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Publication began at 6.15 p.m. Zhe Ctibune Tuesday. November 10, 1914. L TURKEY AND CYPRUS. The full text of the King's Proclamation relating to trading with the enemy, will be found in the "Nassau Guardian" of the 7th instant. Another proclamation informs us that, War lias been declared between England and the Ottoman a Turkish Km pi re. It has occurred to the corn mentatnr who fills the editorial chair of "The Tribune" that, its readers, and the commonaJtvin general are satiated with war news, and its necessary concomitants which have poured in an overwhelming flood upon us since the 4th of August. The < unvnt and principal events have been presented tn us through the mecfcja of tin; telegraph first, and second, by the leading journals of England and America, and in such quick secession that we have had hardly time to digest one batch, before we are served wj th another, and yet another, throughout the twelve hours of daylight. N<> reasonable man can expect more for the money; the censors have supplied us with all that we ought to know, with all that they thmk is necessarv for us to know ; and we think that thev have done and are vet doine wisely and well, the public lias had a "square meal,therefore, we will step aside for a while, and see how it will work out. Medical men tell us that, mod erate abstinence from food i^ beneficial to our physical na tuies, and this is a fact recognised as applicable oqifMlv to our mental requirements by all f-ngaged in educational work ; hence the hours of roe#ss, and the longer vacations. |„ f a(:1 t ]| those who are engaged in men tal labour in the higher walks of life, will knovv the beneficial results which follow a cessation Irom mental application, how that after a vacation of doing nothing, the j.rh-.l mind is rejuvenated au/l resumes its work with renewed energy and better work is the*result ; therefore wv •'re going to tal:.a siesta of a sort in the hope that we too will brighten up. The Turkish or Otoman Empire is so called, not because it is once more to be "sat down upon,"but because it was founded by Othoman or Osman I. (reigned 1288—1306.^ He established it in Asia Minor and took the title of Sulton. The seat of empire was transferred to Constantinople in 1453 on the conquest of the Byzantine Empire. The generic name of the people composing the population is Turks, and the Empire is popularly known as Turkev. A J J great deal can be said of the "unspeakable Turk, but as we are not writing bis history, suffice it to say that, like all other human beings, he has two sides, a good, and a bad, but bis history written by many others, and referred to lately by Wm. F. Doty, Esq., U. S. Consul, in a verv interesting lecture, unmis takably shows that according to Western standards, the bad predominates, sadly to his unspeakable disadvantage. He happily can be cured, but in the process lie will be wiped out. and that part of the world over which he casts bis baneful shadow, will begin with a "clear slate." So we leave him, and turn to Cyprus. We do not at tempt to prognosticate, but we think that he will "tumble out of the frying pan into thtlire." It may be as the boy in the street says, "There'll be no Turkey this Christmas." But let us go on to Cyprus, and tell of it to our readers, and our people whose knowledge <>f it is very vague: for since the receipt of the telegram reporting its ocupation by Turkey, we have been beseiged with questions concerning it, therefore we venture on this apparent didacticism. Cyprus is an island in the Mediterranean, and lies in its glistening waters o| deep azure, between the island of Ciete, and the coast of Syria distant on the east some 60 miles. Cyprus is that island mentioned in the Acts of the Apostles to which llanabas took Mark and sailed after his "sharp contention" with Paul. In the space of three thousand years, it had seen many invaders and many conquerors, until the whole island was Cover ed with the ashes of many civilizations. It was held by tKe Saracam for three hundred years, and wrested from them by Richard Coeur de Leon-. It had a renew al of its former glory for nearly a centuay when Ft belonged to Venice the prideofthe sea. It afterwards fell into the hands of the Turks and rapidly decayed. After the Crimean War, Lord Beaconsfield by a master stroke of policy got a lease of it from Turkey. But England has not found it quite a good bargain. At, first after the occupation there was a boom in "real estate" hut there is an enemy more to be feared than the Turks. The English government spent in one year,£35,000 in lighting — the locusts—However like the bull-dog that she is. she holds it, although it is not a healthy is land. It is in the track of corn merce to the eastern shores of the Mediterranean and there is, always the chaoce of its finding a place in the Imperial economy of England,and wauchanevent say those "in the know"? she might undertake a railway to valley of the Fup'iates, by which it would descend to the head of the Persian Gulf This would make a more direct course lo India than that by the Red v and thus England would have "two strings to her bow," The Suez Canal and the Railway. England then now occupies it. (Provided Turkey has not annexed it) But here the question arises, Can she annex it, having leased it? It perhaps depends upon the terms of the lease. We are not sufficiently wise to answer. It requires a lawyer to answer it. Suppose we ask His Honour the Chief Justice orthe Attorney General, While England occupies it. she is responsible for the government, and to maintain the Civil authority she must needs keep up a considerable military force—In a way Cyprus is of interest to us, because several of those who were once in the public service of this Colony whom we know have been stationed at Cyprus Capt. 11, l.earmonth is now there as Chief Commandant of Police. Sir Charles Anthony Kin 1 ,' Herman was therein 1907as High Commissioner, and VVil liani P.ees Davis as Attorney General also in 1907. SPECIAL. From and after this date, the following Shops will be Depots for the sale of THE TRIBUNE, viz : T. G. JOHNSON, Corner Dowdeswell and Armstrong Streets. V. R. I NCR A HAM, Market Street, South. F. QARINER, Comer Bay and Pitt Streets. Nov. 7th, '91^. • i 1 S. S. Seguranca arrived in New York, at 7 a.m Sunday, The time foralMing Mails per "Frances E." has been extended to 8a m Thursday Nov 12,1914. ELIEF FUND. WAR RE I Previously acknow ledged £ 2 7! 10 u NicollsTown, Andros Isld.,\Ir Ken & others, Bird Cay, Berry Isld. 6 1 John \. Howe 200 Lord Dunmore Chapter Daughters of Empire, Harbour la. 700 Mrs Winter.Bullock's Harbour 2 o Inhabitants of Long Island 56 o 1 Amoimt to Nov. 8th. 191 |. £2780 19 2 — :o:— DISEASED CITRUS FRUIT IN FLORIDA In view of a disease among the Citrus Fruit Trees fn Flori da, The Governor has prohi bi ted the importation, either directly or indirectly of any Ci'rus Flint Trees, or Citrus Fruit from Florida. A TEUTON AND AMITON "Who is Von Moltke ? "Don't vou know '." "Is in. that old Von Moltke ?" "Why no, this is his son" "Of course, the old man died in 1891." "All known is, that he is a German General." These,and many other expres %  ions of a kindred class are such as one ina\ hear every day and all that is known of General Von Molt c "on '.he street" is sum med up inthe last of the series. Suppose I tell you "some more," as the children say. Count Helmuth Von Moltke is the Nephew of the famous field-marshal who was in command in 1H70 71, at the time of the franco Prussian War; and as chief of staff isciedited With the disposition and direction of the German forces at the outbreak of the war. He is four years older t h a n his French antagonist General Joffre. He looks wh.it he is. typical product, of German mih tnrism, face like a maajf but not altogether unplesaing.gyd, formal, official He is,or rather wasa "Kaiserman;" that is to say, was for J



