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-T" Publication began at 5.30 p.m. Zhe Grfbune Saturday. October 17, 1914. The news of the war as it comes to us, does not give material upon which to hase any clear conception of the situation, we read that the Allies have driven the enemy hack at a certain place and immediately after, we Irani that the Allies have heen repulsed ;it the same place. To-day is no exception to this general condition of affairs. We learn that the Allieshave driven the Germans in full flight in two battles near Arras; this is Undoubtedly encourag ing, and so are most of the re ports received to day except the loss of H. M.S. "Hawk" which is decidedly depressing. We can only hope that the news that reaches us tomorrow may be on the same lines. The Annual inspection of the Nassau Branch of the Royal Hank of Canada is being made by Mr. S. R. Noble from the Head Office. —:o: — The Schr. -'Admiral" arrived from Miami on Thursday with a cargo of lumber and one passenger.— Mr. Wilfred Sturrup. :o: — The Schooner "Winifred M" arrived on Fridav from Miami with a cargo of Shingles etc. and passengers as follows.— Mesdames Georgians Coumberbatch, and Savalita Harvey; Messrs Alexander Rahming, Daniel Edgecornbe, Ezekiel Forbes, and Henrv Russell; Master A1 bury Coumberbatch (7) —:o:— The Motor "Frances K arrived soon after one o'clock this afternoon. • -:o:— The following were passengers per "Frances E" this after noon.— Messrs Thad Monro, Milton Mingo, Alpheus Taylor, VV. L. JMcPhee, Thomas Dorsett, Da* vie,, Ma lone and David Solomon (7) -:o:— The Mail Steamer "Seguran ca" sailed from New York for Nassau at 4 p.m. yesterday with 37 passengers and 4,700 bbls cargo. The attention of our readers is called to the great attraction now running at the Imperial, and which will be seen thereto night. Professor "Vitreo" the wonderful. Latest War News RADIOGRAMS OFFICIAL October 17th 1914. London ibth, Governor, Bahamas. October 16th, following from Press Bureau; II. M. S. Ehesus was unsuccessfully attacked by submarines in the Northern waters of the North Sea yesterday afternoon. II. M. S. Hawk, cruiser built in 188'j, Was attacked and sunk, (signed) HARCOURT. Special to the Na$$au Guardian The Allies have driven the Germans in full Sight in two violent battles near Arras, in dieting heavy losses. The French are advancing in Lorraine and are neariug the German fortress of Met/. The Russians have repulsed the Germans at Warsaw. It 's reported that Ostend is occupied b} the Germans. The British cruiser Hawke, built in 1889 has been sunk by a German submarine in the North Sea. OOVBRNMBVT I'HKSS October 171I1 1911. The attempt of the Russians to occupy Lych, In East Prussia lias failed and they lost their artillery and eight hundred men The British labour party has declared its sympathy with the government in the present war. The Wireless station at Mono lulu will be closed bv the gi ivern ment because it reported the arrival <>f the German cruiser < %  .-i set unless a satisfactory expla nation is given. Premier Salandro has lieen appointed temporarily to the portfolio of Minister of Foreign \ffairsof Italy succeed ing the Marqui* de SanGiulanin. flu.' death of the minister will not change Italys determination to remain neutral. The left wing of the Allies continues valorously active and holds its own ground everywhere and gains at some points. The Allies have occupied Laventie east of Lstaires towards Lille. The Germans made an uusuc cessful attack on Verdun. The Queen of Belgium is reported to be with the King at army headquarters, It is reported that the Getmans have occupied Ostend. Flanking movement of the battle of France is considered impossible and that to win one must break through the lines of the other. The Germans are reported to have retrieved the Austrian defeats in Galicia. Estimates places the number of men in Russian and German battles at live millions. The British cruiser llawke was sunk by a sajbmarine Friday few of the crew of 400 were saved The German attempt to turn the flank of the Allies has been unsuccessful. li it reported thai the Germans have evacuated I.die. Servians and Montenegran* ded the tattrians at I rUoanilz. 111American Red -rot* has heen enthusiastically received .11 Vienna, Congress adjournment it Wash ington next week is practically assured. The war tax bill and amend ments will be voted nn Tuesday. An armistice has b en agreed upon at Aguas Calieittas con ference, (lener il Villa will oh sen e the armistice but will de feud the town il attacked. — :o:— BAHAMAS WAK KEMF.F FUND The following subscriptions have been received Amount previously acknowledged £24 8j 10 (, w,ill,u e Thompson ^ n 0 The Victoria School 1 0 0 Total £"3486 10 eva Miller Sarduts Forbes R, B. Cancino Ellen Mi 1 < %  < %  Chat. Hall Isaac Miller Annie Deveaux Thos, I >ev aux Mary A. I 'eveaux John F. Smith Augusta Foil,', s Arthur Sweeting Richard Miller Isaac M I 1 %  Uriah Ash Joseph Ash Romulus Rahming W"m. Miller Isaiah Kwrbi s Ishmael McFee Cornelius Rolle Wilfred Blown Andrew Forb S Rosanna Rolle bvlvanus Rodgers Win Fofbes Emerita Forbes John I'L'e 'inbe (ieorgiana McFee (Hive Rahming Catherine Rahming Savelita I Unison Nathl. Rahming Andrew Mill 1 Gerald Korbes Rosabella Saunders Jacob Stiai hat] Maria HiggS Levi Rahming Lena lb gs Celesl ina Rahming Leviticub Uahming Albert l.i Maria lb Isadora Rahming Enoch Rahming Moses I llggS Rhoda Higgk I Ian n it I liggfl Ophelia HiggS Leonora Rahming Ida McFee i I i/,ill Rahming Caroline Rahming Mary Barueit Geo. Mi Fee Dorothy I aylor Emei ita Forbes Jas. (iibsoi, Charlotte Rahming Emanuel Rahming VV'ui. Smith I lieo. Knowles Walti 1 Rahming Alfred Mi I 1 1 Agnes Rodgers Richd. Rodgers 1 Henry Rahming V o 1 2 1 o I I I I 4 1 3 i 2 l 2 2 2 I I I I 4 •4 2 3 3 3 I O O o o 6 o o o I) 6 0 6 o 0 0 o o o o I 6 0 0 G o %  o o o 2 o 3 3 3 o o o a 9 9 3 o 6 o o o 6 o 6 (> o o 0 (. 6 6 3 6 6 o 6 o o o 0 o o o 6 3 o 0



