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Publication began at 6.45 p. Zhc {tribune ThurBdAv. October 1. 1914. We cannot imagine that there is an intelligent being in the world who does not deprecate the wholesale carnage and slaughter the news" of which, comes to us, over the wires day by day, all the result of the inordinate ambition of one man whom we fittingly term the pinchbeck Napoleon. However much we all mav deprecate the desl ruction afore said n„ one can wish that it should cease just where it is, that is an impossibility Germany must be vanquished utterlv so.o'r the nations perish in the attempt for they will in the event of Germany being victorious perish as nations, as they are todav, this is and must be a war to the knife and the knife to the hilt. Peace at any cost is onlv other words for War again at a fright ful cost. Peace dictated at Berlin the only peace that might be lasting. The question arises when will Mich a peace be secured ? When, and only then, the German Army is completely beaten and destroyed, her Navy moored in British ports as prizes, and the allied powers occupy Berlin. But before this is accomplished many and many a brave man will bite the dust, manv a fair city will be laid in ashes, many a heart will be broken ; widows and crphans will fill the lands; famine disease and rapine will stalk abroad, and this is War. The latest news that has reached us, if it be reliable is encouraging as it indicates that an impression has been made upon the stubborn resistance made by the Germans and if it be followed up as we have no doubt itwill.it is to be hoped that the right wiffg will be completely routed. • the Government Public sclmol system does not provide, and which some of the Christian Religious denominations pro vides, but exclusively, even among members of their own communion. All credit is due to the promoters of this school, which we understand they have been for two of more years working up and we devoutly hope and trust that it will be supremely successful. The youth of our land are heavily handicapped in the present day race of life by the lac k of that education which we believe it is the object of this school to provide. We hope that the parents and others responsible for the trail ling ol our youth will see and appre ciate this grand opportunity and take the fullest advantage of it. — :o: — Five men of the late steamer "I'oxton Hall" burnt off Wat lings Island last Wednesday morning have been found to be German reservist and are held as prisoners of war by the Defence authorities. —:o:— A correspondent from Harbour Island writes that.— The St. Johns Church was broken open on Friday nth Sept and property to the value of £25 was destroyed as follows.— Carpet badly cut, side hangings cut to pieces, back ground of the Altar, Frontal, and White Linen cloth all cut up. One of the gilt crosses broken to pieces and much of it carried away,a small piece was found. The candlesticks on the Altar were thrown down and the can dies taken away and other things likewise. The parties have not been found out yet. The Motor "Francis F." ar| rived at Miami at 7.30 this i morning. — :o; — BAHAMAS WAR RELIEF FUND The following subscriptions have been received — Amount previously Acknowledged /"1694 2 JO St. Andrews Union Burial Society 220 Fiank Pritchard 1 1 o Letia J. Dean 4 o Yoraba Society 300 Rum Cay 4 7 11J Watlings I. 1 16 4 1 c 5 5 o Mrs Olive R. Moore Bertram Maura Montague Maura Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Anderson Farrington2 2 o H. A Rochester 10 o Miss L A. Bethel 1 1 o Spanish Wells 100 o 8£ D. Brown 100 Miss Isabel Butler 1 o o A Friend 15 o Total 1014 13 10 —:o:— N. B.—It Rains. Plant. Your last chance. Plant Native Seed Corn. The following was handed to us with a request for its publics tion.— Mr. J C W. Gibson Sir. On this, the eve of your departure from this Island we cannot allow you to go without expressing our heartfelt giatitude for the interest you have taken both in us and our children, during your three years service here as a Public School Teacher. We Can truly say, as a Public official, you have been impartial in every respect. You have maintained your integrity and execut ed your duty punctually. Glad to say that our school has been classified since you have been here. You have worked hard faithfully. We trust that you will reap the benefits of \our labour. We are sorry to lose you but as Providence has deemed itso, we must be content. We trust that you will like your new station and that your labour there will be encouraging aid that good health will attend both you and Mrs. Gibson. Now Su the time has come, that we must say Hood bye with heavy hearts but ere we do so we beg to sa\ that our Prayerf will ascend on high in your behalf and that everv good blessing may be showere ; on you and yours. And if we never meet on earth again, we trust tnat we may all meet in heaven to part no more. "Where e'er thou dwcllest may contentment be thy lot. May friendship like ivy encircle thy cot. \la\ earh rosy morn dress in mantle of peace, Shed health o'er thy cottage, thy blessings increase." We remain yours respect fully, S. G. liUI.I.ARD, G. M. BROWNE. WM. W. NAIRN. CYRUS MITCHELL, and crlicrs. d 3tt*i>. 9 Gentlemen, Shortly my official term will draw to a close and fade and disappear from your memories with the busy hum of life's duties and trials. Allow me to thank you for the honours that have been so generously conferred upon me. 1 have always tried to discharge mv duty faithfully and impar tiallyand feel proud to hear you state that I have'succeeded in so-doing. Through the grace of God whose sheltering blessings have sustained me thus far, with your kind assistance and counsel, voi r many encouraging words, 1 have step after step ventured upward and,onward through tbepathof duty, with my beat endeavours to satisfy every demand of mv • position, and with all the labours and vexations I have had to contend with, while I have stumbled and fallen by the way by not pleasing all, I rejoice, when I can say mv labours have not been in vain. Under these fosteriq^uiluen. ces, I have almost re"!M the end c.f my journey, from whence I will soon retrace my steps there to resume my position at another town in our land, to mingle my experiences with those of the rest of my companions. To my associates in office here, I am indebted for their support in the active discharge of my duty, and in sundering the ties of our official relation, I feel to express rov sense of thank-, for their courtesies and united support during my term. Accept then my hearts best wishes. I shall ever remember you w ith fond rernemberaiic e and pray that prosperity inav attend you, in future. Yours sincerely J. C. W. GIBSON. Latest War News S/irciul to the Nassau Guardian The French have won a hat tie at Orchies near the Belgian border and have blocked the retreat of the Germans. ~Lhe (iermansare still fighting rWflperateIv to main lain avenues of re treat. Austnans driven out of Galieia. Italy orders Austria to remove mines from the Adriatic.



