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Publication began at 6.05 p.m. TLhc Gvfbune Thursday. October 29. 1914. The weak crying to the strong nation for that protection which she relied upon in her hour of need, a protection of Which she was confidently assured, because of the promise of that more^ powerful nation Great Britain, and the unhesi taring reply to the silent call of her ally, France by a "piper pledge," lias been the subject of wide comment, and the and is guised admiration of the whole world with but one exceptionGermany and the Germans. True it is admitted by some few German Apologists that, Germany had violated its pledged word, bufc the admis sion, only adds an insult to her infliction of injury. The position they take is that, German civi lisation and Culture are so far superior to that of other na tions, that her domination and destiny must prevail in Europe, that the ordinary Standard of morality is no rule fqrher. Such is what these apologists call a common sense view The Empire of Great Britain, and The Republic of the United States are alike conscious of a destiny and a duty common to all the English speaking race, to rule justly, to love mercy, to defend the right, to maintain the truth, at all costs, and to protect and defend the weak. This is what we and they profess, and this is what we' stand by, and perish the day when our profession may be called a dead letter. Fifty three of the best known English writers; Theologians, Poets, Essayists, Novelists, Scholars, Professors of Literature, and Dramatists have signed a vigorous document, def< ud ing "England's War without dishonour." When we mention Margaret L Woods, Flora Annie Steel, as the names among them, those who know anvthing of their writings who liave had their spicks at times refreshed, their senses pleased, and their higher aspirations made higher yet by their writings,-will be satisfied that they have made no mistake. And their verdict has been accepted by the best journalists and greatest thinkers in the world. There are among the signatories, men who have had the greatest good will towards Germany & with a high from sending Troops to Antw rp through the Scheldt, which would have violated Holland's neutrality. This says the American Correspondent in words that must make the blood of English men beat faster in his veins. "This great example of British honour is one which history will regard with admiration, and the Dutch with everlasting gratitude." —:o:— It is with unfeigned sorrow that wc received the report of appreciation of her institutions, the dcatll of ,,. u H /p and though some of them are well-known "Apostles of peace" and divergent political and social views, yet they are agreed that there was no other course left open to England than to "keep her word" and protect a small nation from, as Lord Ro berts, puts it, "being bullied." Does not the Mother Country carry us with her ? not with a tumultousrush, but with a calm aud determined following? I low often have we exulted in our school boy class, when we saw a bully among the boys ty amusing,an I hectoring in the petty ways of bullies a smallei ,uid weaker boy; that one fine day he met his match, and g t a proptt good licking. \W know that the atmosphere, of the school became healthier and purer, in consequence, a more manly spirit prevailed in the whole school, and took the place of the abject servility .vhich seemed to impregnate,its indoor and outdoor life, and each boy felt thai it was good and an lionoui to belong to that school, and it was equally I with the bully He learnt In know his exact value, and to live up to it, with dignity and honour, and hiformer practises fell from him as a ragged garment, he donned a new suit, and suited it. And so will it be with Willudm Hohenzollern. When he gets licked into shape, he will be an ornament to the Crown heads of Europe, his Czars Latest War News RADIOGRAMS brother Kings and and J. M Barrie, Arnold Bennett, A. [Emperors, and President! and C.Benson, E. F. Benson, the [Mikados and Shahs and Sultans. Very Ucv. Monsignor R. H.I His insane desire for do B R. uies Doyle, Thomas Robert nnce Maurice of Battenberg who fell in action, in France. The Prince was the youngest son of Pri.cess Henry of Battenberg ; a cousin of II. M. King (ieorge V.,and brother to Queen of Spain. He was a Lieutenant in the First Ratal inn of the King's Royal Rifle Corps. Upon the Receipt of th above si I intelligence, the following ti I 'gram was d spntched from His Excellency the vernor to the. Right Honourable Secretary of State for the Colon i< s : — 39th, Octoberag 1 }. Harcourt, Colonial Officer, London, Kindly convey to her Royal Highness the Princess, Henry of Battenberg, the'sincere and respectful sympathy of the people >f the Bahamas at the sad loss of her bra vc son. HADDON-SM1TH. — :n:— BAHAMAS WAR. RELIEF FUND The following subscriptions have been receiw d Amount previously acknowledged £3632 6 3 'Com. Si Crew H. M. S. Ilesperns 12 o From Key West per British Vice Consul 7 7 5 St. Marks Baptist Church, Sandilands Rum Cay Total £2047 6 6 Not in the NavpLtet, )bert Bridges, Gilbert. mination will be quenched and Zi'Hl Baptist Church Sir Arthur Conan he will fp-dize the Blessings of Galswprthy, I peace in his individual case *d\, Jbnjhony Hope,I "The New York Herald" of yichen, Jerome K. t he 31st < )ct. records, that The Jerome, Sir Gilbert Parker, Sir Dutch will never forget how .Owen Seaman, Humphrey j England respected tire "scrap ol d. H.G. Wells, Israel Zangpaper when at the cost of seri Mrs. Humpluey [6 6 2 11 BORN Last night, to Mr. aud Ward, ous disadvantage, she refrained U. II. Knowles— a son* MrsOctober -2pl| 19.4b London Oct. 29th. Governor, Nassau. October 29th. follow ing from Press Bureau:--Belgian government reports that the situation of the troops on the Yser has improved. The enemies fire has slackened, being subdued by the runs of the fleet The operations of the Allies at Ypres is very satisfactory. General Botha left Rusten>urg Tuesday and drove Beyers commando in headlong rout, capturing eighty prisoners fully aimed. (Signed) HARCOUT. QOVBRNMENT PRJBB8 London :— The limit of human endurance hasbaen reached in the battle in West Eland' rs and righting has practically 1 ease I. The < iermans will move inland In their attempt to reach Dunkirk .\: ire bi inging Up more men nn<\ arounitiou and establishing a second lim^tf-defense. The Germans werBrmced to withdraw in Poland in the f of strongRussian reinforcements. The,first attempt of the Germans to reach a Channel port has been blocked by the bombardment of the fleet, The greater part of South Africa is at war. The rebellion in British Colonies being more felt than the invasion by the Germans. General Beyers, a rebel commander, was severely defeated with the loss of in my lives and prisoners. Washington: —Germany will use 30,000 bales of cotton and Austria 25,000 balessaytAmbat* sadore Gerard. American vessels are being sought to load the lirst cargoes. England* prom i-e Ito permit cotton transportation 'even to belligerent countries has given the COttOO industry an 1 immediate impetus. Sarajevo, Bosnia:Four of the conspirators in the Assassination of the Grand Duke hive been sentence I to be hanged wd 1 the fifth will go to fcuson on a life sentence Two -lithe other conspirators, one of them being the man who threw the bomb that plunged Europe into war were sentenced to twenty years imprisonment each -r



