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i "' L Publication bt|>n .1 5 p.m. Zbc Zxibnnc Saturday. Octobar 31. 1914. WINTER AND WAR. (Casual Thoughts.) The War has inflicted serious wounds on us in our forward march. Will Winter, the Red Cross Nurse, sterilize them and with cool bandagings and dressings applied with deft fingers allay the smarting and lower tUe fevered pulse ? Present indications lead us to the cherished belief, that the unusual influx of coal into* the bunkers of the "Colonial," presage a good season. We learn that inquires far in excess of any previouslv made, have been replied to at the of fire of the Ward Line Company. The War is sending a stream of custom from tin* Continental, tothe English hotels. (Taridge's, a name as long associated with London, as i^ is with Nassau, has a long list of distinguished visitors, and all others are filled; and as many distinguished Americans have acquired the habit of wintering s >me -where, generally at foreign resort* Egypt, The Mediterranean, The •Riviera and scores of other places possessing a milder and more equable climate than that of their own land, ;\nC as by adverse circumstance these re sorts will be closed to the hosts of social nomads whose proverbial restlessness will not suffer them to stay at home ; in addi tion to those whose state of health compel them to exchange the oscuro of their own skies for the cerulean of tropical climes there are no other spots on earth easy of access, but the islands of the Bahamas, the Caribbean Sea, and the "still vext Bermoothes." The natural attractions of the Bahamas far exceed those others of the series, a?;d it is not doubtful that the further advertising of Nassau by a talented contributor to The Illustrated London News, the Scientific American, and other, journals, and visualized at the Broadway Rose Gardens under the Jules Vernism of "Thirty Leagens Under the;*^" -wwill have had' the effect of ^**>*}nelling the jeu'uesst dorcecmot the^e,^ and greater American Cities^-vi S( e tual realities of Ala ilace. We do not anticipate a Danean shower during the com ing winter so that we may catch it in our cupped palms, but we shall esteem ourselves rich beyond the dreams of avarice, if we shall be aroused from the lethargy which is slowly creeping over us to the extent of a paralytic seizure of our normal energy, which is not remaikable for obtrusiveness. Our American visitors, some of them men of tireless activities, have fallen under the charm of our lotuseating proclivities and wonder ed over and over again why we work at all "down here." It may not arouse their admiration when the glamour has worn off, but it often excites the question. "What do you do when we are gone ?" Let us profit by the suggestion contained in the query and if any opportunities come our way, make the most of them and remove the implied slur. The voice of the First Napo leon comes to us from his magnificent mausoleum amid the din of battle now ravaging the fair land of France, and we hear it saying, "Waiting for an opportunity? Make it. no ifs, no buts, no becauses And we are pluued into 1 bought as we re view the past, and we wonder if we have left undone, that which we ought to have done. Have we not let opportunities slip b\ us in the dark, yes, even when they were almost within our grasp, only to Stretch forth our hands and seize them. We slept, and now has come the awakening. —:o: — HENRY D. BAKER, ESQ. AT PETROGRAD. We learn with much pleasure of a yet further promotion w'hich has come to Henry D. Baker Esq formqrlv (J S. Consul at this place. It vvill be remembered that a year ago he was borrowed bv the U. S. Dep't of "Commerce and Labour," and despatched on special service to New Zealand and Bombay. Having ac quitted himself with distinction he has now been induced to step out of the Consular Service, and enter that Department in which he hasalread done good service. He has just been appointed permanently, as Commercial At tache to the Department at Petrograd, lately changed by Czar from St. Petersburg, promotion will doubtless afford much pleasure to the large circle of his friends in Nassau, and we beg to add our sincere congratulations. —.0: — BAHAMIAN VOLTNTEERS TOR WAR. We understand that the SubCommitteeappointed toconsider the question of obtaining local volunteers for service out of the Colony has reported that up to date offers of personal services have been received from 225 Bahamians. His Excellency the Governor has submitted the offer to the Secretary of State lor the Colonies. —:o: — ARE THE CI.OPDS LIFTING? We are glad to learn that some of the vessels engaged in Sponging are being outfitted with the necessary stores. No cash advances however are being made to the cicus. This we are of the opinion will prove %ore satisfactory at the "setting up" than the old system of ad vances exceeding' the legal limit. —:o: — S. S. "Vigilancia" sailed at 4 p.m. on Friday, October 311th from New York, for Nassau, with bo passengers, 0,300 bhls. cargo, and Mails. The Motor Boat "Frances E." which left Nassau yesterday at q a.m. for Miami arrived at 6.30 thismornii.g. —:o: — IN THE SUPREME COURT Oct. 30th, 1914. The Court met at 10.30 a.m. Present. The Hon. V. C. WellsDurraut, K. C, Acting Chief Justice, The lion II C. Stronge Act. Attonev General, The Act. Registrar, The Commandant. The King us. Ephraim Forbes —Breaking and entering the Warehouse of Henry Martin at Mastic Point, Andnis. Arraigned—Pleaded Not GuiltyWitnesses called-Jury Empanelled—Prisoner undefended — The Cas proceded —Verdict — Not Guilty. Tbi> closed the Criminal Calends-The Court adjourn ed until Wednesday next the 41I1 Nov. at 10 30 a m f,, r the exhibit of the Civil DfJttcef? Communicated It is to be regretted that an effort is being mada^o close the Sponge Beds of the^Colony until the War is enddfl. This we think will be a nnst#e, as we are reliably informed that good sponges are fetching prices today which some years ago were considered excellent. The WarTimes, has worked a good thing for the Spongers. Many of them are going out without the extravagant advances, which havs prevailed for past 3 or 4 years, so that at the end of their voyage they will get their money, instead of being told by the outfitter "you had all your share before you went out." The advance system is a bad one, and we hope these hard times will help to minimise it. The 3ank of Nassau, has lower ed its rate of Discount, we are pleased to learn, back to 6 per cent. This will be helpful to the business community, as the War has considerably reduced the spending power of the people, and thus made trade dull in the stores. ^, On' Island reports mme to us which are confirme-' by the Board of Agriculture lat crops of produce are coining along rapidly and hountiMly. The Out Islands are ahead of the metropolis in this respect We have to look to them for our supplies of native products. Latest War News RADIOGRAMS October* 31st 19:4. London 30th Governor, Bahamas October 30th — Press Bureau Message: Yesterday progress was made round Y|>res and south ol Arras and in the Forest nf Apremont Some of the enemy's trenches were taen between the Aisne and Argonne. Russian victories on the Vistula River front are very important and all Auttro German army corps in thatMftgiou are in retreat Russian Wivalry has entered Radow. Further victory has been won north of the River Peletsa. The Russians have captured sevej thousand prisoners.



