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Publlci bUoMen begun t 4.30 p.irt. XCbe tribune (ii—. Saturday. November 14,1914. TO OUR. PATR.ONS AND OUR READERS On next Saturday the 21st lost, "The Tribune 1 will have completed its Eleventh year of existence. It has been a period of varied experiences, pf blasting of cherished hopes, of misfortunes, of loss, but through them all, we have remained steadfast to the principles which we resolved should be our sheet anchor when we launched our little bark upon the troubled waters of journalism. The motto we then adopted mav have seemed boastful, but we have lived up to it.we have ever maintained an honest straightforward course, we have ever advocated the cause of truth, of right, and of duty, and have never shrunk from lifting our voice against whatwas evil, and unrighteous and unmanly, we have ever protected the weak against the oppressor, we have ever advocated the adoption of measures which appeared to be for the public weal. All these we pledged ourselves to do, and we le&ve it to the public to judge if we have been faithful. When "The Tribune" was established, the world was at peace, the only rivalry that existed among nations, was in the legimate pursuit of a mastery by trade and commerce, but now evil influences are at work, a monarch's voice cried, 'Havoc'! and let slip the dogs of war;" the eartli no longer yields her increase to thpeaceful husbandman, but is ploughed with shot and shell, and sowed with dragons teeth instead; no longer do the merchant princes of the earth freight their Argosies with car goes from their factories in exchange for the rich treasures of other lands. Sorry indeed are we that such horrors must be brought to our readers, but the necessity that knows no law but that of supply and demand compels us. We all cannot go to the front, and there is no use to fret about it. But we can impro^our minds at all events by reading about what others are doiflg thcr?,* therefore beginning on Saturday next the a 1st inst., we purpose to double the size of the "Tribune" and on all succeeding Saturdays while the necessity exists, as also to commemorate our entering upon another decade of existence. We shall endeavour to give jyouofour 'best' and to make the I new venture as acceptable and ; profitable to you in the future as we trust it has been in the past. We want to impress upon you that it is your paper, one that you can command at all times, yours to use reasonably and judiciously, for the expression of your views and opinions in a calm and moderate way, but never for indulgence in personalities ; and to use as your' adverting medium. It shall be our aim to give you a paper that you can read with pleasure and understand with j profit, and understanding, you I will find that-you cannot do %  without it. I Let us become mutually inIterested: be as loyal and true [to us,as we shall be to you; and (let usall humbly and fervently pray that the day will soon come "When Peace shall over all the earth, Her final splendours fling : No longer hosts encount'ring hosts Shall crowds of slain deplore. Thev hang the trumpet in the hall, And study war no more." • —:o:— POST OFFICE NOTICE. The Post Office will be open for the delivery of Mails on Sunday should the "Frances E" arrive before 5 p.m. If she arrives after that hour, the delivery will commence at 7 a.m. on Monday. — :o:— S. S. "Seguranca" left New York at 3 p.m., vesterdav, with Mails, 48 Passengers, and 6000 Barrels Cargo. — :o: — The Motor-Boat "Frances F.. left Miami at noon to day with 3 pa*se:ip*rs 27 Rags Mails and B supply of Newspapers.— IN THE SUPREME COURT The Cate <>f Eady vs Johnson will be continued on M'.nd;iy next the 16th inst. at 10.30, and will probably be Sub Curia a couple of days more. —:o:— Mrs. A H. Nelsen will conduct a 3ible study at the Seventh Day Adventist enapelat 7 o'clock, Sunday night Nov. 15th. Subject; Why 1 Believe The Bible. A cordial welcolm is extended to all. THE I. C. S. (INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL OF CORRESPONDENCE; Education by Correspondence Edison Phonograph suppplies %  conversational recordsin Spanish, French, Italian and German—These records act as schoolmaster, teach without mistakes. Made by professors of the language.The Scholar listens to the record, at the same time repeating the lesson from a book He repeats the lesson in the Phonographic blank reels for the purpose of taking the re cord furnished bv the I. C. S. and these reels are sent to the School for examination, when faults are detected and explained in a letter from the profess >r to the student. Mr H. C. Christie has intro duced the above system here with advantage to those who have availed themselves of the method. "There is no royal road to learning" is as old as the hills but the road is in much better condition than when uesed in all the centuries preceding this 20th. It has been thoroughly graded macadamized, and tarviad, so that the wheels of the gods run smoothly over it without jolt The svsteni of teaching is one that recommends itself to all those who desire a maximum proficiency in languages especially, with only a minimum amount of study. It is a known fact that the chief desideratun is to obtain a correct pronunciation. One may read and write a language to the benefiit of ones stlf and for others, but the spoken language is what is of the greatest value. It is impossible within the limit of this review to detail the method by which languages are acquired by this system, but Mr. Christie is genenlly arou K', and will be glad to convey the information. See him —His terms are moderate— \ndthough not an Ai Philologist, he will convince you of the mavellous adaptation of the Phonograph to t h e acquisition of almost every known language. — :o: — November 5, 10:4 Nassau, N. P Mr. Editor