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Edward L. Higgs Martha Kdgecombe Uriali A. Rahmiog Frances ForMs Natlil. FcJW 1 Marion Ixf^ecombe Jestina W'hitfield Charlotte McFee Mary I )c\ eaux Simeon Rolle Jacob K'-.llo Isaac Rolle Lilian I", i In s Jas. Evans Sand. Rahmmg Prince Rabming Timotheus Rahming Caroline Rodgers Carried Forward 8 i i l'o be continued^ I o 6 6 I 0 4i 3 4 o 6 6 l o i i 3 4 o i 0 6 6 3 8 I oj War Notes THE WAR IN EUROPE. A CRITIQUE. Bv o.n Amerlcsn Military Officer That the (ierman General Staff has exhausted its available re Sources in the matter of lighting units in Northern France and hi. already commenced the with drawal ol %  substantial force from the aruiv of m cupa'.ion in Belgium i|^ apparent. Coupled will the report from Antwerp of a relaxation in the investing op rations before tlm be I lairur ed garrison is the receipt ol in formation that General von Kluck's extreme right Bank has manifested considerable nctivit) l and north of l.illc. The insistent growth of the Allies battle line to die north waul is in fullilm nit ol a two T >ld purpose. Should the Franco British I ien< raj Staff concentrate a sufficient force across the Bel gini frontier and compel further reinforcement of the attenuated ii nnan battle linr, the tmmedi ate objective will have been at tained, for the Stripping of the forces in Belgium will necessi t.ite tinraising b) the Germans of the siege of Antwerp. The success of the Allie's flank in;: movement will depend upon whether they will be able to direct an overwhi Iming attack Upon the German line north of tin Belgian frontier, for in France the line appears al rtres en to IJ&KO sirongiv reiafou eil as not oflf" t p M-t effective as sanlt but uffer a dangerous lb n SIM'. The report tha't General von Moltkehas been superseded as chief of the German General • Staff indicates dissatisfaction on the part of the Kaiser with the manner in which the campaign in the western theatre of operations is being* carried out, military experts agreeing that the field craft of General von Kluck is unimpugnable. From this viewpoint, where we are better informed concerning the allied aimy than that <>f the Germans, tbegravity of such an experiment can be better appreciated by consideration of what would be the effect at this lime of the reduction of General %  rbffrefrom supreme command, I I lowever, such a change as that j icported in the bead of the German General Staff at a critical period is by no means unprece dented and has not always proved dangerous. While developments on the extreme left of the Allies are taking shape rapidly in the appea i a nee of a formidable f< 'ice of I ri i.nan cavalry along the Nel gian frontier north of Lille and an apparent effort on the part of General von Kluck to outmanoeuvre the enveloping force, <" cuts of linpoi tance are being reported from the eastern theatre ofoperations. Notw ithstanding the reiterated statement from Berlin that the Gerrqan arms won a victory over the Russians at Augustowo, the explicit account of the actioiiifioin I'etrograd permits of little doubt coc c i ting the result. The German forces appear to have suffered de cisivc defeat and reoccupatinn of East< i 'i Prussia by Russ > troops is imminent. To the s mth little is known of the (iei man operations in Russian Poland and what for. es Russia inthere in opposition. In (ralicia the Russian forceis being concentrated in the din ( til HI of O.ii .w. and is now in toe v icinity of Tnrnow which is fifty miles from that city. The left flank of this army, which has dealt Btaggi I ing blows at the flower ol tie Austrian field forces, has penetrated the Carpathian range into Iluugary. Invasion of Hungary, however is not believed t'• ii \. any part HI the Russian scheme ol cam paign, the objective being d< feat of (he Vustro German force before Cracow, and invasion ol (iei in any from that direction. •\ itii the Russian army vietoi jous HI Cracow, the plight of the German amis would be come giaVfl indeed, for in order I to prevent a dashing advance upon Berlin, )t would be necessary for the Kaiser to concentrate a for*e of great strength in sou them Silesia, and make a stand at Breslau. This would force a gen eral retirement in the West, since to present a strong front to the Russians, it would be necessary to weaken the western line by the withdrawal of several army corps. — \'ew York Herald Oct. 7, 1914. "Not only has the war overcrowded the membership of the Ananias club but the waiting list is all ready a mile long and still growing." "Russia will confer a great favor if she will change some of those other names," Editor Tribune, You ought to have been commended ere this for your editorial of the 3rd iust, in legard to the fit view expressed about the £10,000 appropriated by the I louse ol Assembly I r the War Relief Fund in the face of our present status and what has al read) been voluntarily contributed. As there seems to be a certain secrecy as to who voted for and against this Grant, would it not be fair Mr. Editor for the various constituencies to know exactly how their representatives voted in this very important matter? Is it bet ause when the war is ovi r "Ilonours" will meted out in the. way of "Sirs"? If so will this help our poor Colon; an) I Are our legislators (most!) business men) blind to the vital fact of the serious predicament this colony 11 laced in on account of the War? With all our Exports at a comparative stand -still, a possi ble financial stringency staring us in the face and most Govern nient Work closed down would it not have been more of an imperative benefit to our present idling working class of people if £5.000 of the £10,000 had been appropriated 10 repair our streets and do other necessary Public Work, thereby relieving people wdio are now actually in distress '' Thosi Legislators n ho v< >ted foi a £,.000 donation, did DO less iii HI their bounden duty \n the Mother country, but did those who voted*for the 1 1 0,000 ever estimate our condition on account of sentiment? If so, ( with my know ledge of the situaj tion, those, Hon. members ; will realize in the very near fu1 ture our true condition, then who can vvc look to for relief, will it be our Treasury? Or will we all, ere long, have to travel the Road to Miami? Is it true that certain menbers of the House of Assembly, were aware, when they voted for the £i0,000 grant, of distress petitions having been sent to the Government for "Relief"? COMMON SENSE. NOTICE T HE Annual General Meeting ol the Shareholders of the Bahamas Building Loan and Improvement Company Limited will be held at the Company's Ofiice on Bay Street on I'hursday the 29th inst.at 8 p.m. ERIC V. SOLOMON Secretary Kerosene 150^ I N New 50 gallon Galvanized Iron I Mums at l8cts per Gallon. In id gallon Cans at aoctfl per. Gallon. Drums and Cans returnable Full pat ticulars at Office "Frances K.," Nassau N. P. C. C. SAT'NDERS COCOANUTS BAHAMA ISLANDS I f* is now possible lor owners of land with fully bearing trees to prove its value and ob tain rents. For furthei particulars Apply to I THEO. FARRINGTON Nassau, N. P. A gent#01 Bahamas Produce Marketing Company 13'J Coplhall nouu ('. pih ,11 Avenue .>' Mn. I <" '"', B. C. For Result Advertise in The Tribune ^db