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The; British naval flotilla continues fo support the Allies left with effectivegnd accurate fire. On the 27th ana 28th the enemy brought up he&/y guns and replied vigor^fsly. On the 29th opposition from shore virtually ceased. The enemy's submarines are reported to be seeking an opportunity to attack our ships which are convoyed by destroyers. Oar casolties are small and structural damage to our ships trifling. Admiral Prince Louis of Battenberg has res gned his appointment as First Sea Lord and has been succeeded by Lord Fisher. His Majesty has directed that Prince Louis be sworr, a member of the Privy Council. In South some 120 father rebels have surrendered. (Signed) HARCOURT, October 31st 1914. The Turks are delighted at the chance of fighting Christians and are making demonstrations. EnglandjMs notified her that t as soon as she crosses the frontier of any of the powers of the entente, war will be declared. Two Turkish destroyers were sunk by a Russian ^u iboat. Two Russian steamers have been lost through contact with Turkish mines. The Belgians have cut the dykes along the Yscr River flooding an immense area and catching thousands of Germans .. and rendering further progress impossible. • There has been some fighting but the situation remains generally the same, and extremely favourable lathe Allies. The New York National City Bank has loaned France ten million dollars. Berlin declares that Japan intends controlling Asia and putting China under her control. Holland fears violation'of her neutrality from the mass of German troops passing the frontier nd will resisc at all cost any invasion. Paris reports that progress has been masWat variouspoints.no. tably in Lorraine Pekin says that 500 Japanese troops attacking Tsiug'l'au were blown up by mines. SJe^e guns WJAI be necessary for the re in of the forts. GOVERNMENT PRESS October 31st 1914 London :—Turkeys attacks upon Russia are likely to produce the gravest complications in the Balkan States. Greece, Italy, Ron ma nia and Bulgaria are ex pccted to enter the conflict. They will throw their forces with the Allies. Turkish destroyers sink a Russian Gunboat and damage three merchant vessels at Odessa. The German attempt to gain Calais and command the English Channel is said to have failed. The French and British have marched further inland. Paris:—Cruisers of the allied fleet are in pursuit of the Germans cruiser Fmden which sunk the Zemtichug in Penang harbour. The French destroyer Mousquet was sunk at the same time while chasing attempting to torpedo the Fmden. Mexico City:—Carranza will quit Mexico if his absence will re-establish peacein the country. His resignation was read yesterday at the Calientas conference. Villa must retire. Washington:—The state department will make a protest against the detention of the steamer Kloonlind at Gibraltar with 1200 passengers and a cargoof copper bound from New York to Italian and Greek ports New Whit by, Fngland:Many lives were lost when the British hospital ship Rohilla went on the rocks at New Whitby. Washington:—President Wilson will not close the Colorad > mines. The report that he would do so brings forth a flat denial, — .'o: — Oct. 1914 The Editor of The Tribune Dear Sir, I want to tell "Christain Scientist," if you will permit me, something that came into my mind as I read his letter in your paper. Mr. Christian Scientist, I think you must have an axe to grind, and you want poor people to turn the grindstone for you. Times are not over brisk with us, but yet, we haven't time to turn your grindstone. I for one have been a patient in the Bahamas General Hospital, and I have never seen any of the things done there that you have mentioned. I am not a leper, becaue if I were, and 1 had gone there, I could not have come out any more except through the Western gate "to pass into the way beyond." Don't you worry your head about us. We are not afraid that when we go to the Bahamas General hospital, we go there to die. There are a great many poor people go there and die ; they would have died anywhere, and when they die there, they dont die anyhow, they die amidst comfortable surroundings. There is no Poor-house here that I know of, perhaps you do. The Government has disestablished what used to be the Poor House, and thrown it into the scrap heap, and provided an institution which is a credit to this Colony, and a blessing to those who are compelled by the force of circumstances alone, to use it. There is no other compelling force. If they are dissatisfied with its arrangements, and medical treatment, they can come out of it when they please, except in the case of those afflicted with leprosy, who by a wise legislative enactment must bj segregated from their fellows. I do trust that you will disabuse your mind of the absurd notion that the poor go there ex pecting that they will die in con sequence of the treatment they will receive. As I have pointed out, there is no compulsion applied. Do you imagine that the poor are natural born fools? Try and learn to have a more rational and better opinion of your lellow men though they be poor. Who you are, I know not, except that you area man, (or perhaps a woman) with an axe to grind Christian Scientist! forsooth. Thanking you for your space Mr. Editor in advance. I am, Yours sincerelv, ONE OF THE POOR. — :o:— MAXIM INVENTS BULLET TO FIRE ZEPPELINS By Marconi Transatlantic Wireless Telegraph to The New Yorh Times. London, Sunday, Oct. 18— The Sunday newspaper, The people, announces that Sir Hiram Maxim has invented an incendiary bullet for use against a Zeppelin. It can be fired from an ordinary rifle, and immediately the bullet strikes the airship it will set the gas alire. The invention canbeapplie to Maxims and other guns. THE 10YAL BANK OF CANADA T he public are hereby notified that the Bank, until further notice, will close on Fridays at 2 p.m. G. H. GAMBLIN, Manar.ger October 29, 1914. PUBLIC BOARD OF 4 WORKS. Notice P ERSONS having land to dispose of in the Eastern District suitable for a burial ground, are invited to communicate with the Public Board of Works. Notice T HE Public Board of Works having decided to name the unnamed streets and lanes in the Suburbs of Nassau (Grants Town, Bains Town, ttc.) and to mark the names on the end$ of same, invite suggestions from the General Public as to the selection of suitable names for the purpose. Notice IT has come to the notice I I the Public Board of Works that certain persons in the City and Suburbs are in the habit of leaving carriages and carts &c. in the public streets when not in use. NOTICE is therefore given' that this is against the rules of the Board and persons guilty of a breach of the rules in future, will be prosecuted. The Foregoing notices are published bv order of the Public Board of Works. James H. Knowles. Clerk to the Board. Nassau, 30th October, 1914. THE Cosmopolitan HIQH SCHOOL Opens on Monday, Oct. 5rh in Aurora n *H on Chpdlf ?trett. iculars apply to i. G. Coffin, head m •r, or Mr. J. P. Si mm



