<%BANNER%>

PAGE 1

Publication began at 6.50 p.m. Zhe tribune Tuesday, October 20, 1914. h The Mail Steamer "Seguranca" arrived from New York early this morning bringing passengers as follows.— -Misses Lillice Bowe, E. S. Lightbourn, Hilda Lightbourn, Edith Maclure, Gladys McCall, Very Solomon and M F Thornton; Mesdames F. R. Griffin,, E. M-Call, R Sawyer F.Simpson and Helen Wilson.-Mr. and Mrs. John A. Bowe, Mr mid Mrs. \V. D. Frazer. Mr. and Mis. II W. Lightbourn, Mr. and Mrs Kenneth Solomon ; Messrs V. Bow A.M.Cunningham, H. M. Davenport, j*. G. Johnson, Charles S. Knowlton, R II.S iwver,and W. L. Wilson; Reverends Herbert Uevall, and George Long; Dr. W. R.Lamb; Masters K.D. McCall and Robert Sawyer. Misses Larisse Cadogan and Catherine Dixon ; Mrs William Humes; Messrs Timothy Bam, Samuel Riley and Wither Swain. (38) — :o:— Our esteemed fellow citizen Mr H. W. Lightbourn accompanied by Mrs Lightbourn and their daughters, the Misses E. S. and Hilda Lightbourn returned tins morning from their summer vacation per Mail Steamer "Seguranca The Tribune extends a WeiCome Home. Commissioner }. A. Bowe, with Mrs Bowe, Miss Lillice and Mr V. Bowe arrived this morning per *Seguranca" Mr and i Mrs Bowe have been visiting' their children in Cana.ia. We hope that they have had,, an enjoyable time. Among the arrivals this morn.' ing were Mr and Mrs. Kenneth 1 Solomon who nave returned from their weddina tour. —:o: — Mrs T. Simpson of Buena Vista has com,home for the winter, and as u-ual is among th tirst in the migration. — :o: — Chief Engineer Cunningham of toe Lighth was render, 'Carnarvon"returned from I on 1 visit to England this 1 %  I 1 Mr. Timothy Bain was among the arrivals this morning per "Scguranca." Principal Light keeper Hubert Higg's of Bird Rock lighthouse, with his wife and three children arrived on Sundav morning per Schr. "Mary Anne." The Shops on Bay Street are many of them closed at 3 o'clock in the afternoons. — :o;— BIRTH LOWE, —Tuesday O'toSer 20th 1911, to Mr. and Mrs. J. Stanley Lowe —a son. —:o: — Latest War News RADIOGRAMS PICKED DP October 20th 1914. The London POST reports that it is reliably informed that the Allies have retaken Ostend. 1 lard fighting is going on near Neuport where the Belgians with the aid of British fleet have repulsed the Germans. The Allies appear to be gaining generally and driving back the Germans steadily but slowly. Turkey refuses England! demand that she discharge the German crews from TutksH warships. Berlin declare? that the Allies have b ;en r e[)uls'd west and northwest of Lille, with severe IOSSPS; while the Russian situation is unchanged except that the Germans have assumed the offensive. Tokio report* that a Japanese cru'ser was hit by a German mine and sunk 354 were drowned and 13 saved. Austrians declare that the Russians lost 40.000 men Irving to take Przemysl Roumania has refused transit of a large shipment of munitions of war from Germany to Turkey. United States Marines have been landed in Capo Haytien for the purpose of keeping order while that city is under control of the rebels. OOVKl:\MK\T I'liKSS The great British battleship Triumph is reported having suflered 'Ion ige from a < ierman howitzer at Tsingtau The German government has consented to per nit food supplies for destitute Belgians. The American relief command has 1500 tons of supplies in London ready f'^r shipment to Belgium" President Wilson lias reiterated that his attitude toward loans to b>th American and European belligerents has not changed. The p dice dispersed rioters in Borough who tried to wreckGerman shops. Third act in the stern threat re of war has reached a-crisis; it is the attempt of the Germans, to advance along the coast of Belgium and France with the ap parent object of menacing ling land from Channel ports. The Allies are |>rogressi.-)g| eastward towards Lille. Something decisive along the coast is expected soon. The flat country makes it impossible for either army to remain entrenched for weeks as they have done elsewhere. The Germans have taken siege guns to the vicinity of Belfort indicating that they are planning to advasjee on both ends of their long fortified line Russians and Austrians continue to battle in the eastern war zone. Reports are contradictory, both sides claiming victory. The Allies are reported to have re-captured Ostend. Belgium is becoming a nation of exiles. Over 400.ono have crossed to I lolland and an equal number to France, while too. 000 have none over to Fir.land. The Panama Canal will be re-opened for tialTic tomorrow. 22 waiting vessel-, will be sent through the canal in two days. Washington;—3S railroads have petitioned the Inter state Commerce Commission to be allowed to increase their freight r t's by five petcnt. Villa will abide bv the nets of the conventional AguasCalientas and declares th.it he Will support aiv provisional government except that h >aded by Car. ran/a. The collier Jaison is to be sent bv the navy department with Christmas gifts from the United States to the European desti tute. Obstruction tactics are delfjW ing the war tax measure, I he House will disagree to all of the Senate amendment! says Mr. Uodi rwood. GOVERNMENT NOTICE S Copies of Regulations etc. for the Civil S> rvice ol India exami tation to be held in Aug. {1915 can be seen at Colonial Secretary's Office. "Fenders for publishing Government Notices" in a Bahamas Newspaper are called for; also Tenders for Pymic printing. An Order in Council fixing the Rates of Postnge^jf Regis. tered newspapers vsvpiin 'he Empire is published. TheopliilusKnowleshas been appointed Third Clerk in the Coldnial Secretary's Depart ment, and Irwin Simeon Bain, Clerk in the Auditor of Public Accounts Department BAHAMAS WAR. RELIEF FUND The following subscriptions have been received Amount previously acknowledged £2486 ro g Inhabitants of Farmers Cay, Exuma 2 1 0 Rock Sound and Tarpum Bay.— 4'' 16 2 Employees 15. G. Hospital 200 A. M. E. Zion Church 7 0 Eastern Union Burial Society 10 o Ragged Isld. and Cotrtrib. 2 80 Biminis i| 6 2 Total £ 2556 19 1 DISTRICT OF MANflBOVE CAY ISLAND OF 5>ROS Cmtr liuilnns in Aid of the War Relief Fund. (i ontinued) Kemps Bay, Forward £8 1 o\ Susan Rabming 1 0 Zach Rahming 1 o Feon Johns HI i i Aubrey Johnson 2 6 Hirman Hill 1 o Emily Miller 5I Simeon McFce 2 0 Ronald Mi Fee 6 I.li/th Smith 2 0 I) maid Roile j o James Minim. 3 Lin olu Rahming 4 o Edwin \liiinii o las. Rolle 1 o 1' \l Johnson, Govr's I larhour .| o Mary I te^i au 1 Jr.) 1 0 Melinia Farrington 6 VVm. Smith 4 o liios Taylor 1 o o John F. Smith 4 o Ivosa \\ S.iunders 6 Savelita I ludson 6 Romulus Rahming %  1 o Maria Hi p 1 o Cornelius Rahming I o Lincoln Rahming T o Savelita I ludson 1 o .l.iEvans I O