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September 30th 1 114 London 30II1. Gsgernor, Bahamas. September 30th, following from Press ^Bureau : Situation in France practically unchanged. The Allies left has had some very heavy righting but are hold log their own well. Near Tsingtau the Allies forces have occupied all high ground overlooking the enemy's line of defence. (Signed) HA-RCOUKT GOVEKNMKNT PRU8 October 1st 1 1) 14. Petro rad officially announces that Galicia has been completely cleared of Austrian*, and that Iney have but little furiber to go to gain direct Communication r ith the hi art l I lungary An f'aliantorpedo boat is r>> p irted having been sunk be tvveen Venice and Comachhio. in the \driatic. The report is unconfirmed. Berlin has 11 'official news from the western battlefield since Tuesday il: ugh a new and great victor}' iv imminent Uom< f I am writing this to you as one of the most influential of our national newspapers to ask you to take the matter underconsid eration and if it appeals to you to start a campaign t.o that elect C. II JORDAN, Rector, Church of the Kesurection. Greenwood, S. C Sept 10, 1914 —New York I It-mid Sept. jjrd 1914 • USE FOR CHRISTMAS MONEY. To the K.hh.r of the Herald: — There ia n letter in the Continent, a Presbv terian weekly, which reccommends that every man, woman, and child in this country abandon the giving of presents during next Chistmai and that they devote all of the monej they would spend in that u,i\ to aiding the widows and orphans ami wounded soldiers in Kurope. It seem to hie that this is a beautiful and moat practical suggestion, and I would like to see the great \i-\v YORK I IBRALD with its world encircling influence, agitate it from lay to day 11-through its news and editorial column,. PRESBYTERIAN. New York City, Sept. at, 1914, -Ibid, — :o:~ "PADDIES EVERMOR.E." Iriah t.nds in their Last Steep in Belgian Soil Of all the letters received from the trout none have been touching and simple as this one, written by an Irish soildier, Private P. McGlade, from "somewhere in France," to his mother:— We were all beat up after four days of the hardest soldiering you ever dreamt of 1 am glad to say we accounted for our ••hare of the (ierman trash, who are a poor lot when it comes to a good square ruction in the open, we tried hard to get at them many a time, but they never would wait for us when they saw bright hits of steel at the business, end of our rifles. Some ol them squeal like the pigs on j killing day when they see the steel ready. Some of our finest lads are sleeping their last sleep in Belgium, but, mother dear, take your sons word for it that every son of lieland who will never come back there are at least three Germans who will never be heard of again. We got here we sang "Paddies V.v I Tin'.re," and then we were off to Chapel to pray for the souls of the lads that are gone. I /; ( ,\Y;es nf the World Sept, 6th 1914. "TELL MOTHER AND DAD" Soldier's Tears for The Boy Who Enlisted. There is tragedy deep and poignant in this letter from Corporal S. I laslett:-The other day 1 stopped to as sist a young lad of the West Kents who had been badly hit by a piece of shell, lie had'nt long to live, and l.e knew it loo, but he wasn't at all put out about it. I asked him if there Wh# any message I could take to anyone it lio.lie. and the poor lad's eves filled with tears as he answered, "I ran a.va\ from home and listed a year ago. Mother and dad don't know I'm here, but you tell them from me that I'm not sorry I did it." When I told our boys afterwards about that they cried like babies; but mind you that's the spirit that's going to pull England through this war, and there isn't a n doesn't think >>f that p< or anil his example every time we go into light. I got his name and the last address of his people' from his .regiment, and I am writing to tell his people that they have every right to be proud of their lad. He may have run away from home, but he didn't run from the Germans, anyway. -Ibid. IN THE MAGISTRATES COURT ro.14. Sept. 26—Evelyn ButlerLoud shouting in Meeting Street —Fined 6s. or 5 days. Jonathan Weech—Loud shout ing in Meeting Street—Fined 6s. or 5 days. Alfred Meadows—Using profane and indecent language ia Bay Street East—12s. 6d. or 10 davs. Geo. Anderson--Assaulting and beating Charles Mortimer -Ordered to pay 4s. costs of prosecution. Richard Morrison—Larceny of divers gold and silver coins amounting In value to 19s. of the moneys of Geo H. Johnson on a certain day in the month of Sept. 1914.—Remanded tiil 30th Sept. Inst. THE Cosmopolitan HIGH SCHOOL Opens on Monday, Oct. 5th in Aurora Hall on Charlotte Street. For particulars apply to Prof. G. G. Coffin, head master, or Mr. J. P. ^imms. VICTORIA HALL Under distinguished Patronage of H. E. The Governor and Mrs. Haddon-Smith CONCERT in aid of THE WAR. KELIEF FUND by the WESLEY CHOIR Friday Oct. 9th*1914 A Programme of Plantation Ml Indies Admission, Reserved 2s. Unreserved Is. Doors open at 7.30 p.m. Commencing at 8 p.m. ian of us that j p lan 0 f Hall and booking at THE CITY PRESS Give me your ear Mr. Ed. Mrs. Pain will sing