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London:—A report that the Duke of Brunswick, only son-inlaw of the Kaiser, was cut off from the German lines whlie leading the Zeium Hussars on the FrencP/roimer. It is believed that he was taken prisoner. 1 New York:—Turkey is busyrecruiting for her army, even trying lo impress naturalized American citizens. So great is 'the enlistment that shortage of uniforms has resulted. October 39th I9I4. London 28th. Governor, Nassau. October 8th, following from Press Bureau; Government of the Union of Africa have for some davs been aware that ;i number of Burghers North Orange Free State and western Transvaal were preparing rebellion and as military requirements are being command i ed under authority of Generals] Christian Devvet and Beyers the] town of Heilbron was siezcd. tram stopped .it R-itz and citi zens by force taen therefrom and detained. The Government are taking steps to deal firmly with the iiMfcter. The majority of citi/ensTtvevery province of the Union thoroughly royal, Treaty between Merit* and Germans has been captured by the Union, promising help to rebels and cession of walfish Bay to German-. Webels Bad Germans of MaritZ Command have been engaged twice recently. On the first occasion four on cers and ninety-one men were taken prisoners, two Maxims were also taken. On the second occasion a large number surrendered v\ lun tardy and B number rf wounded fell into our hands. Maritz was wounded and has retired with his whole force towards German Southwest Alrica. (Signed! HARCOURT. PIOKM) I'l' London says that the battle f.M tin' S traits of 1) >ver cootinU'swilh unabated fury and with out decided advantage. The Germans wnecTrossed the Yser at terrible cost, and others who are railing desperate attacks as f.t^v.uth as \rras are being repulsed with heavy K es. The allied fleet seems to have withdrawn some what having driven the enemy inland. The French are trying to prevent the installation of heavy siege guns near Verdun and Belfort. The Kaiser is said to command now all the Austrian as well as the German armies. The object of the desperate coast attack is to secure ports near England defend them with big Howitsers and mine fields and to plant a triple line of mines across the Channel and then to invade England,sending out their fleet and Zeppelins to attack the English fleet. October 29th i9'4 PICKKD UP The Germans generally are retreating fr im their attack on the French ports and have apparently reached the limit of their endurance. There has been no serious fighting since Ttoesday according to the mnny reports from various parts of the battle line although Germany d ws not admit that her army is" retreating ffthe admit offiRoyalton, Illinois:— The mine disaster was caused by an explo sion of a miners lamp in a dangerous gas pocket. The death list is smaller than at first stated many being saved by the use of air pumps. — :o: — Oct 24, 1914. Nassau, N. P. Dear Tribune. It is a prevailing; idea among people when you go to the poor bouse you go there to die. We acquant the Taxpayers as a rule of things that are going on in the various governmental departments but the poor house seems to bp a private or secret order. Why not let the taxpayers know at least the number of patients treated quarterly or yearly, those cured or passed into the way beyond ? We will make no comment on the dead, as the best doctor loses patients, but we will like to know how Good Morning'! We Are Introducing American Silk American Cashmere American Cotton Lisle HOSIERY Tliey have stood the test. Give real foot comfort. No seams to rip. Never becime loose or baggy. The shape is knit in—not pressed in. GUARANTEED for fineness, style, superiority of material and workmanship. \b>lutel'y st -i in less. Will wear 6 months without holes, or new oues free. OUR. SPECIAL 6FFER to every one sending us f 100 in currency or postal note, to cover advertising an" .hipping charges, we will send port paM, with written gu.-.rantee, backed by a five million dollar company, either 3 P.lr of our 75c. v*.lu American Silk Hosiery, or 4 P&ira of our 30c. v*lu American Cashmere Hosiery. or 4 P*ir of our 50c. Va-luo. American Cotton-Lisle Hosiery or 6 Po-ir. of Children • Hosiery. our experts are getting on in ,_,,.., tropical disease. What do we I a dea i er i n your locality is selected. do for our lepers do we send them |>ooi house to perish and j'he Germans do admit o|fi( ij e } daily being compelled to retreat [ s jt true that consumptive and i wounded ley side by Fide or typhoid and maternity in the same ward? There arc thingsfjr we would like to know and if they were made ( I car to us we would not be so superstitous in running away with the belief— when you go to the poor house you ";o there to die. CHRIS VI AN. SCIENTIST —:o: — War Notes SIR E. GR.EVS BROTHER. CAPTURE!) BY GERMANS Berlin, Oct. 17(by Wireless Telegraph to Sayville, L. I.)— •\" British aeroplane has been the giound near a well directed shot. Both the airmen from Poland owing to the ar rival of n superior force of \ius ,I.II teiuiorc nents 'I he Geri.msay that the retreat was orderly. • I'riiice Maurice of Battenberg, cousin of King George and brother to the Queen of Spain Ins been killed~n the fighting in France. He was lieutenant in the Kings Koyal Rifle Corps. i i srman hea [quarters have been moved back from Ostend. The Bofr rebellion under BeyerS has been defeated by Botha. The German cruiser Kmden which was recently reported va*. ,,,,,,,< ,,een sunk/h.,* sunk .£ • [apan/se steamer. Switzerland is excited because of a German aeroplane dropping bombs in her ter.itory. London: -The German pres* says that the war will last a long time. It is St..ted that sufficient corn is on hand to Supply the people until the next harvest. McGregor, Iowa:—Germans are Racing From Canada to escape draft for service in the arm) for two vears. They proved upon land In Canada, taking the oath of allegiance. Now Canada is drafting f f the army and they are forced the alternative of living up to their oath and join litg the ranks against their fatherland, or giving up their land. ,„ were taken prisoners. The a-'iator acting in the capacity of observer was later found tobeCol. Grey, a brother of the British Secretary for Foreign Affairs. DONT DELAY—Offer expires when aler in your locali THE INTERNATIONAL HOSIERY CO. P. O. Box 224 DAYTON, OHIO. U. S. Aicsrnnrrmr B.V D: ecsT RETAIL mot **-H %  *.<*-< Sanitary Cool Reliable Fruit of the Loom 36 at 7! per yard. THE Cosmopolitan HIGH SCHOOL Opens on Monday, Oct. 5th in Aurora Hall on Charlotte Street For particulars apply to Prof. G. G. Coffin, head master, or Mr. J. P. bimms. For Sale A LOT of land in Blue Hill Koad, I %  rant's Town,South of Wesleyan School-room. MRS. LFONOUA SMITH Chapel St., South. Oct. 29th. .iii-. Notice, D04RH op^RlCULD ivm ^^IsWgetable Seeds For Sale.