Sir: We wat^h with admiration the-splendid valour of our men now fighting at the front,*we also note that some of them are from our own Bahamian soil. It is that inherent bravery of all British subjects that has enabled us in the past aw will in the present struggle to succeed against the worngs that need resistance, and to wteft for the amelioration or betterment of humanity as a whole and not for the selfish motive of any individual sect or creed. Booker T. Washington said some time ago—"in order to keep a man forever down in the gutter you must stay there with him" and I believe Mr. Editor that spirit of keeping your brother in the gutter lias been uppermost in the minds of a good many fellow Bahamians which has not onl\ driven away some of our best agriculturists and working citi" rent, but those that remain are at this crisis facing poverty and want I do rejoice to know that the prevailing conditi n of things has brought about an awaken ing and that our eyes are, open to see that we are only as dead fish floating upon the water going whither the tide carry us. We shudder when we notice the disrespect our leaders have shown us in the past how our wishes have been side tracked nevertheless we will patiently wait and with the ptcfcnt unrest begin from now i^ftbilize our forces and'to put ;it its head as general —that spirit of Rritish bravery that has been on furlough a number of \ears from us. The various armies before leaving for the front were told what was their mission they were to go and fight together with the French against a common enemy who believed in might to crush right. The facts were told to the men who no doubt long saw and knew what they were about. In like manner we shall be occasionally from now until when "the day" arrives be ever reminded of the true rases which plunged the Bahamas In the year 1914 into such a financial panic. Why should the fall in S|xngc and sisal so seriously hamper our prosperity Let ur for a moment stop and po.idet over two enormous sums that could have been far betterspens to alleviate (hepresent sufferers on our islands. £"35000 to the Florida Fast Coast Companv JTlOOOO to the War Kelijgf Fund Total £"3.soo If this suj^ were loaned out with reasonable interest to the many land holders in proportion with, say at least a quarter the value of their land



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-*nd by careful supervision and .guidance the government until the principle if as returned would have been Tar more profitably spent, But ah! I hear somebody saflMfeat will lift too many out of me gutter at once But even if it did would not the circulation of money be of benefit to both me and you. Some will say what's the use. I will point them to the bravery of their British brothers now fighting at the front although many have fallen yet they are never discouraged but with perseverance and patience they are succeeding daily in their endeavours Again others will say we have no soil not even as much as will cover the surface of Barbadoes but by looking around you and observing the luxuriant growth of vegetation should really convince you that statement is not true Mr Kditor I have before me a sugar cane about fourteen feet high without the blades its circumference at the l


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—5* .IJA : £. which he might ofjfer. The Germans first approached Belgium with the nauseating offer of a bribe. She disclaims any hostile intention toward Belgium, and if Belgium will consent "to take an attitude of friendly neutrality toward Germany," ihe Imperial governor engages, when peace is declared, to guarantee the kingdom and its possession, and to evacuate its territory; it will pay cash down for whatever is taken for the support of its troops, and will indemnify Belgium for the damage done. Wholly indifferent to its own obligations of honor, entered into the international treaty of neutrality.Germany seeks to corrupt Belgium's honor, for Jhere could be no such thing as "lriemlly neutrality" on the part of Belgium toward an invasion. In assuming such an attitude Belgium would have been guilty of an act of hostility toward the other signatory powers.The treaty 'and in. ternational law demanded of her resistance to the extent of her power against any invasion whatever. But the German offer was not made up altogether ..f soft ss lies in the markets.of South America. The nations there are among the best customer* of Kumpe, and will turn naturallv to the United Mates if we will but meet them hall way. According t" the latest avaiRbe figures.compiled by the Pan American Union, ihe ten nations of South America—Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Uraguay and Venezuela—armuaIIv irrport products valued at $961,000,000. Of this there ronio from Eorope products valued at $660,000,000. While Great Britain supplies products "of this tota to the vajue of approximately $273,000,000, Gr many, which is completely cut off by the war, supplies $180,000,000; France, $84,000,000; Italy $54" 000,000; Belgium $ 47,o<>o,0"o; Austria Hungary $ S.ooc.ooo; Netherlands, $8,000,000; Switzerland 6,000,000,and other European countries lesser sums. The average imports from the United States of these ten countries of south America amount approximately to $155,000,000. OVER 1500 Pairs Boots snd Shoes being added to an already replete stock Williams the Shoeman is again opening up one of those Sample Lots of Boots and Shoes in a limited number of sizes as follows viz:— Men's Boots and Shoes in sizes from 6 to 7J Women's Boots and Shoes 111 sizes from 3$ to 4J Misses Boots and Shoes in sizes from 12 J to 1 The advantage in purchasing from Ms lot is (as others who have purchased before can attest) that >ou can select the sizes from a very large variety of up-to-date styles at prices