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Publication began at 6.IS p. m. Zbe TWbune Saturday. October 10. 1914. NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS Subscribers to "The Tribune" Monthly and upwards are requested not to pay subscriptions to the carriers but only at the Office, or to a Collector from the office, also to report to the Office any neglect on the part of the carriers to deliver their pnper. The war news received to-day is rather encouraging so far as the great battle front is concern cd, there are evident signs of giving way on the part of the Germans. But the report of the fall of Antwerp (if true) is cause for unfeigned regret. These brave unfortunate people have, up to now, been the greatest sufferers, their cities have been destroyed, their people made fugitives, and their government driven from place to place. It is to be hoped that there has been no failure on the part of the allies, to afford them that assistance and relief that is their due. It is but 52 miles from the sea, we wonder if Naval forces could not have assisted them ? Pity. But Germany may yet have to pay well for her victory, if victory it be. —:o:— The Motor "I-ranees E" arrived from Miami at 1 o clock this afternoon with lumber and gasoline,, mails and passengers.— Miss Loretta Ash ; Mesdames Berneise Cox, and Ethel Adderley ; Messrs Jim Johnson, Anthony Greenwich, Joseph Rolle, Nathan Fergurson, Alkaja Fer gurson, Wm. Mclntosh, Obediah Adderley, Ernest Miller, Joseph Musgrove, Reuben Miller, Win. A. Hill, Arthur Minus, and Mel vin Finlayson. 11O) "TheStrombus" for July— August will be ready on Monday and can then be had at this offiice. We would call the attention of our readers to a Service of Song to be given at Zion, Chapel tomorrow afternoon. See Advertisement. —:o: — GOSPEL HAI.L Corner Christie and Dowdeswell St. The subject on Sunday night will be "The Dreamer." —:o:— Latest War News RADIOGRAMS October 10th 1914. PICKED UP The Germans used sixteen inch mortars by land and bombarded with Zeppelins from the air. Heroic Antwerp is reported to have fallen before the German continous bombardment. A large portion of the ciiy was wrecked. At times twenty shells per minute were falling on the city. Reports from Rotterdam say that 2.000 Germans were killed in the taking of Antwerp. Along the great battle line many violent engagements have occurred, especially about Rove. Paris reports that the flanking movement of the Allies is proving successful and that 1600 prisoners have been taken in the Roye district. Austria claims to be defeating the Russians everywhere, though the Russians continue to report successes. Austrians claim to have decisively defeated the Servians and to have driven them out of Bosnia. The flunking movement of the Allies is meeting with success near the Belgian frontier. General Maytorena, Villas lieutenant, broke the armistice and is shelling Carranzas forces under General Hill. Special to the Nassau Guardian New York, Oct. 10th. The London Morning Post is informed on good authority that Antwerp has fallen. It is said the Germans rained shells and death on the city all day, and that 350,000 people are in flight from the flames and terror. King Albert is reported to be wounded on the way toOstend. The Allies have checked the enemy's flanking movements. GOVKKNMKN1 PRE88 October 10th 1914 Germany is reported to be destroying Antwerp with heavy siege guns. It is said also that the city is on fire in several places and that it has been occupied by the Germans, but the reports lack confirmation. King Albert of Belgium is re ported to be slightly injured. British airmen made an attack on the Zeppelin works at Dusseldorff and destroyed oneZeppelin. Austria announces that the Russian invasion of Hungary has been broken up and that Prsemysl has not failed. Russia denies this report and says that Przemysl is on fire and that its I Wm. Hepb capture is inevitable. Wm. Lockr St. Pater's Church. Gambia The Club Total \ %  'A' __ '8 50 O %3 8 3 O 9 DISTRICT or ipt Cold weather is playing havoc with the Montenegran and Austrian is troops. The American ambulance corps in Han's will add thirty more automobiles' to its service. The French government is assembling exact in forma tion regarding the identi ty of 7,000 German prisoners now in their hands. The French minister of war has issued regulations under which money may be sent to French prisoners in Germany and also from Germany to German prisoners in France. A German newspaper received at Rome announces that the invasion of Great Britain by the Germa.is is to beat the end of October after Antwerp has fallen. Washington—President Wilson urged economy during the coming year to cabinet ministers who called on him today to discuss estimates. Washington:—A commission government for Mexico is now proposed as a means for a settle ment of the Carranza Villa dif ferences. It is believed that this plan would eliminate the persmal rivalry of the various factions and lead to the restoration of a strong central government. BAHAMAS WAR RELIEF rUND The following subscriptions have been received.— Amount previously acknowledge-* £2323 9 7 Bahama Friendly Society 500 Provident Union Female Burial Society 3 3" Bahama Chamber of Commerce 10 10 o Mr. and Mrs W. Maclure 10 o Anonvmous 8 o 5 8 a 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 10 3 4 I I I MANGROVE CAY ISLAND Or ANDR.OS Contributions In aid of tho War Rollof rund Mangrove Cay.— Amount previously acknowledged £17 urn Lockhart Mrs. Luke Rolle SyIvans Roll Letitia Rolle Luke Rolle W. J. Armaly 1 Jas Bannister Octavius Basiain Clarence Poitier Jas C. Nairn Bruce A. Bowe 1 'Sylvans Minns Rebecca Bode Solomon Baskan Edmund Bullard Saliil Newbold Albert Johnson Victoria Poitier .^ tllen Bullard < %  %  Mollie Newbold ^ Mary Ann Bullard Bartholomew Bastian Maitha Rolle Rebecca Rolle Rose Newbold Joseph Bain Herbert Bain Jack Lonjjey Loretta Stuart Rosauna Kerr John McKenzie Solomon Bastian Angelina Rolle John Rolle Matilda Peunerman Eliza Rolle Romeo Hepburn Elijah Flowers Ophelia launders Mrs E. W Forsyth 1 Collected by Ladies Committee 1 Mrs B. A. Bowe By Mrs. Armaly Small Sums Contributions for proposed Entertainment Collected by Mrs. Ceruti Olivia Ceruti Randolph Bowe Mary F. Bowe Bert Bowe Harold Bowe Bertram Bowe Ruth Ceruti 2 4 3 10 3 o o o o 3 o o o 6 6 o o6 o o 3 o o 3 6 9 6 o 6 6 ti 0 6 6 o 3 3 o 6 6 6 3 o 0 o o 5. o 2 6 18 o 9 12 2 2 2 6 4 7 o o o o 6 o 3