PAGE 1

*mm Thro. M-tfler Wilfred Brown Mini HiggS Ehzth Smith .fc. John Forbes i o I o 6 >•} I o Nassau, N. I'. 3 >t 1 () tober 1914. The Editor of Tribune. Total for^temps Bay £\ 1 40 Smith's l*tll and Black"Point. Contributions from Pleasant Bay .11 iiv. Forbes £ 2 2 o Wm. Forbes j | q M iry I. Cibson 5 o Louis MOSS \ 6 (ien. S 1 nils T o Ellen Bollard 1 j J.inioMichson 2 n Lauretta Negmons 1 0 I'.li/.iii Negmons 1 o P.valina Negmons 1 o (I %  Negmons r o \i 1 -s ia MMSS 2 0 Lauretta Wright (, V iria Billiard 1 n Ehzth Rahming j 6 Alan Nickson ( A beri Rahming 2 *6 .1 as Rahming 6 o Total for Pleasant Bay £\ i(> o •Miami, Fla. 1. 12. 1 11 1 '"l|8(? litor of Tribute. Ftlauderdale, Pja.Tues( > t. 12, IQI.) T n At Ft dav S pt. 22 th re was a f'rettv wed ling ai the office of the Rev J A. Ibiines. Mr. Stanley M ijnr w is married to Miss Elen ir Wilcbcombe. both of whom arc citizens of the I'ilia nas. The former of South end Long M md and the latter of West end Grand Bahama. A< rom parrying th-m were Mr. Horatio Nelson Wilchcombe thebr t'lerofths bride & Iris wife Mrs. Emma Olivia Wilcbcombe they yere also accompanied by Mi (euben Major brother of the gr .o:n and several other friends It was a prettj little dding the ceremonies being "i ai jn lock, they were 1 coned by the parties mentioned above to) ie Stea nship Trans portationCo l ickol Ft. Laud erdale, Fla. where they took a pleasant trip to their proposed home qu ; te wife at 4J0. Re. freshmants were served until 7 o'clock, when Mrs. Horatio Nel -1 i >nWi ch nbe got up; addressed t e cqamiany, congratulated ."he IIC-\T uple and he and his late bride round their way borne. May God bless the new couple. • o • e Sir: Endorsing the sentiments ex pressed by you some weeks ago coupled with those of Common Sense of Saturday's date with re regard to the enormous sum of monev voted by that noble body of men stylei Legislators, I am only sorry they cannot be addressed by some other name, exceptions of comsetothe rule dilating upon Common Sense's suggestions, I am crffjvinced that not one of those who voted in favuor of the ten thousand powers, would be able to say to his cot.stituents I am one voted in favour of the amount in dismission and to show reasons in favour of their so doing. The question is did thev ere voting preface the fxistin : slate of affairs and came to a definite conclusion what would*be done in rase of extreme need, if so well, contrary to that Heaven help them At the outbreak of w;ir the Government very unwise/; rinsed down their works, th merchants (spongemerch ints of oursei refused o out 111 their crafts, sisal dropped to a ver\ low ebb, pr icticailya standstill, the prices oJ I rod stuff increased while wages decreased, and work in genernl'suspended y t in spile of these facts they deem to have acted wisely, what a state of affairs ? Mr Editor I sometimes used the words, What a people? What /icountrv? if. those good Gentlemen only knew the meaning they would ihvavs look before leaping. I aiders! md that 11 E. the (i>\-• nor is endeavouring to obtain a market for the disposal of the sponges, I trust God his untiring efforts may meet with ample .'i rtSw. The Board of Works doot seem to realize their position, I would suggest that they have ihe roads and streets in the City and suburbs which are in a most deplorablecondition made good, there by giving the labourer a chance to see for himself and be read) to face the e\ il that is evid' ntlycoming(ie) Starvation If the Government dont find work for the masses, thev are going to have a serious problem to solve. Awake I awake MO sleeping gods, and be 'in your watch ere the enemy overtake you. He member the ill fate of Sir Ralph St.the Rover and the Inch rape Rock. I hanking you for space allowed. Yours Trulv THE BELL. TERRIBLE TALE OF BURNING OF SHIP AT SEA TOLD BY CREW Saved from a ship loaded with Nitrate of Soda which blew up and sank within twenty minutes off the island of Snn Salvador, twenty-four nlheers and seaman irrived in Miami on the Frances I 1 '., thismorning with vivid tales of their harrowing experience. Not one of tliem escaped with mything more than the clothes he happened to have on at the Mine the fue was discovered. The ship was 'he Foxtort Hall lately of the C. G Dunn Co., of Liverpool, bill which became on Sept. 13 an American ship under the American Steel cor poration. '1 lus change was made at Colon. The carg 1 was shipped it the port of MejiHones, Chile and the s> ip was billed for New York The Foxton Hall passed througti the Panama canal a id was Steaming north when, a short distance aff the coast of San Salvador, on the morning t that the sailois could not handle them with bare hand-. %  'Cui therop's came the command from the captain. Knives swished, and the boat dropped dike a plummet into the water One |,\ one the crew jumped into the boat but the craft bad become so hot that the men could not remain in it and every one dove into the water. Some of those with presence of mind realized that it was necessary at once to get the lifeboat away from the ship if any were to be saved so although the boat was still hot asfire.E. Divon second engineer and four of bis fellows clambered back into it and shoved off. So intense was the beat from the ship that'the top of Dixon's cap was buried off during the few minutes, :t took to move the life boat off. AH Saved Excepting Two When we had picked up every man we could see, we counted up and found that the chief eneinr. rand one able seamar were missing", related Edmund Mrarks, ihe second officer, this morning. I b ive never seen them since, and suppose that th*ir bodies will never be recovered/' There were six Germans on board, all of whom worked under Marks the second engineer, who is an Englishman. After all were safely landed on the Island, the) began laying plans to "do" him before the party reached New York. It was not long, however, before the Germans were placed under arrest and became prisoners of war. They were left iu the Bahamas. "I supp ise you were glad that vou were an Englishman when y HI saw the officers putting the 1 iermans in jail, were you not ?" the second officer was asked. He Straight seed up and answered proudly, "I am always glad that I am an Englishman, sir" he said. Capt. Stevenson, of the i'.lfated ship, the third engineer, the fourth officer, the steward ami the cabin boy were left in the hospital in the Bahamas.all being severely burned. The captain was the most seriously V** injured of all. J "You cannot imagine what an' intense heat was created hv the'" burning nitrate* said Mr Dixon this morning, "sThe tl mi s w^re white, and almost onsolid mass. They mounted, 1 suppose, two or three hundred feet in the nir. Within twenty minutes after the In-I explosion occured, the flag of th Ship, the last to :'., down, disappeared from sight. The ciew will leave this evening on the s'x o'clock train for New York. Miami Daily Metro/•• Us, Oct. 1, 1914. V*



