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Putylcatlon begn *t 6.40 p.m. Zbe tribune TuMday, October 6, 1914. "HOW THE WAR BEGAN" The London "Daily Teleg w a ? h is P ublishin g a series of shilling handbooks bearing on the War. One of these, with the above title, lies before us. The book starts with an introductory chapter entitled "The causes of the War" by Dr. W. L. Courtney, but the main part of it is supplied by Mr. J. M. Kennedy and is in part an able resume of the diplomatic correspondence and interviews from the date of the assassination of the Austrian Crown Prince on June .-8th to the time of the decision of our Government to participate in the conflict. Sir Edward Grey's famous "White Paper" is freely drawn upon. With this resume are included illuminating contemporary press messages, mainly from Vienna and Paris. What strikes one first of all is the determination of Austria to force a quarrel with Servia. Dr. Dillon makes it clear in his correspondence with the "Daily Telegraphthat Austria was bent on putting an end to the agitation for a "Big Servia." Her aim, as the Emperor of Rus sia said, was to make Servia a vassal state One is struck with the way in which the pace was forced by Austria. Her ultimatum was launched at Servia while the President and Prime Minister of France were hobnobbing with the Czar in Russia and faraway from England. At the same time the Russian Government was faced with a terrible stroke, the French army was supposed to be unprepared, and the Conference on the Home Rule question at Buckingham Palace had failed. It seems likely that Austria thought she migb/ at such a propitious moment coerce Ser via without interference from the Triple Entente. The statement of the late British Ambassador to Vienna, publish ed in the middle of September, gives colour to the view that Austria hoped thus to localise the conflict. But it also looks probable that Germany thought the time ripe for plunging the great European states into war and rush ed her ally into it. The German Emperor was in Scandinavia when the Austrian note was sent to Servia. He returned speedily. Before his return, the German Chancellor and Foreign Secretary gave a carefully guard ed support to Sir Edward Grey's earnest efforts for peace, but when the Kaiser reached Berlin the tone of Germany hardened. Of course the invasion of Belgium was quite a sufficient reason for our taking a hand in the struggle, and was, as a matter of fact, the immediate occasion of it. At the same time, it is hardly likely that our Government would have been long outside the conflict even if Belgium had not been invaded. It is clear from what Sir Edward Grey said in the House of Commons early in August that the first act of hostility by the German fleet against Erance would have been followed by a British attack on the German fleet. Reading between the lines, one feels that England saw in the action of Germany an effort to reduce France to the position of a second rate power, and was determined to do her best to prevent it. Who can doubt now that the crushing of France would have laid us open to an attack from Germany in the fu ture ? The Kaiser wanted to keep us neutral now, and turn on us later when France and Russia had been put out of ac tion and we were "nnt having any." The Mail Steamer "Viuilancia" arrived early this morning from New York with the following Passengers — Misses Adelle Bleby and Evelyn Kendrick; Sir Joseph and Ladv Brown, Dr Charles W and Mrs Bleby, Mr and Mrs Howard T. Brice,' Dr Walter and Mrs Kendrick; Messrs Orville Conover, S. Randolph Noble, Frank W. Tibbin and Vincent Brown. Mr and Mrs George Greene, Mr and Mrs Thomas Moss, Mrs Agnes Cameron, Mr Emil Voil and. MANY MEN MANY MINDS "British Hypocrisy" Mr. Herman Uidder. On British "Hypocrisy" "May God's vengence fall on Germany She has violated Belgium's neutralitv," the Brit ish piously ejaculate.—Mr. Herman Ridder. Evidently the Imperial Chancellor accurately reflected German thought when he pronounced the treaty guaranteeing Belgium's neutrality a mere "scrap of paper"—to be torn into smaller scraps if it suited the Kaiser's purpose. But the English thought was different, Sir Edward Grey did not plunge great Britain into war tor a mere scrap of paper, but for the principle this particular "scrap of paper" repre sented; in other words, in be half of the inviolability of international obligations. In his role of German protagonist Mr. Ridder can hardly be expected to concede the fact, but as an American Mr. Ridder must know that the sentiment of this country is running strong against the cause he advocates, not because of any particular love for the English people, and certainly not because of any unfriendliness for the German people, but because Americans understand that in fighting fen the inviola bility of international obligations, Great Britain and her allies are lighting in behalf of a principle upon the preservation of which depends what the world knows as civilization. Sew York Herald Sept 30th 1914 A.T. Mahan N. S. N., D. C. L., L. L. D. 'At this moment the proposed fortifications of Flushing byHolland' is accounted for in the pub lie opinion of Europe only by the purpose of preventing a British Force, Naval or Military, from proceeding up the Scheldt, the entrance of which would thus be commanded. This would close the easiest route by which <>Great Britain could maintain the neutrality of Belgium, as she is bound y guarantee to do." '(Italics ours) — North American Review 191 — :o: — Among the passengers per "Vigilanciu" this morning is Mr Frank W. Tibbin of the Debevoise Company. —:o: — We have had the pleasure of meeting Mr Tibbin, he is looking very well and there is a decided improvement in his injured knee. Welcome Mr Tibbin. Mr Orville Conover of Burton and Davis Co is also an arrival by this morning's steamer and we are pleased to see him looking quite fit The Tribune extends a Welcome lonin %  %  l %  %  Sir Joseph and Lady,,'Brown returned this morning from their usual summer vatftiuajn Canada. — :o:— Foreign Mails per "Frances E." will be closed to-morrow morning at 8 o'clock. Latest War News RADIOGRAMS PICKED UP October 6th 1914 Berlin says that Germany is strong enough to succeed. Four million men are now in the field and there are two million in re serve. Paris says that the Allies re pelleda terrific attack at Roye Saturday. Rome reports that the Russains have defeated the Germans in Russian Poland, causing tlie loss of thirty thousand and twenty thousand prisoners, Rome als<> says that it is reported that the Austrians thinks of moving the seat of government from Vienna to Prague or Salzburg. Montreal says 32,00 > men and 8,000 horses sailed in thirty one ships with convoy ^•eleven other ships. There are'various reports of the sinking of British Steamships by German cruisers. Papeete, Tahiti, and the cable station on Panning Island are being bombarded. Heavy fighting occured at Tsingtau. October 6th 1914 General Von Kluck reinforced by troops from the Geiman center is making a determined effort to crush the Allies in their attempt to out Hank him The deteat of the Germans in vading Russia through East Prussia is more derisive than previously reported. The Germans are reported to have lost 70,000 men. This victory is of the gratest importance to Russia as it prevents German landing sea oper ations. Asiatic cholera is reported among the troops returning to Vienna from Galicia. The situation at the fortified positions of Antwerp is unchangd M Skirmishes have been Ifported on the Anglo German frontier in East Africa with a series of German repulses. A big battle on the Silesian frontier is imminent as both armies are moving forward and will meet in Russian Poland.