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y Ttzsrmrmn B.VD %  rSSSSl^ Sanitary Cool Re ltfTBl Sold by Win. Hilton, 260 Bay Si. Fruit of the Loom ai 7i per yatd. matters, as it has been made in municipal matters, in matters within each nation. Such a scheme as the one briefly outlined will not bring perfect justice any m re than under municipal law we obtain perfect justice, but it will mark an immeasurable advance on anything now existing, for it will mean that at last a long stride has been taken in the effort to put the collective strength of civilized mankind behind the collective purposeof mankind to secure the peace of righteousness the peace of justice among the nations of the earth. Armies Are The Alternative It may he, though I hope to the contrary, that such a scheme is for the immediate future Ctopiiin—it r-etainly will not be Utopian for the remote future Ff it be impossible in the immediate future to devifie some working scheme by which foire shall he put behind n'ghieouness in disinterested and effective fashon where international wrons are concerned, then the only alternative will lie for each free people to keep itself in shape with its own strength to defend us own rights and interests, and meanwhile to do all that can be done to help forward the flow prowth of sentiment which is as %  aredly Although very gradually, tailing gainst international wcrm doing and violence. M'ii, in recogniz dlv human shape, has heen for age? ~~ this p'an-t, mdtheextriordin iryd tcuv • rip-, in Kgypt and' ,Ntsopoiani:a now enable us \„ see in dim fishion the beginning ..f historic I -mts 6.000 or 7,000 years ago] |„ the: earlier ages ot which history speak*, there was practically no such thing as an ''international conscience. The armies of Mabylnn and Assyria. Kgvpt and Persia, felt no sense of obligation to out sid"'S and conquered merely because they wish t<> conquer. (To be continued' Notice W E would call the attention of our frienrjs in Nassau and on the OUT ISLANDS to the folio wing prices on lumber which will go into effect from today. All ROUGH lumber up to 8 ft. 6/3 per 100. All DRESSED lumber up to 8 ft. 8/4 per 100. All ROUGH and DRESSED to 16ft. 10/5 per 100. ANYTHING over 16 ft. u/6 per 100. 1 a hove up to 8 ins. wide) These prices are for CASH absolutely and beitif^ WAR prices are made to help the pub lie and are subject to change without notice, The Bahamas Timber Co. Ltd. Professional A nnouncetAei LOOK! The following Blank forms mavbe had at "Tlie Tribune"* Office. I Duty Entry. Eree Entry. Warehouse Entries. Sponging Articles. Ship's Reports. In quantities ,-it Special Rates CANE SYRUP Can be had at T. M. Knowles at 10s. stg. per Tin GOOD and THICK. East Ha v" Street BEST Gasoline is / Oo" Tet. We do not sell it. B UT we do sell and w'ill. continue to sell Standard Oil Co. Gasoline lest your Gasoline. We invite comparison with any in the City. Price 22cts. per gallon in 50 gallon Drums. Customers using 100 gals, or over per Month 20 c. gal Inn. Watch our Notice for Kerosene in June. C. C. SAUNDERS IMPERIAL THEATRE WEDNESDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY Door. op Ml 7.50. Performance begin at ft.IS p.m. Dr. W. R. Lamb*\ AMERICAN OCULIST and OPTICIAN Specially In Examining the EYE and Corracting Dafeciive Vl.lol H AS the pleasure to again announce to the Citizens cj New Providence and the surrounding islands, thaj lie will beat the Knickerbocker Hotel, Nassau, til November 4th inclusive. Those wishing to consult hit should make an appointment at their earliest opportune as he will not be able to remain longer than the time state* He is fully prepared as before, with the most modem instri ments and apparatus for thoroughly examining and rj tracting the eyes according to the latest and most approve methods as employed in the Metropolitan Eve Jnhimarh and has the largest supply and the greatest variety of tl most desirable kinds and styles of lenses, and mountings* the best quality, ever .brought to this Colony, including] a JZ' 1 S'lpidv of spin ro-c\lindrical, prismatic and ether ?pi cial lenses made to order for the correction of astJgmatisn| weakness of the ocular muscles and othi r eye troubles whh ordinarj lenses will not cortect 'I hose who are ttoi ble< with weak eves or defective vision, who suffer from head a< he, rye ache, inllammation of the eyes or the lids, weak rtess of the omk.r muscles, or any of the numerous condl linns ol the eves requiring a careful and thorough ex ami nation,or necessitating the.us< of glasses and most of ibex 'roubles an: permanently cuted by accurate rejection an< properly ndjusted*glasses— woura do well towbraie tin present exceptional opportunity of giving their eyes the at tent ion they require; an opportunity winch, lor completed ness of apparatus' and supply of lenses, thoroughness of ex amuiatiou. neitection of refraction which brings the visioi up to the highest possible standard, and foi most perfei and Satisfactory results, is equal in every respect to the besj obtainable anywhere abroad. Dr. limib uses the Java] ophthalmometer and the electric ophthalmoscope, and hit methods of examination are so thorough and accurate that the best possible result are always obtain are using glass**have theJdndl 'their eves require, the kind which produces tho most coinfort, the best vis on, and the preservation of* the sight which] is the most important. Dr. 1,-wnb is certificated in both optic* and medicineJ has thousands of referenfesnnd testimonials from influential citizens of m my countries, where l>e h,


