<%BANNER%>

PAGE 1

Publication began at 8.10 p.m. ghe Cribune Tuesday. September 29. 1914 Be of Good Cheer We have no doubt that the English Navy will find the way out from this new danger. Tlw sinking of the three cruisers gives more real anxiety than the long drawn battle of the Aisne which we believe has now reached that stage where something must happen soon. —:o: — N. B.—Plant Pepper.— While we await newa that will make future hi.tory. let us remem_ „ "or proudlv, but without vsln.' r>i • /-•• . r> i_ \r< *inrt, r„-i J. .""? Chinese Giant. Ruby King. glory. Kngland s record on F've Continents and on the Sevon Seaj. in the months of August and Sep. tember. SEPTEMBER Sept 39.—Nelson born 175S. •:o:— Plant Radish. -Red Rocket and White Rocket. —:o:~ The following subscriptions have been received.— Amount previously acknowledged £"1604 12 The news fro'n the seat of war H ^ HiK } >t,rs '' r th for die last few days continues : P |l \"' > I r t 1 to be a terribl) monotooous se Neville Frith rieso! advances and retirements Rowland Fritn without any serious effect upon Hazel Frith the battle Hue situation whichil* me8 & B, rt K llv the news reports day after daylTimothy D.o.g. Bided as unchanged until this morning, I Miss Florence II. when it is, reported, that the Annonyraous Germans made a desparate at j A Bahamian tack on the Allies but were de* ^' r ail(1 Mrs. Albert feated with heavy losses, and Ingrabaro Mons. von Klucks new base was Wr8< v L Mowley burning and the Prussian Guard V s Susa Fountain cut to pieces St. Andrew Society The result of this defeat must, Inhabitants Ragged if closely followed, spell disaster I Wand for the German forces. Ragged Isld Burial The most important event of Society the last few davs is the sin kind Rgfc e d Isld. Baptist i 1-1. 1. of the three British cruisers "Aboukir" "Cressv" and i logue" tins circumstance illustral s the great danger to which the whole British fleet in the North Sea is exposed, if tiuee ships 1 au be so sasil) disposed of by sueuna lines so likewise might thirr; or three hundred, for thert* appears tube no defence ot protection from the attacks of these forroi liable engines at destruction. There is so little to betray the 1004 12 b 3 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 10 0 0 1 0 0 11 5 0 3 0 0 12 0 0 1 1 0 4 0 2 0 0 4 0 5' 10 0 4 6 5 5 0 0 1 10 0 Chur.h Total 1694 2 IO — :o: — Latest War News RADIOGRAMS. OFFICIAL September 29th 1914. London 28th. (|l vt 1 W 11 Bahamas, September 28th, following \a ri nit pretence ol these comparatively f r „„, pre* Bureau : small but terribly destructive of operations of His Vtoj^sty's vessels .that the utmost vigilance nava l forces on the West Coast, a lords no safety and may be Duaia/capitolof the CamertKms eluded by*therj, mtH \ Bonbevi liav. surrendered to lhe indignation of the War an Auglo^Freneh forie. Lord and Germany that 11< Hand should have released the survl vors of th# %  cruisers who had land. .1 h Ho|| ,„i seems al most childish m it> orroaance. HARCOURT. i>. arts I'K.'KKI) I l -It is reported thai ibe Ioha% Held th-se men as prie Germans tried desrwrwlv In oners of war, I -li. id wou Id b rvak tli rough lhe vibes Lines have committed 1111 Act of War at \rg hne, but r id against a friend I) nation with There is nothing uev iu the whom she is al peaee, but such general situation. an idea is characteristic of the Antwerp:—The Germans are Raiser and in keeping with some .shelling the outer fortifications rs of his ideas. with heavy guns. Petrogfad : —Russian cavalry have crossed the Carpathian Mountains and entered the plains of Hungary, The Germans are retreating from Poland. The Russian forces are within 65 miles of Cracow. Special to the Nassau Guardian New York Sept 29. Between the Aisne River and the Argonnes the Germans made a desperate attack on the Allies. The Germans were defeated with heavy losses, and Mons whither General von Kluck bad moved his base is burning. The Prussian guard, the pride of toe Kav-w was cut to pieces, The lighting lasted three days. PICKED II' September 29th KM-P The Russian-, are pmsuiiig the retreating Austnans right wing beyond the Carpathian Mountains into Hungary. The Vustrians debacle is complet. they having lost all their artillery. The left wing is in retreat to u ards Cracow. Przemysl is entirely in-' ted by the Russians and the main Austrian army is in retreat. The American Embassy building in Paris wasdamnged b) a bomb dropped from an Aero plane on Sun.lav The Dardanelles is reported closed to navigation. The Nlontenegran army lave been greeted by the Bosnians is liberators Italy is reported to be enlisting volunteer-, for the purpose of landim. at Dalmatia, Austria Hungary. I lie Austrian fortsatCataro aie irted haviug sunk a la French warship on the 19th Phe Allies repulsed violent attacks on the 1 entre arid in de slight advance o%the heigh • ul the Meuse. Generally there 1 no i'li .nge iu Hie situation. The United states will inert use the efficiency "f the aviation service Unmarried lieutenant! ,,f the ii ny are invited to entei the avi 1 IM ii service Austrian government husforc %  .I He' suspension ol all Italian newsphperfl in Venice nud are c.l nely watching all li iliau re dants Phe lime "I tin firing of rht 1 %  ir 1 r • and the last w Inch 1, sun., ti.i • British cruisers "II Heligoland isplacedat one hour 1 The Montenegrans are within 'artillery range of Sarajevo. .Vlau beuge is reported three quarters burned by the IjermBiis. Cholera in epidemic fords* is^ reported in the Eastern war rSBt September 29th 1914. London 29th. Governor, Bahamas. September 20th following from Press Bureau : On 3unday night the enemy attacked our linei with more vigor, but with no more success. The situation is unchanged. The Germans have gained 110 ground and the French have advanced in places. HARCOURT. Paris :—Official reports state that the situation is generally more favourable to the Allies. Berlin reports states more Verdun forts have been silenced and that the (ierman offensive movement is continuing, the Germans having advanced over 25 miles. lhe Russians have chased the Austrian right wing over the Carp Ithian Mountains and have captured several Hungarian towns. It is reported ^at the Germans paid one ligjWn <| million dollars for damage done by German troops. Berlin :— Germany's anxtet) about the war fund has been al laved by the knowledge that the interior loan will amount tfWDM hundred million dollars. Mexico :— Carranza hai agreed not to contest for the presidency if Villa will do the same. Villa has agreed. NEWS FROM RUM CAY (Communicated) We are credibly informed thai Mr. R S. Simms held a meeting at the Sch I room 00 the night of the 23rd instant, in behalf"! the War Fund, which proved quite successful. Tinspeaks wll for Mr. SimmSj is 1 loyal subject and a faithful servant to His Majesty I he King Further information will be furnished later on. — :>: — Gregory Town Eleuthera. Sept. 24 iqif. iCouimimi.-iApl) On the suggestion of the Commissioner of the District, a publi %  tmg was nnvened by the lust ire of the Peace. Daniel U .belts Esq., "ii the 21st inst at the public School room for the purpose of raising subscriptions



