hcadnchi'i, Dizziness, ant till
1 roubles of the EYE cmi be < ured
ni once. If Glaeaea e. re not aat-
isfiw-tory e.1 evny lime we change
FREE OF CH %RGE.
Persons desiring Mr. Queen's
services can notify him at
The City Pha'madm&vhi-u he
shall call on them at their
residences. Without EXTRA
CHARGE.
ON ACCOUNT OF HARD TlWtS
Mr. Queen, Agent for the
Waltham Watch Co., in or-
der to introduce the best
known Watch in the world
will offer a 14 carat gold lill-
j ed, 20 years guaranteed, Ladya
or Gentleman's open or closed
face
Watch, Waltham or Admiral
movement for 2, on the
! Instalment Plan of Is. or
more per week at the Pur-
chaser's Option.
CALL AT ONCE and aee the
SAMPLES and learn our Terme
IJf' These Watches irt told all over the
| World at fa>m 4 V> b each.
IF YOU MISS THIS CHANCE
. YOU MISS THE CHANCE OF
A LIFETIME.
Get Wise before it is too Late.
I_________________________
CANE SYRUP
Can be had at IBrl. Knowles
(at ios. stg.*per. Tin
GOOD and THICK.
Hast Bay Street
.*_


University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2011 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Powered by SobekCM