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Publication began at 5.10 p.m. Zhe Vrfbune Thursday. November 5. 1914. With a world in arms practically, though not literally, with the Combatants in millions; with the battle-field, or battlefields extending over an area of a millions quare miles.North and south, east and west, it cannot be expected by any reasonable mind that success must follow "our side" in every engagement. The reports which we receive are as variable as the mercurial column o| a barometei and our feelings are being played on by special Correspondents and "ea Dies' and "radiograms" in endless iui i ession ; to day we are despondent; to-morron we are in the clouds. During the Crimean' War when England, France, and Turkey which is behaving now so disgracefullj towards a couatry that saved her life from the Great Bear, were allies, rlenrj Russell song: "Cheer! Boys Cheer' DO more of idle sorrow. Courage true hearts to cheer us on our way, Hope smiles before and shows a bright to-morrow, Then let's forget the darkness of to-day." Incidentally, the words were written by Dr. Charles Mackey, and Henry Russell composed the music, and only received three pounds fir the copyright. He asked the publisher once, how the song sold, and was told that nineteen presses could not keep pace with the demand. Afterwards the publishers sent him £io to ease^ their consciences. Although half a century has rolled In-, yet ilie words arS as inspiring to-day as they were when they held hundreds of thousands at tinCrystal Palace They were to the hearts of that time,what"Its a long way to Tiprrary"is to theheartsof tins time. Germany's resoun efullness in bringing up reinforcements is swift, but "the race is not to the swift, nor the battle to the strong." Thousands of newspapers are published ei.iilv in the United Slates for a people whose avidity forreadingis not surpasses by am people in the world, and though the food supplied may not always afford mental pabulum of the best, we throw away the chall, there yet remains many more grains than are sufficentlo satisfy tiie more refined tastes. The American press is kept supplied with war news from special. war correspondents and the information presented to its readers is on the whole corroborative of the telegrams which we receive. The reasons for the war have been so threshed out, that little more can be said than has already been advanced. German Jews have played a prominent part and it is not their fault that "der Vaterland" did not over run Belgium to get at France. The Deutsche Bank in London, is a known centre of Anglophobia, and mammoth suckers of British wealth. It is to be hoped that England will learn the lesson taught, and learn it thoroughly, ami in future scoop out the dirty scum, if it should not be Been on i he surface, it is Mirto lie at the bottom, and will come In Hie surface when it is ready with "I loch! heute ist der Tag." We would urge our readers not to be disheartened, because the Allies do not appear to make rai>itl strides towards vi< tory ; remember that there is practirally as yet but one of^England's Arms at work, and re member also that Jack and Tommy hae shaken hands on the tough proposition of s>11;isi, ing "the mailed list/' ; IU( \ rhy know that the pi ice will i e heavy. Tommy has been paying his share C. O. D., and Jack realises that when his turn" conies, valuable slops and yt more valuable lives will be the cost. For our part we are "jolly well glad" that Sir John Jellicoe has stepped on to the quarterdeck, and that l'rince Louis of Bittenbuiji has "gone forrard." Most important services have been rendered by that new branch of the Service—\viators —Every day their bolts "from the blue" put some of the German Airships out of Commission, and weakens the efficacv of their sky spy system. In one day, live German aeroplanes were brought down by the Allies as they Hew over Uheiuis, and Calais, and this was a gain which can be weighed gainst Germany's blight gain on the and beneath t!:e waters thereof. England regards the airship as such an important i aval auxiliary that she has turned over her Dirigibles to the Navy and the Army has retained only Aeroplanes. There are many new things which have been introduced in Warfare, and England though at first scoffing somewhat at Germany's purpose in the matter of Dirigibles, has weighed their possibilites and quickly acted in accordance. Whether fighting in the air has or has not come to stav. the world will soon know. Meantime, "keep your pecker up." The Telegrams received to day are exceedingly encouraging, and had tiny been otherwise, we should never lose sight of our duty ; that our faith in our Empire should never waver. -:o: — BAHAMAS WAM RELIEF FUND The following subscriptions have been received Up t" Nov. 4th, 10T4. Previously acknowledged >_,"-''. 33 6 2 Bethel Baptist Church 17 2 Inhabitants Staniel Creek ro i< | Baptist Union 14 3 Grand U, O. of < > I". ,<> ,, ,, St. Matthew's Church 8 11 St. Matthe vs Sunday School i 5,3} Charles Stephens i 6 £2660 19 o[ Carollge I Ijn Sis:il 23 Sisal Wast99 bis shells and lips 6 tons Lignumvitae 56 pkgs. Bark 61 boxes 1 ,, t %  1 bl. I ( ; 'l" >fl t 3 bdls. Siii^ar cane i box Pumpkins 1 Plantains 4 empty Gas drums I CS. Films IMI.S ft. Co. Latest War News RADIOGRAMS November 5th r<* 14. From Secretary of State to His Excellency the Governor. London. November 4th. Press Bureau reports following is ac count of recent British operations in Belgium : October 30th The enemy largely reinforced violently attacked positions occupied by first army ^orps and cavalry. Enenn lost very beavi'., ly. Our commanJsr-r confident of maintaining |E ground and has done so. Cavalry whether mounted or in trenches has fought splendidly. The fighting line has been remj|hced by Indian troops. ^ ( On the night of the 30th a strpng attack on Messines was repulsed. Theenemy temporarr ly penetrated the line by weight of numbers -but were finally driven back by excellent bayonet counter attack. Our threatened left 1strongly reinforced bv troops from home and French reserves A brilliant Charge by London Scottish first territorials in fighting Inn' has earni d the warmest congratulations from >i'r John French. ist November the enemy attacked anil were repulsed losing heavily all along the line. Two eight-inch guns demolished bv our howitzers and prodigious slaughter occasioned by om ar tillers-. The enemy is greatly discouragi r| bv maint< nance of our hie' and the repulse <>f repeated assault., causing in some cases the loss of the whole col duns %  .f tiie enemy. The Allies position has been Strengthened and 1 im/rMced to attacks 11 iw tiue^Biieil 5U1 November. From the Secretary of State to His Excellency the G wernor. London. Novembei ith. Press Bureau reports: India 1 troops ire now operating with til" British forces. One of the first Indian regiments in action was heavily shelled while entrenching They showed great sangfroid, hardly troubling to look round after the fust |e > shells, later, in Storming a certain village of tact 1 a! importance, Indian in tops advanced nndrr conditions of no volt) and difficulty undi 1 heavy rifle and machine gun fire with dash and resolution Worthy of the highest ti, iditi>ns of the, army. The Kin:,' has sent the following Message to the Indian Corps Corn rim nd< 1: "Please congratulate your Indian troop* on their gallant condin t and express mv(raiatitude to them". fl^ Indians operating in a Cottntrv wholly dlfleretlt from their own have shown marked adaptability and will doubtless prove them