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in Tho general situation France is stationary. No confirmation ( has been received at Y\tt|higton of the Ber lin report that Portugal is preparing to join the Allies A long standing treaty would force Por tugal into theconflict if England called upon her. The Allies assumed the offen si vein the battle in France but tlieir advanced outposts were forced back on the left wing. It is believed that the Germans are exhausted. German airships lent valuable aid in locating the Allies posi tion, enabling the Germans to bring up reinforcements. The Allies are continually moving to the North hoping to cut the Germans off from Bel gium. London:—An official Constan tinople dispatch says that the victims of the earthquake in K >nia, Province of Asia Minor Saturday at midnight are esti [ mated at 2500. Washington:—The Mexican situation is satisfactory says Mr Bryan. Negotiations are under way for a cessation of hostili ties. Peace dategates go to Auga Calientas to*confer with Villa's representatives Special to the Nassau Guardian New York, Oct. 6th. The French and British have been pushed from their positions by a German onslaught nortli of the River Oise. The Czar has arrived at the Front to lead the Russian forces in the big battle at Cracow. Three million men are engag ed. The Germans have lost 20,000 in the battle along the River Nieinen. There are British forces aid ing the Belgians at Antwerp. —:o:~ Mangrove Cav, Andros Is. Oct. 2nd. 1914. •To the Editor of the Tribune. Sir, It has been my privilege to witness during the last four weeks a demonstration of loyalty of unexpected as it is inspir ing. When thsijCommissioner announced that meetings would be held in all settlements of the district to collect nimev for ilie War Relief Fund, I had serious doubts as to the success of the undertaking, as our men are all Seamen who live to the limit of their means, and often a little beyond, and in consequence of the failure of the sponge market, are in very straightened circumstances. The first meeting however which was held at Mangrove Cay, and of which an account is given in your columns, dispelled all duubt, and from thence forth the slogan was "£ too and more." I am glad to say this is an accomplished fact. About 10 o'clock on Sept. 20th the yachts Pearl and Signal weighed anchor and headed south, with the Commissioner. Father Duquenoy, Bruce A. Bowe, Esq. and others on board. First stopping place was Driggs Hill about 6 miles south of Man grove Cav. there we found that Mr. Albert Smith of the firm of Frances Smith & Bros, had at ready collect (id upwards of £14 and by his leadership inspired the people of this small place to respond most generously to the appeal. Taking population as a basis, no settlement in the district has given so liberally their total now reaching the sum of £16. 6. oj. After a short address to the people here the party left for Long Bay Cays, 6 miles farther south, arriving about 5 p.m. A m^etin^ was called in the school house, which had been prepared by the teaeher Mr. Brqwn for the purpose. Here a large assembly was addressed by several speakers, setting forth in the clearest and most eloquent language at theii command the object of the meeting, and our dutyns British subjects to render all the aid in our power, .here was a hearty respond and £12. 17 5. was at once subscribed, with promises of substantial increase in the near future. On the following day we again embarked with the settlement of Pure gold as our objec tive. Here a meeting was held at the house of .Mr.Henry M. Dames and a most enthusiastic reception given to all the mem bers of the party. The inhabitants of Deep and Turtle Creeks vied with those of Pure Gold in the liberality of their giving, but the Utter place proved 'rue to its name, Great excitement prevailed. The Commissioner, Fr. Duque toy. \lr. Henry Dames, Mr. Richard Dames. Mr. llaark Dames Mr. Gordon, and others, addressed the meeting, and amid scenes of wild enthusiasm £24. 17. 5. was subscribed in a few minutes. Nearly every man and woman coming forward with his or her offering On Sept. 22nd we returned to Kemps Bay which had been passed on the way to Pure Gold. Their a large and attentive meeting was addressed in the native Baptists Chapel. This meeting was remarkable for the close attention of the audience & the large number of people who gave moderate sums of money that were very creditable to the place, considering the straight ened circumstances of many of the inhabitants. Many from Black Point and Smiths Hill attended this meeting and £11. 4. o. was subscribed. At this point some of the party were obliged to return home, they parted regretfully from the Commissioner who with Mr. Bowe proceeded to Mars Bay. the Ultima Thule of the district, They stopped en route at a little place called Pleasant Bay whence the inhabitants generously Subscribed £4.15.0 Mars Bay is also a small place but its people responded loyalh and subscribed the creditable sum of £8.13.7. In conclusion I would say that we have among us, as in every community some men of larger means and poorer spirit who have up to the present time done little to help forward this patriotic and righteous movement; we believe however that stirred by the example of their brethren these men will not much longer be satisfied to maintain that pauper spirit which is so hateful to the loyal and patriotic masses of the people. Too much praise connot be given to the commissioner for his indefatigable energy in further ing this cause, and to Fr. Du quenoy who though very unwell most of the time, stuck to his guns and gave one strong address after another. To both of these gentlemen the success of the work is in a large measure due. Thanking you Sir for the use of your valuable space. I Am Youra Sincerelv. E.W. FOKSYTII. —:o: — BAHAMAS WAR. K CLIFF FUND The following subscriptions hnve been received, Amount previously acknwledgcd £1868 15 6 St. Johns Baptist Chapel 13 o St. Johns Sunday School 9 "Anon" 10 0 0 Mrs. J. H. Brown 3 0 0 Mr. and Mrs. N. B. Burnside 3 0 O Electric Light Station Staff 5 0 0 Mr. and Mrs H. E. S. Reeves 10 0 Mr. and Mrs H. F. Armbrister 3 3 0 F. T. Montell & Sons 10 5 0 Mr. and Mrs. "J.B." 5 5 0 St. Johns Churches 2 0 0 R. H. and E. H. Curry 10 0 0 The J. S. Johnson Co. 20 0 0 J. Alwyn Kelso Nicolls'Town, Andros 1 10 0 Mangrove Cay Andros Island 2nd. Con. 7i 7 0 W. Miller 5 0 0 John S. Garland 10 0 0 Mr. and Mrs. E.Y. V. Sutton 1 1 0 Governors Harbour 29 1 8 Mastic Point Andros 32 3 2 Nicolls Town, Andros 11 16 I* Harbour Island 59 8 8 Current, Eleuthera 9 11 6 Gregory Town 3. 17 9 Hatchet Bay 1 0 11 Lower Bogue 5 r 0 Bluff 7 17 11 Total £2197 16 io£ In Saturday's issue for Mr. and Mrs Joseph Davis rad Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Lewis £110 For Sale T HE House on the lot known as the JIB, just above the Eastern Parade. To be removed bv the 20th inst. Apply W. C. B. JOHNSON. Oct. 3 1914 I ins. Kerosene 1502 I N New 50 gallon Galvanized Iron Drums at (8ctl per Gallon. In 10 gallon Cc'ins at aocti per. Gallon. > Drums and Cans returnable Full particulars at Office "Frances E.," Nassau N. P. C. C. SAUNDERS Liverpool Echo, Sept. 9,1914 ..



