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Publication began at 6.40 p.m. Zhe Vrfbune iL.:. ' — — Saturday. November 7. 1914. SPECIAL. From and after this date, the following Shops will be Depots for the sale of THE TRIBUNE, viz : T. G. JOHNSON', Corner Dowdeswell and Armstrong Streets. V. R. INGRAHAM, Market Street, South. F. GARNER, Corner Bay and Pitt Streets. Nov. 7th, 'i)i,j. Germany's full programme, as indicated by a German Officer reads thus: • "First, France is to be struck down. Second, Russia polished off. Third, Calais, Boulogne, Dunkirk, Ostend and Antwerp to be garrisoned by German legions. Fast. Under cover of the new l6 in. Krupp Guns, and by the aid of mines, submarines, and Zeppelins, the Uhlans, and the Death's Head Hussars would arrive, and promptly convert England into a German province." It is a fine scheme drawn up with that characteristic precision and "efficiency" of which Germany is so proud. But by some inadvertence, peculiar to great minds, it leaves out ol account the Brttinh Navy. S/c, B.-nthardi: "The War %  gainst English Commerce must be boldly and energetically prosecuted, and should start un-1 expectedly. The prizes which j fall into ogr hands, must be remorselessly destroyed." SJ'C, "Floyd George" Out of 20,000,000 tons of British ship ping only 20,000 tons have been captured by Germany. This would be represented by 8 01 10 small vessels of from 1,000 to 3,000 tons." Meanwhile German Commerce has been hounded off the seas, hundreds of German vessels haw been captured (some of them very nice prizes indeed ) And the Kaiser Wilhelm der CiTone, which fifteen vears ago was (to the greaf exultation of the Kaiser) the largest liner afloat has sunk by the little High fly r. And the German Navv as a whole is bottled up in Helgo land. So on the whole, though as a precaution, we might all learn to handle a rifle. I do not anticipate a landing of Uhlans at present." General Sir John French's "contemptible little force" at onetime were hardly beset by "Germans to right of them, Germans to left of them, Germans in front of them." in the attempt to annihilate them, but the men who go into battle with a smile on their faces and a jest on their lips, are the men who have to be reckon ed with. The small British force has distinguished itself in an exceptional manner, and this has been recognised by friends and foes alike, if we can judge of the latter's recognition Ifrom the reports of captured officers. No one can deny that theGer man Empire is a wonderful achievement, and that it has been accomplished in one generation has not made life easier for the individual, but infinitely harder, and the German people have accepted the sound, which to us though accepted literally by a large number of them, lias a false ring to our iars, ringing as it does with the Kaiser's assumption of Divine co-operation, We can have only one opinion of Germany's con' duct in provoking war,' and it has been ably argued by Mr. Beck as we are showing j n t | ie extracts from his article on our frontpages. He dors not pronounce sentence, he but judges, and the conclusion winch he has reacned is, that Germany itself will at the .II | |v itso.\ i.Cvcii. tioner llero-\ u people will con demn her when the) realize thai the terrible price' which they must pay for incapable diplomacy, and brut.ilitv, and ruthleasness has been lived by thDse in whom they repossd unlimited confidence. We have on more than one occasion directed the attention of our people our readers, to the Conflicting character of the information we receive from tele grams and from the reports of special correspondents to the American papers, and that though they are corroborative, they are not altogether worthy of being believed.and we emphasize what we have already said. In proof, we have to say that ( ierman sources of information are distinctly unreliable The Military authorities of Paris saw "It is proper again to call to the public attention that faith should not be placed in the of ficial bulhtines of the German General Staff. A bulletin given out by this staff alleges that our attacks on the heights to the south of Thiaucourt were repulsed with very considerable losses to our men. "Asa matter of fact, our offensive in this direction found it im possible to maintain itself at all at '.he points won in the course of this advance movement: nev ertheless, we were successful in in retaining, as a whole, the major part of the terrain which our offensive movement succeed in taking. "This morning a German offi cer was sent under a flag of truce to the commander of the French Operating in this region. He re quested, speaking for the Ger man authorities, an armistice to bury the dead and remove the wounded. The French com mander sent the officer back to his lines and immediately caused the atttack on the enemy to be renewed. "The advai.ee we at once made against the enemy made it possible for us to secure the advantage over them which^hey had been endeavouring to obtain over US by an armistice, and it showed at the same time the absurdity of the successes claim ed by our adversaries* for them selves One word more. We are extremely sorry and pained,that a great want of perfect oneness at this time is .shown by n few per sons among us Their minds are unbalanced,and they yield easily to the passing puff of wind. These persons are great talkers, and having an incouceiveably swol len idea of their ability, thev ventilate their views and opinions whenever they can find listners. Someof thesearens weak-minded as they, and likely to be wronglv influenced by their specious arguments. We would urge up on this class of street orators, the wisdom of thinking twice j before they speak once. In such Ia Case they will be led to see that ii is itUnce which is golden i Remember the old man and the j bundle of sticks. While on this subject we cannot but say that the American journals and to their credit be it said, have be haved impartially. The attempt to capture American public sentiment was a miserable failure, due to the spirit of fairplay; as a matter of fact, as soon as German Military exploits took on the colour of success, all the American journal gave them just as big Infills as their defeats; and more^could not have been expectedjjlays Mr. Alleyne Ireland F. R.tj. S. writ ing in the United Empire: "Apart from Germans 'and the German Press, 1 have not en countered a single expression of opinion that Get many will be victorious in the present war." This should be the feeling animating the hearts of all British subjects everywhere, believing that the crushing of militarism is the only means by which universal peace shall be secured. THE DEVELOPMENT BOARD. The Development Boafd has decided to compile and issue a Register of Hotels, Bearding houses, Houses and apartments to let in Nassau, for which a small inclusive fee will be charged. Copies of the Register will be supplied t > Messrs Thos. Cook and Sous, Raymond and Whitcombe, the Tucker Agency, "Ask Mr. Foster" Agency, and the steamship Agencies, and as far as possible a corrjyirill be inserted in each pampRfet issued by the Board so that it will reach about 6o,ooo, Photographs of houses will be inserted if desired. Those wishing to appear on the Register .should communicate at once with the Sec retary to the Development Board. —:o:— The death of Mr William Grant Maclure which occurred at his residence on the 5th inst, removes ;1 familiar figure from our midst. For ov<-r a quarter of a century he was in the Public service of the Colony and filled his several appointments with credit. In the House of Asseniblv, where we knew him best, he was the living index to its numerous records, and Parliamentary Law was as familiar to him as n household word, and he was not less distinguished in the Law Courts. In both of these offices, he was unique. To his bereaved Wife and family we effer our sincere condolence. Mr. Maclure rend ^w in the office of the Late Sir^ D. Mai colm and was admitted to th Bar in 1883; Elected Ast.Clerl House of Assembly 1890; Jus tice Governors Harbour 1894 Actg. Stipendiary and Circ