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. THE ELEPHANT • is the largest inhabitant-of the forest in the world, j ; This is an • undisputed fact. SUNU.GHT SOAP has' ...the largest sale of any Soap in,,the world. This, :also, is an undisputed fact. The great value of the Elephant's tusks is well known,' but far better known to good housewives, is the great value of Sunlight It enjoys; a well-deserved popularity. Its mission fa cleanliness—its standard is purity, Increasing leisure, and reducing work* it is used by .delighted liousewives all over the. world in preference to any other. A TRIAL WILL PROVE THIS 4-2IH Vs L paper they are written on, and the multitude of peace congresses that hate been held have (ailed to secure even the slightest tangible result, as regains any contest in which the passions of great nations were fully aroused and their vital interests really concerned. In other words, each nation at present in any crisis of fundamental importance has to re^ly purely on its own power, its own strength, its own individual force. The futility of international agreements in great crises has come from the fact that force was not back of them. What is needed in international ^matters is to create a juge and Them to put police power back of the judge. So fat, the time has not been ripe to attempt this. Surely now, in view of the awful cataclysm of the present war f such a plan could at least be considered, and it may be that the combatants at the end will be willing to try -it in order to secure at least a chance for lh<* only kind of peace that is worto having—.lie peace that is compatible with self-respect. Merely th bring about a peace at the present moment without pro\ iding for the elimination of the causes of war would accomplish nothing of any permanent value, and the attempt to make it would probably^ rep? resent nothing else than the adroit use of some more or less foolish, or more or less slf-intereted outsider eastu'e. power who wished to s> e^K^m^uJd, no t p U t ,| S opponents in *' %  the Remove Ill^auaM of Fetr If the pnwtrs ^fcyustified in going intoihis war uy^RRjtt vital interests, then they are required to continue the war until these vital interests are no longer in jeopardy ^ co which would leave with. ^_ CANE SYIUP Can be had at T. M. Knowles at ios. stg. per Tin GOOD and THICK. East Bay Street Professional A hnouncemen out redress wrongs like those which Belgium has suffered or which would.represent merely the partial. or entire destruction of one or more* nations and the survival in aggravated from of militarism andautorracy, and of international hatred in its most intense and virulent form, Would really be only a worthf/fl truco and would not represent the slightest advance in the cause of of righteousness and of international morality. The essential thing to do is to free each na ion from the besetting fea,r of its neighbor. This can only be done by temoving the cause.of such fear. The neighbor must no longer be a dancer. Meredisarmarnent will not. accomplish this result, and the disarmament of the free and enlightened peoples, so long as a single despotism or batharistn were left armed,would bea hideous calamity. If armaments were redueed while causes of trouble were ir no way lemoved, wars would probably I occme somewhat pinr frequent, just because thev (vould be less expensive and less decisive It is greatly to be desired that the growth of armaments should be arrested, but they cannot be arrested while present conditions continue. Mere treaties, mere Htl of papers with narnes signed to them, have proved uh^7"wo*ihless for the protection of nations, and where they are the only alternatives it is. not only right, but necessary, rh.it each nation should arm itself so as to be able to cope with any possible foe. (To be continued.) Dr. W* R. Lamb\ % AMERICAN OCUf 1ST and OPTICIAN SpecUJIei In. Examining the EYE end Correcting Defective Vision H AS the pleasure to again announce to the Citizens of^ New Providence and the surrounding islands, trja he will be at, the Knickerbocker Hotel, Nassau, til November 4th inclusive. Those wishing to consult hi ml should make arj appointment at their earliest opportunity as he will not be able to remain longer than the time stated He is fully prepared as before, Witb the most modern instr'u raents and apparatus for thoroughly examining and re-J fracting the eyes, according to the latest and mostapprovec methods as employed in the Metropolitan Eye Infirmaries and has the largest supply and the greatest variety of flit most desirable kinds and styles of lenses, and mountings oi the best quality, ever brought to this Colony, including 2 la r ge supply of sphero cylindrica), prismatic arid other spe-B cial lenses made to order for the correction of astigmatism weakness of the ocular muscles and other eye troubles whirl ordinary lenses will not correct. Those who are troubled with weak eyes or defective vision, who suffer from headache, eye ache, inflammation of the eyes or the lids, weakness of the ocular muscles, or any of the numerous conditions of the eyes requiring a careful and thorough examination, or necessitating the use of glassesand most of these troubles are permanently cured by accurate refraction and properly adjia&ted glasses—would do well to esjlrace the present exceptional opportunity of giving their %yes the attention they require ; an opportunity which, for completeness of apparatus and supply of lenses, thoroughness of examination, perfection of refraction which brings the vision up to the highest possible standard, and for most perfect and satisfactory results, is equal in'every respect to the hest obtainable anywhere abroad". Dr. Lamb uses the Jayal ophthalmometer and the electric ophthalmoscopp, and his methods of examination are so thorough and accurate that the best possible result are always obtained from the glasses he prescribes which are accurately fitted and WARRANTED TO BE CORRECT. There are many here, as in oilier places, who suffer from serious eye troubles and most imperfect vision, because they have never had a good opportu nity of consulting an ey;e specialist of repute; hence comparatively few 01 those who are using glasses have the kind their eyes require, the kind which produces the most comfort, the best vision, and the^preservation of the sight which is the most important. *Dr. Lamb is certificated in both opticsand medicine, has thousands of references and testimonials from influential citizens of many countries, where he has practiced his profession continuously for 25 years, and hasestablished through reliable and superior service, the most extensive eye practice in the world! CAarges Reasonable. Hours: 9 to 12 a.m: 2 to S p.m. Fre,sh Onion Seed For Result FROM TENERIFFE AnWrUo in AND NATIVE SEED CORN • ^ overus>e m At Toote's, 409 Bt|y Street. 3L ; The JVibune %  % %  _v 13.