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Rfcelves admirably trained and fully capable (Avoiding their own. # November 5th 1914. The Britadfc cruiser Goodhope was not MIIK; but escaped into a Chilean*port afire and badly damaged, derman cruisers are waiting outside. Other Germans entered Valparaiso where they are coaling and provisioning. They are undamaged. The Turks have sunk a Kus lian battleship, the Sinop. One Cuban artilleryman was killed and a number of policeman and civilians wounded laal night at eleven o'clock in front of the Marti Theatre, I favana. The trouble was the outcome of an order by "Secretary Hevias requiring that the police demand fr mi soldiers w ho are out after ten o'clock at night thai they show their passes Man) am have Been made. 001 I:I;\MI \T I'KKSS London :—Turkey breaks all diplomatic relations with tinpowers of the triple entente as well as with Servia. All her representatives in those countries have been called home. w* Turkey's apUog) for bombard tng Russian Black Sea ports was unacce t ib'e to theKussi in gov ernmeut. The forts in the 1 Dardanelles an b line bomb ird d by Anglo I i' i h fleet. Spe 'illations are rife as to what Milkan powers will do, but with Turkey in the area of war Bulgaria must at least be prepared tot any eventuality. 1 he (iennans have abandoned their piisit 11 m on Ys'-i. Russians report capture of (Jet man officers. N %  York: (', das by Repub licans reduce the Dom>cratic majority. Their majority in the S late ill be but 14. Progress!vi 1 representation in the I louse has been cut from 10 to Q. I'd I'.iso. Texas: — \ lc\ico has t\> o capitals and two presidents, oiift of the factious led bv Carranza at Puebla and the other bv CuIterrVx who • 1 elected President b\ the Agn 1 C al i cnlas conventl< >n. Fort S iT^flk V kans is: Quiet waWiad in the Hartford mine region to which fede. d troops were sent on Tuesday. "Jew York. —II New Haven ictors pleaded not guilty when arraigned in New Yorktoi answer to A charge of criminal violation of the Sherman AntiTrust Law. They were released under $5 000 bond each. Santiago Chile: —No word from British ships that engaged the German squadron off Colonel Sunday, according to reports emanating from German officers All of the German vessels escaped unsca the d, fcrhile the British emiser M on mouth was sunk the cruiser Goodhope put out of ci-immission and the cruiser Glasgow and transport Othanto have been bottled up in port of Tab cahuano by the German cruisers Leipzig and Bremen. "GOD SAVE US ALL" Oct. 31st, 1914. The Editor of The "Tribune'' Sir, won Vr how many of our people in the liahauias know thai there is another verse to "< lod Save the King," or for the matter of that, in Other Colonii s and Iiepen b n< ies of Our Em pire I expect it is known nnli lo the few grey beards, and in this Colony, they are fast joining the "Silent majority." I suppose I might just as well own up that, I am on thai mail mvself, nevertheless while I am over tne age limit for Naval and Military Service, I am con %  1 'tit, not being ovei burdened with modesty,that I can do s .me thing *o wards creating a feeling of 1 tyalty in the breasts of B 13 S< outs and all and sundry other religeous organisations. I know of no better waV than advocating the resinning the sm ing of the discarde I lines of the hymn, at the present crisis. They ought never to have been among "thelines left out" at any and ill times. Just listen to the deep religion--, feeling which permeates evety word. Nothing could he liner. Listen '*( )h Lord our (iofj, arise Scatter our enemies and make them fall. Confound their politics, Upset their knavish tricks. On ihee our hopes we li\, < ind sa>e us all !" These lines are a solemn invo cation t >the God of Battles and adds another litany to our det 0tional exercises: and since the 4th August, yes, even from the 35th July* when Germany began her preparations for war, and the 28th when the German Fleet was assembling at Kiel and Wilhelmsbaven, a day before the British Fleet left Port land, it ought to have been sung and prayed, if good Chris tains believe in the efficacy of prayer, it aptly suits the occasion, Let the Church see to it ; let our journalists see it; let the peo pie see to ft, that the ennobling and patriotic lines arc nolongel eliminated from our National Anthem. Let the loyal senti | ments they embody be sung with fervour from every British heart, and by eve;' true Chris tain no matter what his nation ality or his creed may be. Yours in sincerity, A BRITISH GREY>&EARD. COSTLY BLOW TO GERMANY. London, Sunday, Oct. iK.— The naval correspondent of The London Times say-: "Compari sons will naturally be made l,e tween the loss sustained by the British through the sinking of the Ihwke on Thursday and thai of the Germans by the destructions! tin hands of out salois of four of its destroyers So far as the loss in ships goes the balance is heavily in our favor. The naval operations i" the North Sea jusi n rw give de strovermore 'h in their normal value, and I i i i~ Special Iv in need of!lie 1 n, since her poliCV is tod 1 as much damage by raids of smaller craft as she possibly can so as to reduce our adva itajje in great ships when the ila\nl their meeting comes. ••! iermanycan very ill afford to lose destroyers just now. From this point cf view her loss this week is far heavier than ours, for the Hawke was an old ship and not of great value to us. Iii men the losses of the Germans in these four destroyers] will about equal the number of our men who met death in the i Hawke on Thursday ind in the. affair on Heligoland that t place, at the end of August. "Since then our men have been waiting foranothei opportunity of coming to grips with the | enemy, The tim of waiting must have been dreai j ind trying, but the chan <• has COllje, it will come again. Even little heipS, and in the dm 1 if decision, when the final test j comes between Britain and Get many for the mastery of the seas. these forerunners ol the day, that have gone so decisiveh 111 our favor will not be without their moral effect upon Hie hostile fleets as Miev go into action." —:o: — ILLNESS SAVES KAISER'S SON. London, England, Oct 22—A dispatch from Copenhagen says that Prince Oscar, the.fifth son of the German Emperor, owes his life to his at tack ol heart disease. It appears from the stories current that a party of Turcos were firing from trees and shot down all me officers surrounding the prince without exception. The sudden excitement led to the heart attack and the prince fell unconscious. 