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T Magistrate; Registrar Supreme Court 1898; Actg. Stipendiary and Circuit Magistrate from Sept. to Dec.l"9ril. Retired %  from the Publi'^rvice 1911. #0:The following telegrams were [received yesterday the 6th inst by his Excellency the Governor. London 6th. Governor Bahamas. Your Telegram 12th October lave communicated with Hoard f Trade. Your Telegram of 22nd October Admiralty & War )ffice inform me that their re uirements are met for the pre f*nt under existing contracts. HARCOURT. We are in the receipt of a adiogram from Capt. Pearce >! the Motor Boat "Frances E." -Storm at Miami—Will not save today." Foreign Mails to be despatch per France* E. via Miami, la. will be made up and closed Wednesday nth Nov. at 8 .m. The Public would like to i-now if it is a fact that, certain )f the Out Isl ^^Commissioners ire pressing AN poor people to :ontribute even to their last lenny to the War Relief Fund, imply that the district over Iwhich he s the Pontus Pilate nay out-do other districts If this be true, it is the plain luty of the Government to intrurt every such Commissioner o discontinue the objectionable r.ictice, an allow the people to t voluntarily in the matter. —:o: — WHY A UNITED EMPIRE EXISTS kgatn, through the Courtesy of the Honourable the Colonial Secretary, we are enabled 10 publish the item following 1 WHITEHALL GARDENS London, S. \V. 16th. October, 1914. *fcir, I have the honour to transmit 1 copy of an anon vinous letter remoney can be applied in the manner desired uy the writer. 1 have,&c. (Sg) H. MARTIN., for Crown Agents. The Hon'ble The Colonial Secretaiy, ire. &c. &c. Bahamas. Sec. IVmas 4 Copy of an anonymous letter to the Daily Telegraph. Reading. 13. 10. 14 Dear Sir, I believe it was in your paper a little time since I sa%v an account of great Distress atone of the Bahamas Islands viz. Inagua, the Governor General "of the Bahama" living at the Capital, Nassau. It appears that no crops can be raised on Inagua, though it has a large population. And steamers that call seem chiefly to be German, so as the men act chiefly as stevedores on steamers that ply and call at places between New York and South America and some places that they call at seldom get a call, and if so perhaps it may hf the only vessel they see and get what they require from. In consequence ol these steamers not at work these chiefly stevedores are thrown out of work and the only help and call they had is cut off. It just proves how enterprising the Germans are, yet these people and others get no call from English vessels, though there is a necessity and proves the English should not neglect any Islands or Countries that have wants. I hope our shipping people will awake and study the needs of our Islands and any other that want some kind of foods I enclose One pound {£l) P. O. towards relif from Youis truly, A WORKER AND'A SYMPATHISER. P. S. Now these people and others are cut off from supplies hitherto supplied by New York toSouth America steamers, what an opportunity to supply is now open to the shipping teived by the Editor of the Daily ; Companies, also the people in jelegraph, enclosing the sum of distress but once set on a footle pound itjt) for remittance ing, here are men use to the lagua Isliflfl "toward relief." j Routes and Places of call waitThe Editor has forwarded ing for work, I hope it may be iraount to us, and we have brought to the notice of the \cd it to the credit of the'proper authorities #by you so mini Government in our acj some action be taken and not We shall be glad if the allowed to pass from us. NAMING OF STREETS AND ALLEYS IN THE SUBURBS Nassau, N. P. Nov. 7th. To the Editor of The Tribune. Dear Sir: I was thinking while reading one of the English Papers, which mentioned "Buttonwood Street," that it would beiappropriate for the Public Board of Works to name streets, lanes and alleys after different woods and fruits in the Bahamas. For instance: Paw Paw Lane, Lemon and Orange Street, sound very well. STREETS.. Buttonwood Street Bull wood Iron wood Rosewood Yellowwood Dogwood Cottonwood Horseflesh Cedar Madeira Cocoanut Tamarind LANES. Sand Box Lane Paw Paw Pear Lemon Orange Cherry Sapodilla Grape Fruit Mango Pineapple Cocoa Plum Apple ALLEYS Banana Alley Musk Mellon Lime There is an Alley east of Cedarville called "Pumpkin Aley" but not painted. We have enongh names of persons and places now, I therefore hope that the Hon. Board will choose some of those I have suggesten. ONE INTERESTED. —:o:— Latest War News RADIOGRAMS London:— The Russians are forcing the Germans hackward in Russian Poland and have checked them in East Pussia. If the Russians can keep up their victorious advance relief must come to the allied armies because of the necessity for the withdrawal of German troops from France and Belgium to the aid of those battling the Russians in Silesa and East Prussian territory. The Anglo-French fleet continue.their bombardment of forts of the Dardanelles but the Turks say the warships have inflicted no damage. Holy places are to be respected by the British guns as long as Indian subjects are not molested. Details are still lacking of the naval engagement in the Pacific Japanese and British vessels are to start out and round up the German cruisers. New York :— 24 in the House and 13 in the Senate will be the Democratic majority according to the latest figures at hand tonight. Washington :—The adoption of the $135,000,000 loan on cotton may be announced by the federal reserve board today. That the fund would be fully subscribed within the next few hours was the cheerful outlook last night. • Washington:—Additional government inspectors have been rushed to the infected cattle disdistricts where hoof-and-mouth disease is prevalent. Fort Smith, Arkansas:—Another building in the Hartford coal region was burned breaking the quiet which followed the news that federal troops were being sent by order of President Wilson. The troops will arrive todav. New York:-The Liverpool cotton maket is to re-open. The announcement has been received with joy on the New York cotton market as it means a general resumption of business in the future. The market has been suspended since the latter part of Julv El Paso,'Texas:—No details of the Villa Carranza clash have been received here. Villa has strategic advantage in controlling the solid block of Northwestern states. Washington.—United States marines have been landed at Beyrut Syria according to a dispatch from Paris but Washington has no news of the landingChicago: The states of Nevada and Montana have given tfce vote to women. Thty now have, the full suffrage in eleven states. November 7th 1914. PICKRD UP Paris predicts that the war will end with Germany's exhaustion in about three months as she cannot maintain such Continued on Supplement



