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1 Publication began at 6.15 p.m. Zhc Vribune TvMday. November 3. 1914. STREET NOMENCLATURE A SUBTSITUTE FOR MONUMENTS. From the pages of history both sacred and profane, we learn that, events of remarkable character and which were deemed of a character that entitled them to be kept in remembrance by posterity, were perpetuated W a tangible and visual form, and so it became the custom to erect monuments of the most imperishable material. Ordinary events did not obtain such notice but only evmts that left their mark on the peoj le among whom they occurred, and were destined afterwards to assist in the formation of their character I ni fact can readily be seen and understood^ modems, and we have not to turn back manv pages before we arrive at the indisputable truth of the statement, as these are to be seen today among different nations, sepraatel by distinct lingual differences and variations, but yet connected by a radical relationship, h would seem as if the custom had sprung from a common human instinct, absolutely independent of personal communication or contact. In the eailier history of our race these marks were necessarily of a rude and primitive form, perhaps a simple stone bearing no marks of handicraft, and as the race advanced in the scale of civilization, they were convulsed wall the throes of higher aspirations, and the knowledge 01 the manual arts was born and the rude stone gave place to another perhaps higher with ideographic characters, these continued to be the prevailing type for hundreds of vears, when their expanding intellects demanded a better vehicle of expression, and the rude single stuns, in turn gave place to a shaft or column. Then the fine arts were developed bv taste and imagination, and found expression in # Sculpture, the five orders of Architecture were es tablished, (though Kuskin reduces them by the fiat of his pen I to only two,) and spread rapidly I over the whole civilized globe shown as that of the Temple a Tivoli, the Temple of Jupitar and the Pantheon, not to men tion a great many others; and were freely used in monumental work designed to be of a commemorative character, The proof of this brief, outline, if any were wanting can be supplied by documentary evidence, for we read of the stone set up by the Patriach Jacob at Bethel, of the pillar that signified the treaty made between him and Laban, of the twelve stones commanded by Joshua to be placed in the bed of the Jordan to commemorate its passage, Absolam's pillar and Pompey's pillar. In modern times we have much stronger proof for manv of us have seen Cleopatra's Needle, the Pyramids, the Sphinx, the Taj Mahal, Nelson's Monument, Wellington's, the Victoria Memorial, the .-Albert, The Monument, Gladstones, Beaconslield's the Guards the Crimean, and many others on the Continent. Nor must we pass by Queen Victoria's Statue, Columbus', and the Five Heroes of Nassau Bar in our own, little City. It is unnecessary to point out that all those named were com memorative of persons familar to every school boy and girl, of deeds of valour done and acts perfomed "'While the world wondered." Similar deeds are now in the doing, and it seems to us that, we cannot do better than immortalise the names of those Englishmen who are risking all that they hold dear, that old England shall not be shamed in the ey..s of Europe. We cannot erect Monuments to their memo ry, but we can at least perpetu ate them in a way that is made plain to us by the Notice of t le Board of Works It is a timely move, and will be as highly appreciated as it is commendable. It would be a happy thought under any circumstances, but especially at the present time when th; whole world is in the throes and an guish of a struggle.which must leave an indellible mark on its history. It will be remembered by our children, and our cliil dren's children in succeeding generations until the last man shall stand in silent majesty viewing the decaying World, around, above and below, him. There "area great number of streets and lanes in the named suburbs which have become populously residential, and owing to the long delayed nomenclature, it is extremely difficult to locate residents in them. The names of the men who have madeand will make England grest, are fit to be remembered ; Edward VII, George V, Wellington, Nelson, St Vincent, Hood, Drake, Raleigh, Roberts, Kitchener, French, Gladstone, Beaconsfield, Chatham, Grey, Asquith, Bonar Law, Lloyd George, Fox, Duff, Methuen, Gordon, Baden-Powell, Buller. These names will be of educational value, object lessons in the History of England, educators of the adult as also of childhood and youth, for. when we shall be asked of our children in time to come, why were these streets and lanes thus named, then they will be told of the greatest epoch in the world's history and especially in that of Great Britain and Her Empire, and they will review the names of the thousands of unknown heroes, "of those who have fought and sailed, and ruled and loved, and made our world." Every man a hero, and every woman a heroine who gladly, willingly suffered the dangers and privations and horrors of vvar.that the nmea of Bllglaad should not be erased from the map of Europe,and an accursed name sprawl ove'r it like a poisonous toad over a field of lillies. Such names as are mentioned will bring home forever to us, the resourcefullness of the Old Country, its vigour &its courage, its truthfullnc.sand its honesty and that it knows no fear whatever when called upon to fight for the right ; Australia, New Zealand, Canada, India, and Africa all united and giving to the world a memorable example of cooperation and brotherly love within the Empire at a time of peril and crisis. SPONGE BROKERS' AND BUYERS'. POW-WOW A meeting ol bponge brokers and buyers under the auspices of the Marine products Board was held in the Chamber of Commerce last evening. The object of the meeting was to ascertain from those engaged in the Sponge trade, what views they held on the present crisis. The Chairman of the M. P. Board W. K. Moore, Esq., called the meeting to order*at 7.30. He pointed out that the crisis in our commercial history had reached an acute stage and unless some ready remedy could be found it was likely that the end vwld be more serious than manyvvould believe. He gave some interesting statistics showing the falling off in the Sponge sales since August and pointed out that one of three propositions were before the board. First close all the Sponge beds of the Colony. Second, Alternate closing for A period of two or three months and open them for a similar period Third, Government Financial Act. That is that, the Government be solicited to provide capital to purchase Sponge at prices that cover admitting the brokers outfitting the vessels as usual. After considerable discussion,, the proposal put forth by Mr. H. W. I.ightbourn met with the approval of the majority of those present which was that the Exuma Cays, the Abaco, and the Bight Acklins, be closed, leaving, the rest of the beds open The Chairman thanked the meeting for their attendance and for their advice and £utmised that at an early date traRinatter would receive the full attention of the Board. — :o. — The Mail Steamer Vigilnncia arrived at day-break from New York with Mails, Cargo, and the following passengers. Messrs F. Armbrister, G. Armbrister Dr. J. B. Alburv, Mrs. A. Albury, Miss Alburv, Mrs. J. II. Brown, Dr. J. Culmer, Mrs. Culmer, Master J. Culmer, Mr. i\m\ Mrs K. W. deGlanville, Mr. E. George, Miss. E. Halanen Mrs. E. Hall, Comndr. F. I.obb, Miss I.obb, Mrs. E Leach, Mr. If, Lasker, Miss E. Mansfield, Miss. N. Moultrie, Hon. W Miller, Mrs. Miller, Master H. Millet, Mrs. V. Mosley, Mrs. M. Mosley, Miss M. Mosley, lion. F. M* Menendez, Mrs Menendez, Mrs. A. Nelson, Mr. W. O'Neil, Miss. E. Pritchard, Mr. & Mrs. J. Queen, Mr. M. Stehr; Mr and Mrs R. Sheppard, Mr. and Mrs W. Simms; Mr. and Mrs. B Thomp son; Mr. and Mrs. V. WATodd; Hon. Daniel Tudor, nrjr Mrs. Tudor; Misses Muriel, Mabel, Gwen Tudor; Miss M. Holden. And 2 in transit for Guantanimo, and 7 for Santiago.