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K ft p a* 3 CD (D a 3T 0 Nulliue addictus (urare In verb* mn.gi.tri. Being bound to mesr to the Dogmas >| no Master VOL.X. Nas.avj. N. P., Bahamas. Saturday. O. lober 31. 1914 No. 256 L. CIL!3K1{T DUI'UCH. Editor and Proprietor. OKFICK: 88-44 MAKKKT STKKKT .V me on the wet window pane, And my heart leaps within me so youthful and buoyant Tint I know that like thee I shall ever bt young. Shall ever be moved by the pis sions flamboyant, That colour the sensitive songs 1 hive sung. In the flowery woods, where thy fairy feet glances, I follow and dream of the gladness of earth, Conceiving in secret those dazzling romances, That quicken within me, but never have birth. CIVILIZED NATIONS SHOULD COMBINE IN A GREAT WORLD LEAGUE FOR THE PEACE OF RIGHTEOUSNESS (Theodora Roosevelt) Continued Tribunal Of The Great Powers The nne permanent move for obtaining peace, which has vet been suggested,with any reasonable chance of attaining its object, is hv an agreement among the creat powers, in which each should pledrje itself not onlv to abide by the decision of a common tribunal, but to back with force the d-cison of lhat common tribunal The great civilized nations of the wot Id which do possess forces, ac tjal or immediately potential, should combine by solemn agree. meni in a great World League ft* the Peace of Righteous, A court shoud be created—a changed and amplified Hague Court would meel the requirements—composed of representatives fr"m*eHrli nalio 1; these representatives being sworn to act in each case as judges, pure and simple, and not in a representative capacity. The nation should agree on certain right that should not be questioned, such as their territorial integrity, tlirir rights to deal with their own domastic a fairs and with sin h matters as wli"in they should 01 should not admit to residence and citizenship within their own bus. deis. All should guarantee each of their number in the possession <,f these nchts. AM should agree that other nifltteis ai issue between any of tlnni, or between :niy of'tliem and any one of a number of '"-perified outside civilized nations, should he submitted to the epiirt as above Constituted They should furthermore agree not only to a'>ide. eacli of them by the decision of the Court, but all of them to unite* with their military forces to enforce the decree of the court as against any recalcitrant member. Under these circumstances, it would be possible to agree on a limitation of armament th.it would be real and effective. If any nation were unwilling to go into such a general agreement with other nations, it would of necessity have 10 depend upon its own armed strength for its protection. This is the only alternative. Treaties unbacked by force cannot be considered as alternative by any sober persons of sound. Of couise, if theie were not reasonahle good faith among the nations making such an agreement, it would fail. But it would not fiil merely became one nation did not observe g>o I faith. Il would be impossible to say that such an agreemmt would at once and perininently bring universal peace, but it would certainly m irk an immense advance. Il would cer tainly mean chances of war were minimized and the piospects of limiting and conn ung and regulating war immensely increased. At p esent, force, as represened by the armed Strength of each nation, is wholly divorced froir such instrumentalities for securing peace as international agreements and treaties. In consequence, the latter are practically impotent 10 gieat cri!M There is no connection between force on the one hand and any scheme for securing international peace or justice on the other. Under these conditions every wise and upright nation must continue to rely foi ils own pe ice and wel'being on its own foice, its own strength. As all stu lent I of the law know, a light without a remedy is in no real sense of the w ird a right at all. In international matters the declaration of a right, or the announcement of a worthy purpose, is not only aimless, but is a just cause for deiisio", may even be mischievous. Jieiice is not put behinr p 11 p ise, Our the ,.g orce f sttumen the 'to fnake justice, the id. in international - niinued on fourth page)


The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02292
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Saturday, October 31, 1914
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02292

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Full Text
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Nulliue addictus (urare In verb* mn.gi.tri.
Being bound to mesr to the Dogmas >| no Master
VOL.X.
Nas.avj. N. P., Bahamas. Saturday. O. lober 31. 1914
No. 256
L. CIL!3K1{T DUI'UCH.
Editor and Proprietor.
OKFICK: 88-44 MAKKKT STKKKT
.V PHONI MO. p. o. BOX 108,
PUBLISHED DAILY
Monday, Wednajday and Friday
single copy ......... }d
Tuesday, Tharaday and Saturday-
single copy ... ... ... ,,]
Weakly ... '...... ... 4j<)
Montfcly ............Is. .,|
Quarterlv..... ..
RalfYearly..... a.'
YMr|y ............[6s.
PAYABLR IN ADVANCE
Advertising Bates:.Hi* pence aer line
for first insertion; three pence per line
for second insertion ; ;ni one penny per
line for suhsqtient Insertions.
Advertisement's under eight linea 4s.
OUR SPRING TIME.
H. C. Chris'le.
Rejoice with the giddy winds
leaping the hedges,
Melodiously singing the carols
of Spring
Hearken to what the young
winter time pledges,
Youth and enjoyment, and
Love's wakening
Leaps to salute thee, the heart of
the lover,
Maidens are blushing because
in disguise,
Like a sad truant peeps forth
from his cover
Cupid, the Mischief, with sin
in his eye*
()h Spring, I have waited so long
fur thy Coming,
l-'or thy odnurous footstep to
sweeten the main,
No sound is so sweet as thv
fingertips drumming
A message t<> me on the wet
window pane,
And my heart leaps within me
so youthful and buoyant
Tint I know that like thee I
shall ever bt young.
Shall ever be moved by the pis
sions flamboyant,
That colour the sensitive songs
1 hive sung.
In the flowery woods, where thy
fairy feet glances,
I follow and dream of the
gladness of earth,
Conceiving in secret those daz-
zling romances,
That quicken within me, but
never have birth.