PAGE 1

mmmm *w ^ mnmm wmm now in a swing northward into Belgium if the initiative remains with the Allies and the Belgian field armies join the extreme left as expected, the campaign in France will not be materially affected." The Times' military 'correspondent says that it shows that the permanent forts in exposed position's have no chance against modern artillery, and that with the Ger mans holding Antwerp and the Allies attacking it the result will be same. The Morning Post mili. laiy expert says the German force released will probably not be of great account in the field, though the} moral effect is unfortunate. The Chronicle says that strateaically its possession will not benefit -he Germans, ;md that the capture was merely a spectacular success to console Berlin for the failure to take Paris. "The capture of Antwerp in eleven days carries the germ of the capture If p,,ris" s=.vs Deutsche I gesze,tung, according to a despatch from Merlin by way of Amsterdam to the Reuter Telegram Company. "The fall of this fortress" adds the newspaper "not only means the overthrow of the Belgians but it is a most serious How to England. Itprovesthat it is only necessary to break down a large section of ev*j the most extended foitresses in order to render the remaining part untenable." In a despatch from Amsterdam the correspondent of the Keuter I elegiam Company says a message Irom Merlin conveys a report issued from general army headquartws dated October 10 at eleven *.., that the entire fortress ofAntwtrp including all the forts is m posession of the Germans.— Ibid. IMPERIAL THEATRE WEDNESDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY ->. Dser. open 7.50. Performance \ begin at .I5 p.m. LOqK! The following Blank forms may be had at "TheTribune" Office. Duty Entry. Free Entry. Warehouse Entries. Sponging Articles. Ship's Reports. hi ijuinfities at Special Rates C0C0ANUTS BAHAMA ISLANDS I T is now possible for owners of land with fully bearing trees to prove its value and ob tain rents. For further particulars Apply to J. THEO. FARRINGTON Nassau, N. P. Agent for Bahamas Product Marketing Company 139 Copthall House Cop thai I Avenue 3 Mo. London, E. C. THE Cosmopolitan HIGH SCHOOL Opens on Monday, Oct. 5th in Aurora Hall on Charlotte Street. For particulars apply to Prof. G. G. Coffin, head master, or Mr. J. P. Simms. Mapes Fertilizers / now carry in stock the following formulas: Pineapple. —It has been proven that this has no equal and a visit to fields using same will convince you. Vegetable. —Now is the time to use this and increase I your yield in Tomatoes, Potatoes, Onions and all other vegetables by ioo per cent. Orange Tree. —To assist the growth of Young Citrus Tree. Fruit and Wine.— Increase the yield and growth of old Citrus trees. Eor further information and books on the use of these fertilizers, please apply to WALTER K. MOORE Agent for Mapes Fertilizer in the Bahamas. Notice W E would call the attention of our friends in Nassau and on the OUT ISLANDS to the. following prices on lumber which will go into effect from to-day. All ROUGH lumber up to 8 ft. 6/3 per 100. All DRKSSED lumber up to 8 ft. 8/4 per 100. All ROUGH and DRESSKD to 16ft. 10/5 per 100. ANYTHING over 16 ft. 13/6 per 100. labove up to 8 ins. wide) These prices are for CASH absolutely and being WAR prices are made to help the pub lij and are subject to change j without notice The Bahama* Timber Co. Ltd. I Kerosene 1502 IN New 50 gallon GalvanizI ed Iron Drums at iSYts per Gallon. In 10 gallon Cans at 20cts per. Gallon. Drums and Cans returnable Full particulars at Office "Frances E.," Nassau N. P. C. C. SAHNDERS %  — W ILLIAMS THE SHOEMAN has just received a larger assortment of LADIr S. MifSES and GKNTS SAMPLE BOOTS a.nd SHOES in ONE, TWO, AND THREE pair lots|t The §izesfor ladieVflre limited to 3J, 4 and 4$ Misses—13, 1 and 2 Gents—6, 6J and 7 The Shoes having been sold William*. The Shoemn.r\ at a liberal discount, the principal disadvantage being the limited sizes, he is disposing [ cf them at ; not leaa than 20 percent lees than the regular prices such grades would be. His kind patrons and the i General repair or new w rk Horse Shoeing Specially. All • ork done Mechanically. P. A. HUYI.ER. Bay Kat St. fWharf/ CANE SYBUP Can be had at T. M. Knowles at ios. stg. per Tin GOOD and THICK. h