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m — MA life A Mail to incUrae letters for Florida and other specially addressed correspondence to be forwarded by "Frances E." will be made up aaf[closed on Thursday next, the 5th instant at 8 a.m. PERSONALS The Hon. Daniel Tudor arrived this morning via New York from England, where he has been enjoying a short vacation. He is accompanied by Mrs. Tudor and the Misses Muriel, Mabel and Gwen. We extend a hearty welcome to them. Our old friends Mr. R. Barnes Sheppard is back from his summer's outing, and with Mrs Sheppard is looking the picture of good health. Dr. Joe (J. Baird Albury) smiles once more on his impatient patients. Dr. Culmer will again feel the pulse, and take the tern pirature, at the Bahamas General Hospital, .j^ "Hail to the brides." Mr. Bruce Thompson and his and Mr. Reginald de Glanville and his; Much happiness to all. Hope our erst hard worked friend the Surveyor General, has with Mrs Miller and Master Hubert enjoyed themselves in the old country. G. W. Armbrister, the "f tar" Man, showed his Shoe leather this morning as he dandily descended the downward stage. "How dye do Georgie Boy ? We are glad to see an old friend, Mrs V. Moselev back to the "Old Rock" The "Guardian" hasn't "gone to Leeward", but yet we are { >leased to see Miss Moseley's land at the tiller again. test War News RADIOGRAMS November 3rd 1914 is from Cape Cod, Mass. Hied powers today sevlomatic relations with Turkey although the Ports is reported to have apologized for the Black Sea raids, and there is a probability that Turkey will keep out of the war. Berlin-:—The Turkish Ambassador states that Turkey is preparing for a holy war against Christians. Bulgaria is expected to join Turkey while Greece is expected to join the Allies. Paris:—Theofficial statement, after announcing advance in the North, says that the Allies have made progress on the whole battle line except at Messines, of which a part has been lost. The enamys attacks were checked at Arras, Lihones and LeQuesnay enSan Terre. The Allies have advanced slightly toward Tracy in the -\isne region as well as on right bank of the river between L'Aiglc forest and Soissons. Another attack was repulsed at Vaivley. Others were repulsed at Chenin des Dames and on tli Nieuse heights. A reconnoiasance in force by the Germans failed at Nomeny. IntheVosges the Allies have retaken height dominating the pass of Sainte Marie and in llandesept region they have advanced till they hold enemys former trenches west of St. Die. Petrograd:-After bombarding Black Sea ports the cruiser Goe ben is damaged and is returing to Constantinople for repairs. London: -Dispatches from the battle front in France .and Belgium indicate that German attacks have been repulsed and that the Allies line has held its own throughout. Berlin:Dispatches says that the progress of the fighting in Northern France and Belgium i< slightly favourable to the Germans. The fighting between Nieuport and Dixmude is probable the fiercest of the whole war. The Germans have forced their way southward by repeated night attacks. The loss of life was great on both sides. Petrograd:—There is no now definite details of operations on the Eastern battle line. London:—Heavy firing was heard off the Foreland at Dover this afternoon. OOVKRNMKNT PRESS 3rd November 1914. London:—Turkey has apologized for the. warlike actions of her fleet but the triple entente will demand full reparation. The three cruisers that took 'part in the bombardment must be dismantaled and the German officers dismissed from the service of the Ottoman Empire before the entente will resume relations. Turkey refuses to send the German officers home and there is a long way to go before the situation can be cleared up. London:—The Germans continue to strike hard at the Allies lines in an endeavour to get to the coast. Their road is blocked everywhere but the attacks continue without regard to the cost in live*. The belief is growing that the invaders are making a last effort before retiring into central Belgium. Fighting goes on without change in the Eastern frontier. The backbone of the rebellion is broken in South Africa with the rebel chiefs in flight or asking for mercy. London hears of a naval engagement between a British destroyer and a German submarine in the Straits of Dover. London : —A dispatch from Para, Brazil says that the German steamer Ascuncion has landed there with passengers and crews of the British steamers Vandyck, Hurtsdale and Glanton, captured by the German cruiser Karlsruhe. Washington: —President Wilson will be a candidate for reelection in 1917, so official Washington hears on the eve of the congressional elections. Mexico City—The term of the provisional president of Mexico just selected by the conference at Aguas Calientas, will be a short one The Governor of San Luis Potosi has been selected and, the repufar election will occur in twenty days. Carranza does not acrept the choise of the conference d demans tnat another namPi His faction and Villa's. re expected to clash and movement of troops has commenced. New York—Twenty directors of the New Haven Railroad have been indicted by the Federal Grand Jury charged with violation of the Sherman Law. The iiidicament refers to them as'conspirators. Washington Serious cattle disease has broken out in the States of Pennsylvania, Indiana, Michigan and part of Ohio Shipment of cattle from the infested district has been prohibit'ed. Good Morning'! We Are Introducing American Silk American Cashmere American Cotton-Lisle HOSIERY They have stood the test. Give real foot comfort. No seams to rip. Never become loose or baggy. The shape ii knit in—not pressed in. GUARANTEED for fineness, style, superiority of material and workmanship. Absolutely stainless. Will wear 6 months without holes, or pew ones free. OVR. SPECIAL OFFER to every one sending us f 1.00 in currency or postal note, to cover advertising and shipping charges, we will send post paid, with written guarantee, backed by a five million dollar company, either 3 Pairs of our 75c. value American Silk Hosiery, or 4 Pairs of our 50c. value American Cashmere Hosiery, or 4 Pairs of our 50c. VeJue. American Cotton-Lisle Hosiery or 6 Pairs of Children'* Hosiery. DONT DELAY—Offer expires when dealer in your locality is selected. THE INTERNATIONAL HOSIERY CO. P. O. Box 224 DAYTON. OHIO. U. S. APUBLIC BOAR*D OF WORKS. Notice P ERSONS having land to dispose of in the Eastern District suitable for a burial ground, are invited to communicate with the Public Board of Works. Notice T HE Public Board of Works having decided to name the unnamed streets and lanes in the Suburbs of Nassau (Grants Town, Bains Town, Ac.) and to mark the names on the ends of same, invite suggestions from the General Public as to the selection of suitable names for the purpose. Notice I T has come to the notice of the Public Board of Works that certain persons in the City and Suburbs are in the habit of leaving carriages and carts &c. in the public streets when not in use. NOTICE is therefore given that this is against the rules of the Board and persons guilty of a breach of the rules in future, will be prosecuted. Tht Foregoing notices tire published by order of the PuBlic Board of Works. James H. Knowles. Clerk to the Board. Nassau, 30th October, 1914. L