PAGE 1

to aid the Mother Country in this her time of need. Mr. James H. Smith pMrded. The Chairman u^jjlcssed the meeting on Loyalty to the Throne and Fmpire and besought the people to giv even if their subscriptions were small, toward this worthy object. Mr. Joseph \V. Johnson of fered prayer, imploring help! from on high to our Country, and a blessing on the meeting. At the close of the praver. The Lords prayer was repeated by the audience in a solemn and impressive manner. The hymn Onward Christian soldiers was sung followed by a patriotic Address by the J. P. during his re marks ha held up to view the flag of Britain, the Union Jack, this aroused in the breast of the audience, the spirit of loyalty and enthusiasm During the receiving uf the subscriptions, patriotic songs were sung, men, women a id children brought to the desk their subscriptions. His Majestj King George has some loyal subjects at Gregory Town the children are imbued with the true spirit, one little fellow re narked, if my papa was onlv home I kii\v in 1 would give me a |H'|iny'Ur v-id i.) I'.n-land to p the po n fa i her less i nil ren this lie sod with the tears streamii RH >wn his cheeks. The sum of i\. 10. 9 was raised and much more would have been subscribed if th times had b*en heiter. Patriotic longs were sung dm my the long to be iernembered meeting, which was; brought to i close by singing the National Anthem. Threehearty cheers v n ;nvn for King' Getyge and (Juecn \Luv for our Ai ,uy iii.i Way and bit Excel hncy iheG war nor aud Council. )u the sand I visited the public school, and with the per | mission of the te.u her. \ address id the Children On Loyalty and obsdience, I was pi ise I with the courtesy tin 1 teacher hewed in-, the good behavnur of the c lildren and line singing They saitg Rule UriOsnnia, Hurrah for England When Britains tirst,; Mag of Britain, and National An hem, ioo children were present. JAS. II SMITH. Art I -:o:— unhurt Town, Cti Island i6th 3 pi i )i i. Editor' 11 ibune Sir: Never before have the grim realities of the war been so for citly impressed on our mind^ as on Monday night 14th itist when we congregated in response to the behests of our Commissioner to/'•ee what feeble measures could be adopted by us that WO lid benefit our nation in this terrible crisis, Notwithstanding the inclemency of the weather, the Baptist chapel accommodated a capacity audience with patriotism visible in their very motions, all listening with anxious impatience to hear something about the war. Our Commissioner read the spe dies of His Excellency and those of the various gentlemen (given in St Andrews nail) and a short comment on ych. Then putting down his paper, he preached from the subjects "< live to the needy" and "Do your duty" He told us of the ap palling sacrifice of human life caused by the carmage of the worlds greatest war; of the uni venal distress and agony which compel the worlds great heart to throb and sing"0 God make peace;" of the stagnancy of com mero 1 and >f oui dutj (0 help our Km,lire by offering our ser vice or giving our very most. His appeal met the approval of all .-'tund thinking persons and was secondedandc >rn>l> >ra t"tl In al the subsequent sp< 1 leers. The pres dentsofthev ifious benevolent societies 1 ii-1 the leaders of the churches,—all volunteered tube responsible for the collect! MI of subscriptions. As British subjects and natives of Cat Island we wish it to be clearly understood that we are Second to noother country in our loyalty and that we are wide 1 -. aketo the existing state of affairs of our Mother Country. We are obliged to say that a period, more pregnant with national danger more replete with general destruction, more big with the annihilation of thrones, aye, of the dissolution of the greatest empires of the world, have never before been recorded in the annals of ancient or modern history The fate of Europe is certainly suspended between the powers of one ambitious nation, and the weakness, and the pride, md the resentment, and the person er tnee of her contending oppo nents I say again Mr. Editor, that our people are not ash < p. We are c.i,;ni/ant of the leriousnSM of the tim's. We have done our best to mimic the meeting held by his Excellency, in every par ticulat especially in the spirit of patriotism; and if the other islands would but take the matter as enthusiastically as we, 1 see no reason why we can't raise a minimum number of 1000 men to man ships in these waters. Yours truly, LORENZO THOMPSON GOVERNMENT NOTICE5 The following appointments have been made in the Post Office Department.— William Maclure, 3rd Clerk, Acting 2nd Clerk. Constant H. Lowe, 4th Clerk, Acting 3rd Clerk. Ellen M. Johnson, Asst. Clerk, Acting 4th Clerk. The King will not disallow the following Act of the Bahamas Legislature — 4 and 5 Geo. V cap 23 An Act to prevent the introduction into the Colony of Diseases of Plants. 5 Geo. V., cap 1 An Act to enable the Governor to issue Proclamations on instructions from the Secretary of Stateand to give legal effect to the same and for other purposes. 5 Geo. V., cap 2. An Act to enable the (iovernor in Council to make provision for affording relief in case of any emergency arising from a state of war. John II. Bethel has been ap pointed a member of the Board of Pilotage temporarily. Victor "launders has been ap pointed 1 member of the Board of Agriculture. The Stipendiary and Circuit Magistrate will leave Nassau on the 10th November. A Circular Despatch re the Imperial lustituteis published for general information. Origin Herman Mason has been appointed Second Clerk in the Treasury. Miss Gertrude de Glanville has been granted an extension of sick leave for seven days. THE HENRY M. FLAGLER, GREAT OCEAN FERRYBOAT LAUNCHED AT THE CRAMP SHIP YARDS [Special despatch to the Herald) Philadelphia, Pa., Tuesday.— The Henry M Mauler, the only sea |*ing railroad car ferryboat in the world and the largest ferrv boat of any d ISCI iption, was launched this afternoon at the Ship) aids ol William Cramp .V Son. \l 11 Florence Beckwith, of Jackson\ ille, Fl 1. daughter of Mr. Joseph P. Be. l