considerably cheaper than regular lines kept in stock. CALL EARLY and secure your size at WILLIAMS' WHOLESALE AND RETAIL SHOE ESTABLISHMENT 277 and 289 Bay Street tit v. Come and have your EYES Notice T HIS is to inform my Patrons and the Public in General that I have opened my Public Black Smith Shop; and am now ready to do anything in t e line ol General repair or new w .k Horse Shoeing Specially. All \ orjc done Mechanically. P. A. HUYLKR. Notice W E would call the attention of our friends in Nassau and on the OUT ISLANDS to the following prices on lumber which will go into effect from tO-dav. All ROUGH lumber up to 8 ft. 6/j per too. All DRESSED ; lumber up to 8 ft. 8/4 per 100. All ROUGH and DRESSED to 16ft. 10/5 per loo. ANYTHING over 16 ft. 126 pp r j 0 o. (above up to 8 int. wide) These prices are for CASH absolutely and being WAR ; prices are made to help the pub: He and ritr subject to change I without notice. The Bahmnu Timber Co. Ltd Kerosene 1602 I N New 50 gallon Galvanized Iron Drums at i8cts per Gallon. In 10 gallon Cans at aocts per. Gallon. Drums and Cans returnable Full particulars at Office "Frances E.," Nassau N. P. C. C. SAUNDERS* i STOP-LOOK LISTEN! We have secured Mr. James Queen from the United Stales, 1 a thorough OpticiiJ who will remain here for the eMire winter ••Mon We are therefore enabled to offer for ONE MONTH only a 32s. pair of either PINCE-NEZ or SPECTACLES, 14. carat gold filled 00 lenses, soft cable wires so that they will not cut the ears, aid "warranted for twenty years for 8s. Also English Pebble lenses warranted 20 years without changing for a little higher price. 'Sfc ^( %  s^^ [ ''" '' under the new process FREEof charge Hee.de.ches, Dizziness and nil troubles of the EYE can be cured 0.1 once. We refund the money after a months trial of the"glasses, if not satisfactory, or change them free of charge. PERSONS desiring mv services can notify me atwte City Pharmacy, when 1 Trial I call on them at thru residences. Without EXTRA CHARGE. ON ACCOUNT OF HARD TIMES Mr. Queen, Agent for ilie Walth.im Watch Co., in order to introduce the best known Watch in the world will offer a 11 carat gold filled, 20 years guaranteed, Ladys or Gentleman's open or closed face Watch, Waltham or Admiral movement for £2, on the Instalment Plan of Is. or 1 more per week at the Pur| chaser's Option. CALL AT ONCE and see the SAMPLES and learn our Terms ssf'Ibest Watches are s..| eftdfc ir YOU MISS THIS CHANCE YOU MISS THE CHANCE OF A LIFETIME. Get Wise before it is too Late. I CANE SY8UP j Can be had at T. M. flfcowles jat 1 os. stg. per Tin GOOD and THICK. Fast Bay Street



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CD 3 c 0) rf (0 (0 ST 0 CD 0) ifttttte Nulllue addlrtus |\irare In verb* tnfegletrl. Being bound to iw*r to the Dogme-a >f no Mixater, VOL.X. Naiu, N. P., bahamaa, Saturday. November 14.1914 No. m — L. OILBKItT DUl'UCH, Wtor Jd Proprietor. OFFICE: 38-41 MARKBT STREET .' %  I' MM, ,V. P., /I.lfcrim.-U TBONB 200 P. O. BOX 163. PUBLISHED DAILY Monday, Wednesday and Friday— single copy |d Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday— single copy id Weekly M Monthly i s. 4c! S uarterly .. 4s. alf Yearly 8 s, Yearly 1 6s. PAYABLE IN ADVANCE Advertising Rates : —Six pence per line for first insertion; three peace per line for second insertion ; ami "the penny per line for subsquent insertions. Advertisements under euht lines ^s. A CHANT OF HATE AGAINST ENGLAND. By Erneet Lleeauer In Jugend Rendered Into English verae by Barbara Hendoreon, French and Russian, they matter nol, A blow for a blow and a shot for a sliot; We love them not, we hate them not, We hold the Weichsel and Vosges gate, We have but one and only hale, We love as one, w hate as one, We have one foe and one alone. lie is known to you all, he is |

The Tribune.
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS DOWNLOADS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02303
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Saturday, November 14, 1914
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02303

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ifttttte
Nulllue addlrtus |\irare In verb* tnfegletrl.
Being bound to iw*r to the Dogme-a >f no Mixater,
VOL.X.
Naiu, N. P., bahamaa, Saturday. November 14.1914
No. m

L. OILBKItT DUl'UCH,
Wtor Jd Proprietor.
OFFICE: 38-41 MARKBT STREET
.'' I' MM, ,V. P., /I.lfcrim.-U ,
TBONB 200 P. O. BOX 163.
PUBLISHED DAILY
Monday, Wednesday and Friday
single copy ...... |d
Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday
single copy......... id
Weekly ............ M
Monthly ............is. 4c!
Suarterly........ .. 4s.
alf Yearly............8s,
Yearly ............16s.
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
Advertising Rates : Six pence per line
for first insertion; three peace per line
for second insertion ; ami "the penny per
line for subsquent insertions.
Advertisements under euht lines ^s.
A CHANT OF HATE AGAINST
ENGLAND.
By Erneet Lleeauer In Jugend
Rendered Into English verae
by Barbara Hendoreon,
French and Russian, they matter
nol,
A blow for a blow and a shot for
a sliot;
We love them not, we hate them
not,
We hold the Weichsel and
Vosges gate,
We have but one and only hale,
We love as one, w hate as one,
We have one foe and one alone.
lie is known to you all, he is
| He (.rouches behind the dark
giay flood,
Full of envy, of rage, of craft, of
gall,
Cut off by waves, that are thicker
than Wood.
Come let us stand at the Judg-
ment place,
[ An oath to swear to, face to face,
An oath of bronze no wind can
shake.
An oath for our sons and their
sons to take
Come, bear the word, repeat
the word,
Throughout the Fatherland
make it heard.
We will never forego our hate,
We have all but a single hate,
We love as one, we hate as one,
We have one foe and one alone
ENGLAND!