CIVILIZED NATIONS
SHOULD COMBINE IN A
GREAT WORLD LEAGUE
FOR THE
PEACE OF RIGHTEOUSNESS
(Theodora Roosevelt)
Continued
Tribunal Of The
Great Powers
The nne permanent move for
obtaining peace, which has vet
been suggested,with any reasonable
chance of attaining its object, is
hv an agreement among the creat
powers, in which each should
pledrje itself not onlv to abide by
the decision of a common tribunal,
but to back with force the d-cison
of lhat common tribunal The
great civilized nations of the
wot Id which do possess forces, ac
tjal or immediately potential,
should combine by solemn agree.
meni in a great World League ft*
the Peace of Righteous, A court
shoud be createda changed and
amplified Hague Court would meel
the requirementscomposed of
representatives fr"m*eHrli nalio 1;
these representatives being sworn
to act in each case as judges, pure
and simple, and not in a represen-
tative capacity. The nation
should agree on certain right that
should not be questioned, such as
their territorial integrity, tlirir
rights to deal with their own do-
mastic a fairs and with sin h mat-
ters as wli"in they should 01
should not admit to residence and
citizenship within their own bus.
deis. All should guarantee each of
their number in the possession <,f
these nchts. AM should agree that
other nifltteis ai issue between any
of tlnni, or between :niy of'tliem
and any one of a number of '"-peri-
fied outside civilized nations,
should he submitted to the epiirt
as above Constituted They should
furthermore agree not only to a'>ide.
eacli of them by the decision of the
Court, but all of them to unite*
with their military forces to en-
force the decree of the court as
against any recalcitrant member.
Under these circumstances, it
would be possible to agree on a
limitation of armament th.it would
be real and effective.
If any nation were unwilling to
go into such a general agreement
with other nations, it would of
necessity have 10 depend upon its
own armed strength for its protec-
tion. This is the only alternative.
Treaties unbacked by force cannot
be considered as alternative by
any sober persons of sound. *
Of couise, if theie were not rea-
sonahle good faith among the na-
tions making such an agreement,
it would fail. But it would not
fiil merely became one nation did
not observe g>o I faith. Il would
be impossible to say that such an
agreemmt would at once and per-
ininently bring universal peace,
but it would certainly m irk an
immense advance. Il would cer
tainly mean chances of war were
minimized and the piospects of
limiting and conn ung and regula-
ting war immensely increased. At
p esent, force, as represened by the
armed Strength of each nation, is
wholly divorced froir such instru-
mentalities for securing peace as
international agreements and trea-
ties. In consequence, the latter are
practically impotent 10 gieat cri-
!M
There is no connection between
force on the one hand and any
scheme for securing international
peace or justice on the other. Under
these conditions every wise and
upright nation must continue to
rely foi ils own pe ice and wel'be-
ing on its own foice, its own
strength. As all stu lent I of the
law know, a light without a
remedy is in no real sense of the
w ird a right at all. In internation-
al matters the declaration of a
right, or the announcement of a
worthy purpose, is not only aim-
less, but is a just cause for deiisio",
may even be mischievous. Jieiice
is not put behinr
p 11 p ise, Our
the ,.g
orce
f
sttumen
the
'to fnake
justice, the id.
in international
-
niinued on fourth page)


i "' _____ L
Publication bt|>n .1 5 p.m.
Zbc Zxibnnc
Saturday. Octobar 31. 1914.
WINTER AND WAR.
(Casual Thoughts.)
The War has inflicted serious
wounds on us in our forward
march. Will Winter, the Red
Cross Nurse, sterilize them
and with cool bandagings and
dressings applied with deft fin-
gers allay the smarting and
lower tUe fevered pulse ?
Present indications lead us to
the cherished belief, that the
unusual influx of coal into* the
bunkers of the "Colonial," pre-
sage a good season.
We learn that inquires far in
excess of any previouslv made,
have been replied to at the of
fire of the Ward Line Company.
The War is sending a stream
of custom from tin* Continental,
tothe English hotels. (Taridge's,
a name as long associated with
London, as i^ is with Nassau,
has a long list of distinguished
visitors, and all others are filled;
and as many distinguished
Americans have acquired the
habit of wintering s >me -where,
generally at foreign resort* -
Egypt, The Mediterranean, The
Riviera and scores of other
places possessing a milder and
more equable climate than that
of their own land, ;\nC as by
adverse circumstance these re
sorts will be closed to the hosts
of social nomads whose prover-
bial restlessness will not suffer
them to stay at home ; in addi
tion to those whose state of
health compel them to exchange
the oscuro of their own skies for
the cerulean of tropical climes
there are no other spots on earth
easy of access, but the islands of
the Bahamas, the Caribbean Sea,
and the "still vext Bermoothes."
The natural attractions of the
Bahamas far exceed those others
of the series, a?;d it is not
doubtful that the further adver-
tising of Nassau by a talented
contributor to The Illustrated
London News, the Scientific
American, and other, journals,
and visualized at the Broadway
Rose Gardens under the Jules
Vernism of "Thirty Leagens
Under the;*^" -wwill have had'
the effect of ^**>*}nelling the
jeu'uesst dorcecmot the^e,^ and
greater American Cities^-vi S(.e
tual realities of Ala
ilace.
We do not anticipate a
Danean shower during the com
ing winter so that we may
catch it in our cupped palms,
but we shall esteem ourselves
rich beyond the dreams of ava-
rice, if we shall be aroused from
the lethargy which is slowly
creeping over us to the extent of
a paralytic seizure of our normal
energy, which is not remaikable
for obtrusiveness. Our American
visitors, some of them men of
tireless activities, have fallen
under the charm of our lotus-
eating proclivities and wonder
ed over and over again why we
work at all "down here." It
may not arouse their admiration
when the glamour has worn off,
but it often excites the ques-
tion. "What do you do when
we are gone ?"
Let us profit by the sugges-
tion contained in the query and
if any opportunities come our
way, make the most of them
and remove the implied slur.