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To leave the steamship through the winter at Bar Harbor, where the ice would almost inevitably destroy her, would make the United States liable, possibly, to her Ger man owners and would rob the American bankers of their security. It is desired, therefore, to take her to Boston or New York. That would mean a trip around Cape Ann or Cape Cod. and there a big vessel like the Cecilie must go ogt beyond three mile limit. But the State Department does not believe that Great Britain, with the conciliatory spirit she has shown thus far would attempt to make a question out of the passage of this vessel down the coast even if for some miles she did enter the high sens. The Navy Department will lend a collier to tow the Cecilie and possibly a battle ship to guard her. With these precautions and perhaps a word spoken to r the IWitish authorities in advance it is hoped to avoid the curious technicalities which might arise.— Ibid. WAD! P6b YHin B.V D. %  sgEggggsa jSBL Sanitary Cool Reliable Sold by IMPERIAL THEATRE Friday and Saturday Nights The World Famous Professor VETHEO "The Human Ostrich" This wonderful human being will sit down to a most extraordinary and indigestible dinner of Charcoal, Oyster shells, kid gloves, clay pipes land will drink Parafine. [in addition to.this the Projfessor will perform his great "Dance of the Glasses" He will dance barefooted amongst the brokenup pieces of over two hundred glass bottles. Also Two excellent Pictures will be shown The Installment Marriage His Romantic Wife and Cotton Time in Arkansas Prices as usual Commences at 8.15 THE Cosmopolitan H1QH SCHOOL Opens on Monday, Oct. 5th in Aurora Hall on Charlotte Street. For particulars apply to Prof. G. G. Coffin, head master, or Mr. J. P. Simms. Fruit of the Loom 36 in. at "]\ per yard. IMPERIAL THEATRE I WEDNESDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY Door* open 730. Performance begin at S.I5 p.m. I Notice T HI> is to inform my Patrons and the Public in Genei il tli*t I h.ive OpTMd my Pyhlil Black Smith Shop; RIM] am now reaiey to do anythine in I •• line ,>| Genera' repair or new v\ rk Horse Shoeing Specially. All ork done Mechanically. P. \. IM'YI.ER. Bdjr I'.ast St.(Wharf; Notice W E would call the attention of our frienrls in Nassau and on the OUT ISLANDS to the following prices on lumber which will go into effect from to-day. All ROUGH lumber up to 8 ft, 6/3 per IOO. All DRESSED lumber up to 8 ft. 8/4 per 100. All ROUGH and DRESSED to 16ft. io/ per too. ANYTHING over 16 ft. 12/6 per 100. labove up to 8 ins. wide) These prices 'are for CASH absolutely and being WAR prices are made to help the public and are subject to change without notice The Bahama* Timber Co. Ltd. East Bay i^t. Fresh Onion Seed FROM TENER1FFE AND NATIVE SEED CORN At Toote's, 4<)9 Bay Street Mapes Fertilizers / now carry in stock the following formulas: Pineapple.— It has been proven that this has no equal and a visit to fields using same will convince you. Vegetable. —Now is the time to use this •and increase your yield in Tomatoes, Potatoes, Onions and all other vegetables by 100 per cent. Orange Tree.—To assist the growth of Young Citrus Tree. Fruit and Wine.—Increase the yield and growth of old Citrus trees. For further information and books ton the use of these fertilizers, please apply to WALTER K. MOORE A^ent for Mapes Fertilizer in the lUthnmns. Johnson's Artistic Wood • Finishes Johnson's Prepared Ww-a com plete finith and imli-.li lor all furniture Woodwork %  ">>ut I'ljhi • th that' i\ l* entrusted to hisCNi* with system ami despntcli; and lespect fully solicits theii patronage Get my Prices first and pmve that these are the very lowest lor the first class work. *__



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%  (0 0) o si V) 0) CO & eft 0) Nulliua .ddiciti lurare In verb* maglatri. Blr\g bound to swear to the Dogmas >t no MMIW, VOL.X. Nkiiau, N. P.. B&hamM, Saturday. October 17.1914 No. 244 L. GILBERT DUPUCH, Editor inJ Proprietor. OFFICE: 38-44 MAKKET 8TKKET Nassau, N. P., Bahamas "PHONE 2fi0. P. O. BOX Iftt. PUBLISHED DAILY Monday, Wednesday and Friday— single copy Jd Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday— single copy td Weekly 4i'< Monthly i s. 4d ()ii.ntiily ... ... 4s. HalfYearly H s. Yearly 1 6s. PAYABLE IN ADVANCE Advertising Rates :—Six pence per line t for first insertion; three pence per line for second insertion ; ai.d one penny per line for subsqueut insertions. Advertisements under eight lines js. GERMAN WARCRAFT, PURSUED. AVOIDS BATTLE OFF SANTIAGO. The refusal of the Commander of die German cruiser Karlsruhe to engage a British cruiser which chased him for many mile*prevent ed another sea battle olf Santiago wheie the America i squadron an nihilated tlie Spanish fleet in 1898. The story of the pursuit of the German craft related yesterday by Captuin Anderson, of the Norwegian fruit steamship Katie, fiom Baracoa. The chase of the Karlsruhe by the British cruiser, the identity of which was not learned, was witnessed from the decks of numerous vessels off the south coast of Cuba. Captain Anderson said the British vessel showed the greater speed and gaining rapidly on the Karlsruhe when the German Commander, at the risk of running aground, headed in behind a small island where the neutral waters made him safe, from alt.irk. "The Kailsruhe was tinAnt of the cruisers la lie observed as she neared Santiago at top speed, smoke belching from her funnels and her bow cutting such a clean sweep through the water that the spray seemed to go completely over her bridge" said Captain Anderson. The British cruiser came along a little later and passing close inshore, was seen to be % stripped for