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u 3 > r+ CD CD sr o (D CO Nulllua o.ddictu lurnre in verba me.glatri. Befog bound to eWee.r to the Doffno.1 f noNklMr %  ••• %  • -— VOL.X. NMISU, N. P.. B&hfttn&i, Thursday, October 29.191*" Mo.i54 ..,. -i L. GILBERT DUPUCH, Editor and Proprietor. OFFICE: 38-44 MARKET STREET S'astau, N. P., Rahamas •PHONE 360. P. O. BOX 163. PUBLISHED DAILY Monday, Wednesday and Friday— single Copy Jd Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday— *ingle cojiy ... ... id Weekly 4H Monthly i s. er line fpy subsrjueiit insertions. Advertisements under eight lines 4s. CIVILIZED NATIONS SHOULD COMBINE IN A GREAT WORLD LEAGUE FOR THE PEACE OF RIGHTEOUSNESS (Theodore Roosrell) In tin* three articles that I have already written, I have endeavored to set forth in a spirit of absolute fairness and calmness, the lessons as I see them that this war teaches n'l the world, aild especially the United States, I bcli\e I have shown that while, at least in Ihe rase of Belgium, t here has been actual wrong-doing, yet that, on the whole and looking hack at Ihe real and ultimate causes rather than at the temporary occasions of the war, what has' occur ted is due primarily to the intense fear felt by each nation for other nations and to the anger borri of that fear. Doubtless In certain element-, notably Certain militaristic tie menis of the population, other motives have l our children and our children's cli 1 Idren, if, as conditions are row, wed"-not keep ourselves ready to defend our hearths, trusting in great crises not to treaties, not to the ineffective good will of out-siders, but to our own stout hearts and strong hands. Hurt Seek to Mend Condttlone So muchforthe first and most vit il lesson Hut We are not to be excuseJ if we stop here. We must endeavor earnestly, but with sanity, to try to bring around better world conditions and try to shape our policy in conjunction with other nations so as to bring nearer the day when the p J ace of righteousness, the peace of just ice and fair dealing, will be established among the nations of the earth With this object in view it is our duty care, fully to weigh the influences which are at work or may be put to work in order to bring annul this result, and in every effective way todomir best to further the growth of these influences. When this has been done our Government wil! not be re. du:ed to humili itint! impotence even to protest against such wo-ng as that committed on Belgium, because our "neutrality can only b< pieserved by failure to help r ght what is wrong—and we shall fien as a pople have too much S>lf-respect 10 enter into absurd all inclusive arbitra'ion treaties, unbicked by force at the veiy m nnent when we f iil to do whit is clearly dem m led by the Hague treaties by which we are already hound, by protesting against violation of these treaties Leaaofi o! United States Doubtless'in the long'run most is to be hoped from the slow growlh of a better'feeling, a wore real feeling of brother-hood arrong the peoples. The experience of the United States shows> %  that there is no real foundation in nee for the bitter antagonism felt among Slavs and Germans, French and English. Thereare in this country hundreds Of thousands, millions of men who by birth and parentage are of German descent, of French descent or Slavonic descent or descended from each of the peoples witnin the British Islands. These different races not only get along well together here, but Income knit in^o one people, and after a few generations their blood is mingled. In my own veins runs not only the blood of ancestors from the various peoples of the British Islands, English, Scotch, Welsh, and Irish, but also the blood of Frenchman and of German. It is idle to tell us that the Frenchman ami the German, the Slav and the Englishman art irreconcilably hostile one to the other because of difference of race. From our own daily expeiiences we know the contrary. We know that good men and bad men are to be found in each race We know that the differences between the races above it.uned and many others are infinitesimal compared with the vital points of likeness. Moreover, our experience with the British Empire during the last century shows that it is not nn idle dream to believe that with the growth of wisdom, will come a giowth of Wind'iness and peace. There is not a fort and hardly art armed man on the lone frontier %  lietween Canada and the nited States, and ar•ned hostilities between•.Canada and the United States are literally unthinkable. %  'itBut this growth is too slow by itself adequately ti>meet> present heeds. A' present we a re con fronted with the fact that each nation must he ready to go to war, because '|fre is a real nd desperate nc to do so and because the peuj, for failure may be to SUBB*^" . like tint of Chma. i B ^ Be l t '". ities have* worth the every great shown tl>e Qvtimutd on jonrtk page) a


The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02290
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Thursday, October 29, 1914
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02290

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Nulllua o.ddictu lurnre in verba me.glatri.
Befog bound to eWee.r to the Doffno.1 f noNklMr
'__________________________________________________________________________-____________________________....._________________
VOL.X.
Nmisu, N. P.. B&hfttn&i, Thursday, October 29.191*"
Mo.i54
..,. -i-----
L. GILBERT DUPUCH,
Editor and Proprietor.
OFFICE: 38-44 MARKET STREET
S'astau, N. P., Rahamas
PHONE 360. P. O. BOX 163.