In the Captain's Mess, in the
banquet-hall,
Sat feasting the officers, one and
all,
Like a sabre-blow, like the swing
of a sail,
One seized his glass held high
to hall;
Sharp snapped like the stroke of
a rudder's play,
Spoke three words only: "To the
Day!"
Whose glass this iate?#
They had all but a single hate.
Who was thus known?
They had one foe and one alone
ENGLAND!
Take you the folk of the Eurth
iti pay,
With bars of gold your ramparts
lay,
Bedeck the ocean with bow on
bow,
Ye reckon well, but not well
enough now.
French and Russian they matter
not,
A blow for a blow, a shot for a
shot,
We fight the battle with bronze
and steel,
And the time that is coming
Peace will seal.
You will we hate with a lasting
hate,
We will never forego our hate,
Hate by water and hate by land,
Hate of the head and hate of the
hand,
Hate of the hammer and hate of
the crown,
Hate of seventy millions, chok-
ing down.
We live as one, we hate as one,
We have one foe and one alone
ENGLAND!
EACH SIDE OF
EUROPEAN WAR
THE GERMAN VIEW
By Hxijo Von Klieet.
Large as the English Armada
may be, if there is the slightest,
hope for victory, the German ships
will b ready for the fight. While she
has no possible chance for victory
it were better Germany should
keep her bast material intact, until
the continental fights grow weak-
er. Then the navy, still command-
ing respect, can become of greatest
importance. It would be little
short of a crime to demand of the
German navy a sea fight at this
time, only for the sake of fighting.
But if the European war is ended
and German)' still has or again
gets the force, the navy will come
forth and test the boasted .suprem-
acy of Great Britian on the high
seas.
In many centers the neutrality
of the American administration is
being seriously questioned. Large
sales of war material have been
made to the bedigerenis. Has the
president restricted his neutrality
to talk? Words are mighty but at
this time they do not count as
much as cannon. At the outbieak
of war German wireless stations
were practically sealed and coin-
cidentally the cables connecting
Germany with the united States
were clipped. Thus was Germany
isolated, while the Allies have
complete and perfect communica-
tion between America and Europe.
Many unneutral act of th* allies
have passed unchallenged. Steam-
ers have been halted and searched;
American mails intended for Ger-
many have been destroyed and
English warships spy in American
harbors. Has the president chang-
ed his mind on the rights of neu-
trality and of neutral nations?
THE ALLIES VIEW
Bv Alfred W. Bryce
Germany's treatment of Belgium^
is strongly" reminiscent of Aeiops
fable "The Wolf and the*Lamb."
There is' abundant evidence that
the German wolt approached the
Belgian Lamb with a fully formed
antecedent intention to devour
him, regardless of excuses or please


Publlci
bUoMen begun t 4.30 p.irt.
XCbe tribune
(ii.
Saturday. November 14,1914.
TO OUR. PATR.ONS AND
OUR READERS
On next Saturday the 21st
lost, "The Tribune1' will have
completed its Eleventh year of
existence. It has been a
period of varied experiences,
pf blasting of cherished
hopes, of misfortunes, of loss,
but through them all, we have
remained steadfast to the princi-
ples which we resolved should
be our sheet anchor when we
launched our little bark upon the
troubled waters of journalism.
The motto we then adopted mav
have seemed boastful, but we
have lived up to it.we have ever
maintained an honest straight-
forward course, we have ever
advocated the cause of truth, of
right, and of duty, and have
never shrunk from lifting our
voice against whatwas evil, and
unrighteous and unmanly, we
have ever protected the weak
against the oppressor, we have
ever advocated the adoption of
measures which appeared to be
for the public weal. All these
we pledged ourselves to do, and
we le&ve it to the public to judge
if we have been faithful.
When "The Tribune" was es-
tablished, the world was at
peace, the only rivalry that ex-
isted among nations, was in the
legimate pursuit of a mastery by
trade and commerce, but now
evil influences are at work, a
monarch's voice cried, 'Havoc'!
and let slip the dogs of war;"
the eartli no longer yields her
increase to th- peaceful husband-
man, but is ploughed with shot
and shell, and sowed with dra-
gons teeth instead; no longer do
the merchant princes of the earth
freight their Argosies with car
goes from their factories in ex-
change for the rich treasures of
other lands.
Sorry indeed are we that such
horrors must be brought to our
readers, but the necessity that
knows no law but that of supply
and demand compels us. We all
cannot go to the front, and there
is no use to fret about it. But
we can impro^our minds at
all events by reading about what
others are doiflg thcr?,* there-
fore beginning on Saturday next
the a 1st inst., we purpose to
double the size of the "Tribune"
and on all succeeding Saturdays
while the necessity exists, as al-
so to commemorate our entering
upon another decade of exis-
tence.
We shall endeavour to give
jyouofour 'best' and to make the
I new venture as acceptable and
; profitable to you in the future as
we trust it has been in the past.
We want to impress upon you
that it is your paper, one that
you can command at all times,
yours to use reasonably and ju-
diciously, for the expression of
your views and opinions in a
calm and moderate way, but
never for indulgence in person-
alities ; and to use as your' ad-
verting medium.
It shall be our aim to give you
a paper that you can read with
pleasure and understand with
j profit, and understanding, you
I will find that-you cannot do
without it.