'The Turcos believed lie was dead and stopped firing. PUBLIC BOARD OF WORKS. Notice P ERSONS havmg land to dispose of in the Eastern District suitable for a burial ground, are invited to communicate with the Public Board of Works. Notice T I11C Public Hoard of Works having decided to name the unnamed strt and lanes in the Suburbs of Nassau (Grants Town, Bains Town, etc.) and to mark' tbc names Oil the ends of same, invite suggestions from the General Public as to the selection of suitable names for the purpose. Notice I T has come to the notice ,>| the Public Bond ol Works that certain persons in the City and Suburbs arc in the habit of leaving carriages and carts Sir. in the public streets when not in use. NOTICE is therefore given that tliis is against the rules of the Board and persons guilty of a breach of therules 111 future, will be pro'-' CUted. The Foregoing not 11 es are published by order of the Public Board 1 of Works. James II. Knowles. Clerk to the Board. Naati. joth October, 1914a



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• %  — possessions, can only have one thought-how he is to hack his way through." ened and is fighting for his highest This defense is not even a plea of confession and avoidance. It is a plea of "Guilty" at the bar of the world. It has one merit, that it does not add to the crime the aggravation of hypocrisy. It virtually rests the case of Germany upon 1li gospel of Treitschkc and Bernhaidi that each nation is justified in ex-, erting its physical power to the ut. most in defence of its selfish inter; ests.There is no novelty in this gospel. Its only surprising feature is its revival in the twentieth century. It was tanght far more .effectively hy Machiavelli in his treaties." The \ Prince," wiierein he glorified the policy of Cesare Rorgia in tramp j ing the weaker States o' Italy un-, der foot by ruthless terrorism unbridled ferocity, and the basest deception. Indepd, the wanton de struction "f Belgium is simply Morgiarism amplified ten-thousandfold by the mechanical resources of modern war. Unless our boasted civilization is the thinnes^ veneering of Barbarism; unless th<* law of the world is in lact only ethics of the rifle and the consrienc* of lb* 1 cannon; unless mankind after countless centuries has made unreal advance in political morality beyond that of the cave dweller, then this a> swer of Germany cannot satisfy the "decent respect to the opinion of mankind." GenTi-my's contention that a treaty of peace is "a scrap of paper." to be disregarded vt will when required hy the selfish interests of one contracting party, is negation of all that civilization stands for. Belgium has been crucified in the face of the woild. Its innocence of any offense, untii it was attacked, is too clear for argument. Its voluntary immotion to pieserve its solemn guarantee of neutrality will "plead like angels, trumpettnngued. ag-iinst the deep damnation of its taking off." On that issue the Supom* Court could have no ground for doubt or hesitation. Its judgement would be speedy and inexroable. (To be continued) THE Cosmopolitan HIGH SCHOOL Opens on Monday, Oct. 5th ill Aurora Hall on Charlotte Street. For particulars apply to Prof. G. G. Coffin, head master, or Mr. J. P. Simms. THE REINDEER is an inhabitant of the Arctic Region, and it is possibly the most useful of all the animals which dwell in this part of the world. Unlike the Reindeer, SUNLIGHT SOAP is to be found in all parts of the cltilised world, and its great utility is vouched for by millions of contented housewives who would not be without it. SUNLIGHT SOAP enjoys a well-merited reputation, it is absolutely pure, and will not harm the most delicate fabric. A piece of Sunlight Soap used in your next wash will convince you of its excellence. Sanitary Cool Reliable Fruit of the Loom 3G in. at 7! per yard. Shingles Rest No. 1 Heart 5111. Cypres Shingles at f9.60per Klions sand of 20 bundles Discounts on lots of over 5000 shingles. Special Price also on cheaper grades—also 5in. Cypress at .$6.72 per thousand of 20 bundles. This price made possible by a very large purchase. Fresh stock arriving every week. C. C. SAUNDERS. For Result Advertise in The Tribune OVER 1500 Pairs Boots and Shoes being added to an alreadyreplete stock Williams the Sliocnian is again opening op one of those Sample Lots of Boots and Shoes in a limited number of sizes as follows viz : — Men Idiots and Shoes in il*i from b to 7J Women* Moots andSlioes in sizes from }.J to 4J Misses Bootfl ;iiid Hioi'sin sizes fmin 12J to I The advantage in purchasing from this lot is (as others who have purchased before can attest) that you can select the sizes from a very large variety of upto-date styles at prices considerably cheaper than regular lines kept in tock. CALL EARLY and secure your size at William*' Wholesale and R.elo.1) Shoe Establishment j 77 279 Bey Street (City) CANE SYRUP Can be had at T. M. Knowles at 10s. stg. per Tin GOOD and THICK. East Bay Street Notice W E wou^call the attention it Clint ut. No seams to rip. Never become loose or hugCY'. The shape is knit innot pressed in GUARANTEED f-r fineness, stvl.-, superiority of material ami workmanship, Absolutely stiinhss Will wear < %  months without holes, or t rw ones free. OUR. SPECIAL OFFER to everv one irn OIL' US S| 00 in riirienc; or postal note, to covet advertising am shipping charges, we will semi pit paid with written guarantee, backed by afiv million dollar coni| any. either 5 Fnira of our 7">< value American ^ilk Hciery, or 4 f'-vir-* of Ojr 90B. vis.1 via \merican Cilimefe llosieiv, or 4 H%ir of our Vie. ••' e. 1M •. American Cntt •n.lJ^Hosi ty or 6PalrniCMIIfrn'iHoilrv I'ONT DBLAY -Oner expire* wba dt-alvr in vour I %  • ilil\ is M In id THE INTERNATIONAL HOSIERY CJ P. O. Box 224 DAYTON. OHIO. U. bv