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Supplement to The Tribune SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 7,1914 Latest War News RADIOGRAMS enormous Forces on two fronts beyond (hat time. It is reported thai General Von Klucl; died, ten days ago from wounds: also that the Crown lVi.i-v lies wounded in ;i hos pital in Strasshurg. London re|>orls me tufts in the North Sea of two German cruisers, th Yorck and the Koenigs burg. Bulgaria and Greece have proclamed their neutrality. The British Admiralty announces that the cruiser Goodhope probably sunk with all on board in the fighting off Chile The loss of life abo ird the Monmouth was less because she ran ashore. The Russians have captured Jaroslaw taking 50.000 prisoners There is no change in the French-Belgian situation. Fighting Is still K>'ig on fiercely, each army holding its own. November 7II1, i<|i|London: —The German fortress of Tsingtau has surrender ed to the Japanese-British forces says a Tokio report. Repeated attacks from laud and sea for a period of nearly three months were resisted and the surrender was brought abou : when the allied infantry charge and occupied themiddlc for line. The losses sustained by the garrison are not known but that of the allied forces was heavy. The garrison numbered about 7.000 men mostly reservists in China and surprise is expressed that they held out so long againjt such tremendous odds. The fall of the fortress ends the most picturesque of the minor phases of the war and marks the loss to Germany of her last foot of possession on the Asiatic mainland. Fort Smith, Arkansas:—Fed eral troops are now in camp to preserve order in the mining camps. Washington: — Four fifths of the $135.01)0.000 cotton loan has been subscribed. San Francisco:—A naval engagement is reported off the coast of South America between British-Japanese and German ships, but details are unobtain able. The British Admiralty an nounces that the cruiser Good hop.' took fire and foundered off the Chilian coast in a recent engagement. Washington:—Great 16 inch gun is now ready for test at Indian Head grounds after sec ret construction at the navy yard. It has a range of 15 miles and at least twice the penetrating power of the famous German howitzers used on the Belgian force. The new dreadnoughts will be equipped with this gun. New York:—James A fatten has been made defendant in a suit charging him with corner ing the Oats market in July 1914. London: — 1 he Russians re port having driven the Germans back to their border on the North and to have forced their center to retire from the Vis • tula. The Russian general suiT has turned its attention to the A US trians who have held their posi tion along the San River.



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tile impression that its tone was moderate. Even the Italian Aml>wlrk was not taken into Count Merftb/flds confidence. ftJDSVpt^h from Sir M. de Bunsen to Sir Edward Grey, dated aiI „ipo be continued) -oru —:o:— Dead mans Cay sill lo Long Island DetfiMr. Editor. sir, ?\ I would like for the readerqiof your valuable paper to see what we have done towards! Ithe War Relief Fund. "Giitagth" of Sept last the Commjesioocr held a meeting in the ScliOobiHouse for the purpose of opening a Subscription for the "WacJid)ool Teacher has been a VetjR import.nit assistant in this worJc.'bcan tell you Mr. Editor, thatltfwrenre no people on Long Island/who give more generousK to any good cause than these pe over £13 d do not remember the odd). Hie meeting closed by singing " to 7 I Wo'lienK Boots (111(1 Sin"-, iii sizes front j I ; • i I Misses Roots oinl s lioi s III -.1/. >.% from ijj to i The advantage in purchasing from til's lot is (as oil rt who have purchased before can attest) that you can select] the sizes from a very largt variety of up-to-date styles at prices considerably cheaper lhati regular lines kept irj stuck. CALL EARLY and secur? yott^eize at WILLIAMS' WTOLESA] AND RETAIL SHOE ESTABLISHMEN 1 277 and 289 Ba;, Street Cij



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3 SO > 3 a* -3 IP (A o CO Nulllus e.ddlctua |urnre In vtrba me-gletri. Being bound to swear to the Do|mm if no MMI<[ VOL.*. Ntvaanu. N. P.. BuhMnm, Saturday. November 7.1914 No. 232 L. OILBKRT DUPCCH, Editor and Proprietor. OKFICR: 38-44 MARKKT STREET Nassau, N. P., Bahamas 'PHONE 2B0. P. 0. BOX 163. PUBLISHED DAILY Id id 4U 4cr line for second insertion ; and one penny per line for subsquent insertions. Advertisements under eight lines 4s. THE CASE Or THE DOUBLE ALLIANCE VS THE TR.IPLE ENTENTE Argued By JAMES M. BECK Former Aaelate.nt Attorney General of the UNITED STATES 1 (Continued) The official defense c.f England ck Ruuifl does not apparently show any failure on the part of either to submit all of the documents in their possession, -but the German "White Paper" on its face (Uncloses the suppression of document' of vital importance, while Austria has as yet failed to submit any of the documentary evidence in its possession. We know from the German "White P.iper"—even if we did not conclude as a matter of irresistible inference—that many important communications must also have palled hetween those two Countries and Italy. Italy, despite its embanassing position, owes to the world the duty of a full disclosure. What such di^closuie (would probably show is indicated 'by her deliberate conclusion that her A 11 ies had com menced a aggressive war, winch released her from any obligation under the Triple Alliance. The fact that communications passed" between Berlin and Vienn the text of which has never been disclosed, is pot a matter of conjecture. Germany admits and asserts as part of her defense that she faithfully exercised her. mediatory infuence with Austria, but not only is such mediatory influence not disclosed but the text of these vital communications is still kept in the secret archives of Berlin and Vienna. Until Germany is willing to put the most important documents in its possession in evidence, it must not be surprised that tne world, remembering Bismarck's garbling of the Ems dispatch, which pre cipitated the Franco-Prussian war, will be incredulous as to the sincerity of German's mediatory efforts. On June 38, 191^ Jhe Austrian Crown Prince wits murdered at Serajevo. For nearly 1 mouth there was no action by Austria, and no public statement whatever of its intentions. The world profoundly sympathized with Austria, in its new trouble, and especially with its aged monarch, who like King Lear was "As full of f/i ief rs years and wretched in both." The Servian Government had formerly disclaimed any complicity with the assassination, and had pledged itself to punish any Servian citizen implicated therein. From time to time, from June 28 to July 23,there came semi-inspired intimations from Vienna that that country