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. many years, a favourite of the Kaiser, holding his position by a combination of favour and ability, but his igtL is no longer in the ascendanC it has grown dim, he has fallen under the Kaiser's displeasure for a lack of his farmed*^ I ity --so they say— When his uncle died in 1891, he became A. D C, to the Kaiser, and has been chief of the General staff of the army since Feburarv 1904. He has not shown himself to be a great military genius. Main' believe him to be a less able strategist than General Von Der (Jolt/. His promotion to chief of stall caused a great deal of unfavourable comment at the time,which lias however dissapcared with time, and the evidence that he is able to h a n d 1 e an extraordinary amount of work. Sir John Ruseworth Jellicoe. "Yea I can tell you something ai >ait him." 11" is fifty-five yearsold and has* I ntv-two years service in the Navy. As a lieu tenant or left-tenant ? which is it? Anyhow, he was present at the bombardment of Alexandria—and at the bj-jtile of Telel-Kebri was one of the naval brigade. When the Victoria was rammed by the G^mperdoion in the MtditerraneMi he was seriously ill with Malta fever, and conlinedin the Hospital quarters of the Victoria. Sir John Tvron, and more than 600 officers and men lost their lives, but he escaped. "How?" heexcl lined recently, in speaking of the incident "I don't quite know myself." Shortly before the "ramming" his temperature was 103, and when he was fisbcd out and landed on b >ard the rescuing ship, it w.is normal and normal it rein lined. I la as sent to China in command <>f ,-\ naval brigade in 1898 to help subdue the Boxer Rebellion, and later was chief of staff to Admiral Seymour during the attempted relief of the* Pekin Legation in 1900. He was severely wounded by a bullet in his lungs at Teitsang and when he recovered,The Ger manEmptror conferred 117ion him the Order of the Red Eagle a -id presented him with iw irdl for his great service to the world In general, and to those Germans in particular who were involved in the ChinesflAebellion. He returnf(Tfrom China an invalid and was married in 1902 to Florence Gwendoline Cavzer. .wonder if that name is pronounced like Kaiser? Oh! the irony of fate. Decorated once by that Emperor, who would now gladly thrust him through with the sword which he himself presented for savingGerman life which he is now trying to destroy. Admiral Jellicoe is regarded more than any other officer in the British Navy as responsible for the marvelous progress in the naval gunnery in the English fleet. Qela va sans dire. Said a wounded German sailor to his Nurse; 'Do all the English sailors aim as well as those on the "Amphion?" "Yes, all she said." Then that's the end of us" said he. He is a sea fighter, and in other time would be called something not quite so euphoni ous, tho' quite as "Drakey." In 1907-8, Rear-Admiral of the Atlantic fleet ; Lord Commissioner of the Admiralty and Controller of the Navy in 1908-10. From 1911-12 Commander of the Second Squadron of the Home Fleet, and on the 23rd July last, appointed Vice-Admiral and Commander-in-Chief of the Home fleet, and to him was sent that momentous telegram when England declared war "Capture flie enemy or destroy them." Those who are watching him, speak of him as Nelson Reditus. | "MR. FOSTER." — :o: — Latest War News RADIOGRAMS November 10th 1914. London November gth. Governor, Bahamas. November gth, Press Bureau Report*! In North, enemy appears concentrated actively in the re. gion of Ypres, but we hold our own. Progress has been made round Soiss ins. Russian cavalry has penetrated the German province of P >sen destroying the railway at Pleschen Russians are advancing on East Prussian front. Between October 23rd and November 4th the Russians left wing captured nearly 19,000 prisoners and many guns on Thourn Cracow front and a further 1 2.000 prisoners in the recent fighting Ofl the San River. The Admiralty report successful operation against Fac, in the Persian Gulf. About 400 jpore rebels have been captured in South Africa. November 10th 1914. PICKED UP British ships attacked the German right but were quicklj driver, off by artillery fire. Russian victories appear remarkable, advancing rapidly against Germans and Austrians, yet Germany continues to withdraw troops from the East to send to Western area where they are concentrating every ounce of strength possible in a final attempt to break the Allies lines. Germans have generally as sumed the offensive in France and Belgum but the Allies claim to have repulsed them. Carranza refuses to obey the Aguas Calicntas convention and has ordered it dissolved. He says that if the convention is afraid of Villia he will oust him. American marines have been landed at Acapulco, Mexico, at the request of its inhabitants, November 10th 1914. London:—In the fiercest fighting of the war the attempt of the Germans to break the Allies line was defeated and theie have been desperate re verses of the Austro German army. (iermany is rushing reinforcements to the West in an effort to break down the British French Belgium resistance. No decisive engagement has been fought along the front but both sides claim gains. There are no new developments in the near East but engagements are being foufcht between Russian and Turkish frontier guards. Many young Englishmen are enlisting for service. There was great enthusiasm at the inauguration of the new I.ord Mayor of London. The British cruiser Glasgow which engaged the German squadron lias entered the Btraits of (censored) Washington: —The situation in Mexico now has a grave as pect unless Carranza at once recongnizes the ne v provisional president, who will be sworn in At an early date. The new president will con cede to the United States the point on the evacuation of Vera Cruz by American marines Washington : —North Caro lina has won the case which* was over the boundary line between her and Tennessee and involved 40.000 acres of land on which both assessed taxes. Washington:—Three more states are added to the list of those of already quarantined against suspected cases of footand-mouth disease. The states are Delaware, New Jersey and Rhode Island. Norfolk. Virginia:—The Unit ed States destroyer Paulding which has been ashore at Lynn Haven for two weeks was float ed today by a wrecking