PAGE 1

\M5SINGr ISSUES



PAGE 1

0) & 0 X r e0 0) +-> (0 "£ s OS o ithnte Nulliue addle tus |urare in verb* maglatrt. Being bound to awear to the Dojmai -.f no Maeter VOL.X. Nasanvj. N. P.. Bahamas, Tueaday. October 20. 1914 No. 246 L. GILBERT DUPCOH, Editor and Proprietor. OKKICK: K 44 MARKKT STREET rfoaaia, N. P Bahamas 'PHONE 200. P. o: BOX US. PUBLISHED DAILY Mnnilay, VVeHnesday anil Friday— single copy ; Jd Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday— single copy uf* Weekly 4 Jd Monthly i s. 4d Ounrterlv ,., 41. IhdfYearly 8 s. Yearly 1 6i. PAYABLE IN ADVANCE Advertising Rates'— Six pence |r line for first insertion; three pence |ier line for second insertion ; and one penny per line for suhsqtient insertions. Advertisements under eight lines 4s. DEATH RUIN AND DESOLATION GREET GERMAN VICTORS AS THEY MARCH INTO ANTWERP Antwerp, Sunday. After an attack lasting for more than a week and after a forty hour's bombardment by the Germans' great heavy siege gu is, the gllDl that ha tcred and shattered the forts at I.eige, Namur and Mauheuge, Antwerp, chief seaport of Belgium, fell at midday on Fiidav and a German division took possession of a city in Uames, a city of ilesolaiion, d> ath and uiin. jt is a triumph of German \rtilleiy, ihrGims that smashed the University ofl.ouv.iin and destroyed the historic Cathedral at Rheims. After Reducing Antwerp's ring o( outer foils they took toll of churches, public buildings and frlonuments. Even the gl>nous Cathedral has been damagad by shell fire, while hundreds ol poor non-combatants, aged men women and children, have been killed, as Belgium say, "to make another Prussian holiday. Hut one of the main rtbWta ol the siege, the capture of King Albert's In tie field army and the garrison under General Guise, has failed. The Belgian army after a heroic but unavailing resistance against ove>whelming odds and superior artillery retired with its forces intact to fight again another day. Fugitives left here full of stories of the horror of the siege, but no more convincing evidence is needed than 'he announcement in the official Geiman report issued yeateiday that the city's great hospital which was under 'he protection of the Red Cross flag was burned to the ground and that the patients had to flee for their lives. Before they left Antwerp the Belgian force blew up fifty German steamships, including* everal ocean vessels interned in the harbour since the begining of the war, and as the water supply was destroyed by German shells and great st.nes of provisions were removed by the Belgiin army the position of the victois is not altogether to be envied. When th" German advance guaxl entered Antwerp at midday on Friday they found the streets deserted though the line of march was marked by bodies cf Belgian soldiers and by bodies, too, of women and children killed by shells from the big guns and bombs dropped by Zeppelins from the skies. iThf German reports of the capture say the city was calm, but it was like the quiet of a cemetery for the unfortunates who had been compelled to remain were hidden away in the vaults of churches or in the cellars of their shattered tumbling houses. T • German official repctt also likens the state of the city during the siege to Dante's inferno, wide spread destruction having been wrought by the bombs and shell fiie. Scarcely a part of the city escaped damage, whole blocks having being wiped out by flames. The remnant of the garrison was trapped in two forts, against which the Germans, after repented re. fusals by the commanders of dem mds to sunender, are directing the heavv fire of scores of big gun-. Their demolition is only a question of hours. While the King is with bis army the Queen Is reported to have reached Ostend, the temporary seat of government of the little dom.— Neiv York Herald, Oct. nth, 1914 king. DAMAGE IN ANTWERP GREAT. BUT NOT IRREPARABLE, CORRESPONDENT TELLS LONDON • Rene Feibelman, sp*ical corres. pondent of the Daily Express, te.egraphing from The Hague at midnight on Friday, says: — Antwerp has surrendered and the Belgian flag was pulled down from the cathedral this morning. The German infantry mounted the Belgian fortifications and entered in large numbers in the southern districts of the city The famous Antwerp Cathedial is intact. The Germans made furious attacks on the fortifications this morning, six or seven Belgian forts holding on until the last minute with Roman heroism. "Zeppelins ciicled Antwerp the whole of last night with lights out di r ecting a terrible shell fire. The troops foughtt like lions in the large trenches. Their casualties were terrible. "The Belgians blew up all their forts except Calloo, thereby protecting the retreat of the Belgian a.my. The German artillery diove through the River Nethe, which at eertain place was filled with German bodies. The Scheldt submarine battencs were destroyed by the Belgians this morning before Ant* wterp surrendered. Many ships have been sunk by the Belgians in the harbour includ ing North German Lloyd and HamburgAmerican line vessels. •The damage in Antwerp is greit, but mostly repairaWIe I hfl suburbs of Bun-ham, south tf Antwerp suffered the most. Many inhabitants were killed by falling houses and fires following the f'II of shell*. Strategic Importance Of The City "Strategically the prime importance of the fall of Antweip is the releasing of besieging troops to bolster up the German right wing Continued on fonrth page)


The Tribune.
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS DOWNLOADS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02288
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Tuesday, October 20, 1914
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02288

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

( PDF )

( PDF )

( PDF )

( PDF )

( PDF )