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• CO a> o si 7) CO +-> (A £ Nullius o.ddiclus |urare in verbn m&giatri. Being bound lo iwaar to the Dojmo.* if no Master VOL.X. Nassau. N. P.. Ba.he.meLs. Thursday, November 3,1914 No. 230 SB L. GILBERT DUPUCH, Editor and Proprietor. OFFICE: 38-44 MARKET STREET Nasiau, N. P., Bahamas "PHONE 200. P. O. BOX 163. PUBLISHED DAILY Monday, Wednesday and Fridaysingle copy i,| Tuesday, Thursday and Saturdaysingle copy id Weekly 4 |,i Monthly i s. 4 eiice per line for first insertion; three |nce |ier line for second insertion ; ar.d one penny per line for subsrjuent insertions. Advertisements under eight lines 4s. THE CASE OF THE DOUBLE ALLIANCE vs. THE TRIPLE ENTENTE Argued By JAMES M. BECK Former Assistant Attorney General of the UNITED STATES Mr. Heck's argument of this, the greatest of the world's cases, that of thf Double Alliance vs. the 'triple Entente before the Supreme Court of Civilization, is presented here, and is one of the most interesting articles written about this widely discussed question of the responsibility for the European tonflict. I.el us suppose that in this year of disgrace. Nineteen Hundred and Fourteen, there had existed, as let us pray will one day exist, a Supreme Court of Civilization, before which the sovereign nations could litigate their differences without resort to the iniquitous and less effective appeal to tlit arbitianieni of arms. Let us further suppose that each of the contending nations had a sufficient leaven of Christianity lo have its grievance adjudged not by the ethics of the cannon or the rifle, but by the eternal criteriof justice. What would be the judgment # of that august tribunal. Any discussion of the ethical merits of this great controversy must start with the assumption that there is such a thing as international morality. This fundamental axiom, upon u Inch the entire basis of civilization necessarily rests, ischall lged by a small class of interlectuai perverts. Some of these hold that moral considerations must be subordinated either to military necesity or socalled manifest destiny. This is the Bernhardi doctrine. Other teach that war is a beneficient fatility and that all nations engaged in it are therefore equally justified. On this theory, all of the now contending nations are but victims of an irresistible current of events, and the higbesfcdury of the State is to prepare itself for the systematic extermination, when necessary, of its neighbours. Notwithstanding the clever platitudes under which both these doctrines are veiled, all morally sane minds me agreed that this war is a great crime agiinst civilization, and Mhe only open question is, which f the two contending groups of power is morally responsible for the crime? Was Austria justified in declaring war against Servia? Was Germany justified in declaring war against Russia and France? Was England justified in declaring war against Germany. ? As the last of ihese questions is the most easily disposed of, it maj be considered fir>t. England's Justification England's justification rests upon the solemn treaty of 1839, whereby Prussia, France, England, Austria, and Russia "became the guarantois" of the "perpetual neutrality" of Belgium as reaffieme by Count Bismarck, then Chancellor of the German Empire, on July 22, 107a and as even more recently reaffirmed in the striking fact disclosed in the Belgian "Grav Book". In the Spring of 1913, a debate was in the Budget Commute of the Reichstag will* reference to the military Budget. In the course of the debate the German Secretary of State said: "The neutrality of Belgium is determined by international conventions and Germany is resolved to respect those conventions. To confirm this solemn assurance, the Minister of War added in the same debate: "Belgium does not play any part in the justification of the Ger man scheme of military leorganization. The scheme is justified by the position of matters in the East. Germany will not lose stght of the fact that Belgian neutrality is guaranteed by international treaties. A year later, on July 31, 1914, Herr von Below, the German^Minister at Brussels, assured the Belgian Department of State that be knew of a declaration which the German Chancellor had made in 1911, to the effect "that Germany had no intention of violating our neutrality," and "that he was cer. tain that the sentiments to which expression was given at that time had not changed." (See Belgian "Gray Book," Nos. TI and 12). It seems unnecessary to discuss the wanton disregard of these solemn obligations and protestations, when the present Chancellor of the German Empire, in his speach to the Reichstag and to the world on Aug. 4, 1914, frankly admitted that the action of the German military machine in invading Belgium was a wrong. He said: "We are now in a stateof necessity and necessi.y know no law. Our troops have occupied Luxemburg and perhaps are already on Belgian toil Gentlemen, that is contrary to the dictates of international law. It is tiue that the French Government has declared at Brussels that France is willing to respect the neutrality of Belgium, so long as her opponent respects it. We knew, however, that France stood ready for invasion. France could wait, but we could not wait. A French movement upon our flank upon the lower Rhine might have been disastrous So we were compelled to override the protest of the Luxemburg and Belgian Governm. nts The wrong— I speak openly-that ware commit. ring we wi'l endeavour to make good as soon as our military goal has been reached. Anybody who is threatened as we have bee n threat. Continued on fonrth page)


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Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Thursday, November 05, 1914
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
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General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Nullius o.ddiclus |urare in verbn m&giatri.
Being bound lo iwaar to the Dojmo.* if no Master
VOL.X.
Nassau. N. P.. Ba.he.meLs. Thursday, November 3,1914
No. 230
SB
L. GILBERT DUPUCH,
Editor and Proprietor.
OFFICE: 38-44 MARKET STREET
Nasiau, N. P., Bahamas
"PHONE 200. P. O. BOX 163.
PUBLISHED DAILY
Monday, Wednesday and Friday-
single copy ......... i,|
Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday-
single copy ......... id
Weekly ............ 4|,i
Monthly ............is. 4 Quarterly........ 4s.
Half Yearly............8*.
Yearly ............lf,s.
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
Advertising Rates : Six |>eiice per line
for first insertion; three |nce |ier line
for second insertion ; ar.d one penny per
line for subsrjuent insertions.
Advertisements under eight lines 4s.
THE CASE OF
THE DOUBLE ALLIANCE
vs.
THE TRIPLE ENTENTE
Argued By JAMES M. BECK
Former Assistant
Attorney General of the
UNITED STATES
Mr. Heck's argument of this, the
greatest of the world's cases, that of
thf Double Alliance vs. the 'triple
Entente before the Supreme Court
of Civilization, is presented here,
and is one of the most interesting
articles written about this widely
discussed question of the responsibil-
ity for the European tonflict.
I.el us suppose that in this year
of disgrace. Nineteen Hundred
and Fourteen, there had existed, as
let us pray will one day exist,
a Supreme Court of Civilization,
before which the sovereign nations
could litigate their differences
without resort to the iniquitous
and less effective appeal to tlit
arbitianieni of arms.
Let us further suppose that each
of the contending nations had a
sufficient leaven of Christianity lo
have its grievance adjudged not
by the ethics of the cannon or the
rifle, but by the eternal criteriof jus-
tice.
What would be the judgment #of
that august tribunal.
Any discussion of the ethical
merits of this great controversy
must start with the assumption
that there is such a thing as inter-
national morality.