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it apj>ears to have smothered the British reply from the very start. Between ships of approximately the same class it is generally the ves sel that gets in the second broadside first that wins. The military operations of the last twenty-four hours indicate that the Allies are still pushing their enveloping movement toward the extreme right of the army commanded by General Von Kluck. There is a' report that Von Kluck is throwing up a line of defence between Valenciennes and Mons. The former city is in France the second just across the Belgian border. Between Valenclenes and Mons is a double track railway and froin Mons there is a network of railway leading "eccentrically" through Belgium. Those eccentric lines of communications permit of retreat to the German front by different routes. Strategic Importance of Re.ilwe.ys There are no less than seven railways leading in and out of Valenciennes. Cambrai, which lias been held as one ol the extreme western points by Von Kluck, lias direct railway connection with Valen ciennes, and from Cambrai and St. Queeotin it is possible to fall back on the line of the main northern railway on toCharlcioi and Namur without passing through Valenciennes. The army of General von Kluck is now in position to reach Belgian soil by several railway routes, but the fact that a defence is being thrown up between Valenciennes and Mons would indicate that the Gwmans are making ready to defend their connections from attack from the northward. It is from 'he northwest and north that the Germans lipre seem to be apprehensive, and this new defence line is a defence as much against the English Channel the direction from which F.nglish reinforcements' are coining—as against the attack from the enveloping movement of the left wing of the Allies. The only hope left to the Ger mans of leheving the right wing of Von Kluck isto Break the allies' centre in the vicinity of RhtiiBS, This has not yet been accomplished and every day that the British Franco force* succeed in holding intact the German line, that much nearer will they come to driving back Von Kluck. The day Von Kluck is hurled back, marks the collapse of the whole of the German plan of campaign. — New York Herald, Sspt 23. For Result Advertise in The Tribune THE LEOPARD • cannot change his spots, but the removal of spots and blemishes from clothes is assured if SUNLIGHT SOAP is used. As the Leopard's eyes gleam in the darkness of the night, so clothes washed with SUNLIGHT SOAP gleam white and pure in the brilliant light of day. Unlike the Leopard's jaws, which are formed to destroy, SUNLIGHT SOAP is created to preserve. It preserves your clothes and household linen, and makes themlastlonger. SUNLIOIII" SOAP is guaranteed pure, and will not injure the finest fabric. BUY IT. ?,W U 1*1 <•? mum m m NOTICE T HE public 4HJI notified that the Bahamas Timber Company, Limited have all the men that they need for the present and that any going there cannot expect to get work and are notified that there are no accomodations for them at the works. Bv order ARTHUR B. SUTTON. Agent Sep'ember a6tli, 1914 H—cum )+£d?Z~Z *! • Mapes Fertilizers / now carry in stock the following formulas: Pineapple. —It has been proven that this has no equal and a visit to fields using same will convince you. Vegetable. —Now is the time to use this and increase your yield in Tomatoes, Potatoes, Onions and all other vegetables by ioo per cent. Orange Tree. —To assist the growth of Young Citrus Tree. 4 Fruit and Wine. —Increase the yield and growth of old Citrus trees. Eor further information and books on the use of tin se fertilizers, please apply to WALTER K. MOORE Agent for Mapes Fertilizer in the Bokanuu, COCOANUTS BAHAMA ISLANDS I T is now possible for owners of la:ul with fully bearing trees to prove its value and ob tain rents. For further particulars Apply to J. THEO. FAR RING ION Nassau, N. P. Agent for Bahamas Produce Marketing Company 139 Copthall House 1 opthall Avenue 3 Mo. London, E. C FUS SELL'S CONOfSt" M ILK HE D BUTTF-iJftY BJLAJLP,,'" -SPARED BY ,,. : FUSSELL8rC-J-,£ Special Notitie. LOOK! The following Blank forms mavbe had at "The Tribune" Office. Duty Entry. Free Entry. Warehouse Entries. Sponging Articles. Ship's Reports. In. quantities at SpecialRates JUST RECEIVED Per S. S. "Santiago." Fresh New Potatoes (Irish) Selling at 4 cents Per lb. also Medium Size Onions at 8 Cent-, Per lb. Baker's Cocoa | tins • at is. Each Baker's Cocoa ] tins at 6d. Bach Call early at THE ROYAL STORE, J. I.. SAUNDEUS & Co. Notice W E would call trio attt-ntion of our friends in Nassau and on the 01 IT ISLANDS to the following prices on lumber which will go into effect from to-dav. All ROUGH lumber up to 8 ft. 6/3 per 100. All DRESSED lumber up to 8 ft. 8 4 per 100. All ROUGH and DRESSED to 16ft. 10 5 per too. ANYTHING over 16 ft. !.'/(> per IOO. above up to S ins. wide) These prices are for CASH absolutely and being WAR pi ii 11 are made to help the public and are subject to changs without notice. The Bahamas Timber Co. Ltd. 10 Bart street Siptimbtr 2Ui, 191 J. Notice T IMS is to inform my Patrons and the hlic an ned Jn in; and General iy Public Public that I have opened Black Smith Shop; arid am now ready to do anything in t'e line ol Genera) repair or new w rk Horse Shoeing Specially. All v ork done, Mechanically. P. A. HUYLER. Buy Kast St. (Wharf;



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9 *3 0) rf CD (0 sr o (D CO Nulllus addtctua furare In verb* magtetri. Being bound to awtbr to the Dogmas *f no Mmler VOL.X. Nassau. N. P.. B&h&mM, Thursday, October 1,1914 No. 230 L. GII.ISKKT MJPTJOH, Editor jiui Proprietor. OFFICE: 38-41 MARKET STREET A'assnu, .V. /'., /id/idtms P. <). BOS 183 PUBLISHED DAILY Monday, Wednesday and Friday %  single copy Tuesday, Tliurs.lay awl Saturday%  ingle copy Weekly Monthly Quarterly ... RalfYearly Yearly 5'1 id IS. 41I %  4'ft*, ll PAYABLE IN ADVANCE Advertising Ratal: — Six pence per line t fence fleets, which was mine popular in the United States. The British have doubless felt that to withdraw their blockading lines t • lite head of the North Sea would lay open the east coast of England to forays fnan German destroyers and submarines. The Japanese it will be remembered made a raid on Port Arthur with destroyers in a dash from the Japanese