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who was killed recently in France had a twin brother, CaptairfT". O. Grenfell,' who was of the same regiment and also a fin§ 6olo player. -They looked so nluch alike that it is said thaif bwn grooms could hardly teU tf em apart when they were pl|yil)g on the same side ina polo game. The difficulty be eame so great to the polo officials at Hurlingham that Captain R. N Grenfell used to wear a bright red belt when playing to distinguish, him from his btothee. Off the field it was just as puzzling to tell one' frprp the other, since they, often dressed exactly alike for their own amusement* in confusing their friends. In a charge at Com piegne Captain F. O. Grenfell hadjJvo fingers shot off and was .wounded in both legs. It is estimated, -that much more than 2.000,000 horses are now engaged jn the European war., Germanv alone requires nearly 800,000 for complete'rhobilizatton of its military rfachine.Mobilizationofhe Frencli army calls" for 250,000 which figure^, however, are said to include 'only the cavalry arm of 1.he service. England hascoitected more than 200,000 horses for the army .since August. 1. Russia's equipment is not known, "but with an army of 3,000,000 or 4,000.000 men it is believed the Tsar's forces are finding employ ment for almost 1,000,000 horses in cavalry, artillery and transport service. Austria has put more than 250,000 horses into its military operations, it is said and both Servia and. Belgium have considerable numbers engaged. The British government has placed orders for 45,000 horses to be delivered in Montreal. Most of them will be purchased in the United States. -The New York Herald BEST ^760 let. We do not sell it. B UT we do sell atid will, continue tosell Standard Oil Co. Gasoline. Test .your Gasoline. We invite comparison with any jn the City Price 22 c ts. per.gallon in 50 gallon .Drums, Customers Kiting 100 gals, or over per lonth ao gallon. Vat eh oir Notice for Ker|ene in June. C. C. 'SAU.NDKRS' Professional A nnouncemen i Dr. W^ R. Lamb AMERICAN OCULIST and OPTICIAN Special!t In Examining the EYE and Correcting Defective Vision H AS the pleasure to again announce to the Citizens of New Providence and the surrounding islands, that he will beat the Knickerbocker Hotel, Nassau,till November 4th inclusive. Those wishing, to consult him should make an appointment at their earliest opportunity as he will not be able to remain longor than the time stated. He is fully-prepared as before, \yith the most modern instruments and apparatus foe' thoroughly examining and refracting the eye's according to the latest and most approved methods as employed in the Metropolitan Eye Infirmaries, and has the largest supply and.the greatest variety of the most desirable kinds and styles of lenses, and mountings of the best quality, ever brought to this Colony,, including a large supply of sphero-cylindrical, prismatic and other special lenses made to order for the correction of astigmatism, weakness of the ocular muscles and other eye troubles which ordinary lenses will not correct. Those who are troubled with weak eyes or defective vision, who suffer from headache, eye ache, inflammation of the eyes or the lids, Weakness of the ocular muscles, or any of the numerous conditions of the eyes requiring a careful and thorough examination, or necessitating the use of glasses— and most of these troubles are permanently cured by accurate refraction, and properly adjusted glasses—nvoiild do well to embrace the present exceptional opportunity of giving their eyes the attention they require ; an opportunity which, for completeness of apparatus and supply of lenses, thoroughness of examination, perfection of refraction which brings the vision up to the highest possible standard, and for most perfect and satisfactory results, is equal in every respect to the best obtainable anywhere abroad. Dr. Lamb uses the Javal ophthalmometer and the electric ophthalmoscope, and his methods of examination-are so thorough and accurate that the best possible result are always obtained from the glasses he prescribes which are accurately fitted and WARRANTED TO BE CORRECT. There are many here,as in other places, who suffer from serious eye troubles and most imperfect vision, because they have never had a good opportunity,of consulting an eye specialist of repute; hence comparatively few of those who are using glasses have the kind their eyes require, the kind which produces the most comfort, the best vision, and the preservation of the sight which is the most important. Dr. Lamb is certificated in both optics and medicine, has thousands of references and testimonials from influential citizens of many countries, where he has practiced his profession continuously for 25 years, and hasestablished through reliable and superior seryic-e, the most extensive eye.practice in the world. Charges Reasonable. Hours: 9 to 12 a.m: 2 to 5 p.m. Fresh Onion Seed For Result FROM TEMRRIFFE A ,4,, t AND NATIVE SEED CORN -^overuse in At*Too*e's, 499 Bay Street. The Tribune THE Cosmopolitan HIGH SCHOOL Opens on Monday, 0*. 5th in Aurora Hall on Charlotte Street. For particulars apply to Prof. G. G. Coffin, head master, or Mr. J. P. Simms. NOTICE T HE undersigned begs to notify the public that on Saturday Oct. 31st he will sell at block No. 3 in the City Market, fresh meat at the following low prices, Steak 9d. per. lb. Roast 9d. Stew Meat 8d. Mutton 9d. %  Pen Fed Pork 6d. ' JOSKPH W. RAHM1NG Oct.28th icji4.. ( i mo.) Notice *!.•!• Wt Will 11 I'-lIU?! Ill i\iISid on the (HT-BRANDS following pricecori lumW E would call the attention of our friends in Nassau and on the ()l"l to the following p ber which will go into efleCt from to-day. All ROUGH lumber up to 8 ft. 6/j per 100. All DRESSED lumber up to 8 ft. 8/4 per 100 All ROUGH and DRESSED to 16ft. 10/5 per 100. ANYTHING over 16 ft. l>/6 per 100. 1 above up to 8 ini. Wide) Thete prices are for CASH abfolntely and being WAR prices are mnoV to help the pubhand are subject to change without notice The Bahamas Timber Co. Ltd. COCOANUTS I BAHAMA ISLANDS I is now possible for owners of land with fully bearing trees to prove its value and obtain rents. For further particular! Applv to J. THEO, PARRINGTON Nassau, N. p. Agent for L, Bahamas Produce MarVMins Company 139 CopthoilHouu Copthall Avtnuc { Mo London, R. C