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. Susan fy'cket' Olive Bbwe i 8 3 6 7 o 71 6 3 6 Collected by Harold Bowe i Collected bJWos. Green Mangrove Cay School Isadora Taylor Bolle Jones Maria Rnlle Total for Mangrove • Cay {39 6 10J --:o:— WONDER-rUL ISLANDS DISPLAY RESOURCE Interesting Exhibits Of Land Of Pink PMi-la.Th* Bahama UUnd One of the most interesting ex hibits in the Government Buil ding is that of the Chamber of Commerce representing the government <>f the Bahama Islands. This wonderful country, commonly known as the land of the pink pear I, because of the unusual be; uty of its marine .curios, has n very attractive dis play of its display product. Large sponge, and sisal, from which binder twine is manufactured, anshown to represent the two mail industries of the is lands. Large coloured photo graphs rl.*Mly show the beauty and woiwlenof the famous win ter res< rt of Canadians and Americans and literature is gladly given to visitors. As HL M. Chipman who is in charge of the exhibits, explained each year the number of Cana dian visitors has been steadily increasin,', and not a few have the opportunities which the Ba hamasoffr. Preserves of tropical fruit have this year taken the place of the usual display of raw fruit. But the most attractive feature of the exhibit to the average visitors is the numerous variety of shells and other marine curios. Beau tiful necklaces and other orna meutsare being sold by the ex hibitors in large numbers and not a few of the larger shells, such as are usually seen in a curio case, are being looked upon with favour by the purchasing exhi bition visitior. In a beautifully colored book let which is given away to visi tors, an outline of the history and industries of the island is given.Uegprding the importance of the sponge industry in the coluny, it says that this alone engages some 600 vessels carry ing sortie 6000 men and boys. One of the interesting photo gupf* U of a large silk cotton tretfapind the govenment buil dings in Nassau. This huge tree spreads out in some directions as far as 116 feet. We are enabled to publish the above through the courtesy of Mr. H.N.Chipman who favoured us with papers. Toronto Sunday World, Sept. 6. 1914. —:o:— War Notes TO BERLIN TO SETTLE ACCOUNTS "Not until the horsemen of the gathering nations ride down Unter den Linden will the German people realize that their man dreams are shattered for ever." There are many signs that opinion is hardening in the direction of making this war a final war—so to break the power of the enemy that renewal of the war is impossible. Krupp v. Lou vain "The expiation of Lou vain," says the Times, "should be the absolute obliteration not of Bonn nor Heidelberg, but of the Krupp works at Essen. The price of peace should be, among other things, the reconstruction of new and more beautiful towns and villages upon the ruins of innocent and devastated Belgium. The friends of Germany, and all who talk of a lasting peace, ought to be the first to speed the Allies on their way to Berlin. Not until the capital is reached will the s-vord be struck from Germany's hands, and not until they see the conquerors in their midst will theGermansturnfrom Treitschke and Nietzsche to Lu ther and Goethe once more." A German Debacle "There musi be no weakness or slackening now," says the Pall Mall. "The beginnings are great and promising, but they are not yet by any means decisive. By relentless pressure of pursuit and renewed battle, the German defeat has to be turned into a German debacle. Nothing less will secure the results which will give us and our Allies the assurance of safety atid lasting peace for the future. We may possibly be a long way from that yet. But we have to push this thing right home, and to follow the enemy to the Rhine and across it, until the destruction of Krupp's and Wilhelmshavenat least shall be the retribution exacted for the infamy of Louvain." Pu lie Opinion, Sept, 16. 1914. CAN GERMANY HOLD ON 7 T rom Th* London Monty Nark* R.vl*w *. nd Investor'* Chronlclo One of the big deciding factors in the conduct, duration and result of the war will be finance, and for this reason a brief examination of the financial lesources of Germany may be instructive There is ground for the opinion that Germany'shatte to strike a blow at France while de. daring, war upon Russia was due to a desire to extract a hu%e indemnity from her rich neighbor, as she did over forty years ago. The rapid irdu-trial progress of GerI many during the last generation was based very largely upon the levy .she imposed upon France at the conclusion of the Franco-Prussian war. In many respects this industrial progress has been too rapid. It has only been effected through a system of extravagant credit granted by the banks tocommercial enterprises, and, in turn, by German manufacturers and merchants to their customeis in foreign countries. German banks have ad vanced money upon securities which English banks would not consider, and German exporters have dumped their goods abroad, not only at ridiculously low prices, but upon credits far more extend, ed than British houses would concede The results are that manufacturers and bankers even the state itself in Germany, have for a long time been skating upon thin ic<, financially. Knowledge of this fact Ins made high financiers chary of German securities This is well reflected in the fact that prior to the war a yield of £4 3s. per cent, was demanded of the German Government for cash accomodation. against only £3 10s. per cnt, charged the Bntish Government. Germany's financial straits are also illustrated by the fact that on the eve of the war her Imperial Bank only held enough gold to cover one-thml the face v.ilue of the notes issued, whereas the State Hank of Russia held gold sufficient to cover twice over the notes issued by it. For a long time the financial resources of Germany, in spite of recent excellent trade conditions, have been such as to occasion the greatest uneasiness among her best friends. Some have not hesitated to declare that she was drifting to bankruptcy, and that a sudden war, a swift victory, and a sbstantial inJemnity from some beaten foe would be the only means of her financial salvation. Colour is given to this opinion by the actions of the German Government. It is worth noting at this point that just befoie war was declared the combined war fund* of Germany and Austria hardly reached £300,000,000, and that the Banque de France held more money than the powers of the triple Alliance— y—rJot Germany, Austria and Italy. together. The combined war funds of Britain, France and Russia stood at £4J6,OOO,OOU. With her internal finances at such a low ebb, and her staple industries working at the narrowest of cash margins, Germany cannot stand the strain of a protracted war. If this struggle goes on it ft bound to cost Germany something like £"10,000,000 a week. Germany must win quickly or exhaust herself. A long war on a big scale like thit means utter disaster for Ger-nany — financially, industrially and Imperially. The German national debt has been increased by nearly £"100,000,000 in the last dozen years, and stood at £'740,000,000 before last week's new war credit of £250,000,000 was voted. On the other hand our national debt has been reduced, and stood at £lVJr 000,000 on the eve of war. Toronto Sunday World, Fepr 1 6th. ftAO l f6k TU fH B.VD. %  PTWCTAIlW Mg Sanitary Cool Reliable Sold by Fruit of the Loom 36 in. at 7^ per yard. IMPERIAL THEATRE. WEDNESDAY • FRIDAY • SATURDAY Door* open l.)0. Performance begin at 6.13 p.m. For Sale T HE House on the lot known as the JIB, just above the Eastern Parade. To be removed by the 20th inst. Apply W. C. B. JOHNSON. Oct. 3 1914 3 ins.