coast. The actior. of the German submarines discloses that the Kaiser's naval men are enterprising. Nelson regarded it as absolutely necessary to the morale of a Bret that enter prises partook oi cutticgout expeditions. To kelson's mind the inss if a ship if need be, was more than '-ompensatedby the effect pro. duced on the result accomplished. Our own I'reble in the blockade of Tripoli was constantly sending in expeditions of some sort or other and if officers returned empty handed they were usually upbraided much as a school master would handle recalcitrants. In our Civil War Gushing, by his daring work en the Cape Fear and in the Albemarle Sound set the navy aflame, and Porter declared to the Secretary of the Navy that he believed in these risks being taken that they were warranted, and he himself called upon officers to perform deeds where the chances for return,he pointed out were practically nil, Porter received more volunteers than could be utilized, and it will ever be so with men of the sea. Lose Will Not Deter British The task assigned to the British is to stop the exit of the German high sea fleet and the Et.glish are not going about it by standing off with their entire fleet 400 milesup the North Sea. They now just task in seamanlike fashion. 1 hey are tackling the task in seamanlike fashion. They now just lost three fine ships and a lot of gallant officers and men, but it will not be the British navy if they do not continue to stick right where tbey first took hold. From the reports to hand regarding the effect produced by the German torpedoes some doubt has been aroused among naval men heie concerning the character of the explosive employed. Gun cotton is the explosive used in both the British and American services. It is # a safe explosive to handle and effective in work but no one looks to a standard gun cotton torpedo tearing a ship literally to pieces. The present war has demonstrated that the Germans have drawn on all their chemical skill to render their shells and torpedoes effective in mine power. In the action between the German cruis;r Koenigsherg and the British third class cruiser Pegasus at /.an/.ilar there is presented the first artillery action between two Cruisers ol the war. The guns of the German weie of slightly larger calibre and appear to outrange the British fire. The fact cannot be overlooked howeyer that the German fire was verv effective and (Continued on fourth page)


The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02272
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Thursday, October 01, 1914
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02272

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Nulllus addtctua furare In verb* magtetri.
Being bound to awtbr to the Dogmas *f no Mmler
VOL.X.
Nassau. N. P.. B&h&mM, Thursday, October 1,1914
No. 230
L. GII.ISKKT MJPTJOH,
Editor jiui Proprietor.
OFFICE: 38-41 MARKET STREET
A'assnu, .V. /'., /id/idtms
P. <). BOS 183
PUBLISHED DAILY
Monday, Wednesday and Friday
single copy .........
Tuesday, Tliurs.lay awl Saturday-
ingle copy .........
Weekly
Monthly ............
Quarterly ... .....
RalfYearly............
Yearly ............
5'1
id
IS. 41I
4'-
ft*,
ll
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
Advertising Ratal: Six pence per line
t f"* -i' 'ii'I iii'''ili"ii ; and one | nny per
fine f"i sali'i'ieiii iiiseitions.
Advertisements under eight line- |s,
w
*
THE WAR IN EUROPE
A Critique
By an American Military Officer.
The l"ss nf three big British
armored cruisers the Abnukir the
Hogue and the Cressy off lleligc-
land is the first serious lr*S suffer-
ed by the English blockading force
during the war. The combined
value of these three line ships is
equal to that ol a tuperdread-
nought, but the total niuuber of
men ( an I'd is equivalent to the
compleii e"t of ten dreadnoughts.
While the loss in both matei al
and personnel is serious the allair
may be sit down at the outset to
these risks of battle which must be
taken. The world in general pio*
bably has not bcnawaie ol the
tremendous chances which the Bri-
tisti have assumed in maintaining
a cloie inshoie blockade of the
Gorman lleet. 1 he Kaiser's lleet is
strong in destroyers ard in sub-
marines very strong and as indi-
Cated in these columns early in the
war, the I'nlish plan of blockade
if the North Eta involved a line
I lleet units ex ending from
Rosyth Scotland right across to the
Ni.i wegian const,
llntis'i naval authorities early
declared that by maintaining a
blockade at the roithcrn limits of
the North Sea that body of water
would be as effectively shut up as
if a blockade were maintained close
to the German littoral. It was also
shown that German submarines
would have lo travel fully four
hundred miles to reach the .block-
ading force at the head of the
North Sea and hat cither going or
coming thesubinaiines wood be ex-
posed to daylight and to discovery
dv fast steaming destroyers.
In actual prat ice the Bntish so
fai as cui be learned me maintain-
ing two lines of blockade one at
the head of the North sea as origin-
ally planned and a second an in-
shore patrol,
Prils of Blockading Service
It was the second or inner line
which the German submarines
have attacked and the only won-
der is that the att.'Ck was not made
earlier. It speaks volumes for the
efficiency ol the British cruising
worry tint mtwitlistanding the big
danger attached to a blockade off
Heligoland their navy has escaped
any serious loss until now.
It may be put down as a certain-
ty that the British will write off
the Aboukir the Hogue and the
Cressy as agfinst the price of ad-
miralty and that their blockade
will he tighter than ever. These
are the risks of the blockade and
naval men know full well that
such risks must be taken.