PAGE 1

%  ——> tain Wilmot S. Nicholson. The tonnage and the armament of the three cruisers were the same. They were 440 feet in length, 69.5 feet in width and drew twenty-six feet of water. Eech carried two 9.2 inch guns, twelve 6 indi guns, twelve 13 pounders and five 3-pounders. The Aboukir and the Cressy Were built at Govan and the Hogue at Barrow, all in 1900. They were powerful cruisers with heavy armor ,md capable of battle service as well as cruising. It is believed here that to reach the cruisers the submarine flotilla first passed the line of torpedo boats which is said to hold/he inside position in the line* across Heligoland Bay. In another line back of these light and swift craft were the cruisers and back of these were the battle ships. Increase* Determination for Finish Fight. Although a terrible shock to the British, the news of the disaster is accepted here stoically and only increases the determination of the l>eop e to go on fighting to the end. There is anger and a cry for revenge in certain quarters but the mass of English people already have accepted this dressing news as one of the incidents of war and that there will be others and per haps worse, but that in the end. the British aims will bp victorious. The greatest mystery always has surrounded the submarine equipment of the Geiman navy. No 11formation ever has been permitted to leak out concerning their number, size or equipment, nor of their methods of operation. It is known that they are smaller tinn the types employed by the British, French and United States navies, and it is known that tbe-Germans have at least seventy-two submarines,There may be many more. Such an attack as that delivered in the North Sea yesterday has been expected and feared, as it wis known that it was the Kaisers idea to wear down the British fleet hy submarine attacks and attack' from the air until his own fleet would be not so hopelessly outnumbered. His orders had been to whittle down the preponderant British navy before sending his own fleet against it in^)pen battle. LOOK! The following Blank forms may be had at HieTrihune" Ollice. Duty Entry. Free Entry. Warehouse Entries. Sponging Articles. Ship's Reports. In quantities at Special Rates THE AMERICAN BISON 4 is fast becoming extinct, but this fact need not trouble the housewife. Her interest is centred on the fact that, thanks to SUNLIGHT SOAP, the terrors of wash-day have become quite extinct. With SUNLIGHT SOAP as a helper the wash is quickly over. Labour is reduced by its use-time is saved and the clothes are preserved. SUNLIGHT SOAP does the work. It is made for that purpose. TBY IT AND SAVE YOUR 4146 TIME AND MONEY. "NEW NATIONAL" A "IDEAL" HAND MACHINES •NEW HOME* A "RUBY* FOOT MACHINES FOR SAL? BY CHAS. E. ALBURY IMPERIAL COCOANUTS THEATRE WEDNESDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY Door* open 7.M). Performance begin hi H.13 p.m. NOTICE T HE public are notified that the Bahamas Timber Company, Limited have all the men that they need for the present and that any going there cannot expect to got work and are notified tli.it there are no accoinodations for them at the works. By order ARTHUR B. SUTTON. Agent September 26th, 1914 BAHAMA ISLANDS I T is nuw possible for owners of la:id witli fully bearing trees to prove its value and ob tain rents. For further particulars Apply to J. THEO. FARRINGTON Nassau, N. P. Agent for Bahamas Produce Marketing Company 139 Copthall House f'opthall Avenue 3 Mo. London, E. C WAN ED T O purchase A small house and lot in the Western or Southern suburbs. Communicate with W. Care of "Tribune Office" IWK. Shingles Best No. 1 HeartflikCypres Shingles at $9.60 per thousand of 20 bundles Discounts on lots of over 5000 shingles. Special Price also on cheaper grades—also 5in. Cypress at $6.72 per thousand of 20 bundles. This price made possible by a very large purchase. Fresh stock arriving every week. ,C. C. SAUNDERS. •Mapes Fertilizers / now carry in stock the following formulas: Pineapple.—It has been proven that this has no equal and a visit to fields using same will convince you. Vegetable. —Now is the time to use this and increase your yield in Tomatoes, Potatoes, Onions and all other vegetable by 100 per cent. 1W Orange Tree. —To assist the growth of Young Citrus Tree. Fruit and Wine.— Increase the yield and growth of old Citrus trees. Eor further information and books on the use of these fertilizers, please apply to WALTER K. MOORE Special Notice. JUST RECEIVED Per S. S. "Santiago." Fresh New Potatoes (Irish) Selling at 4 cents Per* lb. al^p Medium Si*e Onions at 8 Cerfts Per lb. Baker's Cocoa £ tins at is. Each Baker's Cocoa | tins at 6d. Each Call early Jfe THE ROYAL STORE, J. L. SAUNDERS & Co. For Result Advertise in The Tribune