company, apparently uninjured. November 10th 1914. London joth 1914. Governor, Bahamas. November 10th, following from Press Bureau: German cruiser Emden driven ashore and burnt after a sharp action with H. M. S. Sydney. Her losses in personnel very heavy. All possible assistance was given to the survivors. Our casualties were three killed and fifteen wounded. The German cruiser Konigsburg was discovered hiding in sltbal water in the Rufigi River opposite Mafia Island. Pending the operations for her capture the only navigable channel has been blocked and she is now imprisoned. Ex cepting for the German squadron now off Chile the whole Pacific and Indian Oceans are now clear of the enemy's warships. The French government re ports progress between Dixmude and the Lys district. There has been a distinct to the enemy in Alsace Russians advance on thj Polish frontier continues. Two Turkish diyi sions were defeated by Russian troops in Asia Minor. (Signed) HARCOURT (The Sidney is a light cruiser of 56.000 tons) LOST O N Monday evening last at the corner of Market and Ray Streets aLADY'SBLUE WOOLEN SWEATER COAT. It was seen to be picked up. Reward offered for return to "TRIBUNE OFFICE" WANTED Ai OWCE 2 BRIGHT BOYS to 'deliver Southern District paper* Apply 'TRIBU\V OFFICE



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The Kaiser can only convince the world of his innocence of the crime of his Potsrl-im camarilla by giving the wot Id the text of anv advice hegsv? the Austrian officials. He has produced his telegiam to the Czar. Where are those he presumably sent to Frances Joseph or Count Berchlold? Where are the instructions he pave his Ambassador or Foreign Minister? It insignificant that on the same day SatOnof telegraphed to Count Benckendorff. "My conversations with the Ger man Ambassador confirm my impression that Germany is i.ither l.ivnurahle to the uncompromising attitude adopted by ^ustria. And he adds, and history will vindicate him in the conclusion, ili.it "The Berlin Cabinet, which might have been able to airest the whole development of this crisis seems lo exercise no act ion on its 1 he Geri'i in \mb ISSfld'il informed Sir Edward Grey lhnl ibe German Government would endeavour to inlluence Austria aflei taking Melgrade, and Sertian temioivin 'he region of the frontier, to promise not to advance lufil.ei while liie Powers endeavour'd to arrange, that Si-rvia should five satisfaction sufficient 10 pacifv Austria but if Germany evei exercised anv such pressure upon Vienna no evidene* of it hat ever been given to the j.'ffWd. Certainty, it was mt veiy effective and Foi the r isons mentioned it is impossible to conclude that the advi< e of 'i rniany, if in '_'ood faith, would not have been' followed by in w< ilcernlly, (Tn I)' eonlinuedi Good Morning'! We Are Introducing American Silk A III.-I u.in C.ishinrre American Cotton-Lisle HOSIERY STOP-LOOK LISTEN! We have secured Mr. J&mei Queen from the United Stages, e. thorough Optician, who will remain here for the entire winter sen.son. We are therefore enabled to offer for ONE MONTH only a 32s. pair of either PINCE-NEZ or SPECTACLES, 14 carat gold filled 00 lenses, soft cable | wires so that they will not cut tbe ears, nod warranted for twenty years fop 8s. Also English Pebble lenses warranted 20 years without changing for a little higher price. Come and have your EYES tested under tlu in w processFR EE'^ c iar K c Hcadivches, Dizziness, and eJI troubles ol the EYK Sanitary Cool Reliable Wm. Hilton, 2f.O Bay St. Fruit of the Loom 56 in. at 7.I |)i;r yard. OVER Mapes Fertilizers / now carry in stock the following formulas: Pineapple.— It'll* been pi oven that this has no equal and a visit to fields using same will ronvu^you. Vegetable. —Now is the tirne>t to use this ;IIH1 increase your yield in Tomatoes, Potatoes, ( Miionand ;dl other vegetabledlby 100 per cent. Orange Tree.—To assist the growth of Staling Citrus Tree. Fruit and Win*.Increase the yield and growth of old Citrus trees. For further information and books on the tst ofthi 9C fertilizers, please apply to WALTE2 K. MOORE Ag.tt for Mdptt Perti ter in thr Hnkan V 1500 Pairs Boots and Shoes being added to an already replete stock Willii ms the Sh. teraan is again opening up one of those Sample Lots of Boots and Shoes in a limited number ol sizes as Follows viz : — Men Boots and Slroes in* titf-s from 6 to 7J VVomens Boots and Sh M S in sizes from J | t< 4 J Misses Moots and Shoes in SlZi S from 12} to 1 Tin' advantage in purchasing from this lot is (as others! Who have purchased before Johnson's Pondered Wax can attest) that you 1 an select ] """ n f l" o the sizes from a very large variety of up-to-date styles at %  prices considerably cheaper than regular lines kept in Johnson's Artistic Wood Finishes I Johnson's Propand Wax ;t •"•'m plate ti iih %  nrl r>"li-li lot all tun itun w.i.nt'vi.rk and fl""iv Johnson's Wool Dvc -f"i column: nl *\\ wo r, >>rMnr <;i I Johnson's Under La* i ">ri finish, veiv much Ml| eriw tn shell 01 vaiin'li Johnson's Fle.t Wood Finish 11 beautiful, irtistic, hand-rubbed effete without the aspeiiM ol rubbing, Johnlon'i Paite Wood Flllei (.it filling the emu anil pnref \ wood, prdpafinij it Im the finish fur hal FOR. SALE BY Chas. E. Alburv They have stood the test. Give rea. fool comlori ito rip. Never bee me loots M baggy. The snaps is knit inQot H'-sscI m GUARANTEED l-.r fineness, style. superiority ..i material and workmanship, Absolutely st linleai Will wear f> months I without holes, or new ones tree. OUR. SPECIAL OFFER to every one %  eiKlmi' us *I IK) in currency "i postal note, to covet advertising, and shipping cli. it-. 's. we will sci).I post paid, with written inarantee, backed by a five million dollar Company, either 3 Petir* of our 75c. value Ann rican --.IK II fiery, or 4 Pairs of our 50c. value American Cashmere Hosiery, or 4 Piiy of our 50c. Value, Amerii in CottonLiala Heaiery or h Pair* of Children's Hosiery. IK)NT DKLAT offo tspirei when dealer in your locality is (elected. THE INTERNATIONAL HOSIERY CO. P. O. Box 224 DAYTON. OHIO. U. S. A. movement for £2, on the]Stock. Instalment Plan of Is. or; • CALL EARLY more per week at the Purand secure your size at chaser's Option. | WILLIAMS' WHOLESALE CALL AT ONCE and aee the AND RETAIL SHOE ESTABLISHMENT 277 and 289 Bay Street City. w 1 %  "* V* tint! II SAMPLES and learn our Terms OTThese Watches an sold ;> 11 over the World at from £i to £o each. r YOU MISS THIS CHANCE YOU MISS THE CHANCE OF A LIFETIME. Get Wise before it is too Late. CANE SYRUP Can be had at T. M. Knowles a! KX. stg\ per Tin GOOD and THICK. Kast Hay Street Cosmopolitan HIGH SCHOOL ( ) pens on Monday. Oct. 5th in Aurora Hall on Charlotte Street. Notice mlfl call tin alienf our friends in NASSAU and "ii the OUT ISLANDS to the following prices on lum; ber whicrjsj will go into eSecl fi'nn to rlnv, All Ri >I'GH lumber up t8 ft. '6/.i per 100. All DRKSSIiir lumber up t> 8 fi. S | pi too. All UOI'GH and DRESSKD in i6ft5ro/5 pei ANYTHING over if' U. \J 6 [>er 100 mbove ti|) to H ins wide) These prices are for CASH i I solute!y and being VV \\i prices ate made to fit p the pul)in change For partit-ularf apply to i,.. nu | are subjed Prof. G. G. Coffin, head maswithout notice ter, or Mr. J. P. Simms. i The Bahamas Timber Co. Ltd. 1