intended to act with selfrestraint and in the most pacific manner. Never was it even hinted that Germany and Austria were about to apply in a time of profound peace a match to the powder magazine of Europe. This is strikingly shown by the first letter in the English "While Paper" from Sir Edward Grey to Sir H. Rnmbold, July 20 1911. It is one of the most significant documents in the entire correspondence. At the time this letter was written it is altogether probable that Austria's arrogant and most unreason able ultimatum had already been framed and approved in Vienna and possibly in Berlin, and yet Sir Edwaid Grey, the Foreign Minister of a great and friendly country had so little knowledge of Austria'* policy that he "Asked the German Ambassador today (July 20^ if he had any news of what was going on in Vienna with regard to Servia The German Ambassador replied "that he had not, but Austria was certainly going to take some step." Sir Edward Grey adds that he told the German Ambassador that he had learned that Count Berchtold, the Austrian Foreign Minister, "In speaking to the Italian Ambassador in Vienna, had deprecated the suggestion that the situation was grave, but had said that it should be cleared up." The German Minister then replied that it would be desirable "if Russia could act as a mediator with regard to Servia" so that the first suggestion .>f Russia playing the part of the peacemaker came from the German Ambassador in London. Sir Edward Grey then adds that he told the German Ambassador that he 'assumed that the Austrian Government would not do anything until they had first disclosed to the public their case against Servia, founded presumably upon what they had discovered at the trial," and the German Ambassador assented to this assumption. [English "White Paper," No. 1.] Either the German Ambassador was then deceiving Sir Edward Grey, on the Theory that the true function of an Ambassador! 1 England did not know what was then in progress. „ The British Ambassador at Vi. ennti reports to Sir Edward Grey. "The delivery at Belgrade on the 23d July of the note to Servia was •preceded by a period of absolute silence at the Ballplati. He proceeds to say that with the exception of the German Ambassador at Vienna — note the significance of the exception—not a single member of the Diplomatic Corps knew anything of the Austrian ultimatum and that the French \mbassador when he visited the Austrian Foreign Office on July 24 was not only kept in ignorance that the ultimatum had actually been issued, but was given Continued en fonrtk page) 1 J*


The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02297
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Saturday, November 07, 1914
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02297

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Full Text
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Nulllus e.ddlctua |urnre In vtrba me-gletri.
Being bound to swear to the Do|mm if no Mmi<[
VOL.*.
Ntvaanu. N. P.. BuhMnm, Saturday. November 7.1914
No. 232
L. OILBKRT DUPCCH,
Editor and Proprietor.
OKFICR: 38-44 MARKKT STREET
Nassau, N. P., Bahamas
'PHONE 2B0. P. 0. BOX 163.
PUBLISHED DAILY
Id
id
4U
4 Monday, Wednesdry and Friday-
single copy ......
Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday-
single copy .........
Weekly ............
Monthly ............is.
Su.irterly........ .. xg.
alfYearly............8s.
Yenrly ............16t.
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
Advertising Rates:Six iience per line
for first insertion; three pence |>cr line
for second insertion ; and one penny per
line for subsquent insertions.
Advertisements under eight lines 4s.
THE CASE Or
THE DOUBLE ALLIANCE
VS
THE TR.IPLE ENTENTE
Argued By JAMES M. BECK
Former Aaelate.nt
Attorney General of the
UNITED STATES
1
(Continued)
The official defense c.f England
ck Ruuifl does not apparently show
any failure on the part of either to
submit all of the documents in
their possession, -but the German
"White Paper" on its face (Uncloses
the suppression of document' of vital
importance, while Austria has as
yet failed to submit any of the docu-
mentary evidence in its possession.
We know from the German
"White P.iper"even if we did
not conclude as a matter of irres-
istible inferencethat many im-
portant communications must also
have palled hetween those two
Countries and Italy. Italy, despite
its embanassing position, owes to
the world the duty of a full dis-
closure. What such di^closuie
(would probably show is indicated
'by her deliberate conclusion that
her a 11 ies had com menced a aggress-
ive war, winch released her from
any obligation under the Triple
Alliance.
The fact that communications
passed" between Berlin and Vienn
the text of which has never been
disclosed, is pot a matter of con-
jecture. Germany admits and as-
serts as part of her defense that
she faithfully exercised her. med-
iatory infuence with Austria, but
not only is such mediatory influ-
ence not disclosed but the text of
these vital communications is still
kept in the secret archives of Berlin
and Vienna.
Until Germany is willing to put
the most important documents in
its possession in evidence, it must
not be surprised that tne world,
remembering Bismarck's garbling
of the Ems dispatch, which pre
cipitated the Franco-Prussian war,
will be incredulous as to the sin-
cerity of German's mediatory ef-
forts.
On June 38, 191^ Jhe Austrian
Crown Prince wits murdered at
Serajevo. For nearly 1 mouth there
was no action by Austria, and no
public statement whatever of its
intentions. The world profoundly
sympathized with Austria, in its
new trouble, and especially with
its aged monarch, who like King
Lear was "As full of f/i ief rs years
and wretched in both."
The Servian Government had
formerly disclaimed any complicity
with the assassination, and had
pledged itself to punish any Servian
citizen implicated therein.
From time to time, from June 28
to July 23,there came semi-inspired
intimations from Vienna that that
country intended to act with self-
restraint and in the most pacific
manner. Never was it even hinted
that Germany and Austria were
about to apply in a time of pro-
found peace a match to the powder
magazine of Europe.
This is strikingly shown by the
first letter in the English "While
Paper" from Sir Edward Grey to
Sir H. Rnmbold, July 20 1911. It
is one of the most significant docu-
ments in the entire correspondence.
At the time this letter was written
it is altogether probable that Aus-
tria's arrogant and most unreason
able ultimatum had already been
framed and approved in Vienna
and possibly in Berlin, and yet Sir
Edwaid Grey, the Foreign Minis-
ter of a great and friendly country
had so little knowledge of Austria'*
policy that he
"Asked the German Ambassador
today (July 20^ if he had any news
of what was going on in Vienna
with regard to Servia The Ger-
man Ambassador replied "that he
had not, but Austria was certainly
going to take some step."
Sir Edward Grey adds that he
told the German Ambassador that
he had learned that Count Berch-
told, the Austrian Foreign Minis-
ter,
"In speaking to the Italian Am-
bassador in Vienna, had deprecated
the suggestion that the situation
was grave, but had said that it
should be cleared up."