PAGE 1

% Nulllua o.ddlcIu (urnre In verb* me-glatrl. Being bound to ewe*r to the Dogm >f no Mentor, VOL.X. N N. P.. Bo.ho.ina.. Tueeday, September 29.1914 No. 22* P > 3 cr 2. 5T r* (D <* 0) a sr o CD CO L. GILBERT DUPUCH, Editor and Proprietor. OFFICE: 38-44 MARKET STREET Nassau, N. P Bahamas P. O. BOX 163 PUBLISHED DAILY Monday, Wednesday und Friday— single copy Jd Tuesday, Thursday and Saturdaysingle copy id Weekly 4ld Monthly i s. 4d Quarterly .. 4s. Half Yearly 8 s. Yearly 1 6s. JErfctr PAYABLE IN ADVANCE tiling Rates :—Six pence per line for first insertion; three pence per line for second insertion ; and one |>enny per line for suhsqueut insertions. Advertisements under eight lines 4s. GERMAN SUBMARINES SINK THREE BRITISH SHIPS 700 OUT Or 2.265 SAVED London, Wednesday. Three great armored British cruisers— the Aboukir the Hogue and the Cressy —with hundreds of dead an>l two German submarine boats are .t the bottom of the North Sea following the first naval engagement of real consequence in the war.Thieeof the tttocking German submarine* escaped, ncroiding to survivors of the cruisers, who were landed at Ytnuiden, Holland, but the quii-kfire of numerous English guns sent the other 'wo to the bof torn. The Aboukir was torpedried first and then a her sister cruiserr. the Houue and the Cressy, approached to pick up thesurvivors their hulls were ripped open hy totpedoesshot from th<* Germ.tn submarine, which probably arose under the was ves"^Apparently the sea was then riddled from shots from the quick firing gui s of the British Wat ships in in effort to sink the flotilla of submarines which had stealthily crept under them. Any ripple or eddy on the surface of the sef the attack accepts this as the German reply to the declaration of Mr. Winston Spencer Churchill First Lord of the Admiralty that if the German navy did not come out and fight the British fleet would "dig them out." While the announcement of this disaster by the official news bureau does not state where it occurred it is assumed that the Aboukir, the Hogue and the Cressy which were sister cruisers of 12,000 tons displacement and with 755 officers and crew each were part of the line of more than a hundred British war vessels that form a great line bot tling the German flet in Heligoland Bay at the mouth of the Elbe and the entrance to the I.icLCanal. "* Numerous trawlers and merchant vessels were in the vicinity at ifce time of the .Htack and, Iillffied 1o the aid of the officets and men in the water. I he liton. a Dutch steamship picked up 114 British wounded and many dejd, and after transferring most of them to British torpedo boats proceeded to the Hook of Holland with twenty wounded. Exploelon Lifte Cruleer Out of Sea The captain of the Titon sail that the Aboukir was lifted out of the sea by a tiemendous explosion under her at half past seven clock yesterday morning. Apparently that torpedo was shot up under her Jrom the tube of a submarine that nad gotten under her hull. As the Aboukir rose out of the water and then crashed down, listing heavily and almost instantly, it was known that a great hole hid been torn in her hull and that she was sinking. It was believed forseveral minutes that sli.had struck a floating mine, according to survivors, and the Hogue and the Cressy moved in closet to pick up the men in the w..ter. Juickly it became apparent ih it the cruisers were in the midst %  >f 1 school o| German submarines thai had sneaked in amo n them. The Aboukir had not gone down when the Hogue was torpedoed and a few seconds later the Cressy and her 13,000 tons of steel was jolted out of the sea and swamped Shooting at Eyee of the Submarines. A score of British topedo boats and torpedo destroyers were then hurrying to the scene. Just above the*6rater could be seen the periscopes, or "eyes" of several submarines. They had stood away after the attack and had come close to the surface to see the carnage they had wrought. These periscopes cut through the water like the dorsal fin of great sharks. The torpedo craft and the other cruisers quickly trained their guns upon these "fins" and, it is believed here tonight that at least two of the submarines, with all hands on board,,were sunk. Among the steamships that went fo the aid of the British seamen and officers who either had been blown off or leaped from the sinking cruisers, was the F'ores, which reached Ymiden,Holla.,d,last night. The Flores had on board 287 of the survivors. Among these were several wounded men. One had died after oeing taken frorr. the water. These survivors told of the sudden at tack of the submarines and of the sinking two of thern hy the British vessels. T belief that the a floating mine until" the Hogi and the Cressy also were torpedoed and then the Britons realized that a flotilla of submarines had administered the most successful attack yet credited to those modern engines of. war. Only 400 Are Known to Have Been Saved. With the twenty survivors landoed at the Hook of Ho'land by the Triton, 287 tj Ymuiden by the Flores and about 100 transferred by the Triton to English War ves^ sels, it is known that about 400 of the 2.265 officer! and men who were on ho'ird the thee* cruisers have been saved. But i( is confidently believed heie that many others were picked up by the British war ships and ihat they are safe "ii board those vessels. The Xboukir was commanded by Captain John K. Drummnud; the Tressy by fjiptain Robert W. Johnson, and the Hogue by Cap. (Continued on fourth page) o of theni hy the BriI'hey alsJtold of the AboukJj had struck ie untifihe Hogue •


The Tribune.
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS DOWNLOADS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02270
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Tuesday, September 29, 1914
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02270

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

( PDF )

( PDF )

( PDF )

( PDF )