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N'ulllvis addictua |urare in vciba maestri. Being bound to swear to the Dogma.* ii no Maeter_ VOL.X. Nassnu. N. P.. Bnhivmn.!i. Tuesday, November 10. 1 914 No. 254 3 CD > or M (0 CD 0) 0 (D L OILBRBT Di'lMcil, Editor and Proprietor. OFFICE!: 88-44 MABKVT STRRErT Nassau, .V. P., Bahamas •PIIONK 200. P. O. BOX lftt. PUBLISHED DAILY Monday, Wednesdf V and Friday— single Copy er line lorfirst insertion; thraa pence per line for second insertion ; ar.fi one penny per line for suhsquent insertions. Advertisements under eight lines 4s. if THE T \YISTER TWISTED Billy with the first of mail Went to twist a lions tail, "Watch the beast begin to run!" Billy said as he be^un. But when Billy got a grip, Then the lion 'Met her ri|>" And Ins tail went slowly curling Bat t'wai Hilly that went whirling. Anon. THE CASE OF THE DOUBLE ALLIANCE VS THE TRIPLE ENTENTE Argued By JAMES M. BECK Former Assistant Attorney General of the UNITED STATES (Continued) If Germany mad* any communicatlOO to U8trja in the interests of peace the texts has yet to be cliswlosed to the world. A word from Jllerlin to Vienna would have given 'the additional time which with sincerely pacific intentions, might have resulted in the preservation of peace. Germany, so far as the record discloses, never spoke that word. Contrast this attitude with that of Russia, whose Foreign Minister on the morning of July 25 offered "to stand aside and leave the question in the hands of England, France, Germany and Italy." [English "White Paper" No 17.] On July 25 Sir Edward Grey proposed that the four Powers (including Germany) should unite "In asking the Austnans and Rus sian Governments rot to cross the frontier and to give time for the four Rowers, acting at Vienna and St. Petersburg, to try and arrange matters. If (jermauy v ill adopt this view I feel strongly t hat France and ourselves should act upon it. Italy would no doubt gladly co-operate." [English "White Paper Nos. 24 and 25.] To this reasonable request the imperial German Chancellor replied. "First and last, we take the ground tiiat this question must he localized hy thi' abstention 0] all Pejtri's from intervention in it," but added th.it Germany would, if HI Austro-Russian dispute arose, "co-opeiate wi'h the other gieat Powers in mediation between Russia and Austria. How she "co-operated" we shall presently see. The Austrian Foreign Minister, having launched the ultimatum, absented himself from the capital, but the Russian Minister at Vienna succeeded in submitting this most reasonable request verbally to the acting Foreign Minister, who simply said that he would submit it to Count Btrchtold, liut that he could predict with assurance a categorical refusal. Eater on that day (july25) Russia was definitely advised that no time extension would be granted. Was ever the peace ol the world shattered upon so slight a pretext? A little time, a few days, even a few hours, might have sufficed to preserve the world from present hoirors.bul no time could be granted. A colossal snap judgement was to be taken by these diplomatic pettifoggers. It would be difficult to find in recorded history a greater discourtesy to a friendly Power, at war with fcr Austria was not Russia. Defeated in their effort to get an extention of time, England, France and Russia made further attempts to preserve peace by temporarily arresting military proceedings until efforts toward conciliation could be made. Sir Edward Grey proposed to Germany, France, Russia and Italy, that they should unite in asking Austria and Servia uot to cross the frontier "until we had had time to try and arrange matters between them," but the Ger man Ambassadors read Sir Edward (irey a telegram that he had Received from the German Foreign Office that "once she [Austria] had launched that note [the ultimatum] Austria could not draw back," [English White Paper No. 25.] As we have seen, Germany never so far as the recorded discloses, sought in any way to influence Austria to make this or any concession. Its attitude was shown by the declaration of its Ambassador at Paris to the French Minister of Foreign Affairs, which, while disclaiming that Germany had coun tenanced the Austrian ultimatum yet added that Germany appioved Us point of view, "and that certainly thaa.row, once sent, Germany could not allow herself to be guided except by her duty to her ally." The Mobilization Of The Nations At this point the rulers of the countries intervened in the dispute. The Kaiser, having returned from Norway, tekgra plied the Czar, under date of July 38, that he was "exerting all my influence to endeavour to make Austria-Hungary come to an open and satisfying understanding with Russia," and invoked the Czar's aid, (German"While Paper," Annex 20] If the Kaiser weresincer-, and he may have been, firs attitude own not that of his Foreign Office. Upon the face of the record we have only his own assurance that he was doing everything to preserve peace but the steps that lie took or tlif communications he made to influence Austria ore not found in the formal defence which the German (I'vernment /ins given to the world. —_ 9 Confiaurd on fonrtk page)


The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02299
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Tuesday, November 10, 1914
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
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General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02299

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Full Text
N'ulllvis addictua |urare in vciba maestri.
Being bound to swear to the Dogma.* ii no Maeter_
VOL.X.
Nassnu. N. P.. Bnhivmn.!i. Tuesday, November 10.1914
No. 254
3
CD
>
or
M
(0
CD
0)
0
(D
L OILBRBT Di'lMcil,
Editor and Proprietor.
OFFICE!: 88-44 MABKVT STRRErT
Nassau, .V. P., Bahamas
PIIONK 200. P. O. BOX lftt.
PUBLISHED DAILY
Monday, Wednesdf V and Friday
single Copy Tuesday, Thursday and Saturclay-
single copy Id
Weekly 4l'l
Monthly IS. 4 Quarterl* ... RalfYeafly... 4s. 6s,
Yearly 16a
PAYABLE IN ADVANCK
Alvcrtisinp Rates :Six pence |>er line
lorfirst insertion; thraa pence per line
for second insertion ; ar.fi one penny per
line for suhsquent insertions.
Advertisements under eight lines 4s.
if THE T \YISTER TWISTED
Billy with the first of mail
Went to twist a lions tail,
"Watch the beast begin to run!"
Billy said as he be^un.
But when Billy got a grip,
Then the lion 'Met her ri|>"
And Ins tail went slowly cur-
ling
Bat t'wai Hilly that went
whirling.
Anon.
THE CASE OF
THE DOUBLE ALLIANCE
VS
THE TRIPLE ENTENTE
Argued By JAMES M. BECK
Former Assistant
Attorney General of the
UNITED STATES
(Continued)
If Germany mad* any communi-
catlOO to U8trja in the interests of
peace the texts has yet to be clis-
wlosed to the world. A word from
Jllerlin to Vienna would have given
'the additional time which with
sincerely pacific intentions, might
have resulted in the preservation
of peace. Germany, so far as the
record discloses, never spoke that
word.