This fundamental axiom, upon
u Inch the entire basis of civiliza-
tion necessarily rests, ischall lged
by a small class of interlectuai per-
verts.
Some of these hold that moral
considerations must be subordinat-
ed either to military necesity or so-
called manifest destiny. This is the
Bernhardi doctrine.
Other teach that war is a benefi-
cient fatility and that all nations
engaged in it are therefore equally
justified. On this theory, all of the
now contending nations are but
victims of an irresistible current of
events, and the higbesfcdury of the
State is to prepare itself for the
systematic extermination, when
necessary, of its neighbours.
Notwithstanding the clever
platitudes under which both
these doctrines are veiled, all
morally sane minds me agreed that
this war is a great crime agiinst
civilization, and Mhe only open
question is, which f the two con-
tending groups of power is morally
responsible for the crime?
Was Austria justified in declar-
ing war against Servia?
Was Germany justified in declar-
ing war against Russia and
France?
Was England justified in declar-
ing war against Germany. ?
As the last of ihese questions is
the most easily disposed of, it maj
be considered fir>t.
England's Justification
England's justification rests upon
the solemn treaty of 1839, whereby
Prussia, France, England, Austria,
and Russia "became the guaran-
tois" of the "perpetual neutrality"
of Belgium as reaffieme by Count
Bismarck, then Chancellor of the
German Empire, on July 22, 107a
and as even more recently reaffirm-
ed in the striking fact disclosed
in the Belgian "Grav Book".
In the Spring of 1913, a debate
was in the Budget Commute of
the Reichstag will* reference to the
military Budget. In the course of
the debate the German Secretary
of State said:
"The neutrality of Belgium is
determined by international con-
ventions and Germany is resolved to
respect those conventions.
To confirm this solemn assur-
ance, the Minister of War added
in the same debate:
"Belgium does not play any
part in the justification of the Ger
man scheme of military leorgani-
zation. The scheme is justified by
the position of matters in the East.
Germany will not lose stght of the
fact that Belgian neutrality is
guaranteed by international treaties.
A year later, on July 31, 1914,
Herr von Below, the German^Min-
ister at Brussels, assured the Bel-
gian Department of State that be
knew of a declaration which the
German Chancellor had made in
1911, to the effect "that Germany
had no intention of violating our
neutrality," and "that he was cer.
tain that the sentiments to which
expression was given at that time
had not changed." (See Belgian
"Gray Book," Nos. ti and 12).
It seems unnecessary to discuss
the wanton disregard of these
solemn obligations and protesta-
tions, when the present Chancellor
of the German Empire, in his
speach to the Reichstag and to the
world on Aug. 4, 1914, frankly ad-
mitted that the action of the
German military machine in invad-
ing Belgium was a wrong. He said:
"We are now in a stateof neces-
sity and necessi.y know no law.
Our troops have occupied Lux-
emburg and perhaps are already on
Belgian toil Gentlemen, that is
contrary to the dictates of interna-
tional law. It is tiue that the
French Government has declared
at Brussels that France is willing
to respect the neutrality of Bel-
gium, so long as her opponent re-
spects it. We knew, however, that
France stood ready for invasion.
France could wait, but we could
not wait. A French movement
upon our flank upon the lower
Rhine might have been disastrous
So we were compelled to override
the protest of the Luxemburg and
Belgian Governm. nts The wrong
I speak openly-that ware commit.
ring we wi'l endeavour to make
good as soon as our military goal
has been reached. Anybody who is
threatened as we have been threat.
Continued on fonrth page)


Publication began at 5.10 p.m.
Zhe Vrfbune
Thursday. November 5. 1914.
With a world in arms prac-
tically, though not literally,
with the Combatants in millions;
with the battle-field, or battle-
fields extending over an area of
a millions quare miles.North and
south, east and west, it cannot
be expected by any reasonable
mind that success must follow
"our side" in every engagement.
The reports which we receive are
as variable as the mercurial col-
umn o| a barometei and our
feelings are being played on by
special Correspondents and "ea
Dies' and "radiograms" in end-
less iui i ession ; to day we are
despondent; to-morron we are
in the clouds. During the Cri-
mean' War when England,
France, and Turkey which is
behaving now so disgracefullj
towards a couatry that saved
her life from the Great Bear,
were allies, rlenrj Russell song:
"Cheer! Boys Cheer' DO more
of idle sorrow.
Courage true hearts to cheer
us on our way,
Hope smiles before and shows
a bright to-morrow,
Then let's forget the darkness
of to-day."
Incidentally, the words were
written by Dr. Charles Mackey,
and Henry Russell composed the
music, and only received three
pounds fir the copyright. He
asked the publisher once, how
the song sold, and was told that
nineteen presses could not keep
pace with the demand. After-
wards the publishers sent him
io to ease^ their consciences.
Although half a century has
rolled In-, yet ilie words arS as
inspiring to-day as they were
when they held hundreds of
thousands at tin- Crystal Palace
They were to the hearts of that
time,what"Its a long way to Tip-
rrary"is to theheartsof tins time.
Germany's resoun efullness in
bringing up reinforcements is
swift, but "the race is not to the
swift, nor the battle to the
strong."
Thousands of newspapers are
published ei.iilv in the United
Slates for a people whose avidity
forreadingis not surpasses by am
people in the world, and though
the food supplied may not al-
ways afford mental pabulum of
the best, we throw away the
chall, there yet remains many
more grains than are sufficentlo
satisfy tiie more refined tastes.
. The American press is kept
supplied with war news from
special. war correspondents
and the information presented
to its readers is on the whole
corroborative of the telegrams
which we receive.
The reasons for the war have
been so threshed out, that little
more can be said than has al-
ready been advanced. .
German Jews have played a
prominent part and it is not
their fault that "der Vaterland"
did not over run Belgium to get
at France. The Deutsche Bank
in London, is a known centre of
Anglophobia, and mammoth
suckers of British wealth. It is
to be hoped that England will
learn the lesson taught, and
learn it thoroughly, ami in
future scoop out the dirty scum,
if it should not be Been on i he
surface, it is Mir- to lie at the
bottom, and will come In Hie
surface when it is ready with
"I loch! heute ist der Tag."