Full Text
?
Nulllua o.ddlcIu (urnre In verb* me-glatrl.
Being bound to ewe*r to the Dogm >f no Mentor,
VOL.X.
N
N. P.. Bo.ho.ina.. Tueeday, September 29.1914
No. 22*
P
>
3
cr
2.
5T
r*
(D
<*
0)
a
sr
o
CD
CO
L. GILBERT DUPUCH,
Editor and Proprietor.
OFFICE: 38-44 MARKET STREET
Nassau, N. P, Bahamas
P. O. BOX 163
PUBLISHED DAILY
Monday, Wednesday und Friday
single copy......... Jd
Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday-
single copy ......... id
Weekly ............ 4ld
Monthly ............is. 4d
Quarterly........ .. 4s.
Half Yearly............8s.
Yearly ............16s.
JErfctr
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
tiling Rates :Six pence per line
for first insertion; three pence per line
for second insertion ; and one |>enny per
line for suhsqueut insertions.
Advertisements under eight lines 4s.
GERMAN SUBMARINES
SINK THREE BRITISH SHIPS
700 OUT Or 2.265 SAVED
London, Wednesday.
Three great armored British cruis-
ers the Aboukir the Hogue and
the Cressy with hundreds of dead
an>l two German submarine boats
are .t the bottom of the North Sea
following the first naval engage-
ment of real consequence in the
war.Thieeof the tttocking German
submarine* escaped, ncroiding to
survivors of the cruisers, who were
landed at Ytnuiden, Holland, but
the quii-kfire of numerous English
guns sent the other 'wo to the bof
torn.
The Aboukir was torpedried first
and then a her sister cruiserr. the
Houue and the Cressy, approached
to pick up thesurvivors their hulls
were ripped open hy totpedoesshot
from th<* Germ.tn submarine, which
probably arose under the was ves-
"^Apparently the sea was then
riddled from shots from the quick
firing gui s of the British Wat ships
in in effort to sink the flotilla of
submarines which had stealthily
crept under them. Any ripple or
eddy on the surface of the se which mignt indicate) the location
of a submarine became the target
for English steel.
German Navy'e Reply to Threat.
All England, shocked and grieved
by the suddenness <>f the attack ac-
cepts this as the German reply to
the declaration of Mr. Winston
Spencer Churchill First Lord of the
Admiralty that if the German navy
did not come out and fight the Bri-
tish fleet would "dig them out."
While the announcement of this
disaster by the official news bureau
does not state where it occurred it
is assumed that the Aboukir, the
Hogue and the Cressy which were
sister cruisers of 12,000 tons dis-
placement and with 755 officers and
crew each were part of the line of
more than a hundred British war
vessels that form a great line bot
tling the German flet in Heligo-
land Bay at the mouth of the Elbe
and the entrance to the I.icLCanal. "*
Numerous trawlers and merchant
vessels were in the vicinity at ifce
time of the .Htack and, Iillffied 1o
the aid of the officets and men in
the water. I he liton. a Dutch
steamship picked up 114 British
wounded and many dejd, and after
transferring most of them to British
torpedo boats proceeded to the
Hook of Holland with twenty
wounded.
Exploelon Lifte Cruleer Out of Sea
The captain of the Titon sail
that the Aboukir was lifted out of
the sea by a tiemendous explosion
under her at half past seven clock
yesterday morning. Apparently
that torpedo was shot up under her
Jrom the tube of a submarine that
nad gotten under her hull.
As the Aboukir rose out of the
water and then crashed down, list-
ing heavily and almost instantly,
it was known that a great hole hid
been torn in her hull and that she
was sinking.
It was believed forseveral minutes
that sli.- had struck a floating mine,
according to survivors, and the
Hogue and the Cressy moved in
closet to pick up the men in the
w..ter. Juickly it became apparent
ih it the cruisers were in the midst
>f 1 school o| German submarines
thai had sneaked in amo n them.
The Aboukir had not gone down
when the Hogue was torpedoed
and a few seconds later the Cressy
and her 13,000 tons of steel was
jolted out of the sea and swamped _
Shooting at Eyee of
the Submarines.
A score of British topedo boats
and torpedo destroyers were then
hurrying to the scene. Just above
the*6rater could be seen the peris-
copes, or "eyes" of several sub-
marines. They had stood away after
the attack and had come close to
the surface to see the carnage they
had wrought. These periscopes
cut through the water like the dor-
sal fin of great sharks.
The torpedo craft and the other
cruisers quickly trained their guns
upon these "fins" and, it is believed
here tonight that at least two of
the submarines, with all hands on
board,,were sunk.
Among the steamships that went
fo the aid of the British seamen
and officers who either had been
blown off or leaped from the sink-
ing cruisers, was the F'ores, which
reached Ymiden,Holla.,d,last night.
The Flores had on board 287 of
the survivors. Among these were
several wounded men. One had
died after oeing taken frorr. the
water.
These survivors told of the sud-
den at tack of the submarines and of
the sinking two of thern hy the Bri-
tish vessels. T
belief that the
a floating mine until" the Hogi
and the Cressy also were torpedoed
and then the Britons realized that
a flotilla of submarines had admin-
istered the most successful attack
yet credited to those modern en-
gines of. war.
Only 400 Are Known to
Have Been Saved.
With the twenty survivors land-
oed at the Hook of Ho'land by the
Triton, 287 tj Ymuiden by the
Flores and about 100 transferred
by the Triton to English War ves^
sels, it is known that about 400 of
the 2.265 officer! and men who
were on ho'ird the thee* cruisers
have been saved. But i( is confi-
dently believed heie that many
others were picked up by the Bri-
tish war ships and ihat they are
safe "ii board those vessels.
The Xboukir was commanded by
Captain John K. Drummnud; the
Tressy by fjiptain Robert W.
Johnson, and the Hogue by Cap.
(Continued on fourth page)
o of theni hy the Bri-
I'hey alsJtold of the
AboukJj had struck
ie untifihe Hogue