It has long been a British axiom
that the fust line of defence shall
be, the enemy's coast. Thisaxiom is
indirect contrast to the term coast
d> fence fleets, which was mine po-
pular in the United States. The
British have doubless felt that to
withdraw their blockading lines
t lite head of the North Sea would
lay open the east coast of England
to forays fnan German destroyers
and submarines. The Japanese it
will be remembered made a raid
on Port Arthur with destroyers in
a dash from the Japanese coast.
The actior. of the German sub-
marines discloses that the Kaiser's
naval men are enterprising. Nelson
regarded it as absolutely necessary
to the morale of a Bret that enter
prises partook oi cutticgout ex-
peditions. To kelson's mind the
inss if a ship if need be, was more
than '-ompensatedby the effect pro.
duced on the result accomplished.
Our own I'reble in the blockade
of Tripoli was constantly sending
in expeditions of some sort or oth-
er and if officers returned empty
handed they were usually upbraid-
ed much as a school master would
handle recalcitrants. In our Civil
War Gushing, by his daring work
en the Cape Fear and in the
Albemarle Sound set the navy
aflame, and Porter declared to the
Secretary of the Navy that he be-
lieved in these risks being taken
that they were warranted, and he
himself called upon officers to per-
form deeds where the chances for re-
turn,he pointed out were practically
nil, Porter received more volun-
teers than could be utilized, and it
will ever be so with men of the sea.
Lose Will Not Deter British
The task assigned to the British
is to stop the exit of the German
high sea fleet and the Et.glish are
not going about it by standing off
with their entire fleet 400 milesup
the North Sea. They now just task
in seamanlike fashion. 1 hey are
tackling the task in seamanlike
fashion. They now just lost
three fine ships and a lot of gal-
lant officers and men, but it
will not be the British navy if they
do not continue to stick right where
tbey first took hold.
From the reports to hand re-
garding the effect produced by the
German torpedoes some doubt has
been aroused among naval men
heie concerning the character of
the explosive employed. Gun cot-
ton is the explosive used in both the
British and American services. It is
#a safe explosive to handle and ef-
fective in work but no one looks
to a standard gun cotton torpedo
tearing a ship literally to pieces.
The present war has demonstrated
that the Germans have drawn on
all their chemical skill to render
their shells and torpedoes effective
in mine power.
In the action between the Ger-
man cruis;r Koenigsherg and the
British third class cruiser Pegasus
at /.an/.ilar there is presented the
first artillery action between two
Cruisers ol the war. The guns of
the German weie of slightly larger
calibre and appear to outrange
the British fire. The fact cannot
be overlooked howeyer that the
German fire was verv effective and
(Continued on fourth page)


Publication began at 6.45 p.
Zhc {tribune
ThurBdAv. October 1. 1914.
We cannot imagine that there
is an intelligent being in the
world who does not deprecate
the wholesale carnage and
slaughter the news" of which,
comes to us, over the wires day
by day, all the result of the in-
ordinate ambition of one man
whom we fittingly term the
pinchbeck Napoleon.
However much we all mav de-
precate the desl ruction afore
said n one can wish that it
should cease just where it is, that
is an impossibility Germany
must be vanquished utterlv so.o'r
the nations perish in the attempt
for they will in the event of Ger-
many being victorious perish as
nations, as they are todav, this is
and must be a war to the knife
and the knife to the hilt.
Peace at any cost is onlv other
words for War again at a fright
ful cost. Peace dictated at Ber-
lin the only peace that might be
lasting.
The question arises when will
Mich a peace be secured ? When,
and only then, the German Army
is completely beaten and des-
troyed, her Navy moored in Bri-
tish ports as prizes, and the al-
lied powers occupy Berlin. But
before this is accomplished
many and many a brave man
will bite the dust, manv a fair
city will be laid in ashes, many
a heart will be broken ; widows
and crphans will fill the lands;
famine disease and rapine will
stalk abroad, and this is War.
The latest news that has
reached us, if it be reliable is
encouraging as it indicates that
an impression has been made
upon the stubborn resistance
made by the Germans and if it
be followed up as we have no
doubt itwill.it is to be hoped that
the right wiffg will be completely
routed.
the Government Public sclmol
system does not provide, and
which some of the Christian
Religious denominations pro
vides, but exclusively, even
among members of their own
communion.
All credit is due to the pro-
moters of this school, which we
understand they have been for
two of more years working up
and we devoutly hope and trust
that it will be supremely suc-
cessful.
The youth of our land are
heavily handicapped in the pre-
sent day race of life by the lac k
of that education which we be-
lieve it is the object of this
school to provide.
We hope that the parents and
others responsible for the trail ling
ol our youth will see and appre
ciate this grand opportunity and
take the fullest advantage of it.
:o:
Five men of the late steamer
"I'oxton Hall" burnt off Wat
lings Island last Wednesday
morning have been found to be
German reservist and are held as
prisoners of war by the Defence
authorities.
:o:
A correspondent from Har-
bour Island writes that.
The St. Johns Church was
broken open on Friday nth Sept
and property to the value of 25
was destroyed as follows.
Carpet badly cut, side hang-
ings cut to pieces, back ground
of the Altar, Frontal, and White
Linen cloth all cut up.
One of the gilt crosses broken
to pieces and much of it carried
away,a small piece was found.
The candlesticks on the Altar
were thrown down and the can
dies taken away and other things
likewise.
The parties have not been
found out yet.
The Motor "Francis F." ar-
| rived at Miami at 7.30 this
i morning.
:o;
BAHAMAS
WAR RELIEF FUND
The following subscriptions
have been received
Amount previously
Acknowledged /"1694 2 JO
St. Andrews Union
Burial Society 220
Fiank Pritchard 1 1 o
Letia J. Dean 4 o
Yoraba Society 300
Rum Cay 4 7 11J
Watlings I. 1 16 4
1 c
5
5 o
Mrs Olive R. Moore
Bertram Maura
Montague Maura
Mr. and Mrs. R. J.