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f <0 SUNDAY NEXT4P.M.[ CHORAL SERVICE AT Zion Baptist Church So/oist:-Mrs. PASHLEY All will be welcome SILVER COLLECTION. divisions of the first two armies are now fcnllecteil at our training rentes. The third army is being formed on new camping grounds I'he fotiith army is bring created by adding to the establishment of ihe reserve battalions from Which the units will 0e deti'ched •n^d organised similarly to the pitier three armies. The whole of the special reserve and^xtra special reserve units will he maintained at their full establishments as feeders to the Expeditionary Force. Local Battalions and Territorial In addition to the four new SpArflSSstSta b f. r < 5w.' •' %  jaltons have been specially raised by the public-spirited initiative of cities, towns orindividuals.Several more are in course of formation, expect toget work and fit' thischt V .ct r e e r Ce,Ve proving its military value t>. the Kmpire by willing subordination of personal feelings to the public good in th acceptance of whatever duty may be assigned to it in any portion of tlie Empire. A division has already left for Egypt, a bridgjtde l. Malta, and a garrison for Gibraltar 'I he sol. 'her like qualities evinced by the ton* are an attarancs to the Government that they maycount to the full upon its readiness to play its part wherever the exigencies of the military situation may deirand. Nor must I omit to refer to the assistance which we shall receive from the division of the gallant Royal Marines and Bluejackets now being organised by my right hon. friend the First Lord of the Admiialty. Their presence in the field will he very welcome, for their fighting qualities are well known. I he creation of the new armies referred to is fraught with considerable difficulty s, one of which is the provision of regimental officers I hope, the problem of supply, ing officers may he so'ved by the large numbers coming forward to fill vacancies and by promotion | from the noncommissioned officers' ranks of the regular forces In a country which prides itself on its skill in and love of outdoor sports we ought to be able to find sufficient young men who will train and qualify as offices under th* guid. anr-eof the niK t*OS of traind ..ffi cers whi.l, W( areablo to provide from nidi i and P'* where. — The Liverpool Echo, Srpt, |8, K)!^. (To be continued' For Result Advertise in The Tribune works. By order ARTHUR B. SUTTON. September i6th, 1914 Agent Shingles Best No. 1 Heart sin. Cypres Shingles at §9.60 per thoussand of 20 bundles Discounts on lots of ovei 5000 shingles. Special Price also on cheaper grades—aln 5in. Cypress at 96.7a per thousand of 20 bundles. Thi:price made possible by a very large purchase. Fresh stock arriving every week. C. C. SAUNDERS. Johnson's Artistic Wood Finishes I Johnson's Prepared Was—a complete finish and polish for all furintuie Woodwork and Hoof*. • Johnson's Wood Dye—for the artistic coloring of all wood, soft or hard Johnson's Under Lac -a spirit finish, very much superior to shellac or varnish Johnson's Fle.1 Wood Finish f r a beautiful, artistic, hand rubbed effete without tinexpense of rubbine. Johnson's Pe>ste Wood Filler—for tiling the pain and pom of wood, preparint; it fm Ilia finisli Johnson's Powdered Wax -foi b tl 11 iii) floors. FOR. SALE BV Chas. E. Albury Fresh Onion Seed FROM TENgRIFFfi AND NATIVE SEED CORN At Toote's, 499 Bay Street Instruction Book FREE You Need It In Your Home Take the coupon below to Irs E, Albury and receive the following—-FREE. 1—25c lm(ruction Book 2— 10c Bottlea Joonaon'i Wood Dye 1—10c Can John.on'. Prepared Wax The samples will prove that Johnson's Artistic Wood Finish--* Johnson's Wood Dye beautiful, lasting shades. 8 Johnson's Prepared Wax A perfect furniture polish nd finish for all woodwork, II Wood w %  i Iff, COCOANUTS BAHAMA ISLANDS I T is now possible for owners of land with fully bearing ^ r ees to prove its value and ob tai" rents. For further particulars Apply to 1. THE0. FARRINGTON Nassau, N I*. Agent for Bahamas Produce Marketing; Company 139 Copthull House C opt hall Avenue 3 Mo. London, E. C BEST gK 76let. We df) not sell it. B UT we do sell and wil confioue to sell Standard Oil Co. Gasoline. Test your Gasoline. We invite compnrisor with any in the City. Price -'Jets. flrf. gallon iL 50 gallon Drums. Customarf using UK) gals, or over pej Mouth 20c. gallon. Watch our Notice for Kerosene in June. C. C. SAUNDKRj



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(0 o n V) S 0) Nulllus addlctus |urnrf In verba mB-Hletri. BcirH bound to swear to the Dogmas if no Master VOL.X. Nassau, N. P.. Bahamas. Saturday, October 10, 1914 No. "238 L OILBBBT DUPUCH. Editor and Proprietor. —. — A —. OFFtOB: 89-44 MAHKKT STIU'DT N(U*au,N P.Bahamas V. o. BOX 108 PUBLISHED DAILY Monday, Wednesday and Friday— • single copy id Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday'— single copy id Weekly 4 ld Mmillify ,. ... . ... is. ^d I •ii.utcily ... ... .. .. At. Half Yearly 8 *. Yearly M a. PAYAIU.K IN AOVANCK Advertising Ratal: Sia pence per line for first insertion; three pence per line For second insertion : and rne penny per line for eubeqaent insertions, Advertisenicr.ts under ei^lit lines 4s. KITCHENER ON THE WAR. Statement In The House Of Lords. THE TIDE TURNED. Good Ground For Quiet Confidence. In the coins.HI 1 statement in the M use of Lords, yesteiday on ttw general militarj aittniion, Lo <1 Kitchen-r paid a irnrtn rrihii'* to Sir John French and the nfflcwi ami men of the Bii'ish Kxpeditionnry Foice and tlic Allied Armies. Lord Kitchener said:— Your lOfthifM will expect that some statement shall he made l)y me on the gei eial military situation he. (ore the session end*, and I will, lher>foie endeavour, as hrnflv as possible, In supplement the re, 1 _l. I I .1 .1.. u* ... | r. natki which I had 'lie honour to ddres* I" yur lordslii|is' House l.vaa iiraula •.. ii f tlie in I need not r> tell the story o. British