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hammering of the Allies on the centre line north of Laon has had its perceptible effect, and for several days the conviction has been forced here that Von Kluck was fighting with the sole object in view of saving his line of retreat into Belgium. According to the reports of the official French War Bureau the Germans in the last forty-eight hours actually passed to the westward of Peronne and reached a point as far west as Chaulnes. The late despatches of last night indicate that Peronne has again been captured by the French, and this means that the Germans are to the east of the North railway. The whole object of the German defence has been to retain control of the North railway, leading into Belgium. Once this railway is lost the German position would be un tenable. General von Kluck it has been stated repeatedly in these columns, has been fighting to save his army. His fierce counter attacks have been made to beat back the ever pressing line of the Allies and thereby afford him the means to withdraw his artillery and equipment ft was suspected more than forty-eight hours ago that when the Germans were resorting to bayonet charges at night it was to cover the withdrawal of siege guns and howitzer batteries. The belief is strong that Von Kluck's right has ken turned by new forces arriving in the north from the region of the Channel. It has been repeatedly indicated in these columns that the leal danger for the Germain might be expected from Boulogne Calais and Dunkirk. The Germans hae appreciated this fact and they adveitised their apprehension by throwing up a line of intrenchments running from Valenciennes to Mons, in a due east and west direction and obviously intended for protection against forcts from the north. In the eastern theatre of war, the Russians aie now squarely planted in Hungary, and an advance on Budapest may be looked for any day. It may reasonably be expected that the Servians will advance to northward to effect a juncture with the Russians to the eastward of Budapest. Along the Prussian frontier the Germans have withdrawn to the Polish border, and hold a long line reaching from Thorn on the nmt.h to Kalisz, and now reaching further south to connect with the German forces sent to the relief of Cracow. The Russians, at last accounts, were only a few miles distant from Cracow and advancing at a rapid rate along the Cracowl.embeHg railway. The fall of Cracow may be looked for soon. The Austrians have failed miserably in their efforts to check the Russian advance, and Germanv is too hard pressed by General Rennenfampf, who is advancing from Lodz, to offer a serious resistance before Cracow. At this writing with the news of Von Kluck's army in retreat, and the steady advance of the Rus. sians in the east, the situation for the Allies has never looked so favorable since the outbreak of the war.— Ibid. THE Cosmopolitan HIGH SCHOOL Opens on Monday, Oct. 5th in Aurora Hall on Charlotte Street. For particulars apply to Prof. G. G. Coffin, head master, or Mr. J. P. isimms. COCOANUTS BAHAMA ISLANDS I T is now possible for owners of land with fully bearing trees to prove its value and ob tain rents. For further particulars Apply to J. THEO. FARRINGTON Nassau, N. P. Agent for Bahamas Produce Marketing Company 139 Copthall House Lopthall Avenue 3 Mo. London,E. C IMPERIAL THEATRE WEDNESDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY Doors open 7.50. Performance begin at o.l5 p.m. Shingles Best No. i Heart 5m. Cypres Shingles at $9.60 per thoussand of 20 bundles Discounts on lots of over 5000 shingles. Special Price also on cheaper grades—also 51B. Cypress at $6.72 per thousand of 20 bundles. This price made possible by a very large purchase. Fresh stock arriving every week. C. C. SAUNDERS. NOTICE T HE public are notified that the Bahamas Timber Company, Limited have all the men that they need for the present and that any going there cannot expect to get work and are notified that there are no accomodations for them at the works. By order ARTHUR B. SUTTON. Agent September 16th, 1914 Notice T HIS is to inform my Patrons and the Public in (iMieral that I have opened my Public Black Smith Shop; and am now ready to do anything in 1 e line ol General repair or new w rk Morse Shoeing Sfitciatly. All ork done. Mechanically. P. A. HUYLER. Bay East St. ("Wharf; Mapes Fertilizers / naw carry in stock the following formulas: Pineapple.— It has been proven that this has no equal and a visit to fields using same will convince you. Vegetable. —Now is the time to use this and increase your yield in Tomatoes, Potatoes, Onions and all other vegetables by ioo per cent. Orange Tree. —To assist the growth of Young Citrus Tree. Fruit and Wine.— Increase the yield and growth of old Citrus trees. Eor further information and books on the use of these fertilizers, please apply to WALTER K. MOORE Agent for.Mapes Fertiliser in the Bahamas. LOOK! The following Blank forms may be had at "The Tribune" Office. Duty Entry. Free Entry. Warehouse Entries. Sponging Articles. Ship's Reports. In quantities at Special Rates Popular Mechanics Magazine "WIT ll l M YOU CAN W—B— IT* A CHEAT Ca-tiadad Story of lk.WU*. ** r n m—t which you may begin reading; C any time, and which will hold your tarast forever. You are livingin the Mot yeer.of the moat woodortul age, of what it aoubtl*** the great eat world la the universe. A ratrl s nt of Mar* would gladly pay— $1,000 BragiESE, Are you reading it? Two milUona of your neighbor! at*, and It la 1 he favorite mageline in thousand* of the best American home*. It appeals to all daaaea—old and young—men and women. The "8h., letee" DeputaMat (0 pagW) give* eaar wayi to do lliinm — how to make naafal articles for bom* and ahnp, repair*. •**. AatatoBT M iewa a ii* (10 pagea 1 tella bow to nuk* Mleatnn furniture, wlralraaouUlta, boat*, •aglnes, magic, and all Uia thing! a boy lore*. %  Mkaana,,, warts roe r— **—ets or TQOAV POPULAR MECHANICS CO. MS W. Waakiaewa at. CHICAGO, U J.A. Johnson's Artistic Wood Finishes Johnson'* Prepared WaS* plete finish and polish for alrfu W'xxaWork and floors. a com urmture, Johnson'* Wood Dye— for the artistic coloring of all wood, soft or hard Johnson's Under Lac—a spirit finish, very much superior to shellac of varnish Johnson's Tin.! Wood Finish—fora beautiful, artistic, hand-rubbed effete without the expense of rubbing. Johnson's Pa.stc Wood Filler—for filling the grain and pores of wood, preparing it for the finish. Johnson's Powdered Wax—for bal room floors. FOR. SALE BY Chas. E. Albury Notice W E would call the attention of our friends in Nassau and on the OUT ISLANDS to the following prices on lumber which will go into effect from to-day. All ROUGH lumber up to 8 ft. 6/3 per 100. All DRESSED lumber up to 8 ft. 8/4 per 100. All ROUGH and DRESSED to 16ft. 10/5 per 100. ANYTHING over 16 ft. 1 a/6 per 100. (above up to 8 ins. wide) These prices are fqgaCASH absolutely and being^WAR prices are made to help the public and are subject to change without notice. Th. Bahstmas Timber Co. Ltd. 10 East Street September 21tt, 1914.