We would urge our readers
not to be disheartened, because
the Allies do not appear to make
rai>itl strides towards vi< tory ;
remember that there is practi-
rally as yet but one of^Eng-
land's Arms at work, and re
member also that Jack and
Tommy hae shaken hands on
the tough proposition of s>11;isi,
ing "the mailed list/' ;IU(\ rhy
know that the pi ice will i e
heavy. Tommy has been paying
his share C. O. D., and Jack
realises that when his turn"
conies, valuable slops and yt
more valuable lives will be the
cost. For our part we are "jolly
well glad" that Sir John Jellicoe
has stepped on to the quarter-
deck, and that l'rince Louis of
Bittenbuiji has "gone forrard."
Most important services have
been rendered by that new
branch of the Service\viators
Every day their bolts "from
the blue" put some of the Ger-
man Airships out of Commis-
sion, and weakens the efficacv
of their sky spy system. In one
day, live German aeroplanes
were brought down by the Al-
lies as they Hew over Uheiuis,
and Calais, and this was a gain
which can be weighed gainst
Germany's blight gain on the
and beneath t!:e waters
thereof. England regards the
airship as such an important
i aval auxiliary that she has
turned over her Dirigibles to the
Navy and the Army has retain-
ed only Aeroplanes. There are
many new things which have
been introduced in Warfare,
and England though at first
scoffing somewhat at Germany's
purpose in the matter of Dirigi-
bles, has weighed their possibil-
ites and quickly acted in accor-
dance. Whether fighting in the
air has or has not come to stav.
the world will soon know.
Meantime, "keep your pecker
up." The Telegrams received to
day are exceedingly encourag-
ing, and had tiny been other-
wise, we should never lose sight
of our duty ; that our faith in
our Empire should never waver.
- -:o:
BAHAMAS
WAM RELIEF FUND
The following subscriptions
have been received Up t"
Nov. 4th, 10T4.
Previously acknowledged
>_,"-''. 33 6 2
Bethel Baptist Church 17 2
Inhabitants Staniel
Creek ro i< |
Baptist Union 14 3
Grand U, O. of < > I". ,<> ,, ,,
St. Matthew's Church 8 11
St. Matthe vs Sunday
School i 5,3}
Charles Stephens i 6
2660 19 o[
Car Seguranca bound for New York
Nov 5th.
121 bales Sponge
! _ Refuse ; |>ollge
I Ijn Sis:il
23 Sisal Wast-
99 bis shells and lips
6 tons Lignumvitae
56 pkgs. Bark
61 boxes 1 ,, t .
1 bl. I ("-;'l">fl"t
3 bdls. Siii^ar cane
i box Pumpkins
1 Plantains
4 empty Gas drums
I CS. Films
IMI.S ft. Co.
Latest War News
RADIOGRAMS
November 5th r<* 14.
From Secretary of State
to "
His Excellency the Governor.
London. November 4th. Press
Bureau reports following is ac
count of recent British opera-
tions in Belgium :
October 30th
The enemy largely reinforced
violently attacked positions oc-
cupied by first army ^orps and
cavalry. Enenn lost very beavi- '.,
ly. Our commanJsr-r confident
of maintaining |E ground and
has done so. Cavalry whether
mounted or in trenches has
fought splendidly. The fight-
ing line has been remj|hced by
Indian troops. ^(
On the night of the 30th a
strpng attack on Messines was _
repulsed. Theenemy temporarr
ly penetrated the line by weight
of numbers -but were finally
driven back by excellent bayonet
counter attack.
Our threatened left 1- strongly
reinforced bv troops from home
and French reserves
A brilliant Charge by London
Scottish first territorials in fight-
ing Inn' has earni d the warmest
congratulations from >i'r John
French.
ist November the enemy at-
tacked anil were repulsed losing
heavily all along the line. Two
eight-inch guns demolished bv
our howitzers and prodigious
slaughter occasioned by om ar
tillers-. The enemy is greatly
discouragi r| bv maint< nance of
our hie' and the repulse <>f re-
peated assault., causing in some
cases the loss of the whole col
duns .f tiie enemy.
The Allies position has been
Strengthened and 1 im/rMced to
attacks 11 iw tiue^Biieil
5U1 November.
From the Secretary of State
to
His Excellency the G wernor.
London. Novembei ith. Press
Bureau reports: India 1 troops
ire now operating with til"
British forces.
One of the first Indian reg-
iments in action was heavily
shelled while entrenching They
showed great sangfroid, hardly
troubling to look round after the
fust |e > shells, later, in Storming
a certain village of tact 1 a!
importance, Indian in tops ad-
vanced nndrr conditions of no
volt) and difficulty undi 1 heavy
rifle and machine gun fire with
dash and resolution Worthy of
the highest ti,iditi>ns of the,
army.
The Kin:,' has sent the fol-
lowing Message to the Indian
Corps Corn rim nd< 1:
"Please congratulate your
Indian troop* on their gallant
condin t and express mv(raiati-
tude to them". fl^
Indians operating in a Cottntrv
wholly dlfleretlt from their own
have shown marked adaptability
and will doubtless prove them-


Rfcelves admirably trained and
fully capable (Avoiding their
own. #
November 5th 1914.
The Britadfc cruiser Goodhope
was not miiK; but escaped into
a Chilean*port afire and badly
damaged, derman cruisers are
* waiting outside. Other Germans
entered Valparaiso where they
are coaling and provisioning.
They are undamaged.
The Turks have sunk a Kus
lian battleship, the Sinop.
One Cuban artilleryman was
killed and a number of policeman
and civilians wounded laal night
at eleven o'clock in front of the
Marti Theatre, I favana.
The trouble was the outcome
of an order by "Secretary Hevias
requiring that the police demand
fr mi soldiers w ho are out after
ten o'clock at night thai they
show their passes Man) am
have Been made.
001 i:i;\mi \t i'kkss
London :Turkey breaks all
diplomatic relations with tin-
powers of the triple entente as
well as with Servia.
All her representatives in those
countries have been called
home. w*
Turkey's apUog) for bombard
tng Russian Black Sea ports was
unacce t ib'e to theKussi in gov
ernmeut.
The forts in the 1 Dardanelles
an b line bomb ird d by Anglo
I i' i h fleet.
Spe 'illations are rife as to what
Milkan powers will do, but with
Turkey in the area of war Bul-
garia must at least be prepared
tot any eventuality.
1 he (iennans have abandoned
their piisit 11 m on Ys'-i.
Russians report capture of
(Jet man officers.
N York: (', das by Repub
licans reduce the Dom>cratic
majority. Their majority in the
S late ill be but 14.