The German Minister then re-
plied that it would be desirable
"if Russia could act as a mediator
with regard to Servia" so that the
first suggestion .>f Russia playing
the part of the peacemaker came
from the German Ambassador in
London. Sir Edward Grey then
adds that he told the German Am-
bassador that he
'assumed that the Austrian Gov-
ernment would not do anything un-
til they had first disclosed to the pub-
lic their case against Servia, found-
ed presumably upon what they had
discovered at the trial,"
and the German Ambassador as-
sented to this assumption.
[English "White Paper," No. 1.]
Either the German Ambassador
was then deceiving Sir Edward
Grey, on the Theory that the true
function of an Ambassador! 1 Eng-
land did not know what was then
in progress.
The British Ambassador at Vi.
ennti reports to Sir Edward Grey.
"The delivery at Belgrade on the
23d July of the note to Servia was
preceded by a period of absolute
silence at the Ballplati.
He proceeds to say that with
the exception of the German Am-
bassador at Vienna note the
significance of the exceptionnot
' a single member of the Diplomatic
Corps knew anything of the Aus-
trian ultimatum and that the
French \mbassador when he visit-
ed the Austrian Foreign Office on
July 24 was not only kept in ignor-
ance that the ultimatum had ac-
tually been issued, but was given
Continued en fonrtk page)
1
J*


Publication began at 6.40 p.m.
Zhe Vrfbune
iL.:. '
Saturday. November 7. 1914.
SPECIAL.
From and after this date,
the following Shops will be
Depots for the sale of THE
TRIBUNE, viz :
T. G. JOHNSON', Corner
Dowdeswell and Arm-
strong Streets.
V. R. INGRAHAM, Market
Street, South.
F. GARNER, Corner Bay
and Pitt Streets.
Nov. 7th, 'i)i,j.
Germany's full programme, as
indicated by a German Officer
reads thus:
"First, France is to be struck
down.
Second, Russia polished off.
Third, Calais, Boulogne, Dun-
kirk, Ostend and Antwerp to be
garrisoned by German legions.
Fast. Under cover of the new
l6 in. Krupp Guns, and by the
aid of mines, submarines, and
Zeppelins, the Uhlans, and the
Death's Head Hussars would
arrive, and promptly convert
England into a German pro-
vince."
It is a fine scheme drawn up
with that characteristic precision
and "efficiency" of which Ger-
many is so proud. But by some
inadvertence, peculiar to great
minds, it leaves out ol account
the Brttinh Navy.
S/c, B.-nthardi: "The War
gainst English Commerce must
be boldly and energetically
prosecuted, and should start un-1
expectedly. The prizes which j
fall into ogr hands, must be
remorselessly destroyed."
Sj'c, "Floyd George" Out of
20,000,000 tons of British ship
ping only 20,000 tons have been
captured by Germany. This
would be represented by 8 01 10
small vessels of from 1,000 to
3,000 tons."
Meanwhile German Com-
merce has been hounded off the
seas, hundreds of German vessels
haw been captured (some of
them very nice prizes indeed )
And the Kaiser Wilhelm der
CiTone, which fifteen vears ago
was (to the greaf exultation of
the Kaiser) the largest liner af-
loat has sunk by the little
High fly r.
And the German Navv as a
whole is bottled up in Helgo
land. So on the whole, though
as a precaution, we might all
learn to handle a rifle. I do not
anticipate a landing of Uhlans
at present."
General Sir John French's
"contemptible little force" at
onetime were hardly beset by
"Germans to right of them,
Germans to left of them,
Germans in front of them."
in the attempt to annihilate
them, but the men who go
into battle with a smile on their
faces and a jest on their lips, are
the men who have to be reckon
ed with. The small British force
has distinguished itself in an ex-
ceptional manner, and this has
been recognised by friends and
foes alike, if we can judge of the
latter's recognition Ifrom the re-
ports of captured officers.
No one can deny that theGer
man Empire is a wonderful
achievement, and that it has
been accomplished in one
generation has not made life
easier for the individual, but in-
finitely harder, and the German
people have accepted the sound,
which to us though accepted
literally by a large number of
them, lias a false ring to our
iars, ringing as it does with the
Kaiser's assumption of Divine
co-operation, We can have only
one opinion of Germany's con'
duct in provoking war,' and it
has been ably argued by Mr.
Beck as we are showing jn t|ie
extracts from his article on our
frontpages. He dors not pro-
nounce sentence, he but judges,
and the conclusion winch he has
reacned is, that Germany itself
will at the .ii | |v itso.\ i.Cvcii.
tioner llero-\ u people will con
demn her when the) realize thai
the terrible price' which they
must pay for incapable diplo-
macy, and brut.ilitv, and ruth-
leasness has been lived by thDse
in whom they repossd unlimited
confidence.
We have on more than one
occasion directed the attention
of our people our readers, to the
Conflicting character of the in-
formation we receive from tele
grams and from the reports of
special correspondents to the
American papers, and that
though they are corroborative,
they are not altogether worthy of
being believed.and we emphasize
what we have already said. In
proof, we have to say that ( ier-
man sources of information are
distinctly unreliable The Mili-
tary authorities of Paris saw
"It is proper again to call
to the public attention that faith
should not be placed in the of
ficial bulhtines of the German
General Staff. A bulletin given
out by this staff alleges that our
attacks on the heights to the
south of Thiaucourt were repuls-
ed with very considerable losses
to our men.
"Asa matter of fact, our offen-
sive in this direction found it im
possible to maintain itself at all
at '.he points won in the course
of this advance movement: nev
ertheless, we were successful in
in retaining, as a whole, the
major part of the terrain which
our offensive movement succeed
in taking.
"This morning a German offi
cer was sent under a flag of truce
to the commander of the French
Operating in this region. He re
quested, speaking for the Ger
man authorities, an armistice to
bury the dead and remove the
wounded. The French com
mander sent the officer back to
his lines and immediately caus-
ed the atttack on the enemy to be
renewed.
"The advai.ee we at once made
against the enemy made it pos-
sible for us to secure the advan-
tage over them which^hey had
been endeavouring to obtain
over US by an armistice, and it
showed at the same time the
absurdity of the successes claim
ed by our adversaries* for them
selves "
One word more. We are ex-
tremely sorry and pained,that a
great want of perfect oneness at
this time is .shown by n few per
sons among us Their minds are
unbalanced,and they yield easily
to the passing puff of wind. These
persons are great talkers, and
having an incouceiveably swol
len idea of their ability, thev ven-
tilate their views and opinions
whenever they can find listners.