Expeditionary Force IHMISIl r.xpeun I firm I y ruivw % % %  France w huh has heen read and anpteciatt d by us all in Sir |. French's despatch. The great restrain! of his account of The achievements only brings into Telief the qualities which enabled our troops successfully tocarry out the 'most difficult of all military operatii ns. There is, however one aspect of the feat of arms upon which the despatch is naturally silent— I refer lo the coriMiniMte skill and calm courage of the Commader-in-Cbief himself icheersj-in the conduct of his si 1 a tegic withdra wal in the face of vastly superior f< rces. Ilis Majesty's Government ap. predate to the full the value of the service which ?ir John French has rendered to the country and the cause of the Allies and I may perhaps be permitted here and now on their behalf to pay a tribute to his leadership, as well as to the marked ability of the geneials under iiis command and the bravery and endurance of the officers and men of the Expeditionary Foice. Driving The Germane Home As yi ur lordships are aware the tide has now turri'd and for some days past we have received the grai ifying intelligence of the forced retirement of the Geiman rrmies The late-t news from Sir John French does not materially change the published statement describing the 11 Hilary situation. In his telegram Sir John reports that the troops ate all in good heart, and ready to move foiward when the moment arrives, Thegallant French armies with whom we are so proud to be co-operating, will receive every support from our troops in their dettre effeciua'ly to clear their country of the invading foe and the undaunted and vigilant activity of the Belgian Army in the North matci iallv conduces to ibis end. I would also like to take this 1 ppoMunity of offering our respectful congratulations to Russia upon the conspicuous successes which have addid fre^h lustie to her armies. Although therefore we have good gi unds for quiet confidence, it is only light that era should remind 1 uisi'ivi s ihat thest 1 ngle is but pd to be N long one and i: behoves us strenuously lo piosecute our labour in developing our ant ed .forces to carry on ancf bring to a successful issue the mighty .conflict in "which we are engaged. British Troops In The Field Theieare now in the field rather more than six divisions of British troopJ and (WO cavalry divisions These are beingand will be numt.'iiin il at full strength by a steady flow of reinforcements. To meet the wastage of war in this field force our icserve units aie available. To augment the expeditionary fore, further regular divisions and additional cavahy are now being organised from units withdrawn from overseas garrisons, whose places, where necessary, will be taken by Territorial troops who A'ith fine patriotism, have volun. teered to exchange a home for an Imperial service obligation. On their way from India are certain divisions from the Indian Army composed of highly-trained and very efficient troops and a body of cavalry including a regiment 1 f historic fame. The dominions beyond tbe seas are sending us freely of their best. Several troops will be available formed of men who have been locally trained in the light of the experience of the* South ;Afric, 11 War; and in the case of Australia and New Zealand, tbe svstem of general national training introduced a few years ago. Four New Armies To Be Formed, pfn response to the call for recruits for the new armies which is considered necessary to raise, we hare,bad a most remarkable demonstra-Jtmn of the energy and patriotism of the young men of this country We propose to organise this splendid material into tour new armies, and although it takes lime torts.niy an army the zeal and goodwill'displived will greatly, simplify out task. • 1 If some of those who have so readily come forward have suffered inconvenience thry will not, I am suie allow t^eir ardour to be damped 'I'll >y will recollect Ihat the \Va; Office has had in*a day to deal with as manv recruits as were usually forthcoming in twelve inoiiihs. No effort is being sparfd to meet the influx of soldiers and the War Office will do its utmost to look after them nnd give them the efficient training necessary to enable them to join their comrades in the field. (Continued on fourth I'age)


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Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Saturday, October 10, 1914
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
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General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
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oclc - 9994850
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Full Text
(0
o
n
V)
S
0)
Nulllus addlctus |urnrf In verba mB-Hletri.
BcirH bound to swear to the Dogmas if no Master
VOL.X.
Nassau, N. P.. Bahamas. Saturday, October 10, 1914
No. "238
L OILBBBT DUPUCH.
Editor and Proprietor.
" . ---------------A.
OFFtOB: 89-44 MAHKKT STIU'DT
* N(U*au,N P.Bahamas
V. o. BOX 108
PUBLISHED DAILY
Monday, Wednesday and Friday
single copy ......... id
Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday'
single copy ......... id
Weekly ............ 4ld
Mmillify ,. ... . ... is. ^d
I ii.utcily ... ... .. .. At.
Half Yearly............8*.
Yearly ............Ma.
PAYAIU.K IN AOVANCK
Advertising Ratal: Sia pence per line
for first insertion; three pence per line
For second insertion : and rne penny per
line for eubeqaent insertions,
Advertisenicr.ts under ei^lit lines 4s.
KITCHENER ON
THE WAR.
Statement In The House
Of Lords.
THE TIDE TURNED.
Good Ground For Quiet
Confidence.
In the coins.- hi 1 statement in
the M use of Lords, yesteiday on
ttw general militarj aittniion, Lo <1
Kitchen-r paid a irnrtn rrihii'* to
Sir John French and the nfflcwi
ami men of the Bii'ish Kxpedi-
tionnry Foice and tlic Allied
Armies.
Lord Kitchener said: Your
lOfthifM will expect that some
statement shall he made l)y me on
the gei eial military situation he.