PUBLISHED DAILY
Monday, Wednesday and Friday
single Copy......... Jd
Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday
*ingle cojiy ... ... id
Weekly ........... 4H
Monthly ...........is. 8U.II tl-l I v........ .. .|K.
alfYearly............8s.
Yearly ............If*.
"AYABI.K IN ADVANCE
Advertising Rates:- Six |*nce eer line
fni first iiisertinn; three iicnce |*r line
farlacond irMMlioa ; and ihM penny |>er
line fpy subsrjueiit insertions.
Advertisements under eight lines 4s.
civilized nations
should combine in a
great World league
FOR THE
PEACE OF RIGHTEOUSNESS
(Theodore Roosrell)
In tin* three articles that I have
already written, I have endeavored
to set forth in a spirit of absolute
fairness and calmness, the lessons
as I see them that this war teaches
n'l the world, aild especially the
United States, I bcli\e I have
shown that while, at least in Ihe
rase of Belgium,'there has been
actual wrong-doing, yet that, on
the whole and looking hack at Ihe
real and ultimate causes rather
than at the temporary occasions of
the war, what has' occur ted is due
primarily to the intense fear felt
by each nation for other nations and
to the anger borri of that fear.
Doubtless In certain element-,
notably Certain militaristic tie
menis of the population, other
motives have l f believe iliat ihe people of each
couuiiy in I ncking the Government
of that country m 1 lie present war,
have been influenced mainly Oy a
genuine patriotism and a genuine
fear of what might Ifappen to their
beloved land in the event of
aggression by other nations.
Our Strength aa Our Reliance
Under such conditions, as I have
shown, our duty is two-fold. In the
first place, events havfe clearly
demonstrated that treaties unback-
ed by force are not worth the paper
upon which they are written/Events
have clearly shown that it is the
idlest of folly to assert, and tittle
short of treason against the nation
for statesmen who should know
better to pretend, that the salvation
of any nation under existing world
conditions can he tiusted to trea.
ties, t<* little bits of papei with
names signed on them, but without
any efficient force behind them.
1 The I'niied States will be gui.ty
of criminal misconduct, we of this
generation will show ourselves
traitors t<> our children and our
children's cli 1 Idren, if, as conditions
are row, wed"-not keep ourselves
ready to defend our hearths,
trusting in great crises not to trea-
ties, not to the ineffective good
will of out-siders, but to our own
stout hearts and strong hands.
Hurt Seek to Mend Condttlone
So muchforthe first and most vit il
lesson Hut We are not to be ex-
cuseJ if we stop here. We must en-
deavor earnestly, but with sanity,
to try to bring around better world
conditions and try to shape our
policy in conjunction with other
nations so as to bring nearer the
day when the pJace of righteous-
ness, the peace of just ice and fair
dealing, will be established among
the nations of the earth With this
object in view it is our duty care,
fully to weigh the influences which
are at work or may be put to work
in order to bring annul this result,
and in every effective way todomir
best to further the growth of these
influences. When this has been done
our Government wil! not be re.
du:ed to humili itint! impotence
even to protest against such wo-ng
as that committed on Belgium,
because our "neutrality can only
b< pieserved by failure to help
r ght what is wrongand we shall
fien as a pople have too much
S>lf-respect 10 enter into
absurd all inclusive arbitra'ion
treaties, unbicked by force at the
veiy m nnent when we f iil to do
whit is clearly dem m led by the
Hague treaties by which we are
already hound, by protesting
against violation of these treaties
Leaaofi o! United States *
Doubtless'in the long'run most
is to be hoped from the slow growlh
of a better'feeling, a wore real
feeling of brother-hood arrong the
peoples. The experience of the
United States shows> that there is
no real foundation in nee for the
bitter antagonism felt among Slavs
and Germans, French and English.
Thereare in this country hundreds
Of thousands, millions of men who
by birth and parentage are of Ger-
man descent, of French descent or
Slavonic descent or descended from
each of the peoples witnin the
British Islands. These different
races not only get along well to-
gether here, but Income knit in^o
one people, and after a few gen-
erations their blood is mingled. In
my own veins runs not only the
blood of ancestors from the various
peoples of the British Islands, Eng-
lish, Scotch, Welsh, and Irish, but
also the blood of Frenchman and
of German. It is idle to tell us that
the Frenchman ami the German,
the Slav and the Englishman art
irreconcilably hostile one to the
other because of difference of race.
From our own daily expeiiences we
know the contrary. We know that
good men and bad men are to be
found in each race We know that
the differences between the races
above it.uned and many others are
infinitesimal compared with the
vital points of likeness. Moreover,
our experience with the British
Empire during the last century
shows that it is not nn idle dream
to believe that with the growth of
wisdom, will come a giowth of
Wind'iness and peace. There is not
a fort and hardly art armed man on
the lone frontier lietween Can-
ada and the nited States, and ar-
ned hostilities between.Canada
and the United States are literally
unthinkable. '- it-......
But this growth is too slow by
itself adequately ti>meet> present
heeds. A' present we a re con fronted
with the fact that each nation must
he ready to go to war, because
'|fre is a real nd desperate nc
to do so and because the peuj,
for failure may be to suBb*^" .
like tint of Chma. iB^Be"lt '".
ities have*
worth the
every great
shown tl>e
Qvtimutd on jonrtk page)
a
............


Publication began at 6.05 p.m.
TLhc Gvfbune
Thursday. October 29. 1914.
The weak crying to the
strong nation for that protection
which she relied upon in her
hour of need, a protection of
Which she was confidently as-
sured, because of the promise
of that more^ powerful nation
Great Britain, and the unhesi
taring reply to the silent call of
her ally, France by a "piper
pledge," lias been the subject of
wide comment, and the and is
guised admiration of the whole
world with but one exception-
Germany and the Germans.