I Let us become mutually in-
Iterested: be as loyal and true
[to us,as we shall be to you; and
(let usall humbly and fervently
pray that the day will soon come
"When Peace shall over all
the earth,
Her final splendours fling :
No longer hosts encount'ring
hosts
Shall crowds of slain deplore.
Thev hang the trumpet in the
hall,
And study war no more."
:o:
POST OFFICE NOTICE.
The Post Office will be open
for the delivery of Mails on
Sunday should the "Frances E"
arrive before 5 p.m. If she ar-
rives after that hour, the deliv-
ery will commence at 7 a.m. on
Monday.
:o:
S. S. "Seguranca" left New
York at 3 p.m., vesterdav, with
Mails, 48 Passengers, and 6000
Barrels Cargo.
:o:
The Motor-Boat "Frances F..-'
left Miami at noon to day with 3
pa*se:ip*rs 27 Rags Mails and b
supply of Newspapers.
IN THE SUPREME COURT
. The Cate <>f Eady vs Johnson
will be continued on M'.nd;iy next
the 16th inst. at 10.30, and will
probably be Sub Curia a couple of
days more.
:o:
Mrs. A H. Nelsen will con-
duct a 3ible study at the Seventh
Day Adventist enapelat 7 o'clock,
Sunday night Nov. 15th. Subject;
Why 1 Believe The Bible. A
cordial welcolm is extended to
all.
THE I. C. S.
(INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL
OF correspondence;
Education by Correspondence
Edison Phonograph suppplies
conversational recordsin
Spanish, French, Italian and
GermanThese records act as
schoolmaster, teach without
mistakes. Made by professors of
the language.The Scholar listens
to the record, at the same time
repeating the lesson from a book
He repeats the lesson in the
Phonographic blank reels for
the purpose of taking the re
cord furnished bv the I. C. S.
and these reels are sent to the
School for examination, when
faults are detected and explain-
ed in a letter from the profess >r
to the student.
Mr H. C. Christie has intro
duced the above system here
with advantage to those who
have availed themselves of the
method. "There is no royal
road to learning" is as old as
the hills but the road is in much
better condition than when
uesed in all the centuries preced-
ing this 20th. It has been tho-
roughly graded macadamized,
and tarviad, so that the wheels
of the gods run smoothly over
it without jolt "
The svsteni of teaching is one
that recommends itself to all
those who desire a maximum
proficiency in languages especi-
ally, with only a minimum
amount of study. It is a known
fact that the chief desideratun
is to obtain a correct pronuncia-
tion. One may read and write
a language to the benefiit of ones
stlf and for others, but the
spoken language is what is of
the greatest value.
It is impossible within the
limit of this review to detail the
method by which languages are
acquired by this system, but Mr.
Christie is genenlly arou k',
and will be glad to convey the
information.
See him His terms are mod-
erate \ndthough not an Ai
Philologist, he will convince
you of the mavellous adaptation
of the Phonograph to t h e
acquisition of almost every
known language.
:o:
November 5, 10:4
Nassau, N. P
Mr. Editor
Sir: .
We wat^h with admiration
the-splendid valour of our men
now fighting at the front,*we
also note that some of them are
from our own Bahamian soil. It
is that inherent bravery of all
British subjects that has enabled
us in the past aw will in the
present struggle to succeed
against the worngs that need
resistance, and to wteft for the
amelioration or betterment of
humanity as a whole and not
for the selfish motive of any in-
dividual sect or creed. Booker
T. Washington said some time
ago"in order to keep a man
forever down in the gutter you
must stay there with him" and
I believe Mr. Editor that spirit
of keeping your brother in the
gutter lias been uppermost in the
minds of a good many fellow
Bahamians which has not onl\
driven away some of our best
agriculturists and working citi"
rent, but those that remain are
at this crisis facing poverty and
want I do rejoice to know that
the prevailing conditi n of things
has brought about an awaken
ing and that our eyes are, open
to see that we are only as dead
fish floating upon the water
going whither the tide carry us.
We shudder when we notice the
disrespect our leaders have
shown us in the past how our
wishes have been side tracked
nevertheless we will patiently
wait and with the ptcfcnt un-
rest begin from now i^ftbilize
our forces and'to put ;it its head
as general that spirit of Rritish
bravery that has been on fur-
lough a number of \ears from
us. The various armies before
leaving for the front were told
what was their mission they
were to go and fight together
with the French against a com-
mon enemy who believed in
might to crush right. The facts
were told to the men who no
doubt long saw and knew what
they were about.