Publication began at 8.10 p.m.
ghe Cribune
Tuesday. September 29. 1914
Be of Good Cheer
We have no doubt that the
English Navy will find the way
out from this new danger.
Tlw sinking of the three
cruisers gives more real anxiety
than the long drawn battle of
the Aisne which we believe has
now reached that stage where
something must happen soon.
:o:
N. B.Plant Pepper.
While we await newa that will
make future hi.tory. let us remem- .........
"or proudlv, but without vsln.' r>i /- . r> i_ \r<
*inrt, r-i j. .""? Chinese Giant. Ruby King.
glory. Kngland s record on F've '
Continents and on the Sevon Seaj.
in the months of August and Sep.
tember.
SEPTEMBER
Sept 39.Nelson born 175S.
:o:
Plant Radish. -Red Rock-
et and White Rocket.
:o:~
The following subscriptions
have been received.
Amount previously
acknowledged "1604 12
The news fro'n the seat of war H- ^ HiK} >t,rs ''r'th
for die last few days continues : P|l\"'!> I'r't'1
to be a terribl) monotooous se Neville Frith
rieso! advances and retirements Rowland Fritn
without any serious effect upon Hazel Frith
the battle Hue situation whichil*me8 & B,'rt K' llv
the news reports day after daylTimothy D.o.g. Bided
as unchanged until this morning, I Miss Florence II.
when it is, reported, that the Annonyraous
Germans made a desparate at j A Bahamian
tack on the Allies but were de* ^'r ail(1 Mrs. Albert
feated with heavy losses, and Ingrabaro
Mons. von Klucks new base was Wr8< v- L Mowley
burning and the Prussian Guard Vs Susa" Fountain
cut to pieces St. Andrew Society
The result of this defeat must, Inhabitants Ragged
if closely followed, spell disaster I Wand
for the German forces. Ragged Isld Burial
The most important event of Society
the last few davs is the sin kind Rgfced Isld. Baptist
" i 1-1.___1.
of the three British cruisers
"Aboukir" "Cressv" and i logue"
tins circumstance illustral s the
great danger to which the whole
British fleet in the North Sea is
exposed, if tiuee ships 1 au be
so sasil) disposed of by sueuna
lines so likewise might thirr; or
three hundred, for thert* appears
tube no defence ot protection
from the attacks of these forroi
liable engines at destruction.
There is so little to betray the
1004 12 b
3 0 0
1 0 0
1 0 0
1 0 10 0 0
1 0 0
11 5 0
3 0 0
12 0 0
1 1 0
4 0
2 0 0
4 0
5' 10 0
'
4 6 5
5 0 0
1 10 0
Chur.h
Total 1694 2 IO
:o:
Latest War News
RADIOGRAMS.
OFFICIAL
September 29th 1914.
London 28th.
(|l vt 1 W 11
Bahamas,
September 28th,
following
\- a ri nit
pretence ol these comparatively fr, pre* Bureau :
small but terribly destructive of operations of His Vtoj^sty's
vessels .that the utmost vigilance naval forces on the West Coast,
a lords no safety and may be Duaia/capitolof the CamertKms
eluded by*therj, mtH\ Bonbevi liav. surrendered to
lhe indignation of the War an Auglo^Freneh forie.
Lord and Germany that 11< Hand
should have released the survl
vors of th-#....... cruisers who
had land. .1 h Ho|| ,i seems al
most childish m it> orroaance.
HARCOURT.
i>.
arts
I'K.'KKI) I l
-It is reported thai ibe
Ioha% Held th-se men as prie Germans tried desrwrwlv In
oners of war, I -li. id wouId.brvak tlirough lhe vibes Lines
have committed 1111 Act of War at \rg hne, but r id
against a friend I) nation with There is nothing uev iu the
whom she is al peaee, but such general situation.
an idea is characteristic of the Antwerp:The Germans are
Raiser and in keeping with some .shelling the outer fortifications
rs of his ideas. with heavy guns.
Petrogfad : Russian cavalry
have crossed the Carpathian
Mountains and entered the
plains of Hungary,
The Germans are retreating
from Poland.
The Russian forces are within
65 miles of Cracow.
Special to the Nassau Guardian
New York Sept 29.
Between the Aisne River and
the Argonnes the Germans made
a desperate attack on the Allies.
The Germans were defeated
with heavy losses, and Mons
whither General von Kluck bad
moved his base is burning.
The Prussian guard, the pride
of toe Kav-w was cut to pieces,
The lighting lasted three days.
PICKED II'
September 29th km-p
The Russian-, are pmsuiiig the
retreating Austnans right wing
beyond the Carpathian Moun-
tains into Hungary. The Vus-
trians debacle is complet., they
having lost all their artillery.
The left wing is in retreat to
u ards Cracow.
Przemysl is entirely in-' ted
by the Russians and the main
Austrian army is in retreat.
The American Embassy buil-
ding in Paris wasdamnged b) a
bomb dropped from an Aero
plane on Sun.lav
The Dardanelles is reported
closed to navigation.
The Nlontenegran army lave
been greeted by the Bosnians is
liberators
Italy is reported to be enlist-
ing volunteer-, for the purpose of
landim. at Dalmatia, Austria
Hungary.
I lie Austrian fortsatCataro aie
irted haviug sunk a la
French warship on the 19th
Phe Allies repulsed violent
attacks on the 1 entre arid in de
slight advance o%the heigh ul
the Meuse. Generally there 1
no i'li .nge iu Hie situation.
The United states will inert use
the efficiency "f the aviation
service Unmarried lieutenant!
,,f the ii ny are invited to entei
the avi 1 im'ii service
Austrian government husforc
..I He' suspension ol all
Italian newsphperfl in Venice
nud are c.l nely watching all
_ li iliau re dants
Phe lime "I tin firing of rht
1 ir 1 r and the last w Inch
1, sun., ti.i British cruisers "II
Heligoland isplacedat one hour
1 The Montenegrans are within
'artillery range of Sarajevo. .Vlau
beuge is reported three quarters
burned by the IjermBiis. Cholera
in epidemic fords* is^ reported in
the Eastern war rSBt
September 29th 1914.
London 29th.
Governor,
Bahamas.
September 20th following
from Press Bureau : On 3unday
night the enemy attacked our
linei with more vigor, but with
no more success. The situation
is unchanged. The Germans
have gained 110 ground and the
French have advanced in places.
HARCOURT.
Paris :Official reports state
that the situation is generally
more favourable to the Allies. *
Berlin reports states more Ver-
dun forts have been silenced and
that the (ierman offensive move-
ment is continuing, the Germans
having advanced over 25 miles.
lhe Russians have chased the
Austrian right wing over the
Carp Ithian Mountains and have
captured several Hungarian
towns.
It is reported ^at the Ger-
mans paid one ligjWn <| million
dollars for damage done by Ger-
man troops.
Berlin : Germany's anxtet)
about the war fund has been al
laved by the knowledge that the
interior loan will amount tfWDM
hundred million dollars.
Mexico : Carranza hai
agreed not to contest for the
presidency if Villa will do the
same. Villa has agreed.
NEWS FROM RUM CAY
(Communicated)
We are credibly informed thai
Mr. R S. Simms held a meeting
at the Sch I room 00 the night
of the 23rd instant, in behalf"!
the War Fund, which proved
quite successful.
Tin- speaks wll for Mr.
SimmSj is 1 loyal subject and a
faithful servant to His Majesty
I he King
Further information will be
furnished later on.
:>:
Gregory Town Eleuthera.
Sept. 24 iqif.
iCouimimi.-iApl)
On the suggestion of the Com-
missioner of the District, a pub-
li .....tmg was nnvened by the
lust ire of the Peace. Daniel
U .belts Esq., "ii the 21st inst at
the public School room for the
purpose of raising subscriptions