True it is admitted by some
few German Apologists that,
Germany had violated its
pledged word, bufc the admis
sion, only adds an insult to her
infliction of injury. The position
they take is that, German civi
lisation and Culture are so far
superior to that of other na
tions, that her domination and
destiny must prevail in Europe,
that the ordinary Standard of
morality is no rule fqrher. Such
is what these apologists call
a common sense view The
Empire of Great Britain, and
The Republic of the United
States are alike conscious of a
destiny and a duty common to
all the English speaking race,
to rule justly, to love mercy, to
defend the right, to maintain
the truth, at all costs, and
to protect and defend the weak.
This is what we and they pro-
fess, and this is what we' stand
by, and perish the day when
our profession may be called a
dead letter.
Fifty three of the best known
English writers; Theologians,
Poets, Essayists, Novelists,
Scholars, Professors of Litera-
ture, and Dramatists have sign-
ed a vigorous document, def< ud
ing "England's War without
dishonour." When we mention
Margaret L Woods, Flora An-
nie Steel, as the names among
them, those who know anvthing
of their writings who liave had
their spicks at times refreshed,
their senses pleased, and their
higher aspirations made higher
yet by their writings,-will be
satisfied that they have made
no mistake. And their verdict
has been accepted by the best
journalists and greatest think-
ers in the world. There are
among the signatories, men who
have had the greatest good will
towards Germany & with a high
from sending Troops to Antw rp
through the Scheldt, which
would have violated Holland's
neutrality. This says the Ameri-
can Correspondent in words that
must make the blood of English
men beat faster in his veins.
"This great example of British
honour is one which history will
regard with admiration, and the
Dutch with everlasting grati-
tude."
:o:
It is with unfeigned sorrow
! that wc received the report of
appreciation of her institutions, the dcatll of ,,. u H/p
and though some of them are
well-known "Apostles of peace"
and divergent political and so-
cial views, yet they are agreed
that there was no other course
left open to England than to
"keep her word" and protect a
small nation from, as Lord Ro
berts, puts it, "being bullied."
Does not the Mother Country
carry us with her ? not with a
tumultousrush, but with a calm
aud determined following?
I low often have we exulted in
our school boy class, when we
saw a bully among the boys
ty amusing,an I hectoring in the
petty ways of bullies a smallei
,uid weaker boy; that one fine
day he met his match, and g t
a proptt good licking. \W
know that the atmosphere, of
the school became healthier and
purer, in consequence, a more
manly spirit prevailed in the
whole school, and took the
place of the abject servility
.vhich seemed to impregnate,its
indoor and outdoor life, and
each boy felt thai it was good
and an lionoui to belong to that
school, and it was equally I
with the bully He learnt In
know his exact value, and to
live up to it, with dignity and
honour, and hi- former practises
fell from him as a ragged gar-
ment, he donned a new suit, and
suited it. And so will it be with
Willudm Hohenzollern.
When he gets licked into
shape, he will be an ornament to
the Crown heads of Europe, his
Czars
Latest War News
RADIOGRAMS
brother Kings and
and
J. M Barrie, Arnold Bennett, A. [Emperors, and President! and
C.Benson, E. F. Benson, the [Mikados and Shahs and Sultans.
Very Ucv. Monsignor R. H.I His insane desire for do
B
R. uies
Doyle,
Thomas
Robert
nnce
Maurice of Battenberg who fell
in action, in France.
The Prince was the youngest
son of Pri.cess Henry of Bat-
tenberg ; a cousin of II. M. King
(ieorge V.,and brother to Queen
of Spain.
He was a Lieutenant in the
First Ratal inn of the King's
Royal Rifle Corps.
Upon the Receipt of th above
si I intelligence, the following
ti I 'gram was d spntched from
His Excellency the vernor to
the. Right Honourable Secretary
of State for the Colon i< s :
39th, Octoberag 1 }.
Harcourt,
Colonial Officer,
London,
Kindly convey to her Royal
Highness the Princess, Henry of
Battenberg, the'sincere and re-
spectful sympathy of the people
>f the Bahamas at the sad loss
of her bra vc son.
HADDON-SM1TH.
:n:
BAHAMAS
WAR. RELIEF FUND
The following subscriptions
have been receiw d
Amount previously
acknowledged 3632 6 3
'Com. Si Crew
H. M. S. Ilesperns 12 o
From Key West per
British Vice
Consul 7 7 5
St. Marks Baptist
Church, Sandilands
Rum Cay
Total 2047 6
6 Not in the NavpLtet,
)bert Bridges, Gilbert. mination will be quenched and Zi'Hl Baptist Church
Sir Arthur Conan he will fp-dize the Blessings of
Galswprthy, I peace in his individual case
*d\, Jbnjhony Hope,I "The New York Herald" of
yichen, Jerome K.'the 31st < )ct. records, that The
Jerome, Sir Gilbert Parker, Sir Dutch will never forget how
.Owen Seaman, Humphrey j England respected tire "scrap ol
d. H.G. Wells, Israel Zang- paper when at the cost of seri
Mrs. Humpluey
[6
6
2
11
Born
Last night, to Mr. aud
Ward, ous disadvantage, she refrained U. II. Knowles a son*
Mrs-
October -2pl| 19.4b
London Oct. 29th.
Governor,
Nassau.
October 29th. follow ing from
Press Bureau:--Belgian govern-
ment reports that the situation
of the troops on the Yser has
improved. The enemies fire has
slackened, being subdued by the
runs of the fleet
The operations of the Allies
at Ypres is very satisfactory.
General Botha left Rusten-
>urg Tuesday and drove Beyers
commando in headlong rout,
capturing eighty prisoners fully
aimed.
(Signed)
HARCOUT.
QOVBRNMENT PRJBB8
London : The limit of hu-
man endurance hasbaen reached
in the battle in West Eland' rs
and righting has practically
1 ease I. The < iermans will move
inland In their attempt to reach
Dunkirk .\: ire bi inging Up more
men nn<\ arounitiou and estab-
lishing a second lim^tf-defense.
The Germans werBrmced to
withdraw in Poland in the f
of strongRussian reinforcements.