Progress!vi 1 representation in
the I louse has been cut from 10
to Q.
I'd I'.iso. Texas: \lc\ico has
t\> o capitals and two presidents,
oiift of the factious led bv
Carranza at Puebla and the
other bv CuIterrVx who 1
elected President b\ the Agn 1
C alicnlas conventl<>n.
Fort S iT^flk V kans is: -
Quiet waWiad in the Hartford
mine region to which fede. d
troops were sent on Tuesday.
"Jew York. II New Haven
ictors pleaded not guilty
when arraigned in New Yorktoi
answer to A charge of criminal
violation of the Sherman Anti-
Trust Law. They were released
under $5 000 bond each.
Santiago Chile: No word
from British ships that engaged
the German squadron off Colo-
nel Sunday, according to reports
emanating from German officers
All of the German vessels
escaped unsca the d, fcrhile
the British emiser M on mouth
was sunk the cruiser Good-
hope put out of ci-immis-
sion and the cruiser Glasgow
and transport Othanto have
been bottled up in port of Tab
cahuano by the German cruisers
Leipzig and Bremen.
"GOD SAVE US ALL"
Oct. 31st, 1914.
The Editor of The "Tribune''
Sir,
! won Vr how many of our
people in the liahauias know
thai there is another verse to
"< lod Save the King," or for the
matter of that, in Other Colonii s
and Iiepen b n< ies of Our Em
pire I expect it is known nnli
lo the few grey beards, and in
this Colony, they are fast join-
ing the "Silent majority." I sup-
pose I might just as well own
up that, I am on thai mail mv-
self, nevertheless while I am
over tne age limit for Naval
and Military Service, I am con
1 'tit, not being ovei burdened
with modesty,that I can do s .me
thing *o wards creating a feeling
of 1 tyalty in the breasts of B 13
S< outs and all and sundry other
religeous organisations.
I know of no better waV
than advocating the resinning
the sm ing of the discarde I
lines of the hymn, at the present
crisis. They ought never to
have been among "the- lines left
out" at any and ill times. Just
listen to the deep religion--, feel-
ing which permeates evety
word. Nothing could he liner.
Listen !
'*( )h Lord our (iofj, arise !
Scatter our enemies and make
them fall.
Confound their politics,
Upset their knavish tricks.
On ihee our hopes we li\,
< ind sa>e us all !"
These lines are a solemn invo
cation t >the God of Battles and
adds another litany to our det 0-
tional exercises: and since the
4th August, yes, even from
the 35th July* when Germany
began her preparations for war,
and the 28th when the German
Fleet was assembling at Kiel
and Wilhelmsbaven, a day be-
fore the British Fleet left Port
land, it ought to have been
sung and prayed, if good Chris
tains believe in the efficacy of
prayer, it aptly suits the oc-
casion,
Let the Church see to it ; let
our journalists see it; let the peo
pie see to ft, that the ennobling
and patriotic lines arc nolongel
eliminated from our National
Anthem. Let the loyal senti |
ments they embody be sung
with fervour from every British
heart, and by eve;' true Chris
tain no matter what his nation
ality or his creed may be.
Yours in sincerity,
A BRITISH GREY>&EARD.
COSTLY BLOW TO
GERMANY.
London, Sunday, Oct. iK.
The naval correspondent of The
London Times say-: "Compari
sons will naturally be made l,e
tween the loss sustained by the
British through the sinking of
the Ihwke on Thursday and
thai of the Germans by the de-
structions! tin- hands of out sa-
lois of four of its destroyers So
far as the loss in ships goes the
balance is heavily in our favor.
The naval operations i" the
North Sea jusi n rw give de
strover- more 'h in their normal
value, and I i i i~ Special
Iv in need of!lie 1 n, since her pol-
iCV is tod 1 as much damage by
raids of smaller craft as she possi-
bly can so as to reduce our ad-
va itajje in great ships when the
ila\- nl their meeting comes.
! iermanycan very ill afford
to lose destroyers just now.
From this point cf view her loss
this week is far heavier than
ours, for the Hawke was an old
ship and not of great value to
us. Iii men the losses of the Ger-
mans in these four destroyers]
will about equal the number of
our men who met death in the i
Hawke on Thursday ind in the.
affair on Heligoland that t
place, at the end of August.
"Since then our men have been
waiting foranothei opportunity
of coming to grips with the |
enemy, The tim of waiting
must have been dreai j ind try-
ing, but the chan < has COllje,
it will come again. Even
little heipS, and in the dm 1 if
decision, when the final test j
comes between Britain and Get
many for the mastery of the seas.
these forerunners ol the day,
that have gone so decisiveh 111
our favor will not be without
their moral effect upon Hie hos-
tile fleets as Miev go into
action."
:o:
ILLNESS SAVES KAISER'S
SON.
London, England, Oct 22A
dispatch from Copenhagen says
that Prince Oscar, the.fifth son
of the German Emperor, owes
his life to his at tack ol heart dis-
ease. It appears from the stories
current that a party of Turcos
were firing from trees and shot
down all me officers surrounding
the prince without exception.
The sudden excitement led to
the heart attack and the prince
fell unconscious. 'The Turcos be-
lieved lie was dead and stopped
firing.
PUBLIC BOARD OF
WORKS.
Notice
PERSONS havmg land to
dispose of in the Eastern
District suitable for a burial
ground, are invited to com-
municate with the Public
Board of Works.
Notice
TI11C Public Hoard of
Works having decided to
name the unnamed strt
and lanes in the Suburbs of
Nassau (Grants Town, Bains
Town, etc.) and to mark' tbc
names Oil the ends of same,
invite suggestions from the
General Public as to the se-
lection of suitable names for
the purpose.
Notice
IT has come to the notice ,>|
the Public Bond ol Works
that certain persons in the
City and Suburbs arc in the
habit of leaving carriages
and carts Sir. in the public
streets when not in use.
NOTICE is therefore given
that tliis is against the rules
of the Board and persons
guilty of a breach of therules
111 future, will be pro'-' CUted.
The Foregoing not 11 es are
published by order of the
Public Board1 of Works.
James II. Knowles.
Clerk to the Board.