The voice of the First Napo
leon comes to us from his mag-
nificent mausoleum amid the
din of battle now ravaging the
fair land of France, and we hear
it saying, "Waiting for an op-
portunity? Make it. no ifs, no
buts, no becauses And we are
pluued into 1 bought as we re
view the past, and we wonder if
we have left undone, that which
we ought to have done. Have
we not let opportunities slip b\
us in the dark, yes, even when
they were almost within our
grasp, only to Stretch forth our
hands and seize them. We
slept, and now has come the
awakening.
:o:
HENRY D. BAKER, ESQ.
AT PETROGRAD.
We learn with much pleasure
of a yet further promotion w'hich
has come to Henry D. Baker Esq
formqrlv (J S. Consul at this
place. It vvill be remembered that
a year ago he was borrowed bv
the U. S. Dep't of "Commerce
and Labour," and despatched
on special service to New Zea-
land and Bombay. Having ac
quitted himself with distinction
he has now been induced to step
out of the Consular Service, and
enter that Department in which
he hasalread done good service.
He has just been appointed per-
manently, as Commercial At
tache to the Department at
Petrograd, lately changed by
Czar from St. Petersburg,
promotion will doubtless
afford much pleasure to the
large circle of his friends in
Nassau, and we beg to add our
sincere congratulations.
.0:
BAHAMIAN .
VOLTNTEERS TOR WAR.
We understand that the Sub-
Committeeappointed toconsider
the question of obtaining local
volunteers for service out of the
Colony has reported that up to
date offers of personal services
have been received from 225
Bahamians.
His Excellency the Governor
has submitted the offer to the
Secretary of State lor the
Colonies.
:o:
Are The Ci.opds Lifting?
We are glad to learn that
some of the vessels engaged in
Sponging are being outfitted
with the necessary stores. No
cash advances however are be-
ing made to the cicus. This we
are of the opinion will prove
%ore satisfactory at the "setting
up" than the old system of ad
vances exceeding' the legal
limit.
. :o:
S. S. "Vigilancia" sailed at
4 p.m. on Friday, October 311th
from New York, for Nassau,
with bo passengers, 0,300 bhls.
cargo, and Mails.
The Motor Boat "Frances E."
which left Nassau yesterday at
q a.m. for Miami arrived at 6.30
thismornii.g.
:o:
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Oct. 30th, 1914.
The Court met at 10.30 a.m.
Present. The Hon. V. C. Wells-
Durraut, K. C, Acting Chief
Justice, The lion II C. Stronge
Act. Attonev General, The Act.
Registrar, The Commandant.
The King us. Ephraim Forbes
Breaking and entering the
Warehouse of Henry Martin at
Mastic Point, Andnis.
ArraignedPleaded Not Guil-
ty-
Witnesses called-Jury Em-
panelledPrisoner undefended
The Cas proceded Verdict
Not Guilty. .
Tbi> closed the Criminal
Calends-The Court adjourn
ed until Wednesday next the
41I1 Nov. at 10 30 a.m. f,,r the
exhibit of the Civil DfJttcef?
Communicated
It is to be regretted that an
effort is being mada^o close the
Sponge Beds of the^Colony un-
til the War is enddfl. This we
think will be a nnst#e, as we
are reliably informed that good
sponges are fetching prices to-
day which some years ago were
considered excellent.
The WarTimes, has worked
a good thing for the Spongers.
Many of them are going out
without the extravagant advan-
ces, which havs prevailed for
past 3 or 4 years, so that at the
end of their voyage they will
get their money, instead of be-
ing told by the outfitter "you
had all your share before you
went out."
The advance system is a bad
one, and we hope these hard
times will help to minimise it.
The 3ank of Nassau, has lower
ed its rate of Discount, we are
pleased to learn, back to 6 per
cent.
This will be helpful to the
business community, as the War
has considerably reduced the
spending power of the people,
and thus made trade dull in the
stores.
____ ^,
On' Island reports mme to us
which are confirme-' by the
Board of Agriculture lat crops
of produce are coining along
rapidly and hountiMly. The
Out Islands are ahead of the
metropolis in this respect We
have to look to them for our
supplies of native products.
Latest War News
RADIOGRAMS
October* 31st 19:4.
London 30th
Governor,
Bahamas
October 30th Press Bureau
Message:
Yesterday progress was made
round Y|>res and south ol Arras
and in the Forest nf Apremont
Some of the enemy's trenches
were taen between the Aisne
and Argonne.
Russian victories on the Vis-
tula River front are very im-
portant and all Auttro Ger-
man army corps in thatMftgiou
are in retreat Russian Wivalry
has entered Radow.
Further victory has been won
north of the River Peletsa. The
Russians have captured sevej
thousand prisoners.


The; British naval flotilla con-
tinues fo support the Allies left
with effectivegnd accurate fire.
On the 27th ana 28th the enemy
brought up he&/y guns and re-
plied vigor^fsly.
On the 29th opposition from
shore virtually ceased.
The enemy's submarines are
reported to be seeking an op-
portunity to attack our ships
which are convoyed by destroy-
ers.
Oar casolties are small and
structural damage to our ships
trifling.
Admiral Prince Louis of Bat-
tenberg has res gned his appoint-
ment as First Sea Lord and has
been succeeded by Lord Fisher.
His Majesty has directed that
Prince Louis be sworr, a member
of the Privy Council.
In South some 120 father re-
bels have surrendered.
(Signed)
HARCOURT,
October 31st 1914.
The Turks are delighted at
the chance of fighting Chris-
tians and are making demon-
- strations.
EnglandjMs notified her that
t as soon as she crosses the frontier
of any of the powers of the en-
tente, war will be declared. .
Two Turkish destroyers were
sunk by a Russian ^u iboat.
Two Russian steamers have
been lost through contact with
Turkish mines.
The Belgians have cut the
dykes along the Yscr River
flooding an immense area and
catching thousands of Germans
.. and rendering further progress
impossible.
There has been some fighting
but the situation remains gen-
erally the same, and extremely
favourable lathe Allies.
The New York National City
Bank has loaned France ten
. million dollars.
Berlin declares that Japan
intends controlling Asia and
putting China under her control.
Holland fears violation'of her
neutrality from the mass of Ger-
man troops passing the frontier
nd will resisc at all cost any
invasion.