Full Text
0)
&
0
X
re0
0)
+->
(0
"
s
OS
o
ithnte
Nulliue addle tus |urare in verb* maglatrt.
Being bound to awear to the Dojmai -.f no Maeter
VOL.X.
Nasanvj. N. P.. Bahamas, Tueaday. October 20. 1914
No. 246
L. GILBERT DUPCOH,
Editor and Proprietor.
OKKICK: K 44 MARKKT STREET
rfoaaia, N. P. Bahamas
'PHONE 200. P. o: BOX US.
PUBLISHED DAILY
Mnnilay, VVeHnesday anil Friday
single copy ......... ; Jd
Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday
single copy ......... uf*
Weekly ............ 4Jd
Monthly ............is. 4d
Ounrterlv........ ,., 41.
IhdfYearly............8s.
Yearly ............16i.
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
Advertising Rates' Six pence |r line
for first insertion; three pence |ier line
for second insertion ; and one penny per
line for suhsqtient insertions.
Advertisements under eight lines 4s.
DEATH
RUIN AND DESOLATION
GREET GERMAN VICTORS
AS THEY MARCH INTO
ANTWERP
Antwerp, Sunday.
After an attack lasting for more
than a week and after a forty
hour's bombardment by the Ger-
mans' great heavy siege gu is, the
gllDl that ha tcred and shattered
the forts at I.eige, Namur and
Mauheuge, Antwerp, chief seaport
of Belgium, fell at midday on Fii-
dav and a German division took
possession of a city in Uames, a
city of ilesolaiion, d> ath and uiin.
jt is a triumph of German \rtil-
leiy, ihrGims that smashed the Uni-
versity ofl.ouv.iin and destroyed the
historic Cathedral at Rheims. After
Reducing Antwerp's ring o( outer
foils they took toll of churches,
public buildings and frlonuments.
Even the gl>nous Cathedral has
been damagad by shell fire, while
hundreds ol poor non-combatants,
aged men women and children, have
been killed, as Belgium say, "to
make another Prussian holiday.
Hut one of the main rtbWta ol
the siege, the capture of King Al-
bert's In tie field army and the
garrison under General Guise, has
failed. The Belgian army after
a heroic but unavailing resistance
against ove>whelming odds and
superior artillery retired with its
forces intact to fight again another
day.
Fugitives left here full of stories
of the horror of the siege, but no
more convincing evidence is need-
ed than 'he announcement in the
official Geiman report issued yea-
teiday that the city's great hospi-
tal which was under 'he protection
of the Red Cross flag was burned
to the ground and that the patients
had to flee for their lives.
Before they left Antwerp the
Belgian force blew up fifty German
steamships, including* everal ocean
vessels interned in the harbour
since the begining of the war, and
as the water supply was de-
stroyed by German shells and great
st.nes of provisions were removed
by the Belgiin army the position
of the victois is not altogether to
be envied.
When th" German advance
guaxl entered Antwerp at midday
on Friday they found the streets
deserted though the line of march
was marked by bodies cf Belgian
soldiers and by bodies, too, of wo-
men and children killed by shells
from the big guns and bombs
dropped by Zeppelins from the
skies.
iThf German reports of the cap-
ture say the city was calm, but it
was like the quiet of a cemetery
for the unfortunates who had been
compelled to remain were hidden
away in the vaults of churches or
in the cellars of their shattered
tumbling houses.
T German official repctt also
likens the state of the city during
the siege to Dante's inferno, wide
spread destruction having been
wrought by the bombs and shell
fiie. Scarcely a part of the city es-
caped damage, whole blocks having
being wiped out by flames.
The remnant of the garrison was
trapped in two forts, against which
the Germans, after repented re.
fusals by the commanders of de-
m mds to sunender, are directing
the heavv fire of scores of big gun-.
Their demolition is only a question
of hours.
While the King is with bis army
the Queen Is reported to have
reached Ostend, the temporary seat
of government of the little
dom.Neiv York Herald,
Oct. nth, 1914
king.
DAMAGE IN ANTWERP
GREAT.
BUT NOT IRREPARABLE,
CORRESPONDENT TELLS
LONDON
Rene Feibelman, sp*ical corres.
pondent of the Daily Express,
te.egraphing from The Hague at
midnight on Friday, says:
Antwerp has surrendered and the
Belgian flag was pulled down from
the cathedral this morning.
The German infantry mounted
the Belgian fortifications and en-
tered in large numbers in the
southern districts of the city The
famous Antwerp Cathedial is in-
tact. The Germans made furious
attacks on the fortifications this
morning, six or seven Belgian forts
holding on until the last minute
with Roman heroism.
"Zeppelins ciicled Antwerp the
whole of last night with lights out
directing a terrible shell fire. The
troops foughtt like lions in the
large trenches. Their casualties
were terrible.
"The Belgians blew up all their
forts except Calloo, thereby pro-
tecting the retreat of the Belgian
a.my. The German artillery diove
through the River Nethe, which at
eertain place was filled with Ger-
man bodies. The Scheldt subma-
rine battencs were destroyed by the
Belgians this morning before Ant*
wterp surrendered.
Many ships have been sunk by
the Belgians in the harbour includ
ing North German Lloyd and
Hamburg- American line vessels.
The damage in Antwerp is
greit, but mostly repairaWIe I hfl
suburbs of Bun-ham, south tf Ant-
werp suffered the most. Many in-
habitants were killed by falling
houses and fires following the f'II
of shell*.
Strategic Importance Of The
City
"Strategically the prime impor-
tance of the fall of Antweip is the
releasing of besieging troops to
bolster up the German right wing
Continued on fonrth page)