Contrast this attitude with that
of Russia, whose Foreign Minister
on the morning of July 25 offered
"to stand aside and leave the
question in the hands of England,
France, Germany and Italy."
[English "White Paper" No 17.]
On July 25 Sir Edward Grey
proposed that the four Powers (in-
cluding Germany) should unite
"In asking the Austnans and Rus
sian Governments rot to cross the
frontier and to give time for the
four Rowers, acting at Vienna and
St. Petersburg, to try and arrange
matters. If (jermauy v ill adopt this
view I feel strongly t hat France and
ourselves should act upon it. Italy
would no doubt gladly co-operate."
[English "White Paper Nos. 24
and 25.] _
To this reasonable request the
imperial German Chancellor re-
plied.
"First and last, we take the
ground tiiat this question must
he localized hy thi' abstention 0] all
Pejtri's from intervention in it,"
but added th.it Germany would, if
hi Austro-Russian dispute arose,
"co-opeiate wi'h the other gieat
Powers in mediation between Rus-
sia and Austria.
How she "co-operated" we shall
presently see.
The Austrian Foreign Minister,
having launched the ultimatum,
absented himself from the capital,
but the Russian Minister at Vienna
succeeded in submitting this most
reasonable request verbally to the
acting Foreign Minister, who sim-
ply said that he would submit it to
Count Btrchtold, liut that he could
predict with assurance a categorical
refusal. Eater on that day (july25)
Russia was definitely advised that
no time extension would be grant-
ed.
Was ever the peace ol the world
shattered upon so slight a pretext?
A little time, a few days, even a
few hours, might have sufficed to
preserve the world from present
hoirors.bul no time could be grant-
ed. A colossal snap judgement was
to be taken by these diplomatic
pettifoggers. It would be difficult
to find in recorded history a great-
er discourtesy to a friendly Power,
at
war with
fcr Austria was not
Russia.
Defeated in their effort to get an
extention of time, England, France
and Russia made further attempts
to preserve peace by temporarily
arresting military proceedings un-
til efforts toward conciliation could
be made. Sir Edward Grey pro-
posed to Germany, France, Russia
and Italy, that they should unite
in asking Austria and Servia uot
to cross the frontier "until we had
had time to try and arrange mat-
ters between them," but the Ger
man Ambassadors read Sir Edward
(irey a telegram that he had Re-
ceived from the German Foreign
Office that "once she [Austria] had
launched that note [the ultimatum]
Austria could not draw back,"
[English White Paper No. 25.]
As we have seen, Germany never
so far as the recorded discloses,
sought in any way to influence
Austria to make this or any con-
cession. Its attitude was shown by
the declaration of its Ambassador
at Paris to the French Minister of
Foreign Affairs, which, while dis-
claiming that Germany had coun
tenanced the Austrian ultimatum
yet added that Germany appioved
Us point of view,
"and that certainly thaa.row, once
sent, Germany could not allow her-
self to be guided except by her
duty to her ally."
The Mobilization Of The Nations
At this point the rulers of the
countries intervened in the dispute.
The Kaiser, having returned from
Norway, tekgra plied the Czar, un-
der date of July 38, that he was
"exerting all my influence to en-
deavour to make Austria-Hungary
come to an open and satisfying un-
derstanding with Russia,"
and invoked the Czar's aid,
(German"While Paper," Annex 20]
If the Kaiser weresincer-, and he
may have been, firs attitude own
not that of his Foreign Office. Upon
the face of the record we have only
his own assurance that he was do-
ing everything to preserve peace
but the steps that lie took or tlif
communications he made to in-
fluence Austria ore not found in the
formal defence which the German
(I'vernment /ins given to the world.
_------_------------------9----------------
Confiaurd on fonrtk page)


Publication began at 6.15 p.m.
Zhe Ctibune
Tuesday. November 10, 1914.
L
TURKEY AND CYPRUS.
The full text of the King's
Proclamation relating to trad-
ing with the enemy, will be
found in the "Nassau Guardian"
of the 7th instant.
Another proclamation informs
us that, War lias been declared
between England and the Otto-
man a Turkish Km pi re.
It has occurred to the corn
mentatnr who fills the editorial
chair of "The Tribune" that, its
readers, and the commonaJtvin
general are satiated with war
news, and its necessary con-
comitants which have poured in
an overwhelming flood upon us
since the 4th of August. The
< unvnt and principal events
have been presented tn us
through the mecfcja of tin; tele-
graph first, and second, by the
leading journals of England and
America, and in such quick se-
cession that we have had hardly
time to digest one batch, before
we are served wj th another, and
yet another, throughout the
twelve hours of daylight. N<>
reasonable man can expect more
for the money; the censors have
supplied us with all that we
ought to know, with all that
they thmk is necessarv for us to
know ; and we think that thev
have done and are vet doine
wisely and well, the public lias
had a "square meal,- therefore,
we will step aside for a while,
and see how it will work out.
Medical men tell us that, mod
erate abstinence from food i^ be-
neficial to our physical na
tuies, and this is a fact recog-
nised as applicable oqifMlv to
our mental requirements by all
f-ngaged in educational work ;
hence the hours of roe#ss, and the
longer vacations. | fa(:1, t]|
those who are engaged in men
tal labour in the higher walks of
life, will knovv the beneficial re-
sults which follow a cessation
Irom mental application, how
that after a vacation of doing
nothing, the j.rh-.l mind is re-
juvenated au/l resumes its work
with renewed energy and better
work is the*result ; therefore wv
're going to tal:.- a siesta of a
sort in the hope that we too will
brighten up.
The Turkish or Otoman Em-
pire is so called, not because it
is once more to be "sat down
upon,"but because it was found-
ed by Othoman or Osman I.
(reigned 12881306.^ He estab-
lished it in Asia Minor and took
the title of Sulton. The seat of
empire was transferred to Con-
stantinople in 1453 on the con-
quest of the Byzantine Empire.
The generic name of the people
composing the population is
Turks, and the Empire is popu-
larly known as Turkev. A
J J
great deal can be said of the
"unspeakable Turk, but as we
are not writing bis history, suf-
fice it to say that, like all other
human beings, he has two sides,
a good, and a bad, but bis histo-
ry written by many others, and
referred to lately by Wm. F.
Doty, Esq., U. S. Consul, in a
verv interesting lecture, unmis
takably shows that according
to Western standards, the bad
predominates, sadly to his un-
speakable disadvantage. He
happily can be cured, but in the
process lie will be wiped out.
and that part of the world over
which he casts bis baneful sha-
dow, will begin with a "clear
slate." So we leave him, and
turn to Cyprus. We do not at
tempt to prognosticate, but we
think that he will "tumble out
of the frying pan into thtlire."