action. She, too, was leaving a cloud of dense black smoke in her wake, and in the gathering dusk seemed to be rapidly bearing down on the Karlsruhe. The German cruiser was easily identified, as she had become a familiar object in West Indian waters, bat nobody seemed to be able to identify her pursuer. "With the British cruiser coming within gun range and evidently making ready to open up her batteries, the German commander headed straight for the coast, disregarding the danger he was facing from hidden rocks and by a superb feat of navigation managed to reach shelter behind a small island which was well within the bounds of neutral witeis. It already had begun to grow dark, and his movements were hidden Irom the British cruiser, which is said to have hove to outside the three mile limit, expecting to catch the quarry when she came out. "No engagement was reported the next morning, and I can only surmise that the Karlsruhe succeeded in slipping away under the cover of darkness, which was easy enough so fat as eluding a hostile ship concerned, but exceedingly difficult in view of the care which the captain WHS compelled to exercise in navigating his vessel through the treacherous reaches leading to the open sea."* It was reported at Baracoa that the Karlsruhe had been surprised while in the act of taking coal from a merchantman, said Captain Anderson, but he knew nothing personally about this report. He said however, that it probably was true and that it was his belief that the British cruiser had allowed the merchantman to escape in an attempt to force the Karlsruhe to fight. The depredations of the Karlsruhe and other Geiman vat vessels on British shipping in Wesi Indian and South American waters, lv said, have ben much greater lb.111 reported here, and so long as they are able toiontinue this work it is improbable that the Kaiser's craft will fight if they can help it. On his arrival hers Captain Anderson reported to Dudley Field Malone, Collector of the port, that he had been ordered to stop by a British converted cruiser while he was within a mile o! the New Jersey shore.but that he was not moles ted when he ran up the Norwegian flag. The Katie had reached a point about half way between the Long Branch buoy and Ambrose Channel Lightship when the British vessel, which Captain Anderson thought was the Caronia, formerly of the Cunard line, appeared through the dusk about a mile away and fired a blank shot. The Katie did not stop.but ran up the Norwegian Hag whereupon the war vessel turned around and headed out to sea. — The New York Herald Oct. 7, 1914. THE KRONPRINZESSIN CECILIE PRESENTS A WAR PROBLEM A problem has risen for the I'nited States government over finding winter quarters for the North German Lloyd line steamship Kronprinzessin Cecilie now held at Bar Harbor, Me., under a United States court libel and guarded by the revenue cutter Mohawk and a torpedo boat. Just ofl the coast British commerce destioyersare lurking, ready at the first opportunity to dispose of the German steamship. 80 long as the Cecilie remains within the American three mile line she is immune frorr attack, but, unfortunately, it is found that to convey her tc a suitable winter berth she must pass out beyond the three mile limit. The I'nited States has a vtjry material interest in the vessel because of the claim filed against her bv a New York bank. As she has bean seized by a United States marshal under order of a United States court, the Cecilie is leally United Slates government properly for the lime being under American law. Hut there would be no necessity foi the British to recognise this peculiar status on the high saat. There she would be a German merchantman, liable to attack. Continued r.n fnnrth page)


The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02286
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Saturday, October 17, 1914
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02286

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Nulliua .ddiciti lurare In verb* maglatri.
Blr\g bound to swear to the Dogmas >t no Mmiw,
VOL.X.
Nkiiau, N. P.. B&hamM, Saturday. October 17.1914
No. 244
L. GILBERT DUPUCH,
Editor inJ Proprietor.
OFFICE: 38-44 MAKKET 8TKKET
Nassau, N. P., Bahamas
"PHONE 2fi0. P. O. BOX Iftt.
*
PUBLISHED DAILY
Monday, Wednesday and Friday
single copy ......... Jd
Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday
single copy ......... td
Weekly ............ 4i'<
Monthly ............is. 4d
()ii.ntiily ... ..... ... 4s.
HalfYearly............Hs.
Yearly ............16s.
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
Advertising Rates :Six pence per line
tfor first insertion; three pence per line
for second insertion ; ai.d one penny per
line for subsqueut insertions.
Advertisements under eight lines js.
GERMAN WARCRAFT,
PURSUED. AVOIDS BATTLE
OFF SANTIAGO.
The refusal of the Commander
of die German cruiser Karlsruhe to
engage a British cruiser which
chased him for many mile*prevent
ed another sea battle olf Santiago
wheie the America i squadron an
nihilated tlie Spanish fleet in 1898.
The story of the pursuit of the
German craft related yesterday by
Captuin Anderson, of the Norwe-
gian fruit steamship Katie, fiom
Baracoa.
The chase of the Karlsruhe by
the British cruiser, the identity of
which was not learned, was wit-
nessed from the decks of numerous
vessels off the south coast of Cuba.
Captain Anderson said the British
vessel showed the greater speed and
gaining rapidly on the Karlsruhe
when the German Commander, at
the risk of running aground, head-
ed in behind a small island where
the neutral waters made him safe,
from alt.irk.
"The Kailsruhe was tin- Ant of
the cruisers la lie observed as she
neared Santiago at top speed,
smoke belching from her funnels
and her bow cutting such a clean
sweep through the water that the
spray seemed to go completely
over her bridge" said Captain
Anderson.
" The British cruiser came along
a little later and passing close in-
shore, was seen to be%stripped for
action. She, too, was leaving a
cloud of dense black smoke in her
wake, and in the gathering dusk
seemed to be rapidly bearing down
on the Karlsruhe. The German
cruiser was easily identified, as she
had become a familiar object in
West Indian waters, bat nobody
seemed to be able to identify her
pursuer.