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-1 3 P 3 cr 5 <£ 0 (D 05 Nvilllus e.ddictue |\irre In verb* mctgietrl. Being bound to iwc&r to the Do|mm tf no Master. VOL.X. N&MBU, N. P., BhmM, Tuesday. November 3.1914 So. 25 L. GILBERT DUPUCII, Editor and Proprietor. OFFICE: 38-44 MARKET 8TRRKT Nastau, N.P., liahamas "PHONE 2fl0. P. O. BOX 163. PUBLISHED DAILY Monday, Wednesday and Fridaysingle copy ... '. jj Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday— single copy a Weekly 4 j ( ] Monthly i s. 4 d S uMterly 4 ,. alfYearlv 8 s, Y'ly 1 6s. PAYABLE IN ADVANCE Advertising Rates:-Six pence eer line for first insertion; three pence pst line for second insertion %  ar..i one penny per line for subsqnent insertions, "vertisements under eight lines 4s. fCL CIVILIZED NATIONS SHOULD COMBINE IN A GREAT WORLD LEAGUE FOR THE PEACE OF RIGHTEOUSNESS (Theodore Roosevelt) Concluded Growth Of Idee,, Of Right In Greece a very imperfect recng nitron of internationalright grew up so fir as Greek conimunities weft concerned, hut it never extended to barbarians; In the Roman Empira this feeling grew slightly, if only for the reason that so many nation Wtre included within its b 'unds ami were forced to live peaceably together. In the Middle Ages the common Christianity of Km ope created a real bond. There was at least a great deal of talk about the duties of Christian nations to one another; andtjdthough. the get ion along the lines of the talk was lamentably insufficient, still tintalk itself represented the dawning recognition of die 'act t each nation might owe someng to othei nations and that it not right to base action purely on self interest. There has undoubtedly been a wide expansion of this feeling during the hist few centuiies, a id particularly during the last century. It now extends so to include not only Christian nations but also those non-Christian nations who themselves treat with justice and fairness their fellow-men of different creed. We are still a lamentably long distance away from the goal toward which we are striving; but we have taken a few steps toward that goal. A hundred years ago the Knglish-speaking peoples of Great Biitam and America regarded one another as inveterate and predestined enemies just as three centuries previously had been tjie case in Great Britain itself between those who dwelt in the northern half of the island. Now war is unthinkable between us Moreover, there is a real advance in good will, respect and untWotaiiding between the fmited States and all the other nations of the eaith. The advance is now Steady and it is interrupted at times by acts of unwisdom, which ate quite as apt to be committed by ourselves as by other peoples, but the advance has gone on.There is far greater sentiment than evre before against unwarranted aggressions by stronger powers against weak powers; there is far greater feeling against misconduct, whether in small or big powers, and far greater feeling against brutality in war. Real Advance In Last iOO Year. This does not mean that the wrong doing as regards any one of these matters has as yet been even approximately stopped, or that the indignation against such wrongdoing is as yet anything like as effective as it should be. But we must not let our horror at the wrong that is still done blind us to the fact that there has been improvement. As late as the eighteenth century there were continual instances where small nations or provinces, were overrun just as Belgium na* been overrun, without anv feeling worth taking into account being thereby excited in the rest of mankind. In the seventeenth century affairs were worse. What has been done in Belgian cities has been very dreadful, and the Belgian countrysi.le has suffered in a way to .wring our Itearts, but our sympathy and indignation must not blind us to the fact that even in this case there has been a real advance during the last three hundred yea's and that such things as were done to Magdeburg and Wexford and Drogheda and the entire Palatinate in the seventeenth century are no longer possible. Still Have Far To Travel There is every reason to feel dissatisfied with the slow progress that has been made in putting a stop to wrongdoing. It is our bounden duty now to act so as to secure redress for wrongdoing, but, nevertheless, we must also recognize the* fact that some progress has been made and that there is now a good deil of real sentiment, and some efficient sentiment.against international wrongdoing. There has been and is a real growth towards international peace, justice, and fair dealing. We have still a long way to go be f ore reaching the goal, but at least we have gone forward a little way toward the eoal. This growth will continue. We must do everything that we can to make it continue. But we must not blind ourselves to the fact that as yet this giowth is not such as in any shape or way to warrant us in relying for our ultimatesafety in great national crises up m anything exc-pt the strong fibre of our national character and upon such preparation in advance as will give that character adequate instruments wherewith to mike proof of its strength. —:o: — TEN DAYS LIFE OF HORSE IN WAR. i That the average life of a horse on the fifing line in France is about ten days, was the astonishing declaration of a British army officer identified with the remount department who visited .the Fiss, Doerr & Carroll Horse Company's big mart in East Twenty-fourth street a few days ago Horsemen were prepared to : iear of unexampled wastage after reading about the havoc wrought by modern artillery and machine guns, but this report indicates such glaughter as had not been dreamed of here The late Captain R. N. Gren fell, of international polo fam Continued en fonrtk pagt) ties


The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02294
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Tuesday, November 03, 1914
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02294

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Nvilllus e.ddictue |\irre In verb* mctgietrl.
Being bound to iwc&r to the Do|mm tf no Master.
VOL.X.
N&mbu, N. P., BhmM, Tuesday. November 3.1914
So. 25
L. GILBERT DUPUCII,
Editor and Proprietor.
OFFICE: 38-44 MARKET 8TRRKT
Nastau, N.P., liahamas
"PHONE 2fl0. P. O. BOX 163.
PUBLISHED DAILY
Monday, Wednesday and Friday-
single copy ... '....... jj
Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday
single copy......... ,a
Weekly ............ 4j(]
Monthly ............is. 4d
SuMterly..........4,.
alfYearlv...... ,.....8s,
Y'ly ............16s.
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
Advertising Rates:-Six pence eer line
for first insertion; three pence pst line
for second insertion ar..i one penny per
line for subsqnent insertions,
"vertisements under eight lines 4s.
fCL
CIVILIZED NATIONS
SHOULD COMBINE IN A
GREAT WORLD LEAGUE
FOR THE
PEACE OF RIGHTEOUSNESS
(Theodore Roosevelt)
Concluded
Growth Of Idee,, Of Right
In Greece a very imperfect recng
nitron of international- right grew
up so fir as Greek conimunities
weft concerned, hut it never exten-
ded to barbarians; In the Roman
Empira this feeling grew slightly,
if only for the reason that so many
nation Wtre included within its
b 'unds ami were forced to live
peaceably together. In the Middle
Ages the common Christianity of
Km ope created a real bond. There
was at least a great deal of talk
about the duties of Christian na-
tions to one another; andtjdthough.
the get ion along the lines of the
talk was lamentably insufficient,
still tin- talk itself represented the
dawning recognition of die 'act
t each nation might owe some-
ng to othei nations and that it
not right to base action purely
on self interest.