It may be as the boy in the
street says, "There'll be no
Turkey this Christmas."
But let us go on to Cyprus,
and tell of it to our readers, and
our people whose knowledge <>f
it is very vague: for since the
receipt of the telegram reporting
its ocupation by Turkey, we
have been beseiged with ques-
tions concerning it, therefore we
venture on this apparent didac-
ticism.
Cyprus is an island in the
Mediterranean, and lies in its
glistening waters o| deep azure,
between the island of Ciete, and
the coast of Syria distant on the
east some 60 miles. Cyprus is
that island mentioned in the
Acts of the Apostles to which
llanabas took Mark and sailed
after his "sharp contention" with
Paul. In the space of three thou-
sand years, it had seen many in-
vaders and many conquerors,
until the whole island was Cover
ed with the ashes of many civil-
izations. It was held by tKe Sara-
cam for three hundred years, and
wrested from them by Richard
Coeur de Leon-. It had a renew
al of its former glory for nearly
a centuay when Ft belonged to
Venice the prideofthe sea. It
afterwards fell into the hands of
the Turks and rapidly decayed.
After the Crimean War, Lord
Beaconsfield by a master stroke
of policy got a lease of it from
Turkey. But England has not
found it quite a good bargain.
At, first after the occupation
there was a boom in "real estate"
hut there is an enemy more to
be feared than the Turks. The
English government spent in
one year,35,000 in lighting
the locustsHowever like the
bull-dog that she is. she holds it,
although it is not a healthy is
land. It is in the track of corn
merce to the eastern shores of
the Mediterranean and there is,
always the chaoce of its finding
a place in the Imperial economy
of England,and wauchanevent
say those "in the know"? she
might undertake a railway to
valley of the Fup'iates, by which
it would descend to the head of
the Persian Gulf This would
make a more direct course lo
India than that by the Red v
and thus England would have
"two strings to her bow," The
Suez Canal and the Railway.
England then now occupies it.
(Provided Turkey has not annex-
ed it) But here the question
arises, Can she annex it, having
leased it? It perhaps depends
upon the terms of the lease. We
are not sufficiently wise to
answer. It requires a lawyer to
answer it. Suppose we ask His
Honour the Chief Justice orthe
Attorney General, While Eng-
land occupies it. she is respon-
sible for the government, and to
maintain the Civil authority she
must needs keep up a consider-
able military forceIn a way
Cyprus is of interest to us, be-
cause several of those who were
once in the public service of this
Colony whom we know have
been stationed at Cyprus Capt.
11, l.earmonth is now there as
Chief Commandant of Police.
Sir Charles Anthony Kin1,'
Herman was therein 1907as
High Commissioner, and VVil
liani P.ees Davis as Attorney
General also in 1907.
SPECIAL.
From and after this date,
the following Shops will be
Depots for the sale of THE
TRIBUNE, viz :
T. G. JOHNSON, Corner
Dowdeswell and Arm-
strong Streets.
V. R. I NCR A HAM, Market
Street, South.
F. QARinER, Comer Bay
and Pitt Streets.
Nov. 7th, '91^.
i 1
S. S. Seguranca arrived in New
York, at 7 a.m Sunday,
The time foralMing Mails per
"Frances E." has been extended
to 8a m Thursday Nov 12,1914.
ELIEF FUND.
WAR RE I
Previously acknow
ledged 27-! 10 u
NicollsTown, An-
dros Isld.,\Ir Ken
& others, Bird
Cay, Berry Isld. 6 1
John \. Howe 200
Lord Dunmore Chapter
Daughters of
Empire, Harbour la. 700
Mrs Winter.Bullock's
Harbour 2 o
Inhabitants of
Long Island 56 o 1
Amoimt to Nov.
8th. 191 |. 2780 19 2
:o:
DISEASED CITRUS FRUIT
IN FLORIDA
In view of a disease among
the Citrus Fruit Trees fn Flori
da, The Governor has prohi
bited the importation, either
directly or indirectly of any
Ci'rus Flint Trees, or Citrus
Fruit from Florida.
A TEUTON AND aMiTON
"Who is Von Moltke ?
"Don't vou know '."
"Is in. that old Von Moltke ?"
"Why no, this is his son"
"Of course, the old man died
in 1891."
"All known is, that he is a
German General."
These,and many other expres
ions of a kindred class are such
as one ina\ hear every day and
all that is known of General Von
Molt c "on '.he street" is sum
med up inthe last of the series.
Suppose I tell you "some
more," as the children say.
Count Helmuth Von Moltke
is the Nephew of the famous
field-marshal who was in com-
mand in 1H70 71, at the time of
the franco Prussian War; and as
chief of staff isciedited With the
disposition and direction of the
German forces at the outbreak
of the war. He is four years
older t h a n his French
antagonist General Jof-
fre. He looks wh.it he is.
typical product, of German mih
tnrism, face like a maajf but not
altogether unplesaing.gyd, for-
mal, official
He is,or rather wasa "Kaiser-
man;" that is to say, was for
J


. many years, a favourite of the
Kaiser, holding his position by
a combination of favour and
ability, but his igtL is no longer
in the ascendanC it has grown
dim, he has fallen under the
Kaiser's displeasure for a lack of
his farmed*^ I ity --so they say
When his uncle died in 1891, he
became A. D C, to the Kaiser,
and has been chief of the Gen-
eral staff of the army since Feb-
urarv 1904. He has not shown
himself to be a great military
genius. Main' believe him to
be a less able strategist than
General Von Der (Jolt/. His
promotion to chief of stall caus-
ed a great deal of unfavourable
comment at the time,which lias
however dissapcared with time,
and the evidence that he is able
to h a n d 1 e an extraordinary
amount of work.
Sir John Ruseworth Jellicoe.
"Yea I can tell you something
ai >ait him." 11" is fifty-five
yearsold and has* I ntv-two years
service in the Navy. As a lieu
tenant or left-tenant ? which is
it? Anyhow, he was present at
the bombardment of Alexan-
driaand at the bj-jtile of Tel-
el-Kebri was one of the naval
brigade.
When the Victoria was ram-
med by the G^mperdoion in the
MtditerraneMi he was seriously
ill with Malta fever, and conlin-
edin the Hospital quarters of the
Victoria. Sir John Tvron, and
more than 600 officers and men
lost their lives, but he escaped.
"How?" heexcl lined recently,
in speaking of the incident "I
don't quite know myself." Short-
ly before the "ramming" his tem-
perature was 103, and when he
was fisbcd out and landed on
b >ard the rescuing ship, it w.is
normal and normal it rein lined.
I la as sent to China in com-
mand <>f ,-\ naval brigade in 1898
to help subdue the Boxer Rebel-
lion, and later was chief of staff
to Admiral Seymour during the
attempted relief of the* Pekin
Legation in 1900.