In like manner we shall be
occasionally from now until
when "the day" arrives be ever
reminded of the true rases which
plunged the Bahamas In the
year 1914 into such a financial
panic. Why should the fall in
S|xngc and sisal so seriously
hamper our prosperity Let ur
for a moment stop and po.idet
over two enormous sums that
could have been far betterspens
to alleviate (hepresent sufferers
on our islands. "35000 to the
Florida Fast Coast Companv
JTlOOOO to the War Kelijgf Fund
Total "3.soo If this suj^ were
loaned out with reasonable in-
terest to the many land holders
in proportion with, say at least
a quarter the value of their land




-*-
nd by careful supervision and
.guidance the government un-
til the principle if as returned
would have been Tar more pro-
fitably spent, But ah! I hear
somebody saflMfeat will lift too
many out of me gutter at once
But even if it did would not the
circulation of money be of bene-
fit to both me and you. Some
will say what's the use. I will
point them to the bravery of
their British brothers now fight-
ing at the front although many
have fallen yet they are never
discouraged but with persever-
ance and patience they are suc-
ceeding daily in their endeav-
ours Again others will say we
have no soil not even as much
as will cover the surface of
Barbadoes but by looking around
you and observing the luxuriant
growth of vegetation should
really convince you that state-
ment is not true Mr Kditor I
have before me a sugar cane
about fourteen feet high without
the blades its circumference at
the l halfinclies.lt came out of a tann
from the Grand Bahamas which
1 had the prBclege some months
ago of witnessing hundreds of
sugar canes that looked quite
pleasing to tlfc^rye and delicious
to the palate,n have also seen
the sugar cane thrive well on
other Oul Islands and by having
a central factory I see no reason
why suL'ar should not be one of
our staple industries. Bananas
can be seen by the bunches in
many yards, the friut bring the
farmers of Jamacia a handsome
inome why not here which is
nearer to the United States. Co
coanuts are seen in abundance
on, some of the Out Islands, On
ions and Irish potatoes can Le
grown her like in the Bermudas
We have forests filled with pine
wixid and Mahogany which Is-
lands like Barbadoes and others
are not blest in having but sir
we have allowed oge trust to
monopolize this industry and
have discouraged and foolishly
driven away other financiers
who vvould have employed hun-
dreds of men they ali would
have found a read" market for
th er luinher in the sister colo
nies who now import lumber all
the way froml lalifax By travell
log Mr Kditor to the various
Out Island^Jtou will notice that
all the sofwis not used up nor
could it be to again be jestiliz -
ed and made to yield the same
abundance of foodstuff as it did
in the good old days but on ac-
count of finance, roads and oth-
'er inconveniences have and are
imigrating to other fields
and pastures.new. If the Govern-
ment were to encourage these
people the Bahamas would soon
be transformed into a Garden of
Eden, but now the door of op-
portunity is closed against us,
our leaders will not harken un-
to criase nevertheless we will pa-
tiently wait and send men tore-
present us who not only give su
a hypocritical visit at Election
time but men who thoroughly
understand our sufferings and
will not hamper but rather en-
courage other industries besides
sponge so that we will not find
ourselves in this predicament that
we have been unwillinglyplung
ed into by our thoughtless lead-
ers in the year 1914.
VOX POPULI
Nassau, N. P.
Nov. 14th, 1914.
To the Editor of the Tribune:
Dear Sir:
1 did not seek a controversy
when 1 sent you a letter sug-
gesting a few names for the un
named streets, lanes and alleys
of Nassau. Neither did I expect
to be abused and called ill names
or considered Non Compus Men
tis by any one.
I saw in vour paper that the
Hon. Board of Public Works
asked for suggestions from the
Public; seeing it was overlooked,
1 thought I would venture a few
names. I assure you I did mv
best and I know the Board will
get more out of my suggestions
than Banbury Lane's. By the by,
thology and Euphony as I mus1:
presume he thinks I am a My--
t h o I o g i s t and a Euphonon
like himself.
I leave it to your readers to
judge if any sound could be
more agreeable to the ear than,
Cherry, Lemon, Orange, Sap-
podilla, Pear and Melon Lanes,
etc.
I am still (even in Banbury Lane)
ONE INTERESTED.
-:o:-
if he had taken as his Norn de
Plume, Cranberry Lane it would
have been equal to Strawberry
Lane, which I forgot to" put. in,
thanks to Banbury. 1 never heard
of Banberries in the Bahamas.
Now Sir. I have not been to
Africa, but I have travelled a
little and in New York City
there are streets named such as
I suggested, and I have walked
them; viz. Pine Street, Cedar
Street, etc. In Philadelphia
more still, Cherry Street, Apple,
Peach, Orange, Pear, etc. In
England we read of Piccadilly
Square. I arh sure that Sap-
podilla Bane would sound as
well as Picadilly Lain
Prom private conversation I
heard the Board did not want
names of persons or places; they
had enough of those. I am still
interested and would like to hear
a few of* your correspondent's
definite names from his My-'
Latest War News
November 14th 1914.
PiOKBD UP
British military experts say
that Germany is now rushing
men to the eastern part of Ger-
many from France and Belgium
for the purpose of checking for-
midable advances of the Rus-
sians, and that they will endea-
vour to maintain the defense of
their lines pending a decision in
the East.
The violence of the fighting
in Prance and Belgium has ceas-
ed, the Allies driving the Ger-
mans back across the Yser, al-
though the Germans claims to
have been successful and having
captured 1800 prisoners
Paris reports that the Allies
posi ions are now only a few
yards from the border where
wire entanglements protect the
Germarflines.
A German submarine has been
rammed and sunk by a French
torpedo boat.
Berlin reports the safe return
to several aviators after sailing
over Sheerness and Harwich.
Beilin reports that the Aus-
trians are holding back the Rus-
sians while Vienna reports oti-
cially acknowledge that the Aus-
trians have evacuated Eastern
Galicia.
British casualties of all kinds
up to October 31st are given as
57.000.
Secretary Bryan annouces the
evacuation of Vera Cruz by
United States troops on No
ember 23rd.
Villa has ordered an attack
on Tampico.
OOVRRNMKNT PKKSS
November 14th 1914.