Anderson Farrington2 2 o
H. A Rochester 10 o
Miss L A. Bethel 1 1 o
Spanish Wells 100 o 8
D. Brown 100
Miss Isabel Butler 1 o o
A Friend 15 o
Total
1014 13 10
:o:
N. B.It Rains. Plant.
Your last chance.
Plant Native Seed Corn.
The following was handed to
us with a request for its publics
tion.
Mr. J C W. Gibson
Sir.
On this, the eve of your depar-
ture from this Island we cannot
allow you to go without expres-
sing our heartfelt giatitude for
the interest you have taken both
in us and our children, during
your three years service here as
a Public School Teacher. We
Can truly say, as a Public official,
you have been impartial in
every respect. You have main-
tained your integrity and execut
ed your duty punctually. Glad
to say that our school has been
classified since you have been
here. You have worked hard
faithfully. We trust that you will
reap the benefits of \our labour.
We are sorry to lose you but as
Providence has deemed itso, we
must be content. We trust that
you will like your new station
and that your labour there will
be encouraging aid that good
health will attend both you and
Mrs. Gibson. Now Su the time
has come, that we must say
Hood bye with heavy hearts but
ere we do so we beg to sa\ that
our Prayerf will ascend on high
in your behalf and that everv
good blessing may be showere ;
on you and yours. And if we
never meet on earth again, we
trust tnat we may all meet in
heaven to part no more.
"Where e'er thou dwcllest
may contentment be thy lot.
May friendship like ivy en-
circle thy cot.
\la\ earh rosy morn dress in
mantle of peace,
Shed health o'er thy cottage,
thy blessings increase."
We remain yours respect
fully,
S. G. liUI.I.ARD,
G. M. BROWNE.
WM. W. NAIRN.
CYRUS MITCHELL,
and crlicrs.
d 3tt*i>.
9
Gentlemen,
Shortly my official term will
draw to a close and fade and
disappear from your memories
with the busy hum of life's
duties and trials.
Allow me to thank you for
the honours that have been so
generously conferred upon me.
1 have always tried to discharge
mv duty faithfully and impar
tiallyand feel proud to hear you
state that I have'succeeded in
so-doing.
Through the grace of God
whose sheltering blessings have
sustained me thus far, with your
kind assistance and counsel, voi r
many encouraging words, 1 have
step after step ventured upward
and,onward through tbepathof
duty, with my beat endeavours
to satisfy every demand of mv
position, and with all the
labours and vexations I have
had to contend with, while I
have stumbled and fallen by
the way by not pleasing all, I
rejoice, when I can say mv
labours have not been in vain.
Under these fosteriq^uiluen.
ces, I have almost re"!M the
end c.f my journey, from whence
I will soon retrace my steps
there to resume my position at
another town in our land, to
mingle my experiences with
those of the rest of my com-
panions.
To my associates in office
here, I am indebted for their sup-
port in the active discharge of
my duty, and in sundering the
ties of our official relation, I feel
to express rov sense of thank-, for
their courtesies and united sup-
port during my term.
Accept then my hearts best
wishes. I shall ever remember
you w ith fond rernemberaiic e
and pray that prosperity inav
attend you, in future.
Yours sincerely
J. C. W. GIBSON.
Latest War News
S/irciul to the Nassau Guardian
The French have won a hat
tie at Orchies near the Belgian
border and have blocked the re-
treat of the Germans. ~Lhe (ier-
mansare still fighting rWflperate-
Iv to main lain avenues of re
treat.
Austnans driven out of Gali-
eia.
Italy orders Austria to remove
mines from the Adriatic.


September 30th 1 114
London 30II1.
Gsgernor, Bahamas.
September 30th, following
from Press ^Bureau : Situation
in France practically unchanged.
The Allies left has had some
very heavy righting but are hold
log their own well.
Near Tsingtau the Allies
forces have occupied all high
ground overlooking the enemy's
line of defence.
(Signed)
HA-RCOUKT
GOVEKNMKNT PRU8
October 1st 11) 14.
Petro rad officially announces
that Galicia has been complete-
ly cleared of Austrian*, and that
Iney have but little furiber to go
to gain direct Communication
rith the hi art l I lungary
An f'alian- torpedo boat is r>>
p irted having been sunk be
tvveen Venice and Comachhio.
in the \driatic. The report is
unconfirmed.
Berlin has 11 'official news from
the western battlefield since
Tuesday il: ugh a new and great
victor}' iv imminent
Uom< f ni_,'ht and dsfv finishing cannon
for the Italian government.
Ordeis have been issued to
hasten preparations for provi
mods and ammunition for Italian
iroopa
Floating mines in the Adria-
tic, believed to becoming from
Istiia and Dalmatia coasts have
brought a protest from the
Italian government.
The Japanese are 18 miles
from! singtauaiidhavei aptured
eight Gi i-n.i 1 field gum and
ammiin tion
I he Allies are uliug all potsi
hie strength to turn the (id man
right wing and fore* it from the
line "f communication through
Belgium and there is evidence
that this movement is beginning
to have itseffei t. rhe I Jermans
admit that they have bee.i uu
able to check the French ad
Vance against their right and
right Hank.
'1 he sale of vodka is to be pro
hibited indefinitely in Russia
after the war. Social and econ
omic conditions have improved
since the sale of liquor Was pro
hibited. ^
All attempts of the Germans
to force the passage of tin River
Nieman on the Eastern Prutaian
frontier have been repulsed by
the Russians.
Moating mines in the Adria-
tic have caused to deaths since
the beginning of the war.