"With the British cruiser com-
ing within gun range and evident-
ly making ready to open up her
batteries, the German commander
headed straight for the coast, disre-
garding the danger he was facing
from hidden rocks and by a superb
feat of navigation managed to
reach shelter behind a small island
which was well within the bounds
of neutral witeis. It already had
begun to grow dark, and his move-
ments were hidden Irom the Bri-
tish cruiser, which is said to have
hove to outside the three mile lim-
it, expecting to catch the quarry
when she came out.
"No engagement was reported
the next morning, and I can only
surmise that the Karlsruhe succeed-
ed in slipping away under the
cover of darkness, which was easy
enough so fat as eluding a hostile
ship concerned, but exceedingly
difficult in view of the care which
the captain WHS compelled to exer-
cise in navigating his vessel
through the treacherous reaches
leading to the open sea."*
It was reported at Baracoa that
the Karlsruhe had been surprised
while in the act of taking coal
from a merchantman, said Captain
Anderson, but he knew nothing
personally about this report. He
said however, that it probably was
true and that it was his belief that
the British cruiser had allowed the
merchantman to escape in an at-
tempt to force the Karlsruhe to
fight. The depredations of the
Karlsruhe and other Geiman vat
vessels on British shipping in Wesi
Indian and South American waters,
lv said, have ben much greater
lb.111 reported here, and so long as
they are able toiontinue this work
it is improbable that the Kaiser's
craft will fight if they can help it.
On his arrival hers Captain An-
derson reported to Dudley Field
Malone, Collector of the port, that
he had been ordered to stop by a
British converted cruiser while he
was within a mile o! the New Jer-
sey shore.but that he was not moles
ted when he ran up the Norwegian
flag.
The Katie had reached a point
about half way between the Long
Branch buoy and Ambrose Channel
Lightship when the British vessel,
which Captain Anderson thought
was the Caronia, formerly of the
Cunard line, appeared through the
dusk about a mile away and fired
a blank shot. The Katie did not
stop.but ran up the Norwegian Hag
whereupon the war vessel turned
around and headed out to sea.
The New York Herald
Oct. 7, 1914.
THE
KRONPRINZESSIN CECILIE
PRESENTS
A WAR PROBLEM
A problem has risen for the
I'nited States government over
finding winter quarters for the
North German Lloyd line steam-
ship Kronprinzessin Cecilie now
held at Bar Harbor, Me., under a
United States court libel and guard-
ed by the revenue cutter Mohawk
and a torpedo boat.
Just ofl the coast British com-
merce destioyersare lurking, ready
at the first opportunity to dispose
of the German steamship. 80 long
as the Cecilie remains within the
American three mile line she is
immune frorr attack, but, unfortu-
nately, it is found that to convey
her tc a suitable winter berth she
must pass out beyond the three
mile limit.
The I'nited States has a vtjry
material interest in the vessel be-
cause of the claim filed against
her bv a New York bank. As she
has bean seized by a United States
marshal under order of a United
States court, the Cecilie is leally
United Slates government properly
for the lime being under American
law. Hut there would be no neces-
sity foi the British to recognise
this peculiar status on the high
saat. There she would be a German
merchantman, liable to attack.
Continued r.n fnnrth page)


-T"
Publication began at 5.30 p.m.
Zhe Grfbune
Saturday. October 17, 1914.
The news of the war as it
comes to us, does not give ma-
terial upon which to hase any
clear conception of the situation,
we read that the Allies have
driven the enemy hack at a
certain place and immediately
after, we Irani that the Allies
have heen repulsed ;it the same
place.
To-day is no exception to
this general condition of af-
fairs. We learn that the Allies-
have driven the Germans in full
flight in two battles near Arras;
this is Undoubtedly encourag
ing, and so are most of the re
ports received to day except the
loss of H. M.S. "Hawk" which
is decidedly depressing.
We can only hope that the
news that reaches us tomorrow
may be on the same lines.
The Annual inspection of the
Nassau Branch of the Royal
Hank of Canada is being made
by Mr. S. R. Noble from the
Head Office.
:o:
The Schr. -'Admiral" arrived
from Miami on Thursday with
a cargo of lumber and one
passenger.
Mr. Wilfred Sturrup.
- :o:
The Schooner "Winifred M"
arrived on Fridav from Miami
with a cargo of Shingles etc.
and passengers as follows.
Mesdames Georgians Coumber-
batch, and Savalita Harvey;
Messrs Alexander Rahming,
Daniel Edgecornbe, Ezekiel
Forbes, and Henrv Russell;
Master A1 bury Coumberbatch
(7)
:o:
The Motor "Frances K ar-
rived soon after one o'clock this
afternoon.
-:o:
The following were passen-
gers per "Frances E" this after
noon.
Messrs Thad Monro, Milton
Mingo, Alpheus Taylor, VV. L.
JMcPhee, Thomas Dorsett, Da*
vie,, Ma lone and David Solomon
(7)
-:o:
The Mail Steamer "Seguran
ca" sailed from New York for
Nassau at 4 p.m. yesterday with
37 passengers and 4,700 bbls
cargo.
The attention of our readers
is called to the great attraction
now running at the Imperial,
and which will be seen thereto
night.
Professor "Vitreo" the wonder-
ful.
Latest War News
RADIOGRAMS
OFFICIAL
October 17th 1914.
London ibth,
Governor,
Bahamas.
October 16th, following from
Press Bureau; II. M. S. Ehesus
was unsuccessfully attacked by
submarines in the Northern
waters of the North Sea yester-
day afternoon.
II. M. S. Hawk, cruiser built
in 188'j, Was attacked and sunk,
(signed)
HARCOURT.
Special to the Na$$au Guardian
The Allies have driven the
Germans in full Sight in two
violent battles near Arras, in
dieting heavy losses.
The French are advancing in
Lorraine and are neariug the
German fortress of Met/.
The Russians have repulsed
the Germans at Warsaw.
It 's reported that Ostend is
occupied b} the Germans.
The British cruiser Hawke,
built in 1889 has been sunk by
a German submarine in the
North Sea.
OOVBRNMBVT I'HKSS
October 171I1 1911.
The attempt of the Russians
to occupy Lych, In East Prussia
lias failed and they lost their
artillery and eight hundred men
The British labour party has
declared its sympathy with the
government in the present war.