Naati. joth October, 1914a



possessions, can only have one
thought-how he is to hack his
way through."
ened and is fighting for his highest
This defense is not even a plea
of confession and avoidance. It is
a plea of "Guilty" at the bar of the
world. It has one merit, that it
does not add to the crime the ag-
gravation of hypocrisy. It virtually
rests the case of Germany upon 1li
gospel of Treitschkc and Bernhaidi
that each nation is justified in ex-,
erting its physical power to the ut.
most in defence of its selfish inter- ;
ests.There is no novelty in this gos-
pel. Its only surprising feature is
its revival in the twentieth century.
It was tanght far more .effectively
hy Machiavelli in his treaties." The \
Prince," wiierein he glorified the
policy of Cesare Rorgia in tramp- j
ing the weaker States o' Italy un-,
der foot by ruthless terrorism un-
bridled ferocity, and the basest de-
ception. Indepd, the wanton de
struction "f Belgium is simply Mor-
giarism amplified ten-thousandfold
by the mechanical resources of mo-
dern war.
Unless our boasted civilization
is the thinnes^ veneering of Bar-
barism; unless th<* law of the
world is in lact only ethics of the
rifle and the consrienc* of lb*1 can-
non; unless mankind after countless
centuries has made unreal advance
in political morality beyond that
of the cave dweller, then this a> -
swer of Germany cannot satisfy the
"decent respect to the opinion of
mankind." GenTi-my's contention
that a treaty of peace is "a scrap
of paper." to be disregarded vt will
when required hy the selfish inter-
ests of one contracting party, is
negation of all that civilization
stands for.
Belgium has been crucified in
the face of the woild. Its inno-
cence of any offense, untii it was
attacked, is too clear for argument.
Its voluntary immotion to pieserve
its solemn guarantee of neutrality
will "plead like angels, trumpet-
tnngued. ag-iinst the deep damna-
tion of its taking off." On that
issue the Supom* Court could
have no ground for doubt or hes-
itation. Its judgement would be
speedy and inexroable.
(To be continued)
THE
Cosmopolitan
HIGH SCHOOL
Opens on
Monday, Oct. 5th
ill Aurora Hall
on Charlotte Street.
For particulars apply to
Prof. G. G. Coffin, head mas-
ter, or Mr. J. P. Simms.
THE REINDEER
is an inhabitant of the Arctic Region, and it is possibly
the most useful of all the animals which dwell in this
part of the world. Unlike the Reindeer,
SUNLIGHT SOAP
is to be found in all parts of the cltilised world, and its
great utility is vouched for by millions of contented
housewives who would not
be without it. Sunlight
Soap enjoys a well-merited
reputation, it is absolutely
pure, and will not harm the
most delicate fabric. A piece
of Sunlight Soap used in
your next wash will con-
vince you of its excellence.
Sanitary
Cool
Reliable
Fruit of the Loom 3G in.
at 7! per yard.
Shingles
Rest No. 1 Heart 5111. Cypres
Shingles at f9.60per Klions
sand of 20 bundles
Discounts on lots of over
5000 shingles.
Special Price
also on cheaper gradesalso
5in. Cypress at .$6.72 per
thousand of 20 bundles. This
price made possible by a very
large purchase.
Fresh stock arriving every
week.
C. C. SAUNDERS.
For Result
Advertise in
The Tribune
OVER
1500
Pairs
Boots and Shoes
being added to an already-
replete stock
Williams the Sliocnian
is again opening op one of
those Sample Lots of Boots
and Shoes in a limited
number of sizes as follows
viz :
Men Idiots and Shoes in il*i
from b to 7J
Women* Moots andSlioes
in sizes from }.J to 4J
Misses Bootfl ;iiid Hioi'sin sizes
fmin 12J to I
The advantage in purchas-
ing from this lot is (as others
who have purchased before
can attest) that you can select
the sizes from a very large
variety of up- to-date styles at
prices considerably cheaper
than regular lines kept in
tock.
CALL EARLY
and secure your size at
William*' Wholesale and R.elo.1)
Shoe Establishment
j77, 279 Bey Street (City)
CANE SYRUP
Can be had at T. M. Knowles
at 10s. stg. per Tin
GOOD and THICK.
East Bay Street
Notice
WE wou^call the atten-
tion i sau and on the OUT ISLANDS
to the following prices on lum-
ber which will gfllkinto effect
from to-dav. Xf
All ROUGH Uimlvfup to 8 ft.
6/3 per 100. All DRESSED
lumber up to 8 ft. 8/4 per 100.
All ROUGH and DRESSED to
16ft. to/5 per 100. ANYTHING
over 16 ft. it/6 per too. mbove
up to 8 ins. wide)
These prices are for CASH
absolutely and bein},' WAR
prices are made to help the pub-
lic and are subject to change
without notice
The Bahamas Timber Co. Ltd.
D17CT Gaso- rjr%mm
DC/O I iic is / OO!
Tet. We do not sell it.
BUT we do sell and will
continue to sell .
Standard Oil Co.
Gasoline, [est your Gaso-
line. We invite comparison
with any in the City.
Price Mcts. per gallon in
50 gallon Drums.Customer!
using 100 gals, or over per
Mouth 20c. gallon.
C. C. ^JUNDKRS
Fresh Onion Seed
FROM TESERlFFK
AND NATIVE SEED CORN
AtToote's, 490, Bay Street.
Good Morning!
We Are Introducing
American Silk
American Cashmere
American C"tlmi Lisle
HOSIERY
The)' have itiMvl the tet. Give real
f' u>t Clint ut. No seams to rip. Never
become loose or hugCY'. The shape is
knit in- not pressed in
GUARANTEED f-r fineness, stvl.-,
superiority of material ami workmanship,
Absolutely stiinhss Will wear < months
without holes, or t rw ones free.
OUR. SPECIAL OFFER
to everv one irn oil' us s| 00 in riirienc;
or postal note, to covet advertising am
shipping charges, we will semi pit paid
with written guarantee, backed by afiv
million dollar coni| any. either
5 Fnira of our 7">< value
American ^ilk Hciery,
or 4 f'-vir-* of Ojr 90b. vis.1 via
\merican Cilimefe llosieiv,
or 4 H%ir of our Vie. ' e. 1m .
American Cntt n.lJ^Hosi ty
or 6PalrniCMIIfrn'iHoilrv
I'ONT DBLAY -Oner expire* wba
dt-alvr in vour I ilil\ is m In id
THE INTERNATIONAL HOSIERY CJ
P. O. Box 224
DAYTON. OHIO. U.
bv


M /S5/XG T55US


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