(ore the session end*, and I will,
lher>foie endeavour, as hrnflv as
possible, In supplement the re-
, 1 _l. I I .1 .1.. u*______ ...
|......... .....r.
natki which I had 'lie honour to
ddres* I" yur lordslii|is' House
l.vaa iiraula .. ii
f tlie
in
I need not r> tell the story o.
British Expeditionary Force
IHMISIl r.xpeun I firm I y ruivw
France w huh has heen read and
anpteciatt d by us all in Sir |.
French's despatch. The great re-
strain! of his account of The
achievements only brings into Te-
lief the qualities which enabled
our troops successfully tocarry out
the 'most difficult of all military
operatii ns.
There is, however one aspect of
the feat of arms upon which the
despatch is naturally silentI refer
lo the coriMiniMte skill and calm
courage of the Commader-in-Cbief
himself icheersj-in the conduct of
his si 1 a tegic withdra wal in the face
of vastly superior f< rces.
Ilis Majesty's Government ap.
predate to the full the value of
the service which ?ir John French
has rendered to the country and
the cause of the Allies and I may
perhaps be permitted here and now
on their behalf to pay a tribute to
his leadership, as well as to the
marked ability of the geneials un-
der iiis command and the bravery
and endurance of the officers and
men of the Expeditionary Foice.
Driving The Germane Home
As yi ur lordships are aware the
tide has now turri'd and for some
days past we have received the
grai ifying intelligence of the forced
retirement of the Geiman rrmies
The late-t news from Sir John
French does not materially change
the published statement describing
the 11 Hilary situation. In his tele-
gram Sir John reports that the
troops ate all in good heart, and
ready to move foiward when the
moment arrives, Thegallant French
armies with whom we are so proud
to be co-operating, will receive
every support from our troops in
their dettre effeciua'ly to clear
their country of the invading foe
and the undaunted and vigilant
activity of the Belgian Army in the
North matci iallv conduces to ibis
end.
I would also like to take this
1 ppoMunity of offering our respect-
ful congratulations to Russia upon
the conspicuous successes which
have addid fre^h lustie to her
armies.
Although therefore we have good
gi unds for quiet confidence, it is
only light that era should remind
1 uisi'ivi s ihat thest 1 ngle is but pd
to be n long one and i: behoves us
' strenuously lo piosecute our labour
in developing our ant ed .forces to
carry on ancf bring to a successful
issue the mighty .conflict in "which
we are engaged.
British Troops In The Field
Theieare now in the field rather
more than six divisions of British
troopJ and (WO cavalry divisions
These are beingand will be num-
t.'iiin il at full strength by a steady
flow of reinforcements. To meet
the wastage of war in this field
force our icserve units aie avail-
able. To augment the expedition-
ary fore, further regular divisions
and additional cavahy are now
being organised from units with-
drawn from overseas garrisons,
whose places, where necessary, will
be taken by Territorial troops who
A'ith fine patriotism, have volun.
teered to exchange a home for an
Imperial service obligation.
On their way from India are
certain divisions from the Indian
Army composed of highly-trained
and very efficient troops and a
body of cavalry including a regi-
ment 1 f historic fame. The domin-
ions beyond tbe seas are sending
us freely of their best. Several troops
will be available formed of men
who have been locally trained in
the light of the experience of the*
South ;Afric, 11 War; and in the
case of Australia and New Zealand,
tbe svstem of general national
training introduced a few years
ago.
Four New Armies To Be Formed,
pfn response to the call for recruits
for the new armies which is con-
sidered necessary to raise, we hare,-
bad a most remarkable demonstra-J-
tmn of the energy and patriotism
of the young men of this country
We propose to organise this splen-
did material into tour new armies, '
and although it takes lime torts.niy
an army the zeal and goodwill'dis-
plived will greatly, simplify out
task. 1
If some of those who have so
readily come forward have suffer-
ed inconvenience thry will not, I
am suie allow t^eir ardour to be
damped 'I'll >y will recollect Ihat
the \Va; Office has had in*a day
to deal with as manv recruits as
were usually forthcoming in twelve
inoiiihs. No effort is being sparfd
to meet the influx of soldiers and
the War Office will do its utmost
to look after them nnd give them
the efficient training necessary to
enable them to join their comrades
in the field.
(Continued on fourth I'age)


Publication began at 6.IS p. m.
Zbe TWbune
Saturday. October 10. 1914.
NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS
Subscribers to "The Tribune"
Monthly and upwards are re-
quested not to pay subscriptions
to the carriers but only at the
Office, or to a Collector from
the office, also to report to the
Office any neglect on the part
of the carriers to deliver their
pnper.
The war news received to-day
is rather encouraging so far as
the great battle front is concern
cd, there are evident signs of
giving way on the part of the
Germans.
But the report of the fall of
Antwerp (if true) is cause for
unfeigned regret. These brave
unfortunate people have, up to
now, been the greatest sufferers,
their cities have been destroyed,
their people made fugitives, and
their government driven from
place to place.
It is to be hoped that there has
been no failure on the part of
the allies, to afford them that as-
sistance and relief that is their
due.
It is but 52 miles from the
sea, we wonder if Naval forces
could not have assisted them ?
Pity. But Germany may yet
have to pay well for her victo-
ry, if victory it be.
:o:
The Motor "I-ranees E" ar-
rived from Miami at 1 o clock
this afternoon with lumber and
gasoline,, mails and passen-
gers.
Miss Loretta Ash ; Mesdames
Berneise Cox, and Ethel Adder-
ley ; Messrs Jim Johnson, An-
thony Greenwich, Joseph Rolle,
Nathan Fergurson, Alkaja Fer
gurson, Wm. Mclntosh, Obediah
Adderley, Ernest Miller, Joseph
Musgrove, Reuben Miller, Win.
A. Hill, Arthur Minus, and Mel
vin Finlayson. 11O)
"TheStrombus" for JulyAu-
gust will be ready on Monday
and can then be had at this
offiice.
We would call the attention
of our readers to a Service of
Song to be given at Zion, Chapel
tomorrow afternoon.
See Advertisement.
:o:
Gospel Hai.l
Corner Christie and
Dowdeswell St.
The subject on Sunday night
will be "The Dreamer."
:o:
Latest War News
RADIOGRAMS
October 10th 1914.