The Wireless station at Mono
lulu will be closed bv the gi ivern
ment because it reported the ar-
rival <>f the German cruiser < .-i
set unless a satisfactory expla
nation is given.
Premier Salandro has lieen
appointed temporarily to the
portfolio of Minister of
Foreign \ffairsof Italy succeed
ing the Marqui* de SanGiulanin.
flu.' death of the minister will
not change Italys determination
to remain neutral.
The left wing of the Allies
continues valorously active and
holds its own ground every-
where and gains at some points.
The Allies have occupied La-
ventie east of Lstaires towards
Lille.
The Germans made an uusuc
cessful attack on Verdun.
The Queen of Belgium is re-
ported to be with the King at
army headquarters,
It is reported that the Get-
mans have occupied Ostend.
Flanking movement of the
battle of France is considered
impossible and that to win one
must break through the lines of
the other.
The Germans are reported to
have retrieved the Austrian de-
feats in Galicia.
Estimates places the number
of men in Russian and German
battles at live millions.
The British cruiser llawke
was sunk by a sajbmarine Fri-
day few of the crew of 400 were
saved
The German attempt to turn
the flank of the Allies has been
unsuccessful.
li it reported thai the Germans
have evacuated I.die.
Servians and Montenegran* de-
d the tattrians at I rUoanilz.
111- American Red -rot* has
heen enthusiastically received .11
Vienna,
Congress adjournment it Wash
ington next week is practically
assured.
The war tax bill and amend
ments will be voted nn Tuesday.
An armistice has b en agreed
upon at Aguas Calieittas con
ference, (lener il Villa will oh
sen e the armistice but will de
feud the town il attacked.
:o:
BAHAMAS
WAK KEMF.F FUND
The following subscriptions
have been received
Amount previously acknow-
ledged 24 8j 10 (,
w,ill,u e Thompson ^ n 0
The Victoria School 1 0 0
Total "3486 10 DISTRICT OF
MANGROVE CAY
ISLAND OF ANDR.OS
Contributions in kid of the War
Relief Fund
KEMP'S BAY.
Leonora Deveaux
William Wallace
M's. ]nstma Ctialb)
Theof. II. W'lntiield
Augusta Miller
Philip Coalby
3 0
3 0
S 0
1 0
6
4 0
Levinia Davis
Isadora Forbes
Henry Edgecomh
Matilda A. Forbes
Anthony Smith
S> eva Miller
Sarduts Forbes
R, B. Cancino
Ellen Mi 1 <<
Chat. Hall
Isaac Miller
Annie Deveaux
Thos, I >ev aux
Mary A. I 'eveaux
John F. Smith
Augusta Foil,', s
Arthur Sweeting
Richard Miller
Isaac M I 1
Uriah Ash
Joseph Ash
Romulus Rahming
W"m. Miller
Isaiah Kwrbi s
Ishmael McFee
Cornelius Rolle
Wilfred Blown
Andrew Forb S
Rosanna Rolle
bvlvanus Rodgers
Win Fofbes
Emerita Forbes
John I'L'e 'inbe
(ieorgiana McFee
(Hive Rahming
Catherine Rahming
Savelita I Unison
Nathl. Rahming
Andrew Mill 1
Gerald Korbes
Rosabella Saunders
Jacob Stiai hat]
Maria HiggS
Levi Rahming
Lena lb gs
Celesl ina Rahming
Leviticub Uahming
Albert l.i
Maria lb
Isadora Rahming
Enoch Rahming
Moses I llggS
Rhoda Higgk
I Ian n it I liggfl
Ophelia HiggS
Leonora Rahming
Ida McFee
i I i/,ill Rahming
Caroline Rahming
Mary Barueit
Geo. Mi Fee
Dorothy I aylor
Emei ita Forbes
Jas. (iibsoi,
Charlotte Rahming
Emanuel Rahming
VV'ui. Smith
I lieo. Knowles
Walti 1 Rahming
Alfred Mi I 11
Agnes Rodgers
Richd. Rodgers
1 Henry Rahming
V
*
o
1
2
1
o
I
I
I
I
4
1
3
i
2
l
2
2
2
I
I
I
I
4
4
2
3
3
3
I
O
O
o
o
6
o
o
o
I)
6
0
6
o
0
0
o
o
o
o
I
6
0
0
G
o
o
o
o
2
o
3
3
3
o
o
o
a
9
9
3
o
6
o
o
o
6
o
6
(>
o
o
"
0
(.
6
6
3
6
6
o
6
o
o
o
0
o
o
o
6
3
o
0


Edward L. Higgs
Martha Kdgecombe
Uriali A. Rahmiog
Frances ForMs
Natlil. FcJW1
Marion Ixf^ecombe
Jestina W'hitfield
Charlotte McFee
Mary I )c\ eaux
Simeon Rolle
Jacob K'-.llo
Isaac Rolle
Lilian I", i In s
Jas. Evans
Sand. Rahmmg
Prince Rabming
Timotheus Rahming
Caroline Rodgers
Carried Forward 8 i
i l'o be continued^
I o
6
6
I 0
4i
3
4 o 6
6
l o
i
i
3
4 o
i 0
6
6
3
8 I oj
War Notes
THE WAR IN EUROPE.
A CRITIQUE.
Bv o.n Amerlcsn Military Officer
That the (ierman General Staff
* has exhausted its available re
Sources in the matter of lighting
units in Northern France and
hi. already commenced the with
drawal ol substantial force
from the aruiv of m cupa'.ion in
Belgium i|^ apparent. Coupled
will the report from Antwerp of
a relaxation in the investing
op rations before tlm be I lairur
. ed garrison is the receipt ol in
formation that General von
Kluck's extreme right Bank has
manifested considerable nctivit)
l and north of l.illc.
The insistent growth of the
Allies battle line to die north
waul is in fullilm nit ol a two
T >ld purpose. Should the Franco
British I ien< raj Staff concentrate
a sufficient force across the Bel
gini frontier and compel further
reinforcement of the attenuated
ii nnan battle linr, the tmmedi
ate objective will have been at
tained, for the Stripping of the
forces in Belgium will necessi
t.ite tin- raising b) the Germans
of the siege of Antwerp.