Publication began at 6.50 p.m.
Zhe tribune
Tuesday, October 20, 1914.
h
The Mail Steamer "Seguran-
ca" arrived from New York
early this morning bringing
passengers as follows.
-Misses Lillice Bowe, E. S.
Lightbourn, Hilda Lightbourn,
Edith Maclure, Gladys McCall,
Very Solomon and M F Thorn-
ton; Mesdames F. R. Griffin,, E.
M-Call, R Sawyer F.Simpson
and Helen Wilson.-Mr. and Mrs.
John A. Bowe, Mr mid Mrs. \V.
D. Frazer. Mr. and Mis. II W.
Lightbourn, Mr. and Mrs Ken-
neth Solomon ; Messrs V. Bow ,
A.M.Cunningham, H. M. Da-
venport, j*. G. Johnson, Charles
S. Knowlton, R II.S iwver,and
W. L. Wilson; Reverends Her-
bert Uevall, and George Long;
Dr. W. R.Lamb; Masters K.D.
McCall and Robert Sawyer.
Misses Larisse Cadogan and
Catherine Dixon ; Mrs William
Humes; Messrs Timothy Bam,
Samuel Riley and Wither
Swain. (38)
:o:
Our esteemed fellow citizen
Mr H. W. Lightbourn accom-
panied by Mrs Lightbourn and
their daughters, the Misses E. S.
and Hilda Lightbourn returned
tins morning from their summer
vacation per Mail Steamer
"Seguranca
The Tribune extends a Wei-
Come Home.
Commissioner }. A. Bowe,
with Mrs Bowe, Miss Lillice
and Mr V. Bowe arrived this
morning per,*Seguranca" Mr and i
Mrs Bowe have been visiting'
their children in Cana.ia.
We hope that they have had,,
an enjoyable time.
Among the arrivals this morn.'
ing were Mr and Mrs. Kenneth 1
Solomon who nave returned
from their weddina tour.
:o:
Mrs T. Simpson of Buena
Vista has com,- home for the
winter, and as u-ual is among
th tirst in the migration.
, :o:
Chief Engineer Cunningham
of toe Lighth was render,
'Carnarvon"returned from I
on 1 visit to England this
1 I 1
Mr. Timothy Bain was among
the arrivals this morning per
"Scguranca."
Principal Light keeper Hubert
Higg's of Bird Rock lighthouse,
with his wife and three children
arrived on Sundav morning per
Schr. "Mary Anne."
The Shops on Bay Street are
many of them closed at 3 o'clock
in the afternoons.
:o;
BIRTH
Lowe,Tuesday O'toSer 20th
1911, to Mr. and Mrs. J. Stanley
Lowe a son.
:o:
Latest War News
RADIOGRAMS
PICKED DP
October 20th 1914.
The London POST reports
that it is reliably informed that
the Allies have retaken Ostend.
1 lard fighting is going on near
Neuport where the Belgians
with the aid of British fleet have
repulsed the Germans.
The Allies appear to be gain-
ing generally and driving back
the Germans steadily but slowly.
Turkey refuses England! de-
mand that she discharge the
German crews from TutksH
warships.
Berlin declare? that the Allies
have b ;en re[)uls'd west and
northwest of Lille, with severe
Iossps; while the Russian situa-
tion is unchanged except that
the Germans have assumed the
offensive.
Tokio report* that a Japanese
cru'ser was hit by a German
mine and sunk 354 were drown-
ed and 13 saved.
Austrians declare that the
Russians lost 40.000 men Irving
to take Przemysl
Roumania has refused transit
of a large shipment of munitions
of war from Germany to Turkey.
United States Marines have
been landed in Capo Haytien
for the purpose of keeping order
while that city is under control
of the rebels.
OOVKl:\MK\T I'liKSS
The great British battleship
Triumph is reported having suf-
lered 'Ion ige from a < ierman
howitzer at Tsingtau
The German government has
consented to per nit food supplies
for destitute Belgians. The
American relief command has
1500 tons of supplies in London
ready f'^r shipment to Belgium"
President Wilson lias reiterat-
ed that his attitude toward loans
to b>th American and European
belligerents has not changed.
The p dice dispersed rioters in
Borough who tried to wreck-
German shops.
Third act in the stern threat re
of war has reached a-crisis; it is
the attempt of the Germans, to
advance along the coast of Bel-
gium and France with the ap
parent object of menacing ling
land from Channel ports.
The Allies are |>rogressi.-)g|
eastward towards Lille.
Something decisive along the
coast is expected soon. The
flat country makes it impossible
for either army to remain en-
trenched for weeks as they have
done elsewhere.
The Germans have taken
siege guns to the vicinity of
Belfort indicating that they are
planning to advasjee on both
ends of their long fortified
line
Russians and Austrians con-
tinue to battle in the eastern
war zone. Reports are contra-
dictory, both sides claiming
victory.
The Allies are reported to
have re-captured Ostend.
Belgium is becoming a nation
of exiles. Over 400.ono have
crossed to I lolland and an equal
number to France, while too.
000 have none over to Fir.land.
The Panama Canal will be
re-opened for tialTic tomorrow.
22 waiting vessel-, will be sent
through the canal in two days.
Washington;3S railroads
have petitioned the Inter state
Commerce Commission to be
allowed to increase their freight
r t's by five petcnt.
Villa will abide bv the nets of
the conventional AguasCalien-
tas and declares th.it he Will
support aiv provisional govern-
ment except that h >aded by Car.
ran/a.
The collier Jaison is to be sent
bv the navy department with
Christmas gifts from the United
States to the European desti
tute.
Obstruction tactics are delfjW
ing the war tax measure, I he
House will disagree to all of the
Senate amendment! says Mr.
Uodi rwood.
GOVERNMENT NOTICE S
Copies of Regulations etc. for
' the Civil S> rvice ol India ex-
ami tation to be held in Aug.
{1915 can be seen at Colonial
Secretary's Office.
"Fenders for publishing Gov-
ernment Notices" in a Bahamas
Newspaper are called for; also
Tenders for Pymic printing.
An Order in Council fixing
the Rates of Postnge^jf Regis- .
tered newspapers vsvpiin 'he
Empire is published.
TheopliilusKnowleshas been
appointed Third Clerk in the
Coldnial Secretary's Depart
ment, and Irwin Simeon Bain,
Clerk in the Auditor of Public
Accounts Department
BAHAMAS
WAR. RELIEF FUND
The following subscriptions
have been received
Amount previously
acknowledged 2486 ro g
Inhabitants of Farmers
Cay, Exuma 2 1 0
Rock Sound and Tar-
pum Bay. 4'' 16 2
Employees 15. G. Hos-
pital 200
A. M. E. Zion Church 7 0
Eastern Union Burial
Society 10 o
Ragged Isld. and
Cotrtrib. 2 80
Biminis i| 6 2
Total 2556 19 1
DISTRICT OF MANflBOVE
CAY ISLAND OF 5>ROS
Cmtr liuilnns in Aid of the
War Relief Fund.
(i ontinued)
Kemps Bay,
Forward 8 1 o\
Susan Rabming 1 0
Zach Rahming 1 o
Feon Johns hi i i
Aubrey Johnson 2 6
Hirman Hill 1 o
Emily Miller 5I
Simeon McFce 2 0
Ronald Mi Fee 6
I.li/th Smith 2 0
I) maid Roile j o
James Minim. 3
Lin olu Rahming 4 o
Edwin \liiini- i o
las. Rolle 1 o
1' \l Johnson,
Govr's I larhour .| o
Mary I te^i au 1 Jr.) 1 0
Melinia Farrington 6
VVm. Smith 4 o
liios Taylor 1 o o
John F. Smith 4 o
Ivosa \\ S.iunders 6
Savelita I ludson 6
Romulus Rahming * 1 o
Maria Hi p 1 o
Cornelius Rahming I o
Lincoln Rahming t o
Savelita I ludson 1 o
.l.i- Evans I O
*