Someof thesearens weak-minded
as they, and likely to be wronglv
influenced by their specious
arguments. We would urge up
on this class of street orators,
the wisdom of thinking twice
j before they speak once. In such
Ia Case they will be led to see
that ii is itUnce which is golden
i Remember the old man and the
j bundle of sticks. While on this
subject we cannot but say that
the American journals and to
their credit be it said, have be
haved impartially. The attempt
to capture American public
sentiment was a miserable
failure, due to the spirit of fair-
play; as a matter of fact, as soon
as German Military exploits
took on the colour of success, all
the American journal gave them
just as big Infills as their
defeats; and more^could not
have been expectedjjlays Mr.
Alleyne Ireland F. R.tj. S. writ
ing in the United Empire:
"Apart from Germans 'and the
German Press, 1 have not en
countered a single expression of
opinion that Get many will be
victorious in the present war."
This should be the feeling ani-
mating the hearts of all British
subjects everywhere, believing
that the crushing of militarism
is the only means by which uni-
versal peace shall be secured.
THE DEVELOPMENT
BOARD.
The Development Boafd has
decided to compile and issue a
Register of Hotels, Bearding
houses, Houses and apartments
to let in Nassau, for which a
small inclusive fee will be
charged. Copies of the Register
will be supplied t > Messrs Thos.
Cook and Sous, Raymond and
Whitcombe, the Tucker Agency,
"Ask Mr. Foster" Agency, and
the steamship Agencies, and as
far as possible a corrjyirill be in-
serted in each pampRfet issued
by the Board so that it will
reach about 6o,ooo, Photographs
of houses will be inserted if de-
sired. Those wishing to appear
on the Register .should com-
municate at once with the Sec -
retary to the Development
Board.
:o:
The death of Mr William
Grant Maclure which occurred
at his residence on the 5th inst,
removes ;1 familiar figure from
our midst. For ov<-r a quarter
of a century he was in the Pub-
lic service of the Colony and
filled his several appointments
with credit. In the House of
Asseniblv, where we knew him
best, he was the living index to
its numerous records, and Parlia-
mentary Law was as familiar to
him as n household word, and
he was not less distinguished in
the Law Courts. In both of
these offices, he was unique. To
his bereaved Wife and family
we effer our sincere condolence.
Mr. Maclure rend ^w in the
office of the Late Sir^ D. Mai
colm and was admitted to th
Bar in 1883; Elected Ast.Clerl
House of Assembly 1890; Jus
tice Governors Harbour 1894
Actg. Stipendiary and Circ


T
Magistrate; Registrar Supreme
Court 1898; Actg. Stipendiary
and Circuit Magistrate from
Sept. to Dec.l"9ril. Retired
from the Publi'^rvice 1911.
#0:-
The following telegrams were
[received yesterday the 6th inst
by his Excellency the Governor.
London 6th.
Governor Bahamas.
Your Telegram 12th October
lave communicated with Hoard
f Trade. Your Telegram of 22nd
October Admiralty & War
)ffice inform me that their re
uirements are met for the pre
f*nt under existing contracts.
HARCOURT.
We are in the receipt of a
adiogram from Capt. Pearce
>! the Motor Boat "Frances E."
-Storm at MiamiWill not
save today."
Foreign Mails to be despatch
per France* E. via Miami,
la. will be made up and closed
Wednesday nth Nov. at 8
.m.
The Public would like to
i-now if it is a fact that, certain
)f the Out Isl ^^Commissioners
ire pressing AN poor people to
:ontribute even to their last
lenny to the War Relief Fund,
imply that the district over
Iwhich he s the Pontus Pilate
nay out-do other districts
If this be true, it is the plain
luty of the Government to in-
trurt every such Commissioner
o discontinue the objectionable
r.ictice, an allow the people to
t voluntarily in the matter.
:o:
WHY A UNITED EMPIRE
EXISTS
kgatn, through the Courtesy of
the Honourable the Colonial
Secretary, we are enabled 10
publish the item
following 1
WHITEHALL GARDENS
London, S. \V.
16th. October, 1914.
*fcir,
, I have the honour to transmit
1 copy of an anon vinous letter re-
money can be applied in the
manner desired uy the writer.
1 have,&c.
(Sg) H. MARTIN.,
for Crown Agents.
The Hon'ble
The Colonial Secretaiy,
ire. &c. &c.
Bahamas.
Sec. IVmas 4
Copy of an anonymous letter to
the Daily Telegraph.
Reading.
13. 10. 14
Dear Sir,
I believe it was in your paper
a little time since I sa%v an ac-
count of great Distress atone of
the Bahamas Islands viz. Inagua,
the Governor General "of the
Bahama" living at the Capital,
Nassau. It appears that no
crops can be raised on Inagua,
though it has a large population.
And steamers that call seem
chiefly to be German, so
as the men act chiefly as ste-
vedores on steamers that ply and
call at places between New
York and South America and
some places that they call at
seldom get a call, and if so per-
haps it may hf the only vessel
they see and get what they re-
quire from. In consequence ol
these steamers not at work these
chiefly stevedores are thrown out
of work and the only help and
call they had is cut off. It just
proves how enterprising the
Germans are, yet these people
and others get no call from En-
glish vessels, though there is a
necessity and proves the English
should not neglect any Islands
or Countries that have wants. I
hope our shipping people will
awake and study the needs of
our Islands and any other that
want some kind of foods I en-
close One pound {l) P. O. to-
wards relif from
Youis truly,
A WORKER AND'A
SYMPATHISER.
P. S. Now these people and
others are cut off from supplies
hitherto supplied by New York
toSouth America steamers, what
an opportunity to supply is
now open to the shipping
teived by the Editor of the Daily ; Companies, also the people in
jelegraph, enclosing the sum of distress but once set on a foot-
le pound itjt) for remittance ing, here are men use to the
lagua Isliflfl "toward relief." j Routes and Places of call wait-
The Editor has forwarded ing for work, I hope it may be
iraount to us, and we have brought to the notice of the
\cd it to the credit of the'proper authorities #by you so
mini Government in our ac- j some action be taken and not
We shall be glad if the allowed to pass from us.
NAMING OF STREETS
AND ALLEYS IN THE
SUBURBS
Nassau, N. P.
Nov. 7th.
To the Editor of The Tribune.
Dear Sir:
I was thinking while read-
ing one of the English Papers,
which mentioned "Buttonwood
Street," that it would beiappro-
priate for the Public Board of
Works to name streets, lanes
and alleys after different woods
and fruits in the Bahamas.
For instance: Paw Paw Lane,
Lemon and Orange Street,
sound very well.