There has undoubtedly been a
wide expansion of this feeling
during the hist few centuiies, a id
particularly during the last cen-
tury. It now extends so to include
not only Christian nations but
also those non-Christian nations
who themselves treat with justice
and fairness their fellow-men of
different creed. We are still a la-
mentably long distance away from
the goal toward which we are
striving; but we have taken a few
steps toward that goal. A hundred
years ago the Knglish-speaking
peoples of Great Biitam and
America regarded one another as
inveterate and predestined enemies
just as three centuries previously
had been tjie case in Great Britain
itself between those who dwelt in
the northern half of the island.
Now war is unthinkable between
us Moreover, there is a real ad-
vance in good will, respect and un-
tWotaiiding between the fmited
States and all the other nations of
the eaith. The advance is now
Steady and it is interrupted at
times by acts of unwisdom, which
ate quite as apt to be committed
by ourselves as by other peoples,
but the advance has gone on.There
is far greater sentiment than evre
before against unwarranted aggres-
sions by stronger powers against
weak powers; there is far greater
feeling against misconduct, whe-
ther in small or big powers, and
far greater feeling against brutality
in war.
Real Advance In Last
iOO Year.
This does not mean that the
wrong doing as regards any one of
these matters has as yet been even
approximately stopped, or that the
indignation against such wrong-
doing is as yet anything like as ef-
fective as it should be. But we
must not let our horror at the wrong
that is still done blind us to the
fact that there has been improve-
ment. As late as the eighteenth
century there were continual in-
stances where small nations or
provinces, were overrun just as Bel-
gium na* been overrun, without
anv feeling worth taking into ac-
count being thereby excited in the
rest of mankind. In the seventeenth
century affairs were worse. What
has been done in Belgian cities
has been very dreadful, and the
Belgian countrysi.le has suffered in
a way to .wring our Itearts, but our
sympathy and indignation must not
blind us to the fact that even in this
case there has been a real advance
during the last three hundred yea's
and that such things as were done
to Magdeburg and Wexford and
Drogheda and the entire Palatinate
in the seventeenth century are no
longer possible.
Still Have Far To Travel
There is every reason to feel
dissatisfied with the slow progress
that has been made in putting a stop
to wrongdoing. It is our bounden '
duty now to act so as to secure
redress for wrongdoing, but, never-
theless, we must also recognize the*
fact that some progress has been
made and that there is now a good
deil of real sentiment, and some
efficient sentiment.against interna-
tional wrongdoing. There has been
and is a real growth towards inter-
national peace, justice, and fair
dealing. We have still a long way
to go before reaching the goal, but
at least we have gone forward a
little way toward the eoal. This
growth will continue. We must do
everything that we can to make it
continue. But we must not blind
ourselves to the fact that as yet this
giowth is not such as in any shape
or way to warrant us in relying for
our ultimatesafety in great nation-
al crises up m anything exc-pt the
strong fibre of our national char-
acter and upon such preparation
in advance as will give that char-
acter adequate instruments where-
with to mike proof of its strength.
:o:
TEN DAYS LIFE OF HORSE
IN WAR.
i That the average life of a
horse on the fifing line in France
is about ten days, was the aston-
ishing declaration of a British
army officer identified with the
remount department who visited
.the Fiss, Doerr & Carroll Horse
Company's big mart in East
Twenty-fourth street a few days
ago Horsemen were prepared
to :iear of unexampled wastage
after reading about the havoc
wrought by modern artillery and
machine guns, but this report
indicates such glaughter as had
not been dreamed of here
The late Captain R. N. Gren
fell, of international polo fam
Continued en fonrtk pagt)
ties



1
Publication began at 6.15 p.m.
Zhc Vribune
TvMday. November 3. 1914.
STREET NOMENCLATURE
A SUBTSITUTE FOR
MONUMENTS.
From the pages of history
both sacred and profane, we
learn that, events of remarkable
character and which were deem-
ed of a character that entitled
them to be kept in remembrance
by posterity, were perpetuated
W a tangible and visual form,
and so it became the custom to
erect monuments of the most
imperishable material. Ordinary
events did not obtain such no-
tice but only evmts that left their
mark on the peoj le among whom
they occurred, and were destin-
ed afterwards to assist in the
formation of their character
I ni fact can readily be seen
and understood^ modems, and
we have not to turn back manv
pages before we arrive at the
indisputable truth of the state-
ment, as these are to be seen to-
day among different nations,
sepraatel by distinct lingual
differences and variations, but
yet connected by a radical rela-
tionship, h would seem as if
the custom had sprung from a
common human instinct, abso-
lutely independent of personal
communication or contact. In
the eailier history of our race
these marks were necessarily of
a rude and primitive form, per-
haps a simple stone bearing no
marks of handicraft, and as the
race advanced in the scale of
civilization, they were convul-
sed wall the throes of higher
aspirations, and the knowledge
01 the manual arts was born and
the rude stone gave place to
another perhaps higher with
ideographic characters, these
continued to be the prevailing
type for hundreds of vears, when
their expanding intellects de-
manded a better vehicle of ex-
pression, and the rude single
stuns, in turn gave place to a
shaft or column. Then the fine
arts were developed bv taste
and imagination, and found ex-
pression in#Sculpture, the five
orders of Architecture were es
tablished, (though Kuskin redu-
ces them by the fiat of his pen
I to only two,) and spread rapidly
I over the whole civilized globe
shown as that of the Temple a
Tivoli, the Temple of Jupitar
and the Pantheon, not to men
tion a great many others; and
were freely used in monu-
mental work designed to be of
a commemorative character,
The proof of this brief, outline,
if any were wanting can be
supplied by documentary evi-
dence, for we read of the stone
set up by the Patriach Jacob
at Bethel, of the pillar that sig-
nified the treaty made between
him and Laban, of the twelve
stones commanded by Joshua to
be placed in the bed of the Jord-
an to commemorate its passage,
Absolam's pillar and Pompey's
pillar. In modern times we
have much stronger proof for
manv of us have seen Cleo-
patra's Needle, the Pyramids,
the Sphinx, the Taj Mahal, Nel-
son's Monument, Wellington's,
the Victoria Memorial, the .-Al-
bert, The Monument, Glad-
stones, Beaconslield's the Guards
the Crimean, and many others
on the Continent. Nor must
we pass by Queen Victoria's
Statue, Columbus', and the Five
Heroes of Nassau Bar in our
own, little City.