London :The centre of gra-
vity of the war has shifted to
East Prussia though there is still
hard fighting in West Flanders.
In East Prussia the Wussiansare
developing a great enveloping
movement and are engaged
with the Germans along a wide
curve of 150 miles.
The Germans have apparent-
ly checked their retreat in Po-
1 -^
land and are now counter-
attacking.
The Germans must allow
East Prussia to be over run a
second time or bring up rein-
forcements, but it is considered
that they can hardly weaken
the army along the Polish fron-
tier as that would leave Posen
and Silecia open to invasion.
The Allies are hopeful that
the enemy will attempt to re-
lieve East Prussia at the ex-
pense of the armies in Belgium
and France. According to the
Daily Telegraph Emperor Nich-
! olas told a deputation of Moscow
merchants that fears of peace
negotiations before the enemy
was completely crushed were
baseless.
Washington :Villa assumes
the offensive against Carranza
and has already occupied San
Luis Potosi and will attack
Tampico.
The American government are
prepared to take American re
fugees aboard ships lying in
Tampico harbour.Carranzaisat
Cordoba where he has establish-
ed headquarters and a tem-
porary capital. Villas objective
is Mexico City.
Washington:Columbia and
Ecuador are violating neutrality
laws assert France and Great
Britain, by allowing wireless
communication with German
warvessels.
Washington:Government
ownership of Telephone and
Telegraphs will be advocated by
Postmaster General Burleson, in
his report.
New York: -The Cotton Ex-
change will re open Monday and
the Stock Exchange on January
1st is the indication. Free and
unrestricted trade is to be con-
ducted by the Cotton Exchange.
Washington: Efforts fail to
float the cotton loan and much
depends on Boston and Phi la
delphia bankers to assure its
success. Their co operation
would make certain the raising
of $96,000,000.
Atlanta, Georgia:Two mil
lion dollars is spent annually in
the United States on alcohol.
Special to the Nassau Guardian
New York, Nov. 14.
The Germans entry into Dix-
mude was marked by terrible
lighting and slaughter- The Ger-
man dead piling up under water
form a footing for thcifinfantry.
Four German aeroplanes were
wrecked ina sky battle at Ypres,
eight occupants being killed
The Germans have suffered
losses in Flanders.
M


5*
.ijA :
.

which he might ofjfer. The Ger-
mans first approached Belgium
with the nauseating offer of a
bribe. She disclaims any hostile in-
tention toward Belgium, and if
Belgium will consent "to take an
attitude of friendly neutrality
toward Germany," ihe Imperial
governor engages, when peace is
declared, to guarantee the king-
dom and its possession, and to
evacuate its territory; it will pay
cash down for whatever is taken
for the support of its troops, and
will indemnify Belgium for the
damage done. Wholly indifferent
to its own obligations of honor,
entered into the international
treaty of neutrality.Germany seeks
to corrupt Belgium's honor, for
Jhere could be no such thing as
"lriemlly neutrality" on the part
of Belgium toward an invasion. In
assuming such an attitude Belgium
would have been guilty of an act
of hostility toward the other sig-
natory powers.The treaty 'and in.
ternational law demanded of her
resistance to the extent of her pow-
er against any invasion whatever.
But the German offer was not
made up altogether ..f soft and persuasion. If Belgium should
assume an attitude#of hostility to-
ward t h e German troops and
resist their advance upon her ter-
ritory, the imperi.il government
would make no engagement but
would leave the Utcr det"rmirH-
tion of the relations between the
two state* to the decision of arms.
Surely there lies a plain threat of
C mquest and annexation.There the
Prussian spirit showed through in
all its candid brutality. In all the
diplomatic interchanges of nations
a more revolting commuication
from one power to another would
be difficult to find.
THE UNITED STATES
STANDS TO LOSE
BILLIONS OF DOLLARS f
THROUGH LOSS OF ITS
EUROPEAN COMMERCE
More than four fifths of our Euro-
pean commerce is threatened with
parahsis by the European war.
Outofanaggregate trade with Eu-
rope of $2,382,101 in the last fiscal
yeai.our commerce with Great Bri-
tain,Germany,France, Russia, Aus.
tria-Hungary.Belgium, Servia, and
Montenegro totaled $1,931,876,492
This leaves only $449,192,072 for
the rest of Europeand much of
that is paralized also by the general
demoralyzation of European indus-
tfy-
On the export side of the statis-
tics, we sent la-t year to the na-
tion n..w at w-if a total of $1,213
921,415 out of a total export to
Europe of $ 1.186,498,72^ On the
import side, we received from the
nations involved, in this death
struggle $719,988,000. while our
entire imports from all of Europe
were offly $895,692,868. '
The biggest commerce both
ways.of course,was with Great Bri-
tain. Our exports to the United
Kingdom, inducing Gibraltar and
Malta, totaled $595,271,958. Our
imports from European Great Bri-
tain were $293,661,304, more than
one third of our entire European
commerce. To Germany we export-
ed $344,794,276 and received in
return $189,919,136. Our exports
to France totaled $159,818,924 and
our imports from that country were
$141,446,262. It is interesting to
note that next in our European
commerce comes neither Russia
nor Austria, but little Belgium. Tc
that nation we sent $61,219,894,
and from it we imported $41,035.-
532-
Here are figures to show how
hard a few industries are afferted.