The,first attempt of the Ger-
mans to reach a Channel port
has been blocked by the bom-
bardment of the fleet,
The greater part of South
Africa is at war. The rebellion
in British Colonies being more
felt than the invasion by the
Germans.
General Beyers, a rebel com-
mander, was severely defeated
with the loss of in my lives and
prisoners.
Washington: Germany will
use 30,000 bales of cotton and
Austria 25,000 balessaytAmbat*
sadore Gerard. American ves-
sels are being sought to load the
lirst cargoes. England* prom i-e
Ito permit cotton transportation
'even to belligerent countries
has given the COttOO industry an
1 immediate impetus.
Sarajevo, Bosnia:- Four of
the conspirators in the Assassin-
ation of the Grand Duke hive
been sentence I to be hanged wd
1 the fifth will go to fcuson on a
life sentence Two -lithe other
conspirators, one of them being
the man who threw the bomb
that plunged Europe into war
were sentenced to twenty years
imprisonment each
-r


London:A report that the
Duke of Brunswick, only son-in-
law of the Kaiser, was cut off
from the German lines whlie
leading the Zeium Hussars on
the FrencP/roimer.
It is believed that he was
taken prisoner.
1 New York:Turkey is busy-
recruiting for her army, even
trying lo impress naturalized
American citizens. So great is
'the enlistment that shortage of
uniforms has resulted.
October 39th I9I4. '
London 28th.
Governor,
Nassau.
October 8th, following from
Press Bureau;
Government of the Union of
Africa have for some davs been
aware that ;i number of Burgh-
ers North Orange Free State and
western Transvaal were prepar-
ing rebellion and as military re-
quirements are being command i
ed under authority of Generals]
Christian Devvet and Beyers the]
town of Heilbron was siezcd.
tram stopped .it R-itz and citi
zens by force taen therefrom
and detained. The Government
are taking steps to deal firmly
with the iiMfcter. The majority
of citi/ensTtvevery province of
the Union thoroughly royal,
Treaty between Merit* and Ger-
mans has been captured by the
Union, promising help to rebels
and cession of walfish Bay to
German-. Webels Bad Germans
of MaritZ Command have been
engaged twice recently. On the
first occasion four on cers and
ninety-one men were taken pri-
soners, two Maxims were also
taken.
On the second occasion a
large number surrendered v\ lun
tardy and B number rf wounded
fell into our hands. Maritz was
wounded and has retired with
his whole force towards Ger-
man Southwest Alrica.
(Signed!
HARCOURT.
PIOKM) I'l'
London says that the battle
f.M tin'Straits of 1) >ver cootin-
U'swilh unabated fury and with
out decided advantage.
The Germans wnecTrossed the
Yser at terrible cost, and others
who are railing desperate at-
tacks as f.t^v.uth as \rras are
being repulsed with heavy K -
es.
The allied fleet seems to have
withdrawn some what having
driven the enemy inland.
The French are trying to pre-
vent the installation of heavy
siege guns near Verdun and Bel-
fort.
The Kaiser is said to command
now all the Austrian as well as
the German armies.
The object of the desperate
coast attack is to secure ports
near England defend them with
big Howitsers and mine fields
and to plant a triple line of
mines across the Channel and
then to invade England,sending
out their fleet and Zeppelins to
attack the English fleet.
October 29th i9'4
PICKKD UP
The Germans generally are
retreating fr im their attack on
the French ports and have ap-
parently reached the limit of
their endurance.
There has been no serious
fighting since Ttoesday accord-
ing to the mnny reports from
various parts of the battle line
although Germany d ws not ad-
mit that her army is" retreating ffthe
admit offi-
Royalton, Illinois:The mine
disaster was caused by an explo
sion of a miners lamp in a
dangerous gas pocket. The death
list is smaller than at first stated
many being saved by the use of
air pumps.
:o:
Oct 24, 1914.
Nassau, N. P.
Dear Tribune.
It is a prevailing; idea among
people when you go to the poor
bouse you go there to die. We
acquant the Taxpayers as a rule
of things that are going on in
the various governmental de-
partments but the poor house
seems to bp a private or secret
order. Why not let the taxpayers
know at least the number of
patients treated quarterly or
yearly, those cured or passed in-
to the way beyond ? We will
make no comment on the dead,
as the best doctor loses patients,
but we will like to know how
Good Morning'!
We Are Introducing
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American Cashmere
American Cotton Lisle
HOSIERY
Tliey have stood the test. Give real
foot comfort. No seams to rip. Never
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superiority of material and workmanship.
\b>lutel'y st -i in less. Will wear 6 months
without holes, or new oues free.
OUR. SPECIAL 6FFER
to every one sending us f 100 in currency
or postal note, to cover advertising an"
.hipping charges, we will send port paM,
with written gu.-.rantee, backed by a five
million dollar company, either
3 P.lr of our 75c. v*.lu
American Silk Hosiery,
or 4 P&ira of our 30c. v*lu
American Cashmere Hosiery.
or 4 P*ir of our 50c. Va-luo.
American Cotton-Lisle Hosiery
or 6 Po-ir. of Children Hosiery.
our experts are getting on in ,_,,.., ..........
tropical disease. What do we I a deaier in your locality is selected.
do for our lepers do we send them
|>ooi house to perish and
j'he Germans do admit o|fi- (ije }
daily being compelled to retreat [s jt true that consumptive and
i wounded ley side by Fide or
typhoid and maternity in the
same ward? There arc thingsfjr
we would like to know and if
they were made (Icar to us we
would not be so superstitous in
running away with the belief
when you go to the poor house
you ";o there to die.
CHRIS VI AN. SCIENTIST
:o:
War Notes
SIR E. GR.EVS BROTHER.
CAPTURE!) BY GERMANS
Berlin, Oct. 17- (by Wireless
Telegraph to Sayville, L. I.)
\" British aeroplane has been
the giound near
a well di-
rected shot. Both the airmen
from Poland owing to the ar
rival of n superior force of \ius
,i.ii teiuiorc nents 'I he Ger-
i.m- say that the retreat was
orderly.