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CO o CO 0) es— Nulllua addlctua (urare in verb; magietrl. Being bound to iwtiir to (he Dojm >f no Msiiir. VOL.X. Nasanvj. N. P.. BhntiM, Tuaedey. October 6.1914 No. 234 L. GILBERT DUPUCH, Editor dttd Ptofrittor. OFFICE: 38-44 MARKET STREET Nassau, N. P., Bahamas P. O. BOX 163 PUBLISHED DAILY CD 8 E < 3 Monday, Wednesday and Friday— single copy ij Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday— single copy ,d Weekly i (i M"hly i s. Id Quarterly 4 S HalfYearly L Year| y i f*. PAYABLE IN ADVANCE Advertising Rates :-Six pence per line for first insertion; three pence per line for second insertion ; and one penny per line for tubaqueut insertions. Advertisements under eight lines 4a. FLOWER Or GREAT GERMAN ARMY OBEYS THE KAISER'S COMMAND TO 'DO OR DIE'. f London, Tuesday. After eighteen days of terrific fighting the battle of the Aisne, which is really a battle of seven rivers, from the Oise to the Woevre and the most sanguinary and colossal battle in the history of war, still rages all along the whole line. In this region, obeying the stern command of the Kaiser to do or die, the Germans have saci ificed the flower of their great army, who, unable to do, have died by thousands. Here it was that the'proud Prussian Guard, the greatest fighters of the Fatherland, came to grip with the terrible Turcos, only to find death at the bayonet points of these superb fighters from Algiers. "I'oaalie" is the pet name which thesesplendidsoldiershave bestowed upon the bayonetand "Rosalie" is shedding the blood of the brave soldiers of the Fatherland by day and by night. Germany's picked men have fought with the energy and desperation to cut their way through the Allied armies, but everywhere along the great battle front they have been hurled back with appalling losses. On the Allies'left where Sir John French's British army has been writing an epic of war with the bayonet too then was a lull yester. day. The Germans realized it would be worse than folly to challenge the khaki chd warriors of Great Britain on the sixty second birthday of Sir John French the redoubtable Irish general, who, next to Lord Kitchener, is the hero of the soldiers who at Mons, tghting one against five, conv need Potsdam that shopkeepers .nake first class fighting men. Eighteen Daye of Great Ba tie. Brave also are these B itish soldiers, and all the world, in hiding Germany admits that nov>, for these are the men who have broken the spirit of the Kaiser's invincibles Their heroism has been equalled by General Joffre's gallant French, who, bearing the brunt of most of the savage German assaults, giving way how then before overwhelming numbers, are nevertheless this morning driving the relentless foe along the road to retribution that leads through Belgium to Germany. This is the eighteenth day of the world's greatest battle and it finds the armies of the Allies, despite the frenzied and exhau ting attacks of the German legions in splendid condition. So filled are they with the desire to fight that the officers actually are forced to use the sternest measures to keep them from throwing themselves on the almost impregnable positions held by the Kaiser's forces. But it is a great thing that the French are steadied by the phlegmatic, bulldog Englishmen, who are restraining themselves, charging only when ordered to charge and then piling up the battle field with German dead. There is a feeling here that the Kaiser's great western army has exhausted its strength in the savage attacks of the last few days, that tne spirit of the Hun is broken and that General Fear, who is a cousin german to General Rout, is on the eve of takirg command. Important Nawe la Expected Soon England knows I hat the Franco British armies hive been strengthened, ton, hy the finest fighters in the world, and within fortyeight hours the world should hear of something that will cheer every foe of militarism and every friend of those who fight for freedom. Bleeding Belgium is doing its share. The blood of its martyrs has inspired its soldiers to prodigious feats of valor and they are exacting a deadly toll for the murder rapine and desolation. Just as a thief suspects a policeman is behind every bush, 30 the Germans in Belgium suspect there is a Belgian in every hiding place, and the Germans are right. The Belgian raiders have cut the German lines of communication and the army of Antwerp is making the foe pay dearly for Louvain, Liege Alost and Tremonde. While the Belgians are hammering the Germans the Russians are continuing their irresistible forward march. Though the German army in east Prussia has made some advance penetrating bey nd the Russian frontier the Bear is too busy completing the destruction of the Austrians to do more than hold the Kaiser's forces in check. But when Cracow has fallen then Germany's east Prussian afmy—now, it is said commanded by the Kaiser himself—will be compelled to meet the overwhelming forces of Russia's first, second and third I ints forming an army, I am told, of more than four million men. To add to the war lord's troubles he has lost the capital of Getman Cameroon, which has fallen to an English naval force. The Japanese ase steadily closing in on Tsingtau, and Roumania with her army fully mobilized, is ready to strike. The New York Herald, Sept. 30th —:o:— THE WAR IN EUROPE A CRITIQUE By an American Military Officer The break in the German right wing according to the late despatches has come at last. It nas been too much to expect that tba tremendous pressure exerted against the army of General von Kluck could be withstood many days more The seriousness of the situation was advertised by the Germans when they were compelled to weaken their left wing by two full army corps in order to send succor to the hard pressed army on their extreme right. The tremendous %  1 1 — (Continued on fourth page)


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Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Tuesday, October 06, 1914
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Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
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General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Full Text
CO
o
CO
0)
es
Nulllua addlctua (urare in verb; magietrl.
Being bound to iwtiir to (he Dojm >f no Msiiir.
VOL.X.
Nasanvj. N. P.. BhntiM, Tuaedey. October 6.1914
No. 234
L. GILBERT DUPUCH,
Editor dttd Ptofrittor.
OFFICE: 38-44 MARKET STREET
Nassau, N. P., Bahamas
P. O. BOX 163
PUBLISHED DAILY
CD *
8
E
<
3
Monday, Wednesday and Friday
single copy ......... ij
Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday
single copy......... ,d
Weekly ............ i(i
M"hly ............is. Id
Quarterly..........4S,
HalfYearly...... L
Year|y ............if*.
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
Advertising Rates :-Six pence per line
for first insertion; three pence per line
for second insertion ; and one penny per
line for tubaqueut insertions.
Advertisements under eight lines 4a.
FLOWER Or GREAT GERMAN
ARMY OBEYS THE KAISER'S
COMMAND TO 'DO OR DIE'.
f London, Tuesday.
After eighteen days of terrific
fighting the battle of the Aisne,
which is really a battle of seven
rivers, from the Oise to the Woevre
and the most sanguinary and co-
lossal battle in the history of war,
still rages all along the whole line.
In this region, obeying the stern
command of the Kaiser to do or
die, the Germans have saci ificed the
flower of their great army, who, un-
able to do, have died by thousands.