He was severely wounded by a
bullet in his lungs at Teitsang
and when he recovered,The Ger
manEmptror conferred 117ion him
the Order of the Red Eagle a-id
presented him with iw irdl for
his great service to the world In
general, and to those Germans
in particular who were involved
in the ChinesflAebellion.
He returnf(Tfrom China an
invalid and was married in 1902
to Florence Gwendoline Cavzer.
.wonder if that name is pro-
nounced like Kaiser? Oh! the
irony of fate. Decorated once
by that Emperor, who would
now gladly thrust him through
with the sword which he him-
self presented for savingGerman
life which he is now trying to
destroy.
Admiral Jellicoe is regarded
more than any other officer in
the British Navy as responsible
for the marvelous progress in the
naval gunnery in the English
fleet. Qela va sans dire. Said
a wounded German sailor to his
Nurse; 'Do all the English
sailors aim as well as those on
the "Amphion?" "Yes, all she
said." Then that's the end of
us" said he.
He is a sea fighter, and in
other time would be called
something not quite so euphoni
ous, tho' quite as "Drakey." In
1907-8, Rear-Admiral of the At-
lantic fleet ; Lord Commissioner
of the Admiralty and Controller
of the Navy in 1908-10.
From 1911-12 Commander
of the Second Squadron of the
Home Fleet, and on the 23rd
July last, appointed Vice-Admir-
al and Commander-in-Chief of
the Home fleet, and to him was
sent that momentous telegram
when England declared war
"Capture flie enemy or destroy
them."
Those who are watching him,
speak of him as Nelson Reditus. |
"MR. FOSTER."
:o:
Latest War News
RADIOGRAMS
November 10th 1914.
London November gth.
Governor,
Bahamas.
November gth, Press Bureau
Report*! In North, enemy appears
concentrated actively in the re.
gion of Ypres, but we hold our
own.
Progress has been made round
Soiss ins. Russian cavalry has
penetrated the German province
of P >sen destroying the railway
at Pleschen
Russians are advancing on
East Prussian front. Between
October 23rd and November 4th
the Russians left wing captured
nearly 19,000 prisoners and many
guns on Thourn Cracow front
and a further 1 2.000 prisoners
in the recent fighting Ofl the San
River. The Admiralty report
successful operation against Fac,
in the Persian Gulf.
About 400 jpore rebels have
been captured in South Africa.
November 10th 1914.
PICKED UP
British ships attacked
the
German right but were quicklj
driver, off by artillery fire.
Russian victories appear re-
markable, advancing rapidly
against Germans and Austrians,
yet Germany continues to with-
draw troops from the East to
send to Western area where they
are concentrating every ounce
of strength possible in a final at-
tempt to break the Allies lines.
Germans have generally as
sumed the offensive in France
and Belgum but the Allies claim
to have repulsed them.
Carranza refuses to obey the
Aguas Calicntas convention and
has ordered it dissolved. He says
that if the convention is afraid
of Villia he will oust him.
American marines have been
landed at Acapulco, Mexico,
at the request of its inhabitants,
November 10th 1914.
London:In the fiercest
fighting of the war the attempt
of the Germans to break the
Allies line was defeated and
theie have been desperate re
verses of the Austro German
army.
(iermany is rushing reinforce-
ments to the West in an effort
to break down the British
French Belgium resistance.
No decisive engagement has
been fought along the front
but both sides claim gains.
There are no new develop-
ments in the near East but en-
gagements are being foufcht be-
tween Russian and Turkish
frontier guards.
Many young Englishmen are
enlisting for service.
There was great enthusiasm
at the inauguration of the new
I.ord Mayor of London.
The British cruiser Glasgow
which engaged the German
squadron lias entered the
Btraits of (censored)
Washington: The situation
in Mexico now has a grave as
pect unless Carranza at once
recongnizes the ne v provisional
president, who will be sworn in
At an early date.
The new president will con
cede to the United States the
point on the evacuation of Vera
Cruz by American marines
Washington : North Caro
lina has won the case which*
was over the boundary line
between her and Tennessee and
involved 40.000 acres of land on
which both assessed taxes.
Washington:Three more
states are added to the list of
those of already quarantined
against suspected cases of foot-
and-mouth disease. The states
are Delaware, New Jersey and
Rhode Island.
Norfolk. Virginia:The Unit
ed States destroyer Paulding
which has been ashore at Lynn
Haven for two weeks was float
ed today by a wrecking com-
pany, apparently uninjured.
November 10th 1914.
London joth 1914.
Governor, Bahamas.
November 10th, following
from Press Bureau: German
cruiser Emden driven ashore
and burnt after a sharp action
with H. M. S. Sydney. Her
losses in personnel very heavy.
All possible assistance was giv-
en to the survivors. Our casu-
alties were three killed and fif-
teen wounded. The German
cruiser Konigsburg was discov-
ered hiding in sltbal water in
the Rufigi River opposite Mafia
Island. Pending the operations
for her capture the only naviga-
ble channel has been blocked
and she is now imprisoned. Ex
cepting for the German squad-
ron now off Chile the whole
Pacific and Indian Oceans are
now clear of the enemy's war-
ships.
The French government re
ports progress between Dixmude
and the Lys district.
There has been a distinct to
the enemy in Alsace Russians
advance on thj Polish frontier
continues. Two Turkish diyi
sions were defeated by Russian
troops in Asia Minor.
(Signed)
HARCOURT
(The Sidney is a light cruis-
er of 56.000 tons)
LOST
ON Monday evening last at
the corner of Market and
Ray Streets aLADY'SBLUE
WOOLEN SWEATER
COAT. It was seen to be
picked up.
Reward offered for return to
"TRIBUNE OFFICE"
WANTED Ai OWCE
2 BRIGHT BOYS to
'deliver Southern Dis-
trict paper*
Apply
'TRIBU\V OFFICE


The Kaiser can only convince the
world of his innocence of the crime
of his Potsrl-im camarilla by giv-
ing the wot Id the text of anv ad-
vice hegsv? the Austrian officials.
He has produced his telegiam to
the Czar. Where are those he pre-
sumably sent to Frances Joseph or
Count Berchlold? Where are the in-
structions he pave his Ambassador
or Foreign Minister?
It insignificant that on the same
day SatOnof telegraphed to Count
Benckendorff.
"My conversations with the Ger
man Ambassador confirm my im-
pression that Germany is i.ither
l.ivnurahle to the uncompromising
attitude adopted by ^ustria.