STREETS..
Buttonwood Street
Bull wood
Iron wood
Rosewood
Yellowwood
Dogwood
Cottonwood
Horseflesh
Cedar
Madeira
Cocoanut
Tamarind
LANES.
Sand Box Lane
Paw Paw
Pear
Lemon
Orange
Cherry
Sapodilla
Grape Fruit
Mango
Pineapple
Cocoa Plum "
Apple
ALLEYS
Banana Alley
Musk Mellon "
Lime
There is an Alley east of
Cedarville called "Pumpkin Al-
ey" but not painted. We have
enongh names of persons and
places now, I therefore hope that
the Hon. Board will choose
some of those I have suggesten.
ONE INTERESTED.
:o:
Latest War News
RADIOGRAMS
London: The Russians are
forcing the Germans hackward
in Russian Poland and have
checked them in East Pussia.
If the Russians can keep up
their victorious advance relief
must come to the allied armies
because of the necessity for the
withdrawal of German troops
from France and Belgium to the
aid of those battling the Rus-
sians in Silesa and East Prussian
territory.
The Anglo-French fleet con-
tinue.their bombardment of forts
of the Dardanelles but the Turks
say the warships have inflicted
no damage.
Holy places are to be respect-
ed by the British guns as long
as Indian subjects are not mo-
lested. ,
Details are still lacking of the
naval engagement in the Pacific
Japanese and British vessels are
to start out and round up the
German cruisers.
New York : 24 in the House
and 13 in the Senate will be the
Democratic majority according
to the latest figures at hand to-
night.
Washington :The adoption
of the $135,000,000 loan on
cotton may be announced by
the federal reserve board today.
That the fund would be fully
subscribed within the next few
hours was the cheerful outlook
last night.
Washington:Additional gov-
ernment inspectors have been
rushed to the infected cattle dis-
districts where hoof-and-mouth
disease is prevalent.
Fort Smith, Arkansas:Anoth-
er building in the Hartford coal
region was burned breaking the
quiet which followed the news
that federal troops were being
sent by order of President Wil-
son. The troops will arrive to-
dav.
New York:-The Liverpool
cotton maket is to re-open. The
announcement has been received
with joy on the New York cot-
ton market as it means a gener-
al resumption of business in the
future. The market has been
suspended since the latter
part of Julv
El Paso,'Texas:No details
of the Villa Carranza clash have
been received here. Villa has
strategic advantage in controll-
ing the solid block of North-
western states.
Washington.United States
marines have been landed at
Beyrut Syria according to a
dispatch from Paris but Wash-
ington has no news of the land-
ing-
Chicago: The states of Nevada
and Montana have given tfce
vote to women. Thty now have,
the full suffrage in eleven states.
November 7th 1914.
PICKRD UP
Paris predicts that the war
will end with Germany's ex-
haustion in about three months
as she cannot maintain such
Continued on Supplement


Supplement to
The Tribune
Saturday, November 7,1914
Latest War News
RADIOGRAMS
enormous Forces on two fronts
beyond (hat time.
It is reported thai General Von
Klucl; died, ten days ago from
wounds: also that the Crown
lVi.i-v lies wounded in ;i hos
pital in Strasshurg.
London re|>orls me tufts in the
North Sea of two German cruis-
ers, th Yorck and the Koenigs
burg.
Bulgaria and Greece have
proclamed their neutrality.
The British Admiralty an-
nounces that the cruiser Good-
hope probably sunk with all on
board in the fighting off Chile
The loss of life abo ird the
Monmouth was less because she
ran ashore.
The Russians have captured
Jaroslaw taking 50.000 prison-
ers
There is no change in the
French-Belgian situation. .
Fighting Is still K>'ig on
fiercely, each army holding its
own.
November 7II1, i<|i|-
London: The German fort-
ress of Tsingtau has surrender
ed to the Japanese-British forces
says a Tokio report.
Repeated attacks from laud
and sea for a period of nearly
three months were resisted and
the surrender was brought abou :
when the allied infantry charge
and occupied themiddlc for line.
The losses sustained by the
garrison are not known but that
of the allied forces was heavy.
The garrison numbered about
7.000 men mostly reservists in
China and surprise is expressed
that they held out so long
againjt such tremendous odds.
The fall of the fortress ends
the most picturesque of the
minor phases of the war and
marks the loss to Germany of
her last foot of possession on the
Asiatic mainland.
Fort Smith, Arkansas:Fed
eral troops are now in camp to
preserve order in the mining
camps.
Washington: Four fifths of
the $135.01)0.000 cotton loan
has been subscribed.
San Francisco:A naval en-
gagement is reported off the
coast of South America between
British-Japanese and German
ships, but details are unobtain
able.
The British Admiralty an
nounces that the cruiser Good
hop.' took fire and foundered
off the Chilian coast in a recent
engagement.
Washington:Great 16 inch
gun is now ready for test at
Indian Head grounds after sec
ret construction at the navy
yard.
It has a range of 15 miles and
at least twice the penetrating
power of the famous German
howitzers used on the Belgian
force. The new dreadnoughts
will be equipped with this gun.
New York:James A fatten
has been made defendant in a
suit charging him with corner
ing the Oats market in July
1914.
London: 1 he Russians re
port having driven the Germans
back to their border on the
North and to have forced their
center to retire from the Vis
tula.
The Russian general suiT has
turned its attention to the A US
trians who have held their posi
tion along the San River.


tile impression that its tone was
moderate. Even the Italian Am-
l>wlrk was not taken into Count
Merftb/flds confidence.
ftJDSVpt^h from Sir M. de Bun-
sen to Sir Edward Grey, dated
aiIipo be continued)
-oru :o:
Dead mans Cay
sill lo Long Island '
DetfiMr. Editor.
sir, ?\ I would like for the
readerqiof your valuable paper
to see what we have done to-
wards! Ithe War Relief Fund.