The Germans have begun at-
tacks on the outer forts of Ant-
werp. They have agreed not
to bombard or destroy any his
torlc buildings or churohes if
the Belgians will agree not to
use them for military purposes.
Servian and Montenegrin
armies are coming within gun
shot of Sarajevo which they
hope to add to their conquest.
Malineshas been recaptured by
the Belgians and the Germans
renew their bombardment of
I.ieffe.
The Servians inflicted heavy
losses on the Vustriaos on the
Anna Shabafz front.
War Motes
ron GREATER RELIEF FUND
lo tli Editor "f the Her ill:
An effort will he made in this
city to cet all the churches to
take an offering on Sunday, Oc-
tober 4th. the day set apart by
the President as a day of prayer
for peace, and send i' to 'he Red
Cross Society foi its relief work
in Kurope.
It has occured Ui me that it
would he well if a general move
men I O uld be started to enlist
all the churches in the United
States in the cause of relief as
well as in the cause of pea >
I am writing this to you as
one of the most influential of our
national newspapers to ask you
to take the matter underconsid
eration and if it appeals to you
to start a campaign t.o that
elect
C. II JORDAN, Rector,
Church of the Kesurection.
Greenwood, S. C Sept 10, 1914
New York I It-mid
Sept. jjrd 1914
USE FOR CHRISTMAS
MONEY.
To the K.hh.r of the Herald:
There ia n letter in the Conti-
nent, a Presbv terian weekly,
which reccommends that every
man, woman, and child in this
country abandon the giving of
presents during next Chistmai
and that they devote all of the
monej they would spend in that
u,i\ to aiding the widows and
orphans ami wounded soldiers in
Kurope.
It seem to hie that this is a
beautiful and moat practical
suggestion, and I would like to
see the great \i-\v York I Ibrald
with its world encircling influ-
ence, agitate it from lay to day
11--
through its news and editorial
column,. PRESBYTERIAN.
New York City, Sept. at, 1914,
-Ibid,
:o:~
"PADDIES EVERMOR.E."
Iriah t.nds in their Last Steep in
Belgian Soil
Of all the letters received from
the trout none have been touch-
ing and simple as this one, writ-
ten by an Irish soildier, Private
P. McGlade, from "somewhere
in France," to his mother:
We were all beat up after
four days of the hardest soldier-
ing you ever dreamt of.....1 am
glad to say we accounted for our
hare of the (ierman trash, who
are a poor lot when it comes to
a good square ruction in the open,
we tried hard to get at them
many a time, but they never
would wait for us when they
saw bright hits of steel at the
business, end of our rifles. Some
ol them squeal like the pigs on
j killing day when they see the
steel ready. Some of our finest
lads are sleeping their last sleep
in Belgium, but, mother dear,
take your sons word for it that
every son of lieland who will
never come back there are at
least three Germans who will
never be heard of again. We
got here we sang "Paddies V.v
I Tin'.re," and then we were off
to Chapel to pray for the souls
of the lads that are gone.
I /;( ,\Y;es nf the World
Sept, 6th 1914.
"TELL MOTHER AND DAD"
Soldier's Tears for The Boy
Who Enlisted.
There is tragedy deep and
poignant in this letter from Cor-
poral S. I laslett:--
The other day 1 stopped to as
sist a young lad of the West
Kents who had been badly hit by
a piece of shell, lie had'nt long
to live, and l.e knew it loo, but
he wasn't at all put out about it.
I asked him if there Wh# any
message I could take to anyone
it lio.lie. and the poor lad's eves
filled with tears as he answered,
"I ran a.va\ from home and list-
ed a year ago. Mother and dad
don't know I'm here, but you
tell them from me that I'm not
sorry I did it." When I told our
boys afterwards about that they
cried like babies; but mind you
that's the spirit that's going to
pull England through this war,
and there isn't a n
doesn't think >>f that p< or
anil his example every time we
go into light. I got his name and .
the last address of his people'
from his .regiment, and I am
writing to tell his people that
they have every right to be proud
of their lad. He may have run
away from home, but he didn't
run from the Germans, anyway.
-Ibid.
IN THE
MAGISTRATES COURT
ro.14.
Sept. 26Evelyn Butler-
Loud shouting in Meeting Street
Fined 6s. or 5 days.
Jonathan WeechLoud shout
ing in Meeting StreetFined
6s. or 5 days.
Alfred MeadowsUsing pro-
fane and indecent language ia
Bay Street East12s. 6d. or 10
davs.
Geo. Anderson--Assaulting
and beating Charles Mortimer
-Ordered to pay 4s. costs of
prosecution.
Richard MorrisonLarceny
of divers gold and silver coins
amounting In value to 19s. of
the moneys of Geo H. Johnson
on a certain day in the month
of Sept. 1914.Remanded tiil
30th Sept. Inst.
THE
Cosmopolitan
HIGH SCHOOL
Opens on
Monday, Oct. 5th
in Aurora Hall
on Charlotte Street.
For particulars apply to
Prof. G. G. Coffin, head mas-
ter, or Mr. J. P. ^imms.
VICTORIA HALL
Under distinguished Patron-
age of H. E. The Governor
and Mrs. Haddon-Smith
CONCERT
in aid of
THE WAR. KELIEF FUND
by the
WESLEY CHOIR
Friday Oct. 9th*1914
A Programme of Plantation
Ml Indies
Admission, Reserved 2s.
Unreserved Is.
Doors open at 7.30 p.m.
Commencing at 8 p.m.
ian of us that j plan 0f Hall and booking at
THE CITY PRESS
Give me your ear Mr. Ed.
Mrs. Pain will sing


it apj>ears to have smothered the
British reply from the very start.
Between ships of approximately the
same class it is generally the ves
sel that gets in the second broad-
side first that wins.