PICKED UP
The Germans used sixteen
inch mortars by land and bom-
barded with Zeppelins from the
air.
Heroic Antwerp is reported
to have fallen before the Ger-
man continous bombardment.
A large portion of the ciiy
was wrecked.
At times twenty shells per
minute were falling on the city.
Reports from Rotterdam say
that 2.000 Germans were killed
in the taking of Antwerp.
Along the great battle line
many violent engagements have
occurred, especially about Rove.
Paris reports that the flanking
movement of the Allies
is proving successful and
that 1600 prisoners have been
taken in the Roye district.
Austria claims to be defeating
the Russians everywhere, though
the Russians continue to report
successes.
Austrians claim to have de-
cisively defeated the Servians
and to have driven them out of
Bosnia. The flunking movement
of the Allies is meeting with suc-
cess near the Belgian frontier.
General Maytorena, Villas
lieutenant, broke the armistice
and is shelling Carranzas forces
under General Hill.
Special to the Nassau Guardian
New York, Oct. 10th.
The London Morning Post is
informed on good authority that
Antwerp has fallen. It is said
the Germans rained shells and
death on the city all day, and
that 350,000 people are in flight
from the flames and terror.
King Albert is reported to be
wounded on the way toOstend.
The Allies have checked the
enemy's flanking movements.
GOVKKNMKN1 PRE88
October 10th 1914
Germany is reported to be
destroying Antwerp with heavy
siege guns. It is said also that
the city is on fire in several
places and that it has been oc-
cupied by the Germans, but the
reports lack confirmation.
King Albert of Belgium is re
ported to be slightly injured.
British airmen made an attack
on the Zeppelin works at Dussel-
dorff and destroyed oneZeppelin.
Austria announces that the
Russian invasion of Hungary
has been broken up and that
Prsemysl has not failed. Russia
denies this report and says that
Przemysl is on fire and that its I Wm. Hepb
capture is inevitable. Wm. Lockr
St. Pater's Church. Gambia The Club Total \ 'A' __ '8 50 O %3 8 3 O 9
DISTRICT or
ipt
Cold weather is playing havoc
with the Montenegran and Aus-
trian is troops.
The American ambulance
corps in Han's will add thirty
more automobiles' to its service.
The French government is
assembling exact in forma
tion regarding the identi
ty of 7,000 German prisoners
now in their hands.
The French minister of war
has issued regulations under
which money may be sent to
French prisoners in Germany
and also from Germany to Ger-
man prisoners in France.
A German newspaper received
at Rome announces that
the invasion of Great Britain by
the Germa.is is to beat the end
of October after Antwerp has
fallen.
WashingtonPresident Wil-
son urged economy during the
coming year to cabinet ministers
who called on him today to
discuss estimates.
Washington:A commission
government for Mexico is now
proposed as a means for a settle
ment of the Carranza Villa dif
ferences.
It is believed that this plan
would eliminate the persmal
rivalry of the various factions
and lead to the restoration of a
strong central government.
BAHAMAS
WAR RELIEF rUND
The following subscriptions
have been received.
Amount previously
acknowledge-* 2323 9 7
Bahama Friendly
Society 500
Provident Union
Female Burial
Society 3 3"
Bahama Chamber
of Commerce 10 10 o
Mr. and Mrs W.
Maclure 10 o
Anonvmous 8 o
5
8
a
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
10
3
4
I
I
I
MANGROVE CAY
ISLAND Or ANDR.OS
Contributions In aid of tho War
Rollof rund
Mangrove Cay.
Amount previously
acknowledged 17
urn
Lockhart
Mrs. Luke Rolle
SyIvans Roll
Letitia Rolle
Luke Rolle
W. J. Armaly 1
Jas Bannister
Octavius Basiain
Clarence Poitier
Jas C. Nairn
Bruce A. Bowe 1
'Sylvans Minns
Rebecca Bode
Solomon Baskan
Edmund Bullard
Saliil Newbold
Albert Johnson
Victoria Poitier .^
tllen Bullard <
Mollie Newbold ^
Mary Ann Bullard
Bartholomew Bastian
Maitha Rolle
Rebecca Rolle
Rose Newbold
Joseph Bain
Herbert Bain
Jack Lonjjey
Loretta Stuart
Rosauna Kerr
John McKenzie
Solomon Bastian
Angelina Rolle
John Rolle
Matilda Peunerman
Eliza Rolle
Romeo Hepburn
Elijah Flowers
Ophelia launders
Mrs E. W Forsyth 1
Collected by Ladies
Committee 1
Mrs B. A. Bowe
By Mrs. Armaly
Small Sums
Contributions for
proposed Enter-
tainment
Collected by Mrs.
Ceruti
Olivia Ceruti
Randolph Bowe
Mary F. Bowe
Bert Bowe
Harold Bowe
Bertram Bowe
Ruth Ceruti
2
4
3
10
3
o
o
o
o
3
o
o
o
6
6
o
o-
6
o
o
3
o
o
3
6
9
6
o
6
6
ti
0
6
6
o
3
3
o
6
6
6
3
o
0
o
o
5.
o
2 6
18 o
*
9
12
2
2
2
6
4
7
o
o
o
o
6
o
3


.
Susan fy'cket'
Olive Bbwe
i
8
3
6
7
o
71
6
3
6
Collected by Harold
Bowe i *
Collected bJWos. Green
Mangrove Cay School
Isadora Taylor
Bolle Jones
Maria Rnlle
Total for Mangrove------
Cay {39 6 10J
--:o:
WONDER-rUL ISLANDS
DISPLAY RESOURCE
Interesting Exhibits Of Land Of
Pink PMi-la.Th* Bahama
UUnd
One of the most interesting ex
hibits in the Government Buil
ding is that of the Chamber of
Commerce representing the gov-
ernment <>f the Bahama Islands.
This wonderful country, com-
monly known as the land of the
pink pear I, because of the un-
usual be; uty of its marine .cu-
rios, has n very attractive dis
play of its display product.
Large sponge, and sisal, from
which binder twine is manufac-
tured, an- shown to represent the
two mail industries of the is
lands. Large coloured photo
graphs rl.*Mly show the beauty
and woiwlenof the famous win
ter res< rt of Canadians and
Americans and literature is
gladly given to visitors.