Here it was that the'proud Prus-
sian Guard, the greatest fighters of
the Fatherland, came to grip with
the terrible Turcos, only to find
death at the bayonet points of
these superb fighters from Algiers.
"I'oaalie" is the pet name which
thesesplendidsoldiershave bestow-
ed upon the bayonetand "Rosalie"
is shedding the blood of the brave
soldiers of the Fatherland by day
and by night. Germany's picked
men have fought with the energy
and desperation to cut their way
through the Allied armies, but
everywhere along the great battle
front they have been hurled back
with appalling losses.
On the Allies'left where Sir John
French's British army has been
writing an epic of war with the
bayonet too then was a lull yester.
day. The Germans realized it
would be worse than folly to chal-
lenge the khaki chd warriors of
Great Britain on the sixty second
birthday of Sir John French the
redoubtable Irish general, who,
next to Lord Kitchener, is the hero
of the soldiers who at Mons, tght-
ing one against five, conv need
Potsdam that shopkeepers .nake
first class fighting men.
Eighteen Daye of Great Ba tie.
Brave also are these B itish
soldiers, and all the world, in hid-
ing Germany admits that nov>, for
these are the men who have broken
the spirit of the Kaiser's invincibles
Their heroism has been equalled by
General Joffre's gallant French,
who, bearing the brunt of most of
the savage German assaults, giving
way how then before overwhelm-
ing numbers, are nevertheless this
morning driving the relentless foe
along the road to retribution that
leads through Belgium to Germany.
This is the eighteenth day of
the world's greatest battle and it
finds the armies of the Allies, des-
pite the frenzied and exhau ting
attacks of the German legions in
splendid condition. So filled are
they with the desire to fight that
the officers actually are forced to
use the sternest measures to keep
them from throwing themselves on
the almost impregnable positions
held by the Kaiser's forces. But it
is a great thing that the French are
steadied by the phlegmatic, bull-
dog Englishmen, who are restrain-
ing themselves, charging only when
ordered to charge and then
piling up the battle field with Ger-
man dead.
There is a feeling here that the
Kaiser's great western army has
exhausted its strength in the savage
attacks of the last few days, that
tne spirit of the Hun is broken and
that General Fear, who is a cousin
german to General Rout, is on the
eve of takirg command.
Important Nawe la Expected Soon
England knows I hat the Franco
British armies hive been strength-
ened, ton, hy the finest fighters
in the world, and within forty-
eight hours the world should hear
of something that will cheer every
foe of militarism and every friend
of those who fight for freedom.
Bleeding Belgium is doing its
share. The blood of its martyrs has
inspired its soldiers to prodigi-
ous feats of valor and they are ex-
acting a deadly toll for the murder
rapine and desolation. Just as a
thief suspects a policeman is be-
hind every bush, 30 the Germans
in Belgium suspect there is a Bel-
gian in every hiding place, and the
Germans are right. The Belgian
raiders have cut the German lines
of communication and the army
of Antwerp is making the foe pay
dearly for Louvain, Liege Alost
and Tremonde.
While the Belgians are hammer-
ing the Germans the Russians are
continuing their irresistible for-
ward march. Though the German
army in east Prussia has made
some advance penetrating bey nd
the Russian frontier the Bear is too
busy completing the destruction of
the Austrians to do more than hold
the Kaiser's forces in check. But
when Cracow has fallen then Ger-
many's east Prussian afmynow,
it is said commanded by the Kais-
er himselfwill be compelled to
meet the overwhelming forces of
Russia's first, second and third I ints
forming an army, I am told, of
more than four million men.
To add to the war lord's troubles
he has lost the capital of Getman
Cameroon, which has fallen to an
English naval force.
The Japanese ase steadily clos-
ing in on Tsingtau, and Roumania
with her army fully mobilized, is
ready to strike.
The New York Herald, Sept. 30th
:o:
THE WAR IN EUROPE
A CRITIQUE
By an American Military Officer
The break in the German right
wing according to the late des-
patches has come at last. It nas
been too much to expect that tba
tremendous pressure exerted against
the army of General von Kluck
could be withstood many days more
The seriousness of the situation
was advertised by the Germans
when they were compelled to
weaken their left wing by two full
army corps in order to send succor
to the hard pressed army on their
extreme right. The tremendous
. 1 1
(Continued on fourth page)


Putylcatlon begn *t 6.40 p.m.
Zbe tribune
TuMday, October 6, 1914.
"HOW THE WAR BEGAN"
The London "Daily Tele-
gwa?h" is Publishing a series of
shilling handbooks bearing on
the War. One of these, with the
above title, lies before us. The
book starts with an introductory
chapter entitled "The causes of
the War" by Dr. W. L. Court-
ney, but the main part of it is
supplied by Mr. J. M. Kennedy
and is in part an able resume of
the diplomatic correspondence
and interviews from the date of
the assassination of the Austrian
Crown Prince on June .-8th to
the time of the decision of our
Government to participate in
the conflict. Sir Edward Grey's
famous "White Paper" is freely
drawn upon. With this resume
are included illuminating con-
temporary press messages, main-
ly from Vienna and Paris.
What strikes one first of all is
the determination of Austria to
force a quarrel with Servia. Dr.
Dillon makes it clear in his cor-
respondence with the "Daily
Telegraph- that Austria was
bent on putting an end to the
agitation for a "Big Servia."
Her aim, as the Emperor of Rus
sia said, was to make Servia a
vassal state
One is struck with the way in
which the pace was forced by
Austria. Her ultimatum was
launched at Servia while the
President and Prime Minister of
France were hobnobbing with
the Czar in Russia and faraway
from England. At the same time
the Russian Government was
faced with a terrible stroke, the
French army was supposed to be
unprepared, and the Conference
on the Home Rule question at
Buckingham Palace had failed.
It seems likely that Austria
thought she migb/ at such a
propitious moment coerce Ser
via without interference from
the Triple Entente. The
statement of the late British
Ambassador to Vienna, publish
ed in the middle of September,
gives colour to the view that
Austria hoped thus to localise
the conflict.
But it also looks probable
that Germany thought the time
ripe for plunging the great Eu-
ropean states into war and rush
ed her ally into it. The Ger-
man Emperor was in Scandina-
via when the Austrian note was
sent to Servia. He returned
speedily. Before his return, the
German Chancellor and Foreign
Secretary gave a carefully guard
ed support to Sir Edward Grey's
earnest efforts for peace, but
when the Kaiser reached Berlin
the tone of Germany hardened.
Of course the invasion of Bel-
gium was quite a sufficient rea-
son for our taking a hand in the
struggle, and was, as a matter
of fact, the immediate occasion
of it. At the same time, it is
hardly likely that our Govern-
ment would have been long out-
side the conflict even if Belgium
had not been invaded. It is clear
from what Sir Edward Grey
said in the House of Commons
early in August that the first act
of hostility by the German fleet
against Erance would have been
followed by a British attack on
the German fleet.