The military operations of the
last twenty-four hours indicate
that the Allies are still pushing
their enveloping movement toward
the extreme right of the army com-
manded by General Von Kluck.
There is a' report that Von
Kluck is throwing up a line of de-
fence between Valenciennes and
Mons. The former city is in France
the second just across the Belgian
border. Between Valenclenes and
Mons is a double track railway
and froin Mons there is a network
of railway leading "eccentrically"
through Belgium. Those eccentric
lines of communications permit
of retreat to the German front by
different routes.
Strategic Importance of Re.ilwe.ys
There are no less than seven rail-
ways leading in and out of Valen-
ciennes. Cambrai, which lias been
held as one ol the extreme western
points by Von Kluck, lias direct
railway connection with Valen
ciennes, and from Cambrai and St.
Queeotin it is possible to fall back
on the line of the main northern
railway on toCharlcioi and Namur
without passing through Valen-
ciennes. The army of General von
Kluck is now in position to reach
Belgian soil by several railway
routes, but the fact that a defence
is being thrown up between Valen-
ciennes and Mons would indicate
that the Gwmans are making ready
to defend their connections from
attack from the northward. It is
from 'he northwest and north that
the Germans lipre seem to be ap-
prehensive, and this new defence
line is a defence as much against
the English Channel the direction
from which F.nglish reinforcements'
are coiningas against the attack
from the enveloping movement of
the left wing of the Allies.
The only hope left to the Ger
mans of leheving the right wing
of Von Kluck isto Break the allies'
centre in the vicinity of RhtiiBS,
This has not yet been accomplished
and every day that the British
Franco force* succeed in holding
intact the German line, that much
nearer will they come to driving
back Von Kluck. The day Von
Kluck is hurled back, marks the
collapse of the whole of the Ger-
man plan of campaign.
New York Herald, Sspt 23.
For Result
Advertise in
The Tribune
THE LEOPARD

cannot change his spots, but the removal of spots and
blemishes from clothes is assured if Sunlight Soap is
used. As the Leopard's eyes gleam in the darkness
of the night, so clothes washed with Sunlight Soap
gleam white and pure in the brilliant light of day. Un-
like the Leopard's jaws, which are formed to destroy,
SUNLIGHT SOAP
is created to preserve. It
preserves your clothes and
household linen, and makes
themlastlonger. Sunlioiii"
Soap is guaranteed pure,
and will not injure the
finest fabric.
* BUY IT.
?,W U
1*1



mum
mm
NOTICE
THE public 4HJI notified
that the Bahamas Tim-
ber Company, Limited have
all the men that they
need for the present and that
any going there cannot
expect to get work and are
notified that there are no ac-
comodations for them at the
works.
Bv order
ARTHUR B. SUTTON.
Agent
Sep'ember a6tli, 1914
Hcum
)+d?Z~Z
*!
Mapes Fertilizers
/ now carry in stock the fol-
lowing formulas:
Pineapple.It has been prov-
en that this has no equal
and a visit to fields using
same will convince you.
Vegetable.Now is the time
to use this and increase
your yield in Tomatoes,
Potatoes, Onions and all
other vegetables by ioo
per cent.
Orange Tree.To assist the
growth of Young Citrus
Tree. 4
Fruit and Wine.Increase the
yield and growth of old
Citrus trees.
Eor further information
and books on the use of tin se
fertilizers, please apply to
WALTER K. MOORE
Agent for Mapes Fertilizer
in the Bokanuu,
COCOANUTS
BAHAMA ISLANDS
IT is now possible for owners
of la:ul with fully bearing
trees to prove its value and ob
tain rents.
For further particulars
Apply to
J. THEO. FAR RING ION
Nassau, N. P.
Agent for
Bahamas Produce Marketing
Company
139 Copthall House
1 opthall Avenue
3 Mo. London, E. C
FUS SELL'S
CONOfSt"
M ILK
HE D
BUTTF-iJftY
bjlajlp,,'"
-Spared by ,,.:
FUSSELL8rC-J-,
Special
Notitie.
LOOK!
The following Blank forms
mavbe had at "The Tribune"
Office.
Duty Entry.
Free Entry.
Warehouse Entries.
Sponging Articles.
Ship's Reports.
In. quantities at SpecialRates
Just Received
Per S. S. "Santiago."
Fresh New Potatoes (Irish)
Selling at 4 cents Per lb.
also
Medium Size Onions at
8 Cent-, Per lb.
Baker's Cocoa | tins
at is. Each
Baker's Cocoa ] tins
at 6d. Bach
Call early at
THE ROYAL STORE,
J. I.. Saundeus & Co.
Notice
WE would call trio attt-n-
tion of our friends in Nas-
sau and on the 01 IT ISLANDS
to the following prices on lum-
ber which will go into effect
from to-dav.
All ROUGH lumber up to 8 ft.
6/3 per 100. All DRESSED
lumber up to 8 ft. 8 4 per 100.
All ROUGH and DRESSED to
16ft. 10 5 per too. ANYTHING
over 16 ft. !.'/(> per IOO. above
up to S ins. wide)
These prices are for CASH
absolutely and being WAR
pi ii 11 are made to help the pub-
lic and are subject to changs
without notice.
The Bahamas Timber Co. Ltd.
10 Bart street
Siptimbtr 2Ui, 191 J.
Notice
TIMS is to inform my Patrons
and the
hlic an
ned Jn
in; and
General
iy Public
Public
that I have opened
Black Smith Shop; arid am now
ready to do anything in t'e line ol
Genera) repair or new w rk Horse
Shoeing Specially. All v ork done,
Mechanically.
P. A. HUYLER.
Buy Kast St. (Wharf;


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