to aid the Mother Country in
this her time of need. Mr. James
H. Smith pMrded. The Chair-
man u^jjlcssed the meeting on
Loyalty to the Throne and Fm-
pire and besought the people to
giv even if their subscriptions
were small, toward this worthy .
object. Mr. Joseph \V. Johnson of
fered prayer, imploring help!
from on high to our Country,
and a blessing on the meeting.
At the close of the praver. The
Lords prayer was repeated by
the audience in a solemn and
impressive manner. The hymn
Onward Christian soldiers was
sung followed by a patriotic Ad-
dress by the J. P. during his re
marks ha held up to view the
flag of Britain, the Union Jack,
this aroused in the breast of the
audience, the spirit of loyalty
and enthusiasm During the
receiving uf the subscriptions,
patriotic songs were sung, men,
women a id children brought to
the desk their subscriptions. His
Majestj King George has some
loyal subjects at Gregory Town
the children are imbued with
the true spirit, one little fellow
re narked, if my papa was onlv
home I kii\v in1 would give me
a |H'|iny'Ur v-id i.) I'.n-land to
p the po n fa i her less i nil ren
this lie sod with the tears
streamii rH >wn his cheeks. The
sum of i\. 10. 9 was raised and
much more would have been
subscribed if th times had b*en
heiter. Patriotic longs were
sung dm my the long to be ie-
rnembered meeting, which was;
brought to i close by singing the
National Anthem. Threehearty
cheers v n ;nvn for King'
Getyge and (Juecn \Luv for our
Ai ,uy iii.i Way and bit Excel
hncy iheG war nor aud Council.
' )u the sand I visited the
public school, and with the per |
mission of the te.u her. \address
id the Children On Loyalty and
obsdience, I was pi ise I with
the courtesy tin1 teacher hewed
in-, the good behavnur of the
c lildren and line singing They
saitg Rule UriOsnnia, Hurrah for
England When Britains tirst,;
Mag of Britain, and National
An hem, ioo children were
present.
JAS. II SMITH.

Art I
-:o:
unhurt Town, Cti Island
i6th 3 pi i )i i.
Editor' 11 ibune "
Sir:
Never before have the grim
realities of the war been so for
citly impressed on our mind^ as
on Monday night 14th itist when
we congregated in response to
the behests of our Commissioner
to/'ee what feeble measures
could be adopted by us that
WO lid benefit our nation in this
terrible crisis,
Notwithstanding the incle-
mency of the weather, the Bap-
tist chapel accommodated a ca-
pacity audience with patriotism
visible in their very motions, all
listening with anxious impa-
tience to hear something about
the war.
Our Commissioner read the
spe dies of His Excellency and
those of the various gentlemen
(given in St Andrews nail) and
a short comment on ych. Then
putting down his paper, he
preached from the subjects
"< live to the needy" and "Do
your duty" He told us of the ap
palling sacrifice of human life
caused by the carmage of the
worlds greatest war; of the uni
venal distress and agony which
compel the worlds great heart
to throb and sing"0 God make
peace;" of the stagnancy of com
mero 1 and >f oui dutj (0 help
our Km,lire by offering our ser
vice or giving our very most.
His appeal met the approval
of all .-'tund thinking persons
and was secondedandc >rn>l> >ra
t"tl In al the subsequent sp< 1
leers. The pres dentsofthev ifious
benevolent societies 1 ii-1 the
leaders of the churches,all
volunteered tube responsible for
the collect! mi of subscriptions.
As British subjects and natives
of Cat Island we wish it to be
clearly understood that we are
Second to noother country in our
loyalty and that we are wide
1 -. aketo the existing state of af-
fairs of our Mother Country. We
are obliged to say that a period,
more pregnant with national
danger more replete with gene-
ral destruction, more big with
the annihilation of thrones, aye,
of the dissolution of the greatest
empires of the world, have never
before been recorded in the an-
nals of ancient or modern history
The fate of Europe is certainly
suspended between the powers
of one ambitious nation, and the
weakness, and the pride, md the
resentment, and the person er
tnee of her contending oppo
nents
I say again Mr. Editor, that
our people are not ash < p. We
are c.i,;ni/ant of the leriousnSM
of the tim's. We have done our
best to mimic the meeting held
by his Excellency, in every par
ticulat especially in the spirit of
patriotism; and if the other is-
lands would but take the matter
as enthusiastically as we, 1 see no
reason why we can't raise a
minimum number of 1000 men
to man ships in these waters.
Yours truly,
LORENZO THOMPSON
GOVERNMENT NOTICE5
The following appointments
have been made in the Post Of-
fice Department.
William Maclure, 3rd Clerk,
Acting 2nd Clerk.
Constant H. Lowe, 4th Clerk,
Acting 3rd Clerk.
Ellen M. Johnson, Asst. Clerk,
Acting 4th Clerk.
The King will not disallow
the following Act of the Baha-
mas Legislature
4 and 5 Geo. V cap 23 An Act
to prevent the introduction into
the Colony of Diseases of Plants.
5 Geo. V., cap 1 An Act to
enable the Governor to issue
Proclamations on instructions
from the Secretary of Stateand to
give legal effect to the same and
for other purposes.
5 Geo. V., cap 2. An Act to
enable the (iovernor in Council
to make provision for affording
relief in case of any emergency
arising from a state of war.
John II. Bethel has been ap
pointed a member of the Board
of Pilotage temporarily.
Victor "launders has been ap
pointed 1 member of the Board
of Agriculture.
The Stipendiary and Circuit
Magistrate will leave Nassau on
. the 10th November.
A Circular Despatch re the
Imperial lustituteis published for
general information.
Origin Herman Mason has
been appointed Second Clerk in
the Treasury.
Miss Gertrude de Glanville
has been granted an extension of
! sick leave for seven days.
THE HENRY M. FLAGLER,
GREAT OCEAN FERRYBOAT
LAUNCHED AT THE
CRAMP SHIP YARDS
[Special despatch to the Herald)
Philadelphia, Pa., Tuesday.
The Henry M Mauler, the only
sea |*ing railroad car ferryboat
in the world and the largest
ferrv boat of any d isci iption, was
launched this afternoon at the
Ship) aids ol William Cramp .V
Son. \l 11 Florence Beckwith,
of Jackson\ ille, Fl 1. daughter of
Mr. Joseph P. Be. l president of the Florida E 1st
Coast Railroad, was sponsor for
the new vessel.
The Henry M. Flagler was
built for the Florida East Coast
Kail way for the purpose of trans-
ferring loaded freight cars be-
tween Key West, Fla., and Ha-
vana, Cuba.
The new ferryboat has room
for thirty of the largest freight
cars. These will be carried on
four trucks on the main deck.
When they are stowed their
weight will be lifted from the
trucks and taken upon jacks fit-
ted to jack rails. This will re-
lieve the strain on the truck in a
rough sea.
The dimensions of the new
vessel are:Length overall,351
feet; length between perpendicu-
lars, 336 feet; beam, moulded,
57 feet; depth 22 feet; breadth
of deck 57 feet; speed, loaded
with 2,300 tons dead weight, 13
knots. She will make the trip
of ninety-six miles between Key
Wes". and Havana in sight hours.
New York Herald