Reading between the lines,
one feels that England saw in
the action of Germany an effort
to reduce France to the position
of a second rate power, and was
determined to do her best to
prevent it. Who can doubt now
that the crushing of France
would have laid us open to an
attack from Germany in the fu
ture ? The Kaiser wanted to
keep us neutral now, and turn
on us later when France and
Russia had been put out of ac
tion and we were "nnt having
any."
The Mail Steamer "Viuilancia"
arrived early this morning from
New York with the following
Passengers
Misses Adelle Bleby and
Evelyn Kendrick; Sir Joseph and
Ladv Brown, Dr Charles W and
Mrs Bleby, Mr and Mrs Howard
T. Brice,' Dr Walter and Mrs
Kendrick; Messrs Orville Con-
over, S. Randolph Noble, Frank
W. Tibbin and Vincent Brown.
Mr and Mrs George Greene,
Mr and Mrs Thomas Moss, Mrs
Agnes Cameron, Mr Emil Voil
and.
MANY MEN MANY MINDS
"British Hypocrisy"
Mr. Herman Uidder.
On British "Hypocrisy"
"May God's vengence fall on
Germany She has violated
Belgium's neutralitv," the Brit
ish piously ejaculate.Mr. Her-
man Ridder.
Evidently the Imperial Chan-
cellor accurately reflected Ger-
man thought when he pronounc-
ed the treaty guaranteeing Bel-
gium's neutrality a mere "scrap
of paper"to be torn into small-
er scraps if it suited the Kaiser's
purpose.
But the English thought was
different, Sir Edward Grey did
not plunge great Britain into
war tor a mere scrap of paper,
but for the principle this par-
ticular "scrap of paper" repre
sented; in other words, in be
half of the inviolability of inter-
national obligations.
In his role of German protag-
onist Mr. Ridder can hardly be
expected to concede the fact, but
as an American Mr. Ridder must
know that the sentiment of this
country is running strong against
the cause he advocates, not be-
cause of any particular love for
the English people, and certainly
not because of any unfriendli-
ness for the German people, but
because Americans understand
that in fighting fen the inviola
bility of international obliga-
tions, Great Britain and her al-
lies are lighting in behalf of a
principle upon the preservation
of which depends what the
world knows as civilization.
Sew York Herald
Sept 30th 1914
A.T. Mahan N. S. N., D. C. L.,
L. L. D.
'At this moment the proposed
fortifications of Flushing byHol-
land' is accounted for in the pub
lie opinion of Europe only by
the purpose of preventing a Bri-
tish Force, Naval or Military,
from proceeding up the Scheldt,
the entrance of which would
thus be commanded. This would
close the easiest route by which
<>Great Britain could maintain
the neutrality of Belgium, as she
is bound y guarantee to do."
'(Italics ours)
North American Review 191
:o:
Among the passengers per
"Vigilanciu" this morning is Mr
Frank W. Tibbin of the Debe-
voise Company.
:o:
We have had the pleasure of
meeting Mr Tibbin, he is looking
very well and there is a decided
improvement in his injured knee.
Welcome Mr Tibbin.
Mr Orville Conover of Burton
and Davis Co is also an arrival
by this morning's steamer and
we are pleased to see him look-
ing quite fit The Tribune extends
a Welcome
lonin
' l
Sir Joseph and Lady,,'Brown re-
turned this morning from their
usual summer vatftiuajn Cana-
da.
:o:
Foreign Mails per "Frances
E." will be closed to-morrow
morning at 8 o'clock.
Latest War News
RADIOGRAMS
PICKED UP
October 6th 1914
Berlin says that Germany is
strong enough to succeed. Four
million men are now in the field
and there are two million in re
serve.
Paris says that the Allies re
pelleda terrific attack at Roye
Saturday.
Rome reports that the Rus-
sains have defeated the Germans
in Russian Poland, causing tlie
loss of thirty thousand and
twenty thousand prisoners,
Rome als<> says that it is re-
ported that the Austrians thinks
of moving the seat of govern-
ment from Vienna to Prague or
Salzburg.
Montreal says 32,00 > men and
8,000 horses sailed in thirty one
ships with convoy ^eleven
other ships. There are'various
reports of the sinking of British
Steamships by German cruisers.
Papeete, Tahiti, and the cable
station on Panning Island are
being bombarded.
Heavy fighting occured at
Tsingtau.
October 6th 1914
General Von Kluck reinforced
by troops from the Geiman
center is making a determined
effort to crush the Allies in their
attempt to out Hank him
The deteat of the Germans in
vading Russia through East
Prussia is more derisive than
previously reported. The Ger-
mans are reported to have lost
70,000 men.
This victory is of the gratest
importance to Russia as it pre-
vents German landing sea oper
ations.
Asiatic cholera is reported
among the troops returning to
Vienna from Galicia.
The situation at the fortified
positions of Antwerp is unchang-
d- M
Skirmishes have been Ifported
on the Anglo German frontier in
East Africa with a series of Ger-
man repulses.
A big battle on the Silesian
frontier is imminent as both
armies are moving forward and
will meet in Russian Poland.


in
Tho general situation
France is stationary.
No confirmation(has been re-
ceived at Y\tt|higton of the Ber
lin report that Portugal is pre-
paring to join the Allies A long
standing treaty would force Por
tugal into theconflict if England
called upon her.
The Allies assumed the offen
si vein the battle in France but
tlieir advanced outposts were
forced back on the left wing. It
is believed that the Germans are
exhausted.
German airships lent valuable
aid in locating the Allies posi
tion, enabling the Germans to
bring up reinforcements.
The Allies are continually
moving to the North hoping to
cut the Germans off from Bel
gium.
London:An official Constan
tinople dispatch says that the
victims of the earthquake in
K >nia, Province of Asia Minor
Saturday at midnight are esti [
mated at 2500.
Washington:The Mexican
situation is satisfactory says Mr
Bryan. Negotiations are under
way for a cessation of hostili
ties. Peace dategates go to Auga
Calientas to*confer with Villa's
representatives
Special to the Nassau Guardian
New York, Oct. 6th.
The French and British have
been pushed from their positions
by a German onslaught nortli of
the River Oise.
The Czar has arrived at the
Front to lead the Russian forces
in the big battle at Cracow.
Three million men are engag
ed.
The Germans have lost 20,000
in the battle along the River
Nieinen.
There are British forces aid
ing the Belgians at Antwerp.
:o:~
Mangrove Cav, Andros Is.
Oct. 2nd. 1914.
To the Editor of the Tribune.
Sir,
It has been my privilege to
witness during the last four
weeks a demonstration of loyal-
ty of unexpected as it is inspir
ing.