We exported to the United King
dom last year $26,015,351 worth
of wheat and $ 13,805 674'of wheat
flour. To Germany we sent $ 10-
604, 692 of wheat and $801,171 of
flour. To Belgium went ^2,479,-
315 of wheat, We also sent $19,-
380,347 of wheat to Holland, but
most of this r*ally went to Ger-
many via Ho'lan.l ports. The big-
gest single item of exportation
was a total of $231,817,865 of cot-
ton to the United Kingdom.
The biggest field now offerer' us
to make up for this heavy 1 >ss lies
in the markets.of South America.
The nations there are among the
best customer* of Kumpe, and will
turn naturallv to the United Mates
if we will but meet them hall way.
According t" the latest avaiRbe
figures.compiled by the Pan Amer-
ican Union, ihe ten nations of
South AmericaArgentina, Boli-
via, Brazil, Chile, Uraguay and
VenezuelaarmuaIIv irrport pro-
ducts valued at $961,000,000. Of
this there ronio from Eorope pro-
ducts valued at $660,000,000.
While Great Britain supplies pro-
ducts "of this tota to the vajue of
approximately $273,000,000, Gr
many, which is completely cut off
by the war, supplies $180,000,000;
France, $84,000,000; Italy $54"
000,000; Belgium $ 47,o<>o,0"o;
Austria Hungary $ S.ooc.ooo;
Netherlands, $8,000,000; Switzer-
land 6,000,000,and other European
countries lesser sums.
The average imports from the
United States of these ten countries
of south America amount approx-
imately to $155,000,000.
OVER
1500
Pairs
Boots snd Shoes
being added to an already
replete stock
Williams the Shoeman
is again opening up one of
those Sample Lots of Boots
and Shoes in a limited
number of sizes as follows
viz:
Men's Boots and Shoes in sizes
from 6 to 7J
Women's Boots and Shoes
111 sizes from 3$ to 4J
Misses Boots and Shoes in sizes
from 12 J to 1
The advantage in purchas-
ing from Ms lot is (as others
who have purchased before
can attest) that >ou can se-
lect the sizes from a very
large variety of up-to-date
styles at prices considerably
cheaper than regular lines
kept in stock.
CALL EARLY
and secure your size at
WILLIAMS' WHOLESALE
AND RETAIL
SHOE ESTABLISHMENT
277 and 289 Bay Street tit v.
Come and have
your EYES
Notice
THIS is to inform my Patrons
and the Public in General
that I have opened my Public
Black Smith Shop; and am now
ready to do anything in t e line ol
General repair or new w .k Horse
Shoeing Specially. All \ orjc done
Mechanically.
P. A. HUYLKR.
Notice
WE would call the atten-
tion of our friends in Nas-
sau and on the OUT ISLANDS
to the following prices on lum-
ber which will go into effect
from tO-dav.
All ROUGH lumber up to 8 ft.
6/j per too. All DRESSED
; lumber up to 8 ft. 8/4 per 100.
All ROUGH and DRESSED to
16ft. 10/5 per loo. ANYTHING
over 16 ft. 126 ppr j0o. (above
up to 8 int. wide)
These prices are for CASH
absolutely and being WAR
; prices are made to help the pub-
: He and ritr subject to change
I without notice.
The Bahmnu Timber Co. Ltd
, Kerosene
1602
IN New 50 gallon Galvaniz-
ed Iron Drums at i8cts
per Gallon.
In 10 gallon Cans at aocts
per. Gallon.
Drums and Cans returnable
Full particulars at Office
"Frances E.," Nassau N. P.
C. C. SAUNDERS*
- !i
STOP-LOOK
LISTEN!
We have secured Mr. James
Queen from the United Stales, 1
a thorough OpticiiJ who will
remain here for the eMire winter
Mon
We are therefore enabled to
offer for ONE MONTH only
a 32s.
pair of either PINCE-NEZ
or SPECTACLES, 14. carat
gold filled 00 lenses, soft cable
wires so that they will not
cut the ears, aid "warranted '
for twenty years
for 8s.
Also English Pebble lenses
warranted 20 years without
changing for a little higher
price.
'Sfc
^(s^^ [ ''" '' under the
new process FREEof charge
Hee.de.ches, Dizziness and nil
troubles of the EYE can be cured
0.1 once. We refund the money
after a months trial of the"glass-
es, if not satisfactory, or change
them free of charge.
Persons desiring mv services
can notify me atwte City
Pharmacy, when 1 Trial I call
on them at thru residences.
Without EXTRA CHARGE.
ON ACCOUNT OF HARD TIMES
Mr. Queen, Agent for ilie
Walth.im Watch Co., in or-
der to introduce the best
known Watch in the world
will offer a 11 carat gold fill-
ed, 20 years guaranteed, Ladys
or Gentleman's open or closed
face
Watch, Waltham or Admiral
movement for 2, on the
, Instalment Plan of Is. or
1 more per week at the Pur-
| chaser's Option.
CALL AT ONCE and see the
SAMPLES and learn our Terms
ssf'Ibest Watches are s..| World at from \ to i> eftdfc
ir YOU MISS THIS CHANCE
YOU MISS THE CHANCE OF
A LIFETIME.
Get Wise before it is too Late.
I CANE SY8UP
j Can be had at T. M. flfcowles
jat 1 os. stg. per Tin
GOOD and THICK.
Fast Bay Street


MIS5/HG- TSSVS


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