Paris reports that progress has
been masWat variouspoints.no.
tably in Lorraine
Pekin says that 500 Japanese
troops attacking Tsiug'l'au were
blown up by mines. SJe^e guns
wjAI be necessary for the re
in of the forts.
GOVERNMENT PRESS
October 31st 1914
London :Turkeys attacks up-
on Russia are likely to produce
the gravest complications in the
Balkan States. Greece, Italy,
Ron ma nia and Bulgaria are ex
pccted to enter the conflict. They
will throw their forces with the
Allies.
. Turkish destroyers sink a Rus-
sian Gunboat and damage three
merchant vessels at Odessa.
The German attempt to gain
Calais and command the Eng-
lish Channel is said to have
failed. The French and British
have marched further inland.
Paris:Cruisers of the allied
fleet are in pursuit of the Ger-
mans cruiser Fmden which sunk
the Zemtichug in Penang har-
bour. The French destroyer
Mousquet was sunk at the same
time while chasing attempting
to torpedo the Fmden.
Mexico City:Carranza will
quit Mexico if his absence will
re-establish peacein the country.
His resignation was read yester-
day at the Calientas conference.
Villa must retire.
Washington:The state de-
partment will make a protest
against the detention of the
steamer Kloonlind at Gibraltar
with 1200 passengers and a car-
goof copper bound from New
York to Italian and Greek ports
New Whit by, Fngland:-
Many lives were lost when the
British hospital ship Rohilla
went on the rocks at New Whit-
by.
Washington:President Wil-
son will not close the Colorad >
mines. The report that he would
do so brings forth a flat denial,
.'o:
Oct. 1914
The Editor of The Tribune
Dear Sir,
I want to tell "Christain
Scientist," if you will permit me,
something that came into my
mind as I read his letter in your
paper.
Mr. Christian Scientist, I think
you must have an axe to grind,
and you want poor people to
turn the grindstone for you.
Times are not over brisk with us,
but yet, we haven't time to
turn your grindstone.
I for one have been a patient
in the Bahamas General Hos-
pital, and I have never seen
any of the things done there
that you have mentioned. I am
not a leper, becaue if I were, and
1 had gone there, I could not
have come out any more except
through the Western gate "to
pass into the way beyond."
Don't you worry your head
about us. We are not afraid
that when we go to the Baha-
mas General hospital, we go
there to die. There are a great
many poor people go there and
die ; they would have died any-
where, and when they die there,
they dont die anyhow, they die
amidst comfortable surround-
ings. There is no Poor-house
here that I know of, perhaps you
do. The Government has dis-
established what used to be the
Poor House, and thrown it into
the scrap heap, and provided an
institution which is a credit to
this Colony, and a blessing to
those who are compelled by the
force of circumstances alone, to
use it. There is no other com-
pelling force. If they are dis-
satisfied with its arrangements,
and medical treatment, they can
come out of it when they please,
except in the case of those af-
flicted with leprosy, who by a
wise legislative enactment must
bj segregated from their fellows.
I do trust that you will dis-
abuse your mind of the absurd
notion that the poor go there ex
pecting that they will die in con
sequence of the treatment they
will receive. As I have pointed
out, there is no compulsion ap-
plied. Do you imagine that the
poor are natural born fools?
Try and learn to have a more
rational and better opinion of
your lellow men though they be
poor. Who you are, I know not,
except that you area man, (or
perhaps a woman) with an axe
to grind
Christian Scientist! forsooth.
Thanking you for your space
Mr. Editor in advance.
I am,
Yours sincerelv,
ONE OF THE POOR.
:o:
MAXIM INVENTS BULLET
TO FIRE ZEPPELINS
By Marconi Transatlantic
. Wireless Telegraph to The '
New Yorh Times.
London, Sunday, Oct. 18
The Sunday newspaper, The
people, announces that Sir
Hiram Maxim has invented an
incendiary bullet for use against
a Zeppelin.
It can be fired from an ordi-
nary rifle, and immediately the
bullet strikes the airship it will
set the gas alire.
The invention canbeapplie
to Maxims and other guns.
THE 10YAL BANK
OF CANADA
The public are hereby notified
that the Bank, until further
notice, will close on Fridays at
2 p.m.
G. H. GAMBLIN,
Manar.ger
October 29, 1914.
PUBLIC BOARD OF4
WORKS.
Notice
PERSONS having land to
dispose of in the Eastern
District suitable for a burial
ground, are invited to com-
municate with the Public
Board of Works.
Notice
THE Public Board of
Works having decided to
name the unnamed streets
and lanes in the Suburbs of
Nassau (Grants Town, Bains
Town, ttc.) and to mark the
names on the end$ of same,
invite suggestions from the
General Public as to the se-
lection of suitable names for
the purpose.
Notice
IT has come to the notice I
I the Public Board of Works
that certain persons in the
City and Suburbs are in the
habit of leaving carriages
and carts &c. in the public
streets when not in use.
NOTICE is therefore given'
that this is against the rules
of the Board and persons
guilty of a breach of the rules
in future, will be prosecuted.
The Foregoing notices are
published bv order of the
Public Board of Works.
James H. Knowles.
Clerk to the Board.
Nassau, 30th October, 1914.
THE
Cosmopolitan
HIQH SCHOOL
Opens on
Monday, Oct. 5rh
in Auroran*H
on Chpdlf ?trett.
iculars apply to
i. G. Coffin, head m
r, or Mr. J. P. Si mm


y
Ttzsrmrmn
B.VD
rSSSSl^ ,
Sanitary
Cool
Re
ltfTBl
Sold by
Win.
Hilton,
260
Bay Si.
Fruit of the Loom ,
ai 7i per yatd.
matters, as it has been made in
municipal matters, in matters
within each nation.
Such a scheme as the one brief-
ly outlined will not bring perfect
justice any m re than under mun-
icipal law we obtain perfect jus-
tice, but it will mark an immea-
surable advance on anything now
existing, for it will mean that at
last a long stride has been taken
in the effort to put the collective
strength of civilized mankind be-
hind the collective purposeof man-
kind to secure the peace of right-
eousness the peace of justice
among the nations of the earth.