"Giitagth" of Sept last the Com-
mjesioocr held a meeting in the
ScliOobiHouse for the purpose of
opening a Subscription for the
"Wac ingowas a splendid and effective
oosd lb was well attended by
memfaromen and children, who
displayed the keenest loyalty as
tliavnieeting went on. The Com-
miiaolrJer pointed out to the
people the object of the meeting ;
and/dbd Governor's desire that \
every lislanrl should contributel
someWring towards the Fund '
wliid)tvas also explained to the |
people. Fr. Davison, then ad-j
lresbRdithom, and they cheered
hirhusHen he spoke about the;
protifction we had got and are i
stiH//agettini; from the Mother i
Co$inifi^. The School Teacher |
tliedisffoke in few butwapt words
about our duty as British Sub-j
jects; that "as we cannot go to
thdw*r\ we can show oarloyalty
bysd'lsacrilice of our personal
mefcwifu A sacrifice of life is more
thartdis sacrifice of money." The
nainesiof the donors were then
enrolled This was as tedious, as
thayjjdsl poured on the Com-
missioner, bringing their dona
tions The School Teacher as-
sishhl.tin the enrollment, and
alsft/inl receiving the donations
of tkdse who had no change Ml
the tangling, but wlio promised
to sefid'it in a day or two later.
This they strictly adhered to
Tlie>Jid)ool Teacher has been a
VetjR import.nit assistant in this
worJc.'bcan tell you Mr. Editor,
thatltfwrenre no people on Long
Island/who give more generousK
to any good cause than these !
pe merHt the Commissioner an- I
nomwed that' the donation*
atmssftied t<> over 13 d do not
remember the odd). Hie meet-
ing closed by singing " the King", which sounded as if
thejNnVeant what they were do
ing. 'They made the School
Hod&"ring with the singing.;
Thai-'is not all. Several days '
.......'Jl L
afterwards, many brought their
shillings and pennies. The So-
cieties, too, have done their very
best, which is a mark of their
loyalty to England.
Now we come to the children
of the Public School who have
done splendidly, and so we must
not forget them. Amid varied
struggles with the hard times,
and no sisal selling, these child-
ren have contributed a large
sum towards the "Fund", and
the liberal way in which they
did it shows that their parents
stood strong for the cause. We
can safely say they have done
their best. The amount collect-
ed from this Settlement is bve*
25, which is very good indeed.
Nearly the whole of the dona-
tion from this settlement may
be reckoned as one of sacrifice. I
know many who gave a shilling
really needed it for the times are
very hard and food scarce and
costly. Sisal, the main source of
getting money has fallen in
price and so when we combine
all these privations, it is obvious
that Deadman's Cay has made
some sacrifice. Uut we ate proud
we were able to make a sacri-
fice of our money, and then aie
some of us who would be will-
ing if really needed, to sacrifice
our lives for the Mnttier country
which is so dear to us.
"God save the King"
Thanks for your valuable
space..
Yours
A KBallJfcNT.
sJ
Sanitary /w Sold by
^p Wo.
Cool 1 Hilton,
(1 VI 260
Reliable Tl W Bay St.
Fruit of the Loom j6 in.
fct 7) per v in
For .sale.
ALOr nf land in Nine Hill
Uoad, Grant's Town, South
of Weslevan School.room.
Mrs LEONORA SMITH
Chapel St., South.
Ort. jQth. 4int.
STOP-LOOK
LISTEN!
We have secured Mr. James
Queen from the United States.
Bl thorough Optician, who will
remain here for the entire winter
see. son
We are therefore enabled to
offer for ONE MONTH only
a 32s.
pair of either PINCE-NEZ
or SPECTACLES, 14 carat
gold filled 00 lenses, soft cable
wires so tint they will not
cut the ears, and warranted
for twenty years
fop 8s.
Also English Pebble lenses
warranted 20 years without
changing for a little higher
price.
jfjfl Ifcfe Come and have
*3 m you.- EYES
^sjjp^^ tested under the
new process PR E Eofcharge
Headaches, Dizziness, and all
troubles of the RYE can be cured
at once. Wo refund the money
after . momhe trial of the glass-
es, if not satisfactory, or change
them free of charge.
Persons desiring my services
(..I notify me at The City
Pharmacy, when I shall call
on them at their, residences.
Withcut EXTRA CHARGE.
ON ACCOUNT OF HARD TIMES
Mr. Queen, Agent for the
Waltliam Watch Co., in or-
der to introduce the best
known Watch in the world
will offer a / / carat gold Jill-1
ed, 20 years guaranteed, Ladys
or Gentleman's open or closed
j ire
Watch, Walt;,am cr Admiral;
movement fcr 2, on the'
Instalment Plan of Is. or
more per week at the Fur-i
chas.-r's Option.
CALL AT ONCE and see the
SAMIPl.ES and learn our Terms
HPTheM Watehsa sol sold ill over the
World ,,i from /,4 t-i/,'5 each. '"
IF YOU MISS THIS CHANCE
YOU MISS THE CH4NCE Of
A LIFETIME.
Get Wise before it is too Late.
CANE SYRUP
Can he had at T. M. Knowles
at 10s. stg. per Tin
GOOD and THICK.
tt Bay Street i
Good Morning
We Ar$ Introducing
American 8ilkT^
American CashSMr-
American Cotton Jrisle
HOSIERY
Thry have stood the test, dive real
foot comfort No team* to rip. Neva
become loose or baggy. The shape \{
knit in not pressed in.
GUARANTEED for fineness, style/
superiority of material and workmanship.
Absolutely stainless Will wear 6 months]
without hole*, or new ones free.
OUR. SPECIAL Of rER
to every one sending us $ 1.00 in currency
or postal note, to cover advertising and
Shipping Charge*, we will send post paid
with written guarantee, backed by a five
million dollar company, either
5 Pairs of our'75c. value
American Silk Hosiery,
or 4 Pairs of our 50c. value
American Cashmere Hosiery,
or 4 Pairs of our 50c. Value.
American Cotton-Lisle Hosiery
or 6 Pairs of Children's Hosiery-
DON'T DELAY Ofier expires srhan
dealer in your locality i-. selected.
The International Hosiery co
P. O. Bex 224
DAYTON. OHIO, U. S. A-
OVER
1500
Boots and Shoes
being added to an already JK
replete stock
Williams the Shoeman
is again opening up one of
those Sample Lots of Boots
and Shoes in h limited
nuinher of sizes .'is follows
viz :
Men Boolj and Slices in sizes
I mm (> to 7 I
Wo'lienK Boots (111(1 Sin"-,
iii sizes front j I ;' i I
Misses Roots oinl slioi s iii -.1/. >.%
from ijj to i
The advantage in purchas-
ing from til's lot is (as oil rt
who have purchased before
can attest) that you can select]
the sizes from a very largt
variety of up-to-date styles at
prices considerably cheaper
lhati regular lines kept irj
stuck.
CALL EARLY
and secur? yott^eize at
WILLIAMS' WTOLESA]
AND RETAIL
SHOE ESTABLISHMEN1
277 and 289 Ba;, Street Cij


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