The success of the Allie's flank
in;: movement will depend upon
whether they will be able to di-
rect an overwhi Iming attack
Upon the German line north of
tin Belgian frontier, for in
France the line appears al rtres
en to Ij&ko sirongiv reiafou eil
as not oflf" t p M-t effective as
sanlt but uffer a dangerous lb n
SIM'.
The report tha't General von
Moltkehas been superseded as
chief of the German General
Staff indicates dissatisfaction on
the part of the Kaiser with the
manner in which the campaign
in the western theatre of opera-
tions is being* carried out, mili-
tary experts agreeing that the
field craft of General von Kluck
is unimpugnable.
From this viewpoint, where
we are better informed concern-
ing the allied aimy than that <>f
the Germans, tbegravity of such
an experiment can be better
appreciated by consideration of
what would be the effect at this
lime of the reduction of General
rbffrefrom supreme command, I
I lowever, such a change as that j
icported in the bead of the Ger-
man General Staff at a critical
period is by no means unprece
dented and has not always
proved dangerous.
While developments on the
extreme left of the Allies are
taking shape rapidly in the ap-
pea i a nee of a formidable f< 'ice of
I ri i.nan cavalry along the Nel
gian frontier north of Lille and
an apparent effort on the part of
General von Kluck to outma-
noeuvre the enveloping force,
<" cuts of linpoi tance are being
reported from the eastern theatre
ofoperations. Notw ithstanding
the reiterated statement from
Berlin that the Gerrqan arms
won a victory over the Russians
at Augustowo, the explicit ac-
count of the actioiiifioin I'etro-
grad permits of little doubt coc
c i ting the result. The German
forces appear to have suffered de
cisivc defeat and reoccupatinn of
East< i 'i Prussia by Russ >
troops is imminent.
To the s mth little is known
of the (iei man operations in
Russian Poland and what for. es
Russia in- there in opposition.
In (ralicia the Russian force-
is being concentrated in the
din ( til hi of O.ii .w. and is
now in toe v icinity of Tnrnow
which is fifty miles from that
city. The left flank of this
army, which has dealt Btaggi I
ing blows at the flower ol tie
Austrian field forces, has
penetrated the Carpathian range
into Iluugary.
Invasion of Hungary, however
is not believed t' ii \. any part
hi the Russian scheme ol cam
paign, the objective being d<
feat of (he Vustro German force
before Cracow, and invasion ol
(iei in any from that direction.
\ itii the Russian army vie-
toi jous hi Cracow, the plight
of the German amis would be
come giaVfl indeed, for in order
I to prevent a dashing advance
upon Berlin, )t would be necess-
ary for the Kaiser to concentrate
a for*e of great strength in sou th-
em Silesia, and make a stand at
Breslau. This would force a gen
eral retirement in the West,
since to present a strong front
to the Russians, it would be ne-
cessary to weaken the western
line by the withdrawal of sever-
al army corps.
\'ew York Herald
Oct. 7, 1914.
"Not only has the war over-
crowded the membership of the
Ananias club but the waiting
list is all ready a mile long and
still growing."
"Russia will confer a great
favor if she will change some of
those other names,"
Editor Tribune,
You ought to have been com-
mended ere this for your edito-
rial of the 3rd iust, in legard to
the fit view expressed about the
10,000 appropriated by the
I louse ol Assembly I r the War
Relief Fund in the face of our
present status and what has al
read) been voluntarily contri-
buted.
As there seems to be a certain
secrecy as to who voted for and
against this Grant, would it
not be fair Mr. Editor for the
various constituencies to know
exactly how their representa-
tives voted in this very impor-
tant matter? Is it bet ause when
the war is ovi r "Ilonours" will
meted out in the. way of
"Sirs"? If so will this help our
poor Colon; an) I Are our legis-
lators (most!) business men)
blind to the vital fact of the
serious predicament this colony
1- 1 laced in on account of the
War?
With all our Exports at a
comparative stand -still, a possi
ble financial stringency staring
us in the face and most Govern
nient Work closed down would
it not have been more of an im-
perative benefit to our present
idling working class of people
if 5.000 of the 10,000 had
been appropriated 10 repair our
streets and do other necessary
Public Work, thereby relieving
people wdio are now actually in
distress ''
Thosi Legislators n ho v< >ted
foi a ,.000 donation, did do
less iii hi their bounden duty \n
the Mother country, but did
those who voted*for the 110,000
ever estimate our condition on
account of sentiment? If so,
( with my know ledge of the situa-
j tion, those, Hon. members
; will realize in the very near fu-
1 ture our true condition, then
who can vvc look to for relief,
! will it be our Treasury? Or will
we all, ere long, have to travel
the Road to Miami?
Is it true that certain menbers
of the House of Assembly, were
aware, when they voted for the
i0,000 grant, of distress peti-
tions having been sent to the
Government for "Relief"?
COMMON SENSE.
NOTICE
THE Annual General Meet-
ing ol the Shareholders
of the Bahamas Building
Loan and Improvement Com-
pany Limited will be held
at the Company's Ofiice on
Bay Street on I'hursday the
29th inst.at 8 p.m.
ERIC V. SOLOMON
Secretary
Kerosene
150^
IN New 50 gallon Galvaniz-
ed Iron I Mums at l8cts
per Gallon.
In id gallon Cans at aoctfl
per. Gallon.
Drums and Cans returnable
Full pat ticulars at Office
"Frances K.," Nassau N. P.
C. C. SAT'NDERS
COCOANUTS
BAHAMA ISLANDS
If* is now possible lor owners
of land with fully bearing
trees to prove its value and ob
tain rents.
For furthei particulars
Apply to
I THEO. FARRINGTON
Nassau, N. P.
A gent#01
Bahamas Produce Marketing
Company
13'J Coplhall nouu
('. pih ,11 Avenue
.>' Mn. I <"!'"', B. C.
For Result
Advertise in
The Tribune
^db



To leave the steamship through
the winter at Bar Harbor, where
the ice would almost inevitably
destroy her, would make the United
States liable, possibly, to her Ger
man owners and would rob the
American bankers of their security.