W A. MATHER
UNDERTAKER
DESIRES to inform his friends
and the Public that fe has
just received a complete outfit of
facilities foi the buisness of an un-
dertaker, which places him in a
position to carry out Funerals that
may he entrusted to his care with
System and despatch ; and respect
fully solicits theii patronage Get
my Prices first and piove that these
are the Very lowest tor tbefirat class
work
D17QT Gaso- ptajO
DD3l line is /O
Gaso*
ine is
I Tost. We do no* sell it.
BUT we do seli and will,
continue to sell
Standard .Oil Co.
[Gasoline Lst your Gaso-
line. We invite comparison
with any in the City.
Price 23cts. per gallon in
'50 gallon Drums. Customers
using 100 gals, or over per
Month 20c. gallon.
Watch our Notice for Ker-
osene in June.
C. C. SAUNDERS



>
. tain Wilmot S. Nicholson. The
tonnage and the armament of the
three cruisers were the same. They
were 440 feet in length, 69.5 feet in
width and drew twenty-six feet of
water. Eech carried two 9.2 inch
guns, twelve 6 indi guns, twelve 13
pounders and five 3-pounders.
The Aboukir and the Cressy
Were built at Govan and the
Hogue at Barrow, all in 1900. They
were powerful cruisers with heavy
armor ,md capable of battle ser-
vice as well as cruising.
It is believed here that to reach
the cruisers the submarine flotilla
first passed the line of torpedo
boats which is said to hold/he in-
side position in the line* across
Heligoland Bay. In another line
back of these light and swift craft
were the cruisers and back of these
were the battle ships.
Increase* Determination for
Finish Fight.
Although a terrible shock to the
British, the news of the disaster is
accepted here stoically and only
increases the determination of the
l>eop e to go on fighting to the end.
There is anger and a cry for re-
venge in certain quarters but the
mass of English people already
have accepted this dressing news
as one of the incidents of war and
that there will be others and per
haps worse, but that in the end.
the British aims will bp victorious.
The greatest mystery always has
surrounded the submarine equip-
ment of the Geiman navy. No 11-
formation ever has been permitted
to leak out concerning their num-
ber, size or equipment, nor of their
methods of operation. It is known
that they are smaller tinn the types
employed by the British, French
and United States navies, and it is
known that tbe-Germans have at
least seventy-two submarines,There
may be many more.
Such an attack as that delivered
in the North Sea yesterday has been
expected and feared, as it wis
known that it was the Kaisers idea
to wear down the British fleet hy
submarine attacks and attack'
from the air until his own fleet
would be not so hopelessly outnum-
bered. His orders had been to whit-
tle down the preponderant British
navy before sending his own fleet
against it in^)pen battle.
LOOK!
The following Blank forms
may be had at HieTrihune"
Ollice.
Duty Entry.
Free Entry.
Warehouse Entries.
Sponging Articles.
Ship's Reports.
In quantities at Special Rates
THE AMERICAN BISON 4
is fast becoming extinct, but this fact need not
trouble the housewife. Her interest is centred on
the fact that, thanks to Sunlight Soap, the terrors
of wash-day have become quite extinct. With
SUNLIGHT
SOAP
as a helper the wash is
quickly over. Labour is
reduced by its use-time
is saved and the clothes
are preserved.
Sunlight Soap does the
work. It is made for that
purpose.
TBY IT AND SAVE YOUR
4146 TIME AND MONEY.
"NEW NATIONAL" A
"IDEAL"
HAND MACHINES
NEW HOME* A "RUBY*
FOOT MACHINES
FOR SAL? BY
CHAS. E. ALBURY
IMPERIAL COCOANUTS
THEATRE
WEDNESDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
Door* open 7.M). Performance
begin hi H.13 p.m.
NOTICE
THE public are notified
that the Bahamas Tim-
ber Company, Limited have
all the men that they
need for the present and that
any going there cannot
expect to got work and are
notified tli.it there are no ac-
coinodations for them at the
works.
By order
ARTHUR B. SUTTON.
Agent
September 26th, 1914
BAHAMA ISLANDS
IT is nuw possible for owners
of la:id witli fully bearing
trees to prove its value and ob
tain rents.
For further particulars
Apply to
J. THEO. FARRINGTON
Nassau, N. P.
Agent for
Bahamas Produce Marketing
Company
139 Copthall House
f'opthall Avenue '
3 Mo. London, E. C
WAN ED
TO purchase A small house
and lot in the Western
or Southern suburbs.
Communicate with W.
Care of "Tribune Office"
IWK.
Shingles
Best No. 1 HeartflikCypres
Shingles at $9.60 per thou-
sand of 20 bundles
Discounts on lots of over
5000 shingles.
Special Price
also on cheaper gradesalso
5in. Cypress at $6.72 per
thousand of 20 bundles. This
price made possible by a very
large purchase.
Fresh stock arriving every
week.
,C. C. SAUNDERS.
Mapes Fertilizers
/ now carry in stock the fol-
lowing formulas:
Pineapple.It has been prov-
en that this has no equal
and a visit to fields using
same will convince you.
Vegetable.Now is the time
to use this and increase
your yield in Tomatoes,
Potatoes, Onions and all
other vegetable by 100
per cent. 1W
Orange Tree.To assist the
growth of Young Citrus
Tree.
Fruit and Wine. Increase the
yield and growth of old
Citrus trees.
Eor further information
and books on the use of these
fertilizers, please apply to
WALTER K. MOORE
Special
Notice.
Just Received
Per S. S. "Santiago."
Fresh New Potatoes (Irish)
Selling at 4 cents Per* lb.
al^p
Medium Si*e Onions at
8 Cerfts Per lb.
Baker's Cocoa tins
at is. Each
Baker's Cocoa | tins
at 6d. Each
Call early Jfe
THE ROYAL STORE,
J. L. Saunders & Co.
For Result
Advertise in
The Tribune


University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2011 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Powered by SobekCM