*mm
Thro. M-tfler
Wilfred Brown
Mini HiggS
Ehzth Smith .fc.
John Forbes
i o
I o
6
>}
I o
Nassau, N. I'.
3 >t 1 () tober 1914.
The Editor of Tribune.
Total for^temps Bay \ 1 40
Smith's l*tll and Black"Point.
Contributions from Pleasant
Bay
.11 iiv. Forbes 2 2 o
Wm. Forbes j | q
M iry I. Cibson 5 o
Louis MOSS \ 6
(ien. S 1 nils t o
Ellen Bollard 1 j
J.inio- Michson 2 n
Lauretta Negmons 1 0
I'.li/.iii Negmons 1 o
P.valina Negmons 1 o
(I Negmons r o
\i 1 -s ia Mmss 2 0
Lauretta Wright (,
V iria Billiard 1 n
Ehzth Rahming j 6
Alan Nickson ,(
A beri Rahming 2 *6
.1 as Rahming 6 o
Total for Pleasant Bay \ i(> o
Miami, Fla.
" 1. 12. 1 11 1
'"l|8(? litor of Tribute.
Ftlauderdale, Pja.Tues-
(> t. 12, IQI.)
t n
At Ft
dav S pt. 22 th re was a f'rettv
wed ling ai the office of the Rev
J A. Ibiines. Mr. Stanley
M ijnr w is married to Miss
Elen ir Wilcbcombe. both of
whom arc citizens of the
I'ilia nas. The former of South
end Long M md and the latter
of West end Grand Bahama.
A< rom parrying th-m were Mr.
Horatio Nelson Wilchcombe
thebr t'lerofths bride & Iris wife
Mrs. Emma Olivia Wilcbcombe
they yere also accompanied by
Mi (euben Major brother of
the gr .o:n and several other
friends It was a prettj little
dding the ceremonies being
" "i ai jn lock, they were 1 -
coned by the parties mentioned
above to) ie Stea nship Trans
portationCo l ickol Ft. Laud
erdale, Fla. where they took
a pleasant trip to their proposed
home qu;te wife at 4J0. Re.
freshmants were served until 7
o'clock, when Mrs. Horatio Nel -1
i >nWi ch nbe got up; addressed
t e cqamiany, congratulated
."he iic-\T uple and he and his
late bride round their way borne.
May God bless the new
couple.
o e
Sir:
Endorsing the sentiments ex
pressed by you some weeks ago
coupled with those of Common
Sense of Saturday's date with re
regard to the enormous sum of
monev voted by that noble body
of men stylei Legislators, I am
only sorry they cannot be ad-
dressed by some other name,
exceptions of comsetothe rule
dilating upon Common Sense's
suggestions, I am crffjvinced
that not one of those who voted
in favuor of the ten thousand
powers, would be able to say to
his cot.stituents I am one voted
in favour of the amount in dis-
mission and to show reasons in
favour of their so doing. The
question is did thev ere voting
preface the fxistin : slate of
affairs and came to a definite
conclusion what would*be done
in rase of extreme need, if so
well, contrary to that Heaven
help them !
At the outbreak of w;ir the
Government very unwise/;
rinsed down their works, th
merchants (spongemerch ints of
oursei refused o out 111 their
crafts, sisal dropped to a ver\
low ebb, pr icticailya standstill,
the prices oJ I rod stuff increased
while wages decreased, and
work in genernl'suspended y t
in spile of these facts they deem
to have acted wisely, what a
state of affairs ? Mr Editor I
sometimes used the words,
What a people? What /icountrv?
if. those good Gentlemen only
knew the meaning they would
ihvavs look before leaping. I
aiders! md that 11 E. the (i>\--
nor is endeavouring to obtain
a market for the disposal of the
sponges, I trust God his untiring
efforts may meet with ample
.'i rtSw.
The Board of Works doot
seem to realize their position,
I would suggest that they have
ihe roads and streets in the City
and suburbs which are in a most
deplorablecondition made good,
there by giving the labourer a
chance to see for himself and be
read) to face the e\ il that is
evid' ntlycoming(ie) Starvation
If the Government dont find
work for the masses, thev are
going to have a serious problem
to solve.
Awake I awake MO sleeping
gods, and be 'in your watch ere
the enemy overtake you. He
member the ill fate of Sir Ralph
, St.- -
the Rover and the Inch rape
Rock.
I hanking you for space
allowed.
Yours Trulv
THE BELL.
TERRIBLE
TALE OF BURNING OF
SHIP AT SEA
TOLD BY CREW
Saved from a ship loaded with
Nitrate of Soda which blew up
and sank within twenty minutes
off the island of Snn Salvador,
twenty-four nlheers and seaman
irrived in Miami on the Frances
I1'., thismorning with vivid tales
of their harrowing experience.
Not one of tliem escaped with
mything more than the clothes
he happened to have on at the
Mine the fue was discovered.
The ship was 'he Foxtort Hall
lately of the C. G Dunn Co., of
Liverpool, bill which became
on Sept. 13 an American ship
under the American Steel cor
poration. '1 lus change was made
at Colon. The carg 1 was shipped
it the port of MejiHones, Chile
and the s> ip was billed for New
York The Foxton Hall passed
througti the Panama canal a id
was Steaming north when, a
short distance aff the coast of
San Salvador, on the morning
issuing from the hunkers Wealiz
iog the explosive character of
the cargo and the extreme dan
ger of the situation the captain
ordered all hands below to fight
the lire. .But after only a few
minutes ofdigging coal to per
mit the passage of a hose the
draft of fresh air from the out-
si le lu ni-died the necessarv ox-
ygen, and (he buskers hurst into
one mass of flame and smoke.
Ship Wae Diinni'd
Onlv a wooden partition se-
parated the hunkers from the
nitrate and every sailor knew
instantly that the ship was
doomed.
"To the boats,*- cried the.
captain, and the well trained
ere \ divided, half rushing to the
Btarboard to lower the life boat '
there and the rest to the port side
The heat was already so intense
le iwever that the steel boat on
the starboard could not be hand-i
le I and all hands rushed ba-k to
tin porl side This boat while
h ooileu was aim In it, and even
the hawsers were like heated ca-
bles So h >t that the sailois could
not handle them with bare hand-.
'Cui therop's came the com-
mand from the captain. Knives
swished, and the boat dropped
dike a plummet into the water
One |,\ one the crew jumped
into the boat but the craft bad
become so hot that the men
could not remain in it and every
one dove into the water.
Some of those with presence
of mind realized that it was ne-
cessary at once to get the life-
boat away from the ship if any
were to be saved so although the
boat was still hot asfire.E. Divon
second engineer and four of bis
fellows clambered back into it
and shoved off. So intense was
the beat from the ship that'the
top of Dixon's cap was buried
off during the few minutes, :t
took to move the life boat off.
AH Saved Excepting Two
When we had picked up every
man we could see, we counted
up and found that the chief en-
einr. rand one able seamar were
missing", related Edmund
Mrarks, ihe second officer, this
morning. I b ive never seen
them since, and suppose that
th*ir bodies will never be recov-
ered/'
There were six Germans on
board, all of whom worked un-
der Marks the second engineer,
who is an Englishman. After
all were safely landed on the Is-
land, the) began laying plans to
"do" him before the party reach-
ed New York. It was not long,
however, before the Germans
were placed under arrest and be-
came prisoners of war. They
were left iu the Bahamas.
"I supp ise you were glad that
vou were an Englishman when
y hi saw the officers putting the
1 iermans in jail, were you not ?"
the second officer was asked. He
Straight seed up and answered
proudly, "I am always glad that
I am an Englishman, sir" he
said.
Capt. Stevenson, of the i'.l-
fated ship, the third engineer,
the fourth officer, the steward
ami the cabin boy were left in
the hospital in the Bahamas.all
being severely burned. The
captain was the most seriously V**
injured of all. J
"You cannot imagine what an'
intense heat was created hv the'"
burning nitrate* said Mr Dixon
this morning, "sThe tl mi s w^re
white, and almost on- solid mass.
They mounted, 1 suppose, two or
three hundred feet in the nir.
Within twenty minutes after
the In-I explosion occured, the
flag of th Ship, the last to :'.,
down, disappeared from sight.
The ciew will leave this even-
ing on the s'x o'clock train for
New York. Miami Daily Metro-
/ Us, Oct. 1, 1914.
V*