It is unnecessary to point out
that all those named were com
memorative of persons familar
to every school boy and girl, of
deeds of valour done and acts
perfomed "'While the world
wondered."
Similar deeds are now in the
doing, and it seems to us
that, we cannot do better than
immortalise the names of those
Englishmen who are risking all
that they hold dear, that old
England shall not be shamed in
the ey..s of Europe. We cannot
erect Monuments to their memo
ry, but we can at least perpetu
ate them in a way that is made
plain to us by the Notice of t le
Board of Works
It is a timely move, and will
be as highly appreciated as it is
commendable. It would be a
happy thought under any cir-
cumstances, but especially at
the present time when th; whole
world is in the throes and an
guish of a struggle.which must
leave an indellible mark on its
history. It will be remembered
by our children, and our cliil
dren's children in succeeding
generations until the last man
shall stand in silent majesty
viewing the decaying World,
around, above and below, him.
There "area great number of
streets and lanes in the named
suburbs which have become
populously residential, and
owing to the long delayed
nomenclature, it is extremely
difficult to locate residents in
them.
The names of the men who
have madeand will make Eng-
land grest, are fit to be remem-
bered ; Edward VII, George V,
Wellington, Nelson, St Vincent,
Hood, Drake, Raleigh, Roberts,
Kitchener, French, Gladstone,
Beaconsfield, Chatham, Grey,
Asquith, Bonar Law, Lloyd
George, Fox, Duff, Methuen,
Gordon, Baden-Powell, Buller.
These names will be of educa-
tional value, object lessons in
the History of England, educa-
tors of the adult as also of child-
hood and youth, for. when we
shall be asked of our children in
time to come, why were these
streets and lanes thus named,
then they will be told of the
greatest epoch in the world's
history and especially in that of
Great Britain and Her Empire,
and they will review the names
of the thousands of unknown
heroes, "of those who have
fought and sailed, and ruled
and loved, and made our world."
Every man a hero, and every
woman a heroine who gladly,
willingly suffered the dangers
and privations and horrors of
vvar.that the nmea of Bllglaad
should not be erased from the
map of Europe,and an accursed
name sprawl ove'r it like a
poisonous toad over a field of
lillies.
Such names as are mentioned
will bring home forever to us,
the resourcefullness of the Old
Country, its vigour &its courage,
its truthfullnc.sand its honesty
and that it knows no fear what-
ever when called upon to fight
for the right ; Australia, New
Zealand, Canada, India, and
Africa all united and giving to
the world a memorable example
of cooperation and brotherly
love within the Empire at a
time of peril and crisis.
SPONGE BROKERS'
AND BUYERS'.
POW-WOW
A meeting ol bponge brokers
and buyers under the auspices of
the Marine products Board
was held in the Chamber of
Commerce last evening. The
object of the meeting was to as-
certain from those engaged in the
Sponge trade, what views they
held on the present crisis.
The Chairman of the M. P.
Board W. K. Moore, Esq., called
the meeting to order*at 7.30. He
pointed out that the crisis in our
commercial history had reached
an acute stage and unless some
ready remedy could be found it
was likely that the end vwld be
more serious than manyvvould
believe.
He gave some interesting sta-
tistics showing the falling off in
the Sponge sales since August
and pointed out that one of
three propositions were before
the board.
First close all the Sponge beds
of the Colony. Second, Alter-
nate closing for A period of two
or three months and open them
for a similar period Third,
Government Financial Act.
That is that, the Government be
solicited to provide capital to
purchase Sponge at prices that
cover admitting the brokers out-
fitting the vessels as usual.
After considerable discussion,,
the proposal put forth by Mr.
H. W. I.ightbourn met with
the approval of the majority of
those present which was that the
Exuma Cays, the Abaco, and the
Bight Acklins, be closed, leav-
ing, the rest of the beds open ,
The Chairman thanked the
meeting for their attendance and
for their advice and utmised
that at an early date traRinatter
would receive the full attention
of the Board.
:o.
The Mail Steamer Vigilnncia
arrived at day-break from New
York with Mails, Cargo, and the
following passengers.
Messrs F. Armbrister, G. Arm-
brister Dr. J. B. Alburv, Mrs. A.
Albury, Miss Alburv, Mrs. J. II.
Brown, Dr. J. Culmer, Mrs. Cul-
mer, Master J. Culmer, Mr. i\m\
Mrs K. W. deGlanville, Mr.
E. George, Miss. E. Halanen
Mrs. E. Hall, Comndr. F. I.obb,
Miss I.obb, Mrs. E Leach, Mr.
If, Lasker, Miss E. Mansfield,
Miss. N. Moultrie, Hon. W Mil-
ler, Mrs. Miller, Master H. Millet,
Mrs. V. Mosley, Mrs. M. Mos-
ley, Miss M. Mosley, lion. F.
M* Menendez, Mrs Menendez,
Mrs. A. Nelson, Mr. W. O'Neil,
Miss. E. Pritchard, Mr. & Mrs. J.
Queen, Mr. M. Stehr; Mr and Mrs
R. Sheppard, Mr. and Mrs W.
Simms; Mr. and Mrs. B Thomp
son; Mr. and Mrs. V. WATodd;
Hon. Daniel Tudor, nrjr Mrs.
Tudor; Misses Muriel, Mabel,
Gwen Tudor; Miss M. Holden.
And 2 in transit for Guantan-
imo, and 7 for Santiago.


m

MA
life
A Mail to incUrae letters for
Florida and other specially ad-
dressed correspondence to be
forwarded by "Frances E." will
be made up aaf[closed on Thurs-
day next, the 5th instant at 8
a.m.
PERSONALS
The Hon. Daniel Tudor ar-
rived this morning via New
York from England, where he
has been enjoying a short vaca-
tion. He is accompanied by
Mrs. Tudor and the Misses
Muriel, Mabel and Gwen.
We extend a hearty welcome
to them.
Our old friends Mr. R. Barnes
Sheppard is back from his sum-
mer's outing, and with Mrs
Sheppard is looking the picture
of good health.
Dr. Joe (J. Baird Albury)
smiles once more on his impa-
tient patients.
Dr. Culmer will again feel
the pulse, and take the tern
pirature, at the Bahamas Gen-
eral Hospital, .j^
"Hail to the brides."