Armies Are The Alternative
It may he, though I hope to the
contrary, that such a scheme is for
the immediate future Ctopiiinit
r-etainly will not be Utopian for
the remote future Ff it be impossi-
ble in the immediate future to de-
vifie some working scheme by
which foire shall he put behind
n'ghieouness in disinterested and
effective fashon where internation-
al wrons are concerned, then the
only alternative will lie for each
free people to keep itself in shape
with its own strength to defend
us own rights and interests, and
meanwhile to do all that can be
done to help forward the flow
prowth of sentiment which is as
aredly Although very gradually,
tailing gainst international wcrm
doing and violence.
M'ii, in recogniz dlv human
shape, has heen for age? ~~ this
p'an-t, mdtheextriordin iryd tcuv
rip-, in Kgypt and' ,Ntsopoiani:a
now enable us \ see in dim
fishion the beginning ..f historic
I -mts 6.000 or 7,000 years ago] |
the: earlier ages ot which history
speak*, there was practically no
such thing as an ''international
conscience. The armies of Mabylnn
and Assyria. Kgvpt and Persia,
felt no sense of obligation to out
sid"'S and conquered merely be-
cause they wish t<> conquer.
(To be continued'
Notice
WE would call the atten-
tion of our frienrjs in Nas-
sau and on the OUT ISLANDS
to the folio wing prices on lum-
ber which will go into effect
from today.
All ROUGH lumber up to 8 ft.
6/3 per 100. All DRESSED
lumber up to 8 ft. 8/4 per 100.
All ROUGH and DRESSED to
16ft. 10/5 per 100. ANYTHING
over 16 ft. u/6 per 100. 1 a hove
up to 8 ins. wide)
These prices are for CASH
absolutely and beitif^ WAR
prices are made to help the pub
lie and are subject to change
without notice,
The Bahamas Timber Co. Ltd.
Professional A nnouncetAei
LOOK!
The following Blank forms
mavbe had at "Tlie Tribune"*
Office.
I
Duty Entry.
Eree Entry.
Warehouse Entries.
Sponging Articles.
Ship's Reports.
In quantities ,-it Special Rates
CANE SYRUP
Can be had at T. M. Knowles
at 10s. stg. per Tin
GOOD and THICK. .
East Ha v" Street
BEST
Gaso-
line is / Oo"
Tet. We do not sell it.
BUT we do sell and w'ill.
continue to sell '
Standard Oil Co.
Gasoline lest your Gaso-
line. We invite comparison
with any in the City.
Price 22cts. per gallon in
50 gallon Drums. Customers
using 100 gals, or over per
Month 20 c. gal Inn.
Watch our Notice for Ker-
osene in June.
C. C. SAUNDERS
IMPERIAL
THEATRE
WEDNESDAY
FRIDAY .
SATURDAY
Door. op Ml 7.50. Performance
begin at ft.IS p.m.
Dr. W. R. Lamb*\
AMERICAN OCULIST and OPTICIAN
Specially In Examining the EYE and Corracting Dafeciive Vl.lol
HAS the pleasure to again announce to the Citizens cj
New Providence and the surrounding islands, thaj
lie will beat the Knickerbocker Hotel, Nassau, til
November 4th inclusive. Those wishing to consult hit
should make an appointment at their earliest opportune
as he will not be able to remain longer than the time state*
He is fully prepared as before, with the most modem instri
ments and apparatus for thoroughly examining and rj
tracting the eyes according to the latest and most approve
methods as employed in the Metropolitan Eve Jnhimarh
and has the largest supply and the greatest variety of tl
most desirable kinds and styles of lenses, and mountings*
the best quality, ever .brought to this Colony, including]
a JZ'1 S'lpidv of spin ro-c\lindrical, prismatic and ether ?pi
cial lenses made to order for the correction of astJgmatisn|
weakness of the ocular muscles and othi r eye troubles whh
ordinarj lenses will not cortect 'I hose who are ttoi ble<
with weak eves or defective vision, who suffer from head
a< he, rye ache, inllammation of the eyes or the lids, weak
rtess of the omk.r muscles, or any of the numerous condl
linns ol the eves requiring a careful and thorough ex ami
nation,or necessitating the.us< of glasses and most of ibex
'roubles an: permanently cuted by accurate rejection an<
properly ndjusted*glasses woura do well towbraie tin
present exceptional opportunity of giving their eyes the at
tent ion they require; an opportunity winch, lor completed
ness of apparatus' and supply of lenses, thoroughness of ex
amuiatiou. neitection of refraction which brings the visioi
up to the highest possible standard, and foi most perfei
and Satisfactory results, is equal in every respect to the besj
obtainable anywhere abroad. Dr. limib uses the Java]
ophthalmometer and the electric ophthalmoscope, and hit
methods of examination are so thorough and accurate that
the best possible result are always obtain Ue prescribes which are accuratelv filled and \Y\I"RA\'M
El) TO BE CORRECT. TheVe are main here.ns'inothe
places, who suffer from serio-.s eye troubles and most im
perfect vision, because they have never had 1 Rood opportu-a
nity of consulting an eye specialist of repute; hence cm-j
iparatively few ol th.se wli > are using glass**- have theJdndl
'their eves require, the kind which produces tho most coin-
fort, the best vis on, and the preservation of* the sight which]
is the most important.
Dr. 1,-wnb is certificated in both optic* and medicineJ
has thousands of referenfesnnd testimonials from influential
citizens of m my countries, where l>e h,<- prnMiced his pro-j
fcsMoiicontiiuiouslvfor2 5 years,and has established through!
reliable* ami superior *ervi< e. the most exteniveeye practice!
in the world. Charges Reasonable.
Hours: 9'to 12 a.m: 2 to 5 p.m.
Fresh Onion Seed
KUO I IWIiKlEKi-.
and nativk W.ij conn
AtToote's, v)) Biy Street.
For Result ,
Advertise in *
The Tri!


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