I'riiice Maurice of Battenberg,
cousin of King George and
brother to the Queen of Spain
Ins been killed~n the fighting
in France. He was lieutenant in
the Kings Koyal Rifle Corps.
i i srman hea [quarters have
been moved back from Ostend.
The Bofr rebellion under
BeyerS has been defeated by
Botha.
The German cruiser Kmden
which was recently reported va*.
,,,,,,,< ,,een sunk/h.,* sunk .
[apan/se steamer.
Switzerland is excited because
of a German aeroplane dropping
bombs in her ter.itory.
London: -The German pres*
says that the war will last a long
time. It is St..ted that sufficient
corn is on hand to Supply the
people until the next harvest.
McGregor, Iowa:Germans
are Racing From Canada to
escape draft for service in the
arm) for two vears. They proved
upon land In Canada, taking the
oath of allegiance. Now Canada
is drafting f f the army and they
are forced the alternative of
living up to their oath and join
litg the ranks against their
fatherland, or giving up their
land. , '
were taken prisoners.
The a-'iator acting in the ca-
pacity of observer was later
found tobeCol. Grey, a brother
of the British Secretary for For-
eign Affairs.
DONT DELAYOffer expires when
aler in your locali
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DAYTON, OHIO. U. S. A-
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THE
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For Sale
A LOT of land in Blue Hill
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Chapel St., South.
Oct. 29th. .iii-.
Notice,
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A TRIAL WILL PROVE THIS
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'
Vs
L
paper they are written on, and the
multitude of peace congresses that
hate been held have (ailed to sec-
ure even the slightest tangible re-
sult, as regains any contest in
which the passions of great na-
tions were fully aroused and their
vital interests really concerned. In
other words, each nation at present
in any crisis of fundamental im-
portance has to re^ly purely on its
own power, its own strength, its
own individual force. The futility
of international agreements in great
crises has come from the fact that
force was not back of them.
What is needed in international
^matters is to create a juge and
Them to put police power back of
the judge.
So fat, the time has not been
ripe to attempt this. Surely now,
in view of the awful cataclysm of
the present warf such a plan could
at least be considered, and it may
be that the combatants at the end
will be willing to try -it in order to
secure at least a chance for lh<*
only kind of peace that is worto
having.lie peace that is com-
patible with self-respect. Merely th
bring about a peace at the present
moment without pro\ iding for the
elimination of the causes of war
would accomplish nothing of any
permanent value, and the attempt
to make it would probably^ rep?
resent nothing else than the adroit
use of some more or less foolish, or
more or less slf-intereted outsider
eastu'e. power who wished to
s> e^K^m^uJd, not pUt ,|S opponents
in *'"
the
Remove Ill^auaM of Fetr
If the pnwtrs ^fcyustified in
going intoihis war uy^RRjtt vital
interests, then they are required to
continue the war until these vital
interests are no longer in jeopardy
^ co which would leave with.
^_
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Professional A hnouncemen
out redress wrongs like those which
Belgium has suffered or which
would.represent merely the partial.
or entire destruction of one or more*
nations and the survival in aggrav-
ated from of militarism andautorr-
acy, and of international hatred in
its most intense and virulent form,
Would really be only a worthf/fl
truco and would not represent the
slightest advance in the cause of
of righteousness and of inter-
national morality.
' The essential thing to do is to
free each na ion from the besetting
fea,r of its neighbor. This can only
be done by temoving the cause.of
such fear. The neighbor must no
longer be a dancer.
Meredisarmarnent will not. ac-
complish this result, and the dis-
armament of the free and enlight-
ened peoples, so long as a single
despotism or batharistn were left
armed,would bea hideous calamity.
If armaments were redueed while
causes of trouble were ir no way
lemoved, wars would probably I o-
ccme somewhat pinr frequent,
just because thev (vould be less ex-
pensive and less decisive It is
greatly to be desired that the growth
of armaments should be arrested,
but they cannot be arrested while
present conditions continue. Mere
treaties, mere Htl of papers with
narnes signed to them, have proved
uh^7"wo*ihless for the protect-
ion of nations, and where they are
the only alternatives it is. not only
right, but necessary, rh.it each na-
tion should arm itself so as to be
able to cope with any possible foe.
(To be continued.)
Dr. W* R. Lamb\ %
AMERICAN OCUf 1ST and OPTICIAN
SpecUJIei In. Examining the EYE end Correcting Defective Vision
HAS the pleasure to again announce to the Citizens of^
New Providence and the surrounding islands, trja
he will be at, the Knickerbocker Hotel, Nassau, til
November 4th inclusive. Those wishing to consult hi ml
should make arj appointment at their earliest opportunity
as he will not be able to remain longer than the time stated
He is fully prepared as before, Witb the most modern instr'u
raents and apparatus for thoroughly examining and re-J
fracting the eyes, according to the latest and mostapprovec
methods as employed in the Metropolitan Eye Infirmaries
and has the largest supply and the greatest variety of flit
most desirable kinds and styles of lenses, and mountings oi
the best quality, ever brought to this Colony, including 2
large supply of sphero cylindrica), prismatic arid other spe-B
cial lenses made to order for the correction of astigmatism
weakness of the ocular muscles and other eye troubles whirl
ordinary lenses will not correct. Those who are troubled
with weak eyes or defective vision, who suffer from head-
ache, eye ache, inflammation of the eyes or the lids, weak-
ness of the ocular muscles, or any of the numerous condi-
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nation, or necessitating the use of glasses- and most of these
troubles are permanently cured by accurate refraction and
properly adjia&ted glasseswould do well to esjlrace the
present exceptional opportunity of giving their %yes the at-
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up to the highest possible standard, and for most perfect
and satisfactory results, is equal in'every respect to the hest
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methods of examination are so thorough and accurate that
the best possible result are always obtained from the glasses
he prescribes which are accurately fitted and WARRANT-
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their eyes require, the kind which produces the most com-
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is the most important.
*Dr. Lamb is certificated in both opticsand medicine,
has thousands of references and testimonials from influential
citizens of many countries, where he has practiced his pro-
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*
_v
13.


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