It is desired, therefore, to take her
to Boston or New York. That
would mean a trip around Cape
Ann or Cape Cod. and there a big
vessel like the Cecilie must go ogt
beyond three mile limit.
But the State Department does
not believe that Great Britain,with
the conciliatory spirit she has
shown thus far would attempt to
make a question out of the passage
of this vessel down the coast even if
for some miles she did enter the
high sens. The Navy Department
will lend a collier to tow the
Cecilie and possibly a battle ship
to guard her. With these precau-
tions and perhaps a word spoken
to rthe IWitish authorities in ad-
vance it is hoped to avoid the curi-
ous technicalities which might
arise.Ibid.
Wad! P6b YHin
B.V D.
sgEggggsa jSBL
Sanitary
Cool
Reliable
Sold by
IMPERIAL
THEATRE
Friday and Saturday Nights
The World Famous Professor
VETHEO
"The Human
Ostrich"
This wonderful human being
will sit down to a most ex-
traordinary and indigestible
dinner of Charcoal, Oyster
shells, kid gloves, clay pipes
land will drink Parafine.
[in addition to.this the Pro-
jfessor will perform his great
"Dance of the
Glasses"
He will dance barefooted
amongst the broken- up pieces
of over two hundred glass
bottles.
Also
Two excellent Pictures will
be shown
The Installment
Marriage
His Romantic Wife
and
Cotton Time in
Arkansas
Prices as usual
Commences at 8.15
THE
Cosmopolitan
H1QH SCHOOL
Opens on
Monday, Oct. 5th
in Aurora Hall
on Charlotte Street.
For particulars apply to
Prof. G. G. Coffin, head mas-
ter, or Mr. J. P. Simms.
Fruit of the Loom 36 in.
at "]\ per yard.
IMPERIAL
THEATRE
I WEDNESDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
Door* open 730. Performance
begin at S.I5 p.m.
I
Notice
THI> is to inform my Patrons
and the Public in Genei il
tli*t I h.ive OpTMd my Pyhlil
Black Smith Shop; rim] am now
reaiey to do anythine in I line ,>|
Genera' repair or new v\ rk Horse
Shoeing Specially. All ork done
Mechanically.
P. \. IM'YI.ER.
Bdjr I'.ast St.(Wharf;
Notice
WE would call the atten-
tion of our frienrls in Nas-
sau and on the OUT ISLANDS
to the following prices on lum-
ber which will go into effect
from to-day.
All ROUGH lumber up to 8 ft,
6/3 per ioo. All DRESSED
lumber up to 8 ft. 8/4 per 100.
All ROUGH and DRESSED to
16ft. io/ per too. ANYTHING
over 16 ft. 12/6 per 100. labove
up to 8 ins. wide)
These prices 'are for CASH
absolutely and being WAR
prices are made to help the pub-
lic and are subject to change
without notice
The Bahama* Timber Co. Ltd.
East Bay i^t.
Fresh Onion Seed
FROM TENER1FFE
AND NATIVE SEED CORN
At Toote's, 4<)9 Bay Street
Mapes Fertilizers *
/ now carry in stock the
following formulas:
Pineapple. It has been prov-
en that this has no equal
and a visit to fields using
same will convince you.
Vegetable.Now is the time
to use this and increase
your yield in Tomatoes,
Potatoes, Onions and all
other vegetables by 100
per cent.
Orange Tree.To assist the
growth of Young Citrus
Tree.
Fruit and Wine.Increase the
yield and growth of old
Citrus trees.
For further information
and books ton the use of these
fertilizers, please apply to
WALTER K. MOORE
A^ent for Mapes Fertilizer
in the lUthnmns.
Johnson's
Artistic Wood
Finishes
Johnson's Prepared Ww-a com
plete finith and imli-.li lor all furniture
Woodwork "> Johnson's Wood Dye furtlie artistic
cnlirrini! of all wood, loft or hard
Johnson's Under Leea spirit
finish, very much superior to shellac or
vainish
Johnson's flea Wood Finish f a
beautiful, artistic, band-rubbsd effete
without the aspenrc of ruhhinir.
Johnson's PmsIi Wood Fillerfor
rilling the grain and pores of wood '
preparing it for the finish
Johnson's Powdered Wax -lot bal
room il. ioiBi
FOR. SALE BY
Chas. E. Albury
v
WILLIAMS THE SHOE-
M.iN has just received a
larger assortment of
LADIES. MISSEft and GENTS
SAMPLE BOOTSv|fcd SHOES
in ONE, TWO, AW? THREE
pair lots
The sizes for ladies are limited
to 3J, 4 and 4-J
Misses13, 1 and 2
Gents -6, 6J and 7
The Shoes having been sold
Wtllie.ms. The Shoeman
at a liberal discount, tlie princi-
pal disadvantage being the
limited sizes, he is disposing
cf them at
not less then 20 percent less than
the regular prices such
grades would be.
His kind patrons and the gen-
eral public will please take
Special Notice
of the above sizes mentioned
and in calling for them will
see for themselves that they
are obtaining Real Bargains
at
Williams' Wholesale and H.ete.11
Shoe Establishment
277, 379 Bay Str^-t (City)
BEST|f::,s7S2
Tot. We do not sell il
BL'I we do sclland will,
continue to seW
Standard Oil Co.
Gasoline. Fcst your Gaso-
line. We invite comparison
with any in the City.'
Price 22cts. per gallon in
50 gallon Drums.Custun in
using 100 gals, or o\t*r per
Month 20C, gallun.
Watch cur Notice for ;eP-
osene in June.
C. C. SAUNOKRS
CANE SYRUP
Can be had at T. M. Knowles
at 10s. stg. per Tin
GOOD and THICK.
W A. MATHER
UNDERTAKER
DESIRES to inform h- h tends
ami the Public ilia' I e has
just received a complete utfu of
I tCililles fui the huisiii'isji.i an un-
(Irct'lo'l, v\ huh p|' ii I'sM- 1 in h
pi wit ion to cany >>ut I'ljhi th that-
' i\ l* entrusted to hisCNi* with
system ami despntcli; and lespect
fully solicits theii patronage Get
my Prices first and pmve that these
are the very lowest lor the first class
work.
*__


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