As HL M. Chipman who is in
charge of the exhibits, explained
each year the number of Cana
dian visitors has been steadily
increasin,', and not a few have
the opportunities which the Ba
hamasoffr.
Preserves of tropical fruit have
this year taken the place of the
usual display of raw fruit. But
the most attractive feature of the
exhibit to the average visitors
is the numerous variety of shells
and other marine curios. Beau
tiful necklaces and other orna
meutsare being sold by the ex
hibitors in large numbers and not
a few of the larger shells, such
as are usually seen in a curio
case, are being looked upon with
favour by the purchasing exhi
bition visitior.
In a beautifully colored book
let which is given away to visi
tors, an outline of the history
and industries of the island is
given.Uegprding the importance
of the sponge industry in the
coluny, it says that this alone
engages some 600 vessels carry
ing sortie 6000 men and boys.
One of the interesting photo
gupf* U of a large silk cotton
tretfapind the govenment buil
dings in Nassau. This huge tree
spreads out in some directions as
far as 116 feet.
We are enabled to publish the
above through the courtesy of
Mr. H.N.Chipman who favoured
us with papers.
Toronto Sunday World,
Sept. 6. 1914.
:o:
War Notes
TO BERLIN TO SETTLE
ACCOUNTS
"Not until the horsemen of
the gathering nations ride down
Unter den Linden will the Ger-
man people realize that their
man dreams are shattered for
ever."
There are many signs that
opinion is hardening in the di-
rection of making this war a fi-
nal warso to break the power
of the enemy that renewal of the
war is impossible.
Krupp v. Lou vain
"The expiation of Lou vain,"
says the Times, "should be the
absolute obliteration not of
Bonn nor Heidelberg, but of the
Krupp works at Essen. The price
of peace should be, among other
things, the reconstruction of new
and more beautiful towns and
villages upon the ruins of inno-
cent and devastated Belgium.
The friends of Germany, and all
who talk of a lasting peace,
ought to be the first to speed the
Allies on their way to Berlin.
Not until the capital is reached
will the s-vord be struck from
Germany's hands, and not until
they see the conquerors in their
midst will theGermansturnfrom
Treitschke and Nietzsche to Lu
ther and Goethe once more."
A German Debacle
"There musi be no weakness
or slackening now," says the
Pall Mall. "The beginnings are
great and promising, but they
are not yet by any means deci-
sive. By relentless pressure of
pursuit and renewed battle, the
German defeat has to be turned
into a German debacle. Nothing
less will secure the results which
will give us and our Allies the
assurance of safety atid lasting
peace for the future. We may
possibly be a long way from that
yet. But we have to push this
thing right home, and to follow
the enemy to the Rhine and
across it, until the destruction of
Krupp's and Wilhelmshavenat
least shall be the retribution ex-
acted for the infamy of Lou-
vain."
Pu lie Opinion, Sept, 16. 1914.
CAN GERMANY HOLD ON 7
T rom Th* London Monty Nark*
R.vl*w *. nd Investor'*
Chronlclo
One of the big deciding factors in
the conduct, duration and result of
the war will be finance, and for
this reason a brief examination of
the financial lesources of Germany
may be instructive There is ground
for the opinion that Germany'shatte
to strike a blow at France while de.
daring, war upon Russia was due to
a desire to extract a hu%e indem-
nity from her rich neighbor, as she
did over forty years ago. The
! rapid irdu-trial progress of Ger-
I many during the last generation
was based very largely upon the
levy .she imposed upon France at
the conclusion of the Franco-Prus-
sian war. In many respects this
industrial progress has been too
rapid. It has only been effected
through a system of extravagant
credit granted by the banks tocom-
mercial enterprises, and, in turn, by
German manufacturers and mer-
chants to their customeis in foreign
countries. German banks have ad
vanced money upon securities
which English banks would not
consider, and German exporters
have dumped their goods abroad,
not only at ridiculously low prices,
but upon credits far more extend,
ed than British houses would con-
cede The results are that manu-
facturers and bankers even the
state itself in Germany, have for
a long time been skating upon thin
ic<, financially.
Knowledge of this fact Ins made
high financiers chary of German
securities This is well reflected in
the fact that prior to the war a
yield of 4 3s. per cent, was de-
manded of the German Govern-
ment for cash accomodation.
against only 3 10s. per cnt,
charged the Bntish Government.
Germany's financial straits are al-
so illustrated by the fact that on
the eve of the war her Imperial
Bank only held enough gold to
cover one-thml the face v.ilue of
the notes issued, whereas the State
Hank of Russia held gold sufficient
to cover twice over the notes issued
by it. For a long time the financial
resources of Germany, in spite of
recent excellent trade conditions,
have been such as to occasion the
greatest uneasiness among her best
friends. Some have not hesitated to
declare that she was drifting to
bankruptcy, and that a sudden
war, a swift victory, and a sbstan-
tial inJemnity from some beaten
foe would be the only means of
her financial salvation. Colour is
given to this opinion by the ac-
tions of the German Government.
It is worth noting at this point
that just befoie war was declared
the combined war fund* of Ger-
many and Austria hardly reached
300,000,000, and that the Banque
de France held more money than
the powers of the triple Alliance
yrJot
Germany, Austria and Italy- .
together. The combined war funds
of Britain, France and Russia
stood at 4j6,ooo,oou.
With her internal finances
at such a low ebb, and her staple
industries working at the narrow-
est of cash margins, Germany can-
not stand the strain of a protracted
war. If this struggle goes on it ft ,
bound to cost Germany something
like "10,000,000 a week. Germany
must win quickly or exhaust herself.
A long war on a big scale like thit
means utter disaster for Ger-nany
financially, industrially and Im-
perially. The German national
debt has been increased by nearly
"100,000,000 in the last dozen
years, and stood at '740,000,000
before last week's new war credit
of 250,000,000 was voted. On the
other hand our national debt has
been reduced, and stood at lVJr
000,000 on the eve of war.
Toronto Sunday World, Fepr1 6th.
ftAOl f6k TUfH
B.VD.
PTWCTAIlWMg
Sanitary
Cool
Reliable
Sold by
Fruit of the Loom 36 in.
at 7^ per yard.