Mr. Bruce Thompson and his
and Mr. Reginald de Glanville
and his;
Much happiness to all.
Hope our erst hard worked
friend the Surveyor General,
has with Mrs Miller and Master
Hubert enjoyed themselves in
the old country.
G. W. Armbrister, the "f tar"
Man, showed his Shoe leather
this morning as he dandily de-
scended the downward stage.
"How dye do Georgie Boy ?
We are glad to see an old
friend, Mrs V. Moselev back to
the "Old Rock"
The "Guardian" hasn't "gone
to Leeward", but yet we are
{>leased to see Miss Moseley's
land at the tiller again.
test War News
RADIOGRAMS
November 3rd 1914
is from Cape Cod, Mass.
Hied powers today sev-
lomatic relations with
Turkey although the Ports is
reported to have apologized for
the Black Sea raids, and there
is a probability that Turkey will
keep out of the war.
Berlin-:The Turkish Am-
bassador states that Turkey is
preparing for a holy war against
Christians. Bulgaria is expected
to join Turkey while Greece is
expected to join the Allies.
Paris:Theofficial statement,
after announcing advance in the
North, says that the Allies have
made progress on the whole bat-
tle line except at Messines, of
which a part has been lost.
The enamys attacks were
checked at Arras, Lihones and
LeQuesnay enSan Terre.
The Allies have advanced
slightly toward Tracy in the
-\isne region as well as on right
bank of the river between L'Ai-
glc forest and Soissons.
Another attack was repulsed
at Vaivley. Others were repulsed
at Chenin des Dames and on
tli Nieuse heights.
A reconnoiasance in force by
the Germans failed at Nomeny.
IntheVosges the Allies have
retaken height dominating the
pass of Sainte Marie and in
llandesept region they have ad-
vanced till they hold enemys
former trenches west of St. Die.
Petrograd:-After bombarding
Black Sea ports the cruiser Goe
ben is damaged and is returing
to Constantinople for repairs.
London: -- Dispatches from
the battle front in France .and
Belgium indicate that German
attacks have been repulsed and
that the Allies line has held its
own throughout.
Berlin:- Dispatches says that
the progress of the fighting in
Northern France and Belgium
i< slightly favourable to the
Germans. The fighting between
Nieuport and Dixmude is prob-
able the fiercest of the whole
war. The Germans have forced
their way southward by repeated
night attacks. The loss of life
was great on both sides.
Petrograd:There is no now
definite details of operations on
the Eastern battle line.
London:Heavy firing was
heard off the Foreland at Dover
this afternoon.
OOVKRNMKNT PRESS
3rd November 1914.
London:Turkey has apol-
ogized for the. warlike actions
of her fleet but the triple entente
will demand full reparation.
The three cruisers that took
'part in the bombardment must
be dismantaled and the German
officers dismissed from the ser-
vice of the Ottoman Empire be-
fore the entente will resume
relations. Turkey refuses to send
the German officers home and
there is a long way to go before
the situation can be cleared up.
London:The Germans con-
tinue to strike hard at the
Allies lines in an endeavour to
get to the coast.
Their road is blocked every-
where but the attacks continue
without regard to the cost in
live*.
The belief is growing that the
invaders are making a last ef-
fort before retiring into central
Belgium.
Fighting goes on without
change in the Eastern frontier.
The backbone of the rebellion
is broken in South Africa with
the rebel chiefs in flight or ask-
ing for mercy.
London hears of a naval en-
gagement between a British de-
stroyer and a German subma-
rine in the Straits of Dover.
London : A dispatch from
Para, Brazil says that the Ger-
man steamer Ascuncion has
landed there with passengers and
crews of the British steamers
Vandyck, Hurtsdale and Glan-
ton, captured by the German
cruiser Karlsruhe.
Washington: President Wil-
son will be a candidate for re-
election in 1917, so official
Washington hears on the eve
of the congressional elections.
Mexico CityThe term of the
provisional president of Mexico
just selected by the conference
at Aguas Calientas, will be a
short one The Governor of San
Luis Potosi has been selected
and, the repufar election will
occur in twenty days.
Carranza does not acrept the
choise of the conference d de-
mans tnat another namPi
His faction and Villa's. re ex-
pected to clash and movement of
troops has commenced.
New YorkTwenty directors
of the New Haven Railroad
have been indicted by the Fed-
eral Grand Jury charged with
violation of the Sherman Law.
The iiidicament refers to them
as'conspirators.
Washington Serious cattle
disease has broken out in the
States of Pennsylvania, Indiana,
Michigan and part of Ohio
Shipment of cattle from the in-
fested district has been prohibit-
'ed.
Good Morning'!
We Are Introducing
American Silk
American Cashmere
American Cotton-Lisle
HOSIERY
They have stood the test. Give real
foot comfort. No seams to rip. Never
become loose or baggy. The shape ii
knit innot pressed in.
GUARANTEED for fineness, style,
superiority of material and workmanship.
Absolutely stainless. Will wear 6 months
without holes, or pew ones free.
. OVR. SPECIAL OFFER
to every one sending us f 1.00 in currency
or postal note, to cover advertising and
shipping charges, we will send post paid,
with written guarantee, backed by a five
million dollar company, either
3 Pairs of our 75c. value
American Silk Hosiery,
or 4 Pairs of our 50c. value
American Cashmere Hosiery,
or 4 Pairs of our 50c. VeJue.
American Cotton-Lisle Hosiery
or 6 Pairs of Children'* Hosiery.
DONT DELAYOffer expires when
dealer in your locality is selected.
THE INTERNATIONAL HOSIERY CO.
P. O. Box 224
DAYTON. OHIO. U. S. A-
PUBLIC BOAR*D OF
WORKS.
Notice
PERSONS having land to
dispose of in the Eastern
District suitable for a burial
ground, are invited to com-
municate with the Public
Board of Works.
Notice
THE Public Board of
Works having decided to
name the unnamed streets
and lanes in the Suburbs of
Nassau (Grants Town, Bains
Town, Ac.) and to mark the
names on the ends of same,
invite suggestions from the
General Public as to the se-
lection of suitable names for
the purpose.
Notice
IT has come to the notice of
the Public Board of Works
that certain persons in the
City and Suburbs are in the
habit of leaving carriages
and carts &c. in the public
streets when not in use.
NOTICE is therefore given
that this is against the rules
of the Board and persons
guilty of a breach of the rules
in future, will be prosecuted.
Tht Foregoing notices tire
published by order of the
PuBlic Board of Works.
James H. Knowles.
Clerk to the Board.
Nassau, 30th October, 1914.