When thsijCommissioner an-
nounced that meetings would
be held in all settlements of the
' district to collect nimev for ilie
War Relief Fund, I had serious
doubts as to the success of the
undertaking, as our men are all
Seamen who live to the limit of
their means, and often a little
beyond, and in consequence of
the failure of the sponge market,
are in very straightened circum-
stances.
The first meeting however
which was held at Mangrove
Cay, and of which an account
is given in your columns, dispell-
ed all duubt, and from thence
forth the slogan was " too and
more." I am glad to say this is
an accomplished fact.
About 10 o'clock on Sept. 20th
the yachts Pearl and Signal
weighed anchor and headed
south, with the Commissioner.
Father Duquenoy, Bruce A.
Bowe, Esq. and others on board.
First stopping place was Driggs
Hill about 6 miles south of Man
grove Cav. there we found that
Mr. Albert Smith of the firm of
Frances Smith & Bros, had at
ready collect (id upwards of 14
and by his leadership inspired
the people of this small place
to respond most generously to
the appeal. Taking population
as a basis, no settlement in the
district has given so liberally
their total now reaching the
sum of 16. 6. oj.
After a short address to the
people here the party left for
Long Bay Cays, 6 miles
farther south, arriving about 5
p.m.
A m^etin^ was called in the
school house, which had been
prepared by the teaeher Mr.
Brqwn for the purpose. Here
a large assembly was addressed
by several speakers, setting forth
in the clearest and most eloquent
language at theii command the
object of the meeting, and our
dutyns British subjects to render
all the aid in our power, .here
was a hearty respond and 12.
17 5. was at once subscribed,
with promises of substantial in-
crease in the near future.
On the following day we
again embarked with the settle-
ment of Pure gold as our objec
tive. Here a meeting was held
at the house of .Mr.Henry M.
Dames and a most enthusiastic
reception given to all the mem
bers of the party.
The inhabitants of Deep and
Turtle Creeks vied with those of
Pure Gold in the liberality of
their giving, but the Utter place
proved 'rue to its name, Great
excitement prevailed. The
Commissioner, Fr. Duque toy.
\lr. Henry Dames, Mr. Richard
Dames. Mr. llaark Dames Mr.
Gordon, and others, addressed
the meeting, and amid scenes of
wild enthusiasm 24. 17. 5. was
subscribed in a few minutes.
Nearly every man and woman
coming forward with his or her
offering
On Sept. 22nd we returned to
Kemps Bay which had been
passed on the way to Pure Gold.
Their a large and attentive
meeting was addressed in the
native Baptists Chapel. This
meeting was remarkable for the
close attention of the audience &
the large number of people who
gave moderate sums of money
that were very creditable to the
place, considering the straight
ened circumstances of many of
the inhabitants. Many from
Black Point and Smiths Hill at-
tended this meeting and 11.
4. o. was subscribed.
At this point some of the party
were obliged to return home,
they parted regretfully from the
Commissioner who with Mr.
Bowe proceeded to Mars Bay.
the Ultima Thule of the district,
They stopped en route at a
little place called Pleasant
Bay whence the inhabitants
generously Subscribed 4.15.0
Mars Bay is also a small place
but its people responded loyalh
and subscribed the creditable
sum of 8.13.7.
In conclusion I would say that
we have among us, as in every
community some men of larger
means and poorer spirit who
have up to the present time done
little to help forward this patri-
otic and righteous movement;
we believe however that stirred
by the example of their brethren
these men will not much longer
be satisfied to maintain that pau-
per spirit which is so hateful to
the loyal and patriotic masses of
the people.
Too much praise connot be
given to the commissioner for his
indefatigable energy in further
ing this cause, and to Fr. Du
quenoy who though very unwell
most of the time, stuck to his
guns and gave one strong ad-
dress after another. To both of
these gentlemen the success of
the work is in a large measure
due.
Thanking you Sir for the use
of your valuable space.
I Am Youra Sincerelv.
E.W. fOksytii.
:o:
BAHAMAS
WAR. K CLIFF FUND
The following subscriptions
hnve been received,
Amount previously
acknwledgcd 1868 15 6
St. Johns Baptist
Chapel 13 o
St. Johns Sunday
School 9 *
"Anon" 10 0 0
Mrs. J. H. Brown 3 0 0
Mr. and Mrs. N. B.
Burnside 3 0 O
Electric Light
Station Staff 5 0 0
Mr. and Mrs H. E.
S. Reeves 10 0
Mr. and Mrs H. F.
Armbrister 3 3 0
F. T. Montell &
Sons 10 5 0
Mr. and Mrs. "J.B." 5 5 0
St. Johns Churches 2 0 0
R. H. and E. H.
Curry 10 0 0
The J. S. Johnson
Co. 20 0 0
J. Alwyn Kelso
Nicolls'Town,
Andros 1 10 0
Mangrove Cay
Andros Island
2nd. Con. 7i 7 0
W. Miller 5 0 0
John S. Garland 10 0 0
Mr. and Mrs. E.Y. V.
Sutton 1 1 0
Governors Harbour 29 1 8
Mastic Point Andros 32 3 2
Nicolls Town, Andros 11 16 I*
Harbour Island 59 8 8
Current, Eleuthera 9 11 6
Gregory Town 3. 17 9
Hatchet Bay 1 0 11
Lower Bogue 5 r 0
Bluff 7 17 11
Total 2197 16 io
In Saturday's issue for Mr.
and Mrs Joseph Davis rad Mr.
and Mrs. Joseph Lewis 110
For Sale
THE House on the lot
known as the JIB, just
above the Eastern Parade.
To be removed bv the 20th
inst.
Apply
W. C. B. JOHNSON.
Oct. 3 1914 I ins.
Kerosene
1502
IN New 50 gallon Galvaniz-
ed Iron Drums at (8ctl
per Gallon.
In 10 gallon Cc'ins at aocti
per. Gallon. >
Drums and Cans returnable
Full particulars at Office
"Frances E.," Nassau N. P.
C. C. SAUNDERS
Liverpool Echo, Sept. 9,1914

..


hammering of the Allies on the
centre line north of Laon has had
its perceptible effect, and for sever-
al days the conviction has been
forced here that Von Kluck was
fighting with the sole object in
view of saving his line of retreat
into Belgium.
According to the reports of the
official French War Bureau the
Germans in the last forty-eight
hours actually passed to the west-
ward of Peronne and reached a
point as far west as Chaulnes. The
late despatches of last night in-
dicate that Peronne has again been
captured by the French, and this
means that the Germans are to the
east of the North railway. The
whole object of the German de-
fence has been to retain control of
the North railway, leading into
Belgium. Once this railway is lost
the German position would be un
tenable. General von Kluck it has
been stated repeatedly in these
columns, has been fighting to save
his army. His fierce counter attacks
have been made to beat back the
ever pressing line of the Allies and
thereby afford him the means to
withdraw his artillery and equip-
ment ft was suspected more than
forty-eight hours ago that when
the Germans were resorting to
bayonet charges at night it was to
cover the withdrawal of siege guns
and howitzer batteries.