And he adds, and history will vin-
dicate him in the conclusion, ili.it
"The Berlin Cabinet, which
might have been able to airest the
whole development of this crisis
seems lo exercise no act ion on its
1 he Geri'i in \mb ISSfld'il informed
Sir Edward Grey lhnl ibe German
Government would endeavour to
inlluence Austria aflei taking Mel-
grade, and Sertian temioivin 'he
region of the frontier, to promise
not to advance lufil.ei while liie
Powers endeavour'd to arrange,
that Si-rvia should five satisfac-
tion sufficient 10 pacifv Austria but
if Germany evei exercised anv
such pressure upon Vienna no evi-
dene* of it hat ever been given to the
j.'ffWd. Certainty, it was mt veiy
effective and Foi the r isons men-
tioned it is impossible to conclude
that the advi< e of 'i rniany, if in
'_'ood faith, would not have been'
followed by in w< ilcernlly,
(Tn I)' eonlinuedi
Good Morning'!
We Are Introducing
American Silk
A iii.-i u.in C.ishinrre
American Cotton-Lisle
HOSIERY
STOP-LOOK
LISTEN!
We have secured Mr. J&mei
Queen from the United Stages,
e. thorough Optician, who will
remain here for the entire winter
sen.son.
We are therefore enabled to
offer for ONE MONTH only
a 32s.
pair of either PINCE-NEZ
or SPECTACLES, 14 carat
gold filled 00 lenses, soft cable |
wires so that they will not
cut tbe ears, nod warranted
for twenty years
fop 8s.
Also English Pebble lenses
warranted 20 years without
changing for a little higher
price.
Come and have
your EYES
tested under tlu
in w processFR EE'^c'iarKc
Hcadivches, Dizziness, and eJI
troubles ol the EYK at once. We refund the money
after n. months trial of the glass-
es, if not satisfactory, or change
them free of chetrtte.
Persons desiring my services
#
can notify me at The City
Pharmacy, when I shall 1 all
on them ;it their residi nces.
Without EXTRA CHARGE.
ON ACCOUNT OF HARD TIMES
Mr. Ouecn, Agent for the
Wartham Watch Co., in or-
der to introduce the b< t
known Watch in the world
w ill oiler a 14 carat gold fill-
ed, 20 years guaranteed, Ladys
or Gentleman' open or closed
face
atch, Waltham or Admiral
i""i>
Sanitary
Cool
Reliable
Wm.
Hilton,
2f.O
Bay St.
Fruit of the Loom 56 in.
at 7.I |)i;r yard.
OVER
Mapes Fertilizers
/ now carry in stock the
following formulas:
Pineapple. It'll* been pi ov-
en that this has no equal
and a visit to fields using
same will ronvu^you.
Vegetable.Now is the tirne>t
to use this ;iih1 increase
your yield in Tomatoes,
Potatoes, ( Miion- and ;dl
other vegetabledlby 100
per cent.
Orange Tree.To assist the
growth of Staling Citrus
Tree.
Fruit and Win*.- Increase the
yield and growth of old
Citrus trees.
For further information
and books on the tst ofthi 9C
fertilizers, please apply to
WALTE2 K. MOORE
Ag.tt for Mdptt Perti ter
in thr Hnkan
V
1500
Pairs
Boots and Shoes
being added to an already
replete stock
Willii ms the Sh. teraan
is again opening up one of
those Sample Lots of Boots
and Shoes in a limited
number ol sizes as Follows
viz :
Men Boots and Slroes in* titf-s
from 6 to 7J
VVomens Boots and Sh m s
in sizes from J | t< 4 J
Misses Moots and Shoes in SlZi S
from 12} to 1
Tin' advantage in purchas-
ing from this lot is (as others!
Who have purchased before Johnson's Pondered Wax
can attest) that you 1 an select] """nfl"o-
the sizes from a very large
variety of up-to-date styles at '
prices considerably cheaper
than regular lines kept in
Johnson's
Artistic Wood
Finishes
I
Johnson's Propand Wax ;t "'m
plate ti iih nrl r>"li-li lot all tun itun
w.i.nt'vi.rk and fl""iv
Johnson's Wool Dvc -f"i
column: nl *\\ wo r, >>rMnr <;i I
Johnson's Under La* i ">ri
finish, veiv much Ml| eriw tn shell 01
vaiin'li
Johnson's Fle.t Wood Finish 11
beautiful, irtistic, hand-rubbed effete
without the aspeiiM ol rubbing,
Johnlon'i Paite Wood Flllei (.it
filling the emu anil pnref \ wood,
prdpafinij it Im the finish
fur hal
FOR. SALE BY
Chas. E. Alburv
They have stood the test. Give rea.
fool comlori ito rip. Never
bee me loots m baggy. The snaps is
knit in- Qot H'-sscI m
GUARANTEED l-.r fineness, style.
superiority ..i material and workmanship,
Absolutely st linleai Will wear f> months I
without holes, or new ones tree.
OUR. SPECIAL OFFER
to every one eiKlmi' us *I IK) in currency
"i postal note, to covet advertising, and
shipping cli.it-.'s. we will sci).I post paid,
with written inarantee, backed by a five
million dollar Company, either
3 Petir* of our 75c. value
Ann rican --.Ik II fiery,
or 4 Pairs of our 50c. value
American Cashmere Hosiery,
or 4 Piiy of our 50c. Value,
Amerii in CottonLiala Heaiery
or h Pair* of Children's Hosiery.
IK)NT DKLAT offo tspirei when
dealer in your locality is (elected.
The International Hosiery co.
P. O. Box 224 '
DAYTON. OHIO. U. S. A.
movement for 2, on the]Stock.
Instalment Plan of Is. or; CALL EARLY
more per week at the Pur- and secure your size at
chaser's Option. | WILLIAMS' WHOLESALE
CALL AT ONCE and aee the AND RETAIL
SHOE ESTABLISHMENT
277 and 289 Bay Street City.
w1 "*
V* tint! II
SAMPLES and learn our Terms
OTThese Watches an sold ;> 11 over the
World at from i to o each.
r YOU MISS THIS CHANCE
YOU MISS THE CHANCE OF
A LIFETIME.
Get Wise before it is too Late.
CANE SYRUP
Can be had at T. M. Knowles
a! KX. stg\ per Tin
GOOD and THICK.
Kast Hay Street
Cosmopolitan
HIGH SCHOOL
()pens on
Monday. Oct. 5th
in Aurora Hall
on Charlotte Street.
Notice
mlfl call tin alien-
f our friends in Nas-
sau and "ii the OUT ISLANDS
to the following prices on lum-
; ber whicrjsj will go into eSecl
fi'nn to rlnv,
All Ri >I'GH lumber up t8 ft.
'6/.i per 100. All DRKSSIiir
! lumber up t> 8 fi. S | pi too.
All UOI'GH and DRESSKD in
i6ft5ro/5 pei...... ANYTHING
over if' U. \j 6 [>er 100 mbove
ti|) to H ins wide)
These prices are for CASH
i I solute!y and being VV \\i
prices ate made to fit p the pul)-
in change
For partit-ularf apply to i,..nu| are subjed
Prof. G. G. Coffin, head mas- without notice
ter, or Mr. J. P. Simms. i The Bahamas Timber Co. Ltd.
1


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