IMPERIAL
THEATRE.
WEDNESDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
Door* open l.)0. Performance
begin at 6.13 p.m.
For Sale
THE House on the lot
known as the JIB, just
above the Eastern Parade.
To be removed by the 20th
inst.
Apply
W. C. B. JOHNSON.
Oct. 3 1914 3 ins.


f
<0
SUNDAY NEXT4p.m.[
CHORAL SERVICE
AT
Zion Baptist Church
So/oist:-Mrs. PASHLEY
All will be welcome
SILVER COLLECTION.
divisions of the first two
armies are now fcnllecteil at our
training rentes. The third army
is being formed on new camping
grounds I'he fotiith army is bring
created by adding to the establish-
ment of ihe reserve battalions from
Which the units will 0e deti'ched
n^d organised similarly to the
pitier three armies.
The whole of the special reserve
and^xtra special reserve units will
he maintained at their full estab-
lishments as feeders to the Expedi-
tionary Force.
Local Battalions and Territorial
In addition to the four new
SpArflSSstSta bf.r<5w.' ' '
jaltons have been specially raised
by the public-spirited initiative of
cities, towns orindividuals.Several
more are in course of formation, expect toget work and fit'
thischtV.ctreerCe,Ve fhe Territorial Fcrce is making fomodations for them at the
*
NOTICE
i|"T"*rIE pubric are notified
i I that the Bahamas Tim-
all the men that they
need for the present and that
any going there cannot
great strides inefficiency, and will,
bf fore many months, be ready to
take a share in the campaign. This
'ftrc<" i> proving its military value
t>. the Kmpire by willing sub-
ordination of personal feelings to
the public good in th acceptance
of whatever duty may be assigned
to it in any portion of tlie Empire.
A division has already left for
Egypt, a bridgjtde l. Malta, and
a garrison for Gibraltar 'I he sol.
'her like qualities evinced by the
ton* are an attarancs to the Gov-
ernment that they maycount to the
full upon its readiness to play its
part wherever the exigencies of the
military situation may deirand.
Nor must I omit to refer to the
assistance which we shall receive
from the division of the gallant
Royal Marines and Bluejackets
now being organised by my right
hon. friend the First Lord of the
Admiialty. Their presence in the
field will he very welcome, for their
fighting qualities are well known.
I he creation of the new armies
referred to is fraught with con-
siderable difficulty s, one of which
is the provision of regimental offi-
cers I hope, the problem of supply,
ing officers may he so'ved by the
large numbers coming forward to
fill vacancies and by promotion
| from the noncommissioned officers'
ranks of the regular forces In a
country which prides itself on its
skill in and love of outdoor sports
we ought to be able to find sufficient
young men who will train and
qualify as offices under th* guid.
anr-eof the niK t*OS of traind ..ffi
cers whi.l, W(. areablo to provide
from nidi i and p'* where.
The Liverpool Echo,
Srpt, |8, K)!^.
_______(To be continued'
For Result
Advertise in
The Tribune
works.
By order
ARTHUR B. SUTTON.
September i6th, 1914
Agent
Shingles
Best No. 1 Heart sin. Cypres
Shingles at 9.60 per thous-
sand of 20 bundles
Discounts on lots of ovei
5000 shingles.
Special Price
also on cheaper gradesal- n
5in. Cypress at 96.7a per
thousand of 20 bundles. Thi:-
price made possible by a very
large purchase.
Fresh stock arriving every
week.
C. C. SAUNDERS.
Johnson's
Artistic Wood
Finishes
I Johnson's Prepared Wasa com-
plete finish and polish for all furintuie
Woodwork and Hoof*.
Johnson's Wood Dyefor the artistic
coloring of all wood, soft or hard
Johnson's Under Lac -a spirit
finish, very much superior to shellac or
varnish
Johnson's Fle.1 Wood Finish f r a
beautiful, artistic, hand rubbed effete ,
without tin- expense of rubbine.
Johnson's Pe>ste Wood Fillerfor '
tiling the pain and pom of wood,
preparint; it fm Ilia finisli
Johnson's Powdered Wax -foi b tl
11 iii) floors.
FOR. SALE BV
Chas. E. Albury
Fresh Onion Seed
FROM TENgRIFFfi
AND NATIVE SEED CORN
At Toote's, 499 Bay Street
Instruction
Book
FREE!
You Need It
In Your Home
Take the coupon below to
Irs E, Albury
and receive the following-FREE.
125c lm(ruction Book
2 10c Bottlea Joonaon'i Wood Dye
110c Can John.on'. Prepared Wax
The samples will prove that Johnson's Artistic Wood Finish--*
Johnson's Wood Dye
beautiful, lasting shades. 8
Johnson's Prepared Wax
A perfect furniture polish
nd finish for all woodwork,
II Wood w
apa/ts a
lud-
vel-
fiuish of
floors and furni
Ing pianos. Im<
vety, protecting
great beauty.
For Sale By
C.E. \lbury
HARDWARE
254, 2,2 Bay Street
..-._ *'""' s r THIS COUPON AT OUI STOKE """ """ "*|
We will rutnish tl bearer, free of ;ill expense, irh ""
I25c Instruction Hook
210c Kottks Johnson's) Wood Dm
1 10c Can JofUMOn'l Prepared Wax
MOT Bl PEJ '. 11 i) Bl \.n Ai>i Iff,
COCOANUTS
BAHAMA ISLANDS '
IT is now possible for owners
of land with fully bearing
^rees to prove its value and ob
tai" rents.
For further particulars
Apply to
1. THE0. FARRINGTON
Nassau, N I*.
Agent for
Bahamas Produce Marketing;
Company
139 Copthull House
Copt hall Avenue
3 Mo. London, E. C
BEST gK 76-
let. We df) not sell it.
BUT we do sell and wil
confioue to sell
Standard Oil Co.
Gasoline. Test your Gaso-
line. We invite compnrisor
with any in the City.
Price -'Jets. flrf.gallon iL
50 gallon Drums. Customarf
using uk) gals, or over pej
Mouth 20c. gallon.
Watch our Notice for Ker-
osene in June.
C. C. SAUNDKRj


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