L


who was killed recently in
France had a twin brother, Cap-
tairfT". O. Grenfell,' who was of
the same regiment and also a
fin 6olo player. -They looked
so nluch alike that it is said
thaif bwn grooms could hardly
teU tf em apart when they were
pl|yil)g on the same side in- a
polo game. The difficulty be
eame so great to the polo offici-
als at Hurlingham that Captain
R. N Grenfell used to wear a
bright red belt when playing to
distinguish, him from his bto-
thee. Off the field it was just as
puzzling to tell one' frprp the
other, since they, often dressed
exactly alike for their own
amusement* in confusing their
' friends. In a charge at Com
piegne Captain F. O. Grenfell
hadjJvo fingers shot off and was
.wounded in both legs.
It is estimated, -that much
more than 2.000,000 horses are
now engaged jn the European
war., Germanv alone requires
nearly 800,000 for complete'rho-
bilizatton of its military rfa-
chine.Mobilizationofhe Frencli
army calls" for 250,000 which
figure^, however, are said to in-
clude 'only the cavalry arm of
1.he service. England hascoitected
more than 200,000 horses for the
army .since August.1. Russia's
equipment is not known, "but
with an army of 3,000,000 or
4,000.000 men it is believed the
Tsar's forces are finding employ
ment for almost 1,000,000 horses
in cavalry, artillery and trans-
port service. Austria has put
more than 250,000 horses into
its military operations, it is said
and both Servia and. Belgium
have considerable numbers en-
gaged.
The British government has
placed orders for 45,000 horses
to be delivered in Montreal. Most
of them will be purchased in the
United States.
-The New York Herald
BEST ^760
let. We do not sell it.
BUT we do sell atid will,
continue tosell
Standard Oil Co.
Gasoline. Test .your Gaso-
line. We invite comparison
with any jn the City.....
Price 22cts. per.gallon in
50 gallon .Drums, Customers
Kiting 100 gals, or over per
lonth ao gallon.
Vat eh oir Notice for Ker-
|ene in June.
C. C. 'SAU.NDKRS'
Professional A nnouncemen i
Dr. W^ R. Lamb
AMERICAN OCULIST and OPTICIAN
Special!t In Examining the EYE and Correcting Defective Vision
HAS the pleasure to again announce to the Citizens of
New Providence and the surrounding islands, that
he will beat the Knickerbocker Hotel, Nassau,till
November 4th inclusive. Those wishing, to consult him
should make an appointment at their earliest opportunity
as he will not be able to remain longor than the time stated.
He is fully-prepared as before, \yith the most modern instru-
ments and apparatus foe' thoroughly examining and re-
fracting the eye's according to the latest and most approved
methods as employed in the Metropolitan Eye Infirmaries,
and has the largest supply and.the greatest variety of the
most desirable kinds and styles of lenses, and mountings of
the best quality, ever brought to this Colony,, including a
large supply of sphero-cylindrical, prismatic and other spe-
cial lenses made to order for the correction of astigmatism,
weakness of the ocular muscles and other eye troubles which
ordinary lenses will not correct. Those who are troubled
with weak eyes or defective vision, who suffer from head-
ache, eye ache, inflammation of the eyes or the lids, Weak-
ness of the ocular muscles, or any of the numerous condi-
tions of the eyes requiring a careful and thorough exami-
nation, or necessitating the use of glasses and most of these
troubles are permanently cured by accurate refraction, and
properly adjusted glassesnvoiild do well to embrace the
present exceptional opportunity of giving their eyes the at-
tention they require ; an opportunity which, for complete-
ness of apparatus and supply of lenses, thoroughness of ex-
amination, perfection of refraction which brings the vision
up to the highest possible standard, and for most perfect
and satisfactory results, is equal in every respect to the best
obtainable anywhere abroad. Dr. Lamb uses the Javal
ophthalmometer and the electric ophthalmoscope, and his
methods of examination-are so thorough and accurate that
the best possible result are always obtained from the glasses
he prescribes which are accurately fitted and WARRANT-
ED TO BE CORRECT. There are many here,as in other
places, who suffer from serious eye troubles and most im-
perfect vision, because they have never had a good opportu-
nity,of consulting an eye specialist of repute; hence com-
paratively few of those who are using glasses have the kind
their eyes require, the kind which produces the most com-
fort, the best vision, and the preservation of the sight which
is the most important.
Dr. Lamb is certificated in both optics and medicine,
has thousands of references and testimonials from influential
citizens of many countries, where he has practiced his pro-
fession continuously for 25 years, and hasestablished through
reliable and superior seryic-e, the most extensive eye.practice
in the world. Charges Reasonable.
Hours: 9 to 12 a.m: 2 to 5 p.m.
Fresh Onion Seed For Result
FROM TEMRRIFFE a ,4,, t-
and native seed corn -^overuse in
At*Too*e's, 499 Bay Street. The Tribune
-------THE *
Cosmopolitan
HIGH SCHOOL
Opens on
Monday, 0*. 5th
in Aurora Hall
on Charlotte Street.
For particulars apply to
Prof. G. G. Coffin, head mas-
ter, or Mr. J. P. Simms.
NOTICE
THE undersigned begs to
notify the public that
on Saturday Oct. 31st he will
sell at block No. 3 in the City
Market, fresh meat at the
following low prices,
Steak 9d. per. lb.
Roast 9d. *
Stew Meat 8d. "
Mutton 9d. "
Pen Fed Pork 6d. ' "
JOSKPH W. RAHM1NG
. Oct.28th icji4..(i mo.)
Notice
*!.! Wt Will 11 I'-lIU?! Ill i\iIS-
id on the (HT-BRANDS
following pricecori lum-
WE would call the atten-
tion of our friends in Nas-
sau and on the ()l"l
to the following p
ber which will go into efleCt
from to-day.
All ROUGH lumber up to 8 ft.
6/j per 100. All DRESSED
lumber up to 8 ft. 8/4 per 100
All ROUGH and DRESSED to
16ft. 10/5 per 100. ANYTHING
over 16 ft. l>/6 per 100. 1 above
up to 8 ini. Wide)
Thete prices are for CASH
abfolntely and being WAR
prices are mnoV to help the pub-
h- and are subject to change
without notice '
The Bahamas Timber Co. Ltd.
COCOANUTS
I
BAHAMA ISLANDS
I is now possible for owners
of land with fully bearing
trees to prove its value and ob-
tain rents.
For further particular!
Applv to
J. THEO, PARRINGTON
Nassau, N. p.
Agent for l,
Bahamas Produce MarVMins
Company
139 CopthoilHouu
Copthall Avtnuc
{. Mo London, R. C-


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