mmmm
*w
^
mnmm
wmm
now in a swing northward into
Belgium if the initiative remains
with the Allies and the Belgian
field armies join the extreme left
as expected, the campaign in
France will not be materially af-
fected."
The Times' military 'correspon-
dent says that it shows that the
permanent forts in exposed position's
have no chance against modern
artillery, and that with the Ger
mans holding Antwerp and the
Allies attacking it the result will
be same. The Morning Post mili.
laiy expert says the German force
released will probably not be of
great account in the field, though
the} moral effect is unfortunate. The
Chronicle says that strateaically
its possession will not benefit -he
Germans, ;md that the capture was
merely a spectacular success to con-
sole Berlin for the failure to take
Paris.
"The capture of Antwerp in
eleven days carries the germ of the
capture If p,,ris" s=.vs Deutsche
I gesze,tung, according to a des-
patch from Merlin by way of Am-
sterdam to the Reuter Telegram
Company.
"The fall of this fortress" adds the
newspaper "not only means the
overthrow of the Belgians but it is
a most serious How to England.
Itprovesthat it is only necessary
to break down a large section of
ev*j the most extended foitresses
in order to render the remaining
part untenable."
In a despatch from Amsterdam
the correspondent of the Keuter
I elegiam Company says a message
Irom Merlin conveys a report is-
sued from general army headquar-
tws dated October 10 at eleven
*.., that the entire fortress ofAnt-
wtrp including all the forts is m
posession of the Germans. Ibid.
IMPERIAL
THEATRE
WEDNESDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
->. Dser. open 7.50. Performance
\ begin at .I5 p.m.
LOqK!
The following Blank forms
may be had at "TheTribune"
Office.
Duty Entry.
Free Entry.
Warehouse Entries.
Sponging Articles.
Ship's Reports.
hi ijuinfities at Special Rates
C0C0ANUTS
BAHAMA ISLANDS
IT is now possible for owners
of land with fully bearing
trees to prove its value and ob
tain rents.
For further particulars
Apply to
J. THEO. FARRINGTON
Nassau, N. P.
Agent for
Bahamas Product Marketing
Company
139 Copthall House
Cop thai I Avenue
3 Mo. London, E. C.
THE
Cosmopolitan
HIGH SCHOOL
Opens on
Monday, Oct. 5th
in Aurora Hall
on Charlotte Street.
For particulars apply to
Prof. G. G. Coffin, head mas-
ter, or Mr. J. P. Simms.
Mapes Fertilizers
/ now carry in stock the
following formulas:
Pineapple.It has been prov-
en that this has no equal
and a visit to fields using
same will convince you.
Vegetable.Now is the time
to use this and increase I
your yield in Tomatoes,
Potatoes, Onions and all
other vegetables by ioo
per cent.
Orange Tree.To assist the
growth of Young Citrus
Tree.
Fruit and Wine.Increase the
yield and growth of old
Citrus trees.
Eor further information
and books on the use of these
fertilizers, please apply to
WALTER K. MOORE
Agent for Mapes Fertilizer
in the Bahamas.
Notice
WE would call the atten-
tion of our friends in Nas-
sau and on the OUT ISLANDS
to the. following prices on lum-
ber which will go into effect
from to-day.
All ROUGH lumber up to 8 ft.
6/3 per 100. All DRKSSED
lumber up to 8 ft. 8/4 per 100.
All ROUGH and DRESSKD to
16ft. 10/5 per 100. ANYTHING
over 16 ft. 13/6 per 100. labove
up to 8 ins. wide)
These prices are for CASH
absolutely and being WAR
prices are made to help the pub
lij and are subject to change j
without notice
The Bahama* Timber Co. Ltd.I
Kerosene
1502
IN New 50 gallon Galvaniz-
I ed Iron Drums at iSYts
per Gallon.
In 10 gallon Cans at 20cts
per. Gallon.
Drums and Cans returnable
Full particulars at Office
"Frances E.," Nassau N. P.
C. C. SAHNDERS

WILLIAMS THE SHOE-
MaN has just received a
larger assortment of
LADIr S. MifSES and GKNTS
SAMPLE BOOTS a.nd SHOES
in ONE, TWO, AND THREE
pair lots|t
The izesfor ladieVflre limited
to 3J, 4 and 4$
Misses13, 1 and 2
Gents6, 6J and 7
The Shoes having been sold
William*. The Shoemn.r\
at a liberal discount, the princi-
pal disadvantage being the
limited sizes, he is disposing
[ cf them at
; not leaa than 20 percent lees than
the regular prices such
grades would be.
His kind patrons and the eral public will please take
Special Notice
of the above sizes mentioned
and in calling for them will
see for themselves that they
are obtaining Real Bargains
at
Williams' Wholesale and Reta.ll
Shoe Establishment
277, 279 Bay Street (City)
BEST SEE 762
Fresh Onion Seed
FROM TENERIFFE
AND NATIVE SEED CORN
At Toote's, 499 Bay Street.
Gaso-
ine is
Tet. We do not sell it.
BUT we do sell and will,
continue to sell
Standard Oil Co.
Gasoline. lest your Gaso-
line. We invite comparison
with any in the City.
Price 22cts. per gallon in
50 gallon Drums. Customers
using 100 gals, or over per
Month 20c. gallon.
Watch our Notice for Ker-
osene in June.
C. C. SAUNDERS
Johnson's
Artistic Wood
Finishes
Johnson's Prepared Was a com
plete finish and nolish for all furniture
woodwork and floors.
Johnson's Wood Dyefor the artistic
coloring of all wood, soft or liaid
Johnson's Under Lac a M''nt
finish, very much superior tn shellac or
varnish
Johnson's Flat Wood Finish -for a
beautiful, artistic, haud-rubln-d effete
without the sspsnte of rubbinu'.
Johnson's Paste Wood Filler -for
filliiiL' the (Train and pores of wood,
preparing it for the finish.
Johnson's Powdered Wax-for bal
room floors.
FOR SALE BY
Chas. E. Albury
W A. MATHER
UNDERTAKER
DESIRFS to inform his friends
and the Public that 1 e has
just received a complete outfit of
facilities for the buianess of an un-
dertuker, which places him in a
position to carry out Funerals that
may he entrusted to his care with
system anil despatch ; and respect
fully solicits their patronage Gel
my Pi ices first and move that thi'se
are the very lowest for the first el -*
work.
Notice
THIS is to inform my Patrons
and the Public in General
that I have opened my Public
Mack Smith Shop; and am now
j ready to do anything in I e line <>i
General repair or new w rk Horse
, Shoeing Specially. All ork done
Mechanically.
P. A. HUYI.ER.
Bay Kat St. fWharf/
CANE SYBUP
Can be had at T. M. Knowles
at ios. stg. per Tin
GOOD and THICK.
h


\M5SINGr ISSUES


University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2011 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Powered by SobekCM