The belief is strong that Von
Kluck's right has ken turned by
new forces arriving in the north
from the region of the Channel. It
has been repeatedly indicated in
these columns that the leal dan-
ger for the Germain might be ex-
pected from Boulogne Calais and
Dunkirk. The Germans ha- e ap-
preciated this fact and they advei-
tised their apprehension by throw-
ing up a line of intrenchments run-
ning from Valenciennes to Mons,
in a due east and west direction
and obviously intended for protect-
ion against forcts from the north.
In the eastern theatre of war, the
Russians aie now squarely planted
in Hungary, and an advance on
Budapest may be looked for any
day. It may reasonably be expected
that the Servians will advance to
northward to effect a juncture with
the Russians to the eastward of
Budapest.
Along the Prussian frontier the
Germans have withdrawn to the
Polish border, and hold a long
line reaching from Thorn on the
nmt.h to Kalisz, and now reaching
further south to connect with the
German forces sent to the relief of
Cracow. The Russians, at last ac-
counts, were only a few miles dis-
tant from Cracow and advancing
at a rapid rate along the Cracow-
l.embeHg railway. The fall of Cra-
cow may be looked for soon. The
Austrians have failed miserably in
their efforts to check the Russian
advance, and Germanv is too hard
pressed by General Rennenfampf,
who is advancing from Lodz, to
offer a serious resistance before Cra-
cow.
At this writing with the news
of Von Kluck's army in retreat,
and the steady advance of the Rus.
sians in the east, the situation for
the Allies has never looked so
favorable since the outbreak of the
war.Ibid.
THE
Cosmopolitan
HIGH SCHOOL
Opens on
Monday, Oct. 5th
in Aurora Hall
on Charlotte Street.
For particulars apply to
Prof. G. G. Coffin, head mas-
ter, or Mr. J. P. isimms.
COCOANUTS
BAHAMA ISLANDS
IT is now possible for owners
of land with fully bearing
trees to prove its value and ob
tain rents.
For further particulars
Apply to
J. THEO. FARRINGTON
Nassau, N. P.
Agent for
Bahamas Produce Marketing
Company
139 Copthall House
Lopthall Avenue
3 Mo. London,E. C
IMPERIAL
THEATRE
WEDNESDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
Doors open 7.50. Performance
begin at o.l5 p.m.
Shingles
Best No. i Heart 5m. Cypres
Shingles at $9.60 per thous-
sand of 20 bundles
Discounts on lots of over
5000 shingles.
Special Price
also on cheaper gradesalso
51B. Cypress at $6.72 per
thousand of 20 bundles. This
price made possible by a very
large purchase.
Fresh stock arriving every
week.
C. C. SAUNDERS.
NOTICE
THE public are notified
that the Bahamas Tim-
ber Company, Limited have
all the men that they
need for the present and that
any going there cannot
expect to get work and are
notified that there are no ac-
comodations for them at the
works.
By order
ARTHUR B. SUTTON.
Agent
September 16th, 1914
Notice
THIS is to inform my Patrons
and the Public in (iMieral
that I have opened my Public
Black Smith Shop; and am now
ready to do anything in 1 e line ol
General repair or new w rk Morse
Shoeing Sfitciatly. All ork done.
Mechanically.
P. A. HUYLER.
Bay East St. ("Wharf;
Mapes Fertilizers
/ naw carry in stock the fol-
lowing formulas:
Pineapple.It has been prov-
en that this has no equal
and a visit to fields using
same will convince you.
Vegetable.Now is the time
to use this and increase
your yield in Tomatoes,
Potatoes, Onions and all
other vegetables by ioo
per cent.
Orange Tree.To assist the
growth of Young Citrus
Tree.
Fruit and Wine.Increase the
yield and growth of old
Citrus trees.
Eor further information
and books on the use of these
fertilizers, please apply to
WALTER K. MOORE
Agent for.Mapes Fertiliser
in the Bahamas.
LOOK!
The following Blank forms
may be had at "The Tribune"
Office.
Duty Entry.
Free Entry.
Warehouse Entries.
Sponging Articles.
Ship's Reports.
In quantities at Special Rates
Popular Mechanics
Magazine
"WITlll M YOU CAN WB IT*
A CHEAT Ca-tiadad Story of lk.WU*.
** rnmt which you may begin reading;
Cany time, and which will hold your
tarast forever. You are living- in the Mot
yeer.of the moat woodortul age, of what it
aoubtl*** the great eat world la the universe.
A ratrlsnt of Mar* would gladly pay
$1,000 BragiESE,
Are you reading it? Two milUona of your
neighbor! at*, and It la 1 he favorite mage-
line in thousand* of the best American
home*. It appeals to all daaaeaold and
youngmen and women.
The "8h., letee" DeputaMat (0 pagW)
give* eaar wayi to do lliinm how to make
naafal articles for bom* and ahnp, repair*. **.
" AatatoBT Miewaaii* (10 pagea 1 tella bow to
nuk* Mleatnn furniture, wlralraaouUlta, boat*,
aglnes, magic, and all Uia thing! a boy lore*.
Mkaana,,,
warts roe r* **ets or tqoav
POPULAR MECHANICS CO.
MS W. Waakiaewa at. CHICAGO, U J.A.
Johnson's
Artistic Wood
Finishes
Johnson'* Prepared WaS*
plete finish and polish for alrfu
W'xxaWork and floors.
a com
urmture,
Johnson'* Wood Dye for the artistic
coloring of all wood, soft or hard
Johnson's Under Laca spirit
finish, very much superior to shellac of
varnish
Johnson's Tin.! Wood Finishfora
beautiful, artistic, hand-rubbed effete
without the expense of rubbing.
Johnson's Pa.stc Wood Fillerfor
filling the grain and pores of wood,
preparing it for the finish.
Johnson's Powdered Waxfor bal
room floors.
FOR. SALE BY
Chas. E. Albury
Notice
WE would call the atten-
tion of our friends in Nas-
sau and on the OUT ISLANDS
to the following prices on lum-
ber which will go into effect
from to-day.
All ROUGH lumber up to 8 ft.
6/3 per 100. All DRESSED
lumber up to 8 ft. 8/4 per 100.
All ROUGH and DRESSED to
16ft. 10/5 per 100. ANYTHING
over 16 ft. 1 a/6 per 100. (above
up to 8 ins. wide)
These prices are fqgaCASH
absolutely and being^WAR
prices are made to help the pub-
lic and are subject to change
without notice.
Th. Bahstmas Timber Co. Ltd.
10 East Street
September 21tt, 1914.


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