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Publication began at 6.13 p.m. ttb* tttibune Thursday, Soptoiber-24. 1914 The situation at the seat of War continues to be, so far as can be gathered from the conflicting reports which reach us, a case of the most strenuous and persistent fighting that can pos sibly be imagined without definite result. Day after day there rages a conflict that well might he term ed an inferno, in which sea-saw fashion the Germans are putting up a fiercely stubborn hght'on one hand and the Allies are making a fierce and persistent attack on the other hand; either side alternately advancing and retreating. Up to today there is no change in the situation. However this state of affairs cannot continue interminably; before long something must hap pen and it is to be hoped that the reinforcement of the Allies will be of such force that they may break through this stubborn German stand and rout them completely. The sinking of three of our cruisers was the disquieting news received yesterday, and is subject for grave reflection; if one Submarine, as is now said, can inflict such a terrible blow what might five or ten subma rines do in the midst of a large fleet, as there seem no positive defence against the attacks of these formidable engines of des traction. Thus the fortune of war. However it is consoling to know by today Vnews that many more of the crews of these ves sels have been saved, than were reported yesterday. We can only await develop ments and trust that the courage skill and abilityof our forces cooly and wisely guided by those in c?>mmand will ulti mately vanquish .the stubborn foe. — :Q. :~-. • BAHAMAS NAVY VOLUNTEERS The me*tinn called for the emolment of Volunteers for The i British Navy, was held last I evening at the .Boys' Central' School, Nassau .Court. There | was a fairly good .and attentive attendance. Punctually t 8 o'clock George Weech, Esq., M. L. A. took' the dais and moved that Charles O. Anderson,Esq., M. L. A., be elected chairman of the meeting aiid upon its being seconded by W. E S. Callender, Esq., Barrister at Law, Mr. Anderson announced himself as the first of the speakers invited by the Subcommittee of the War Relief Committee. In a few well chosen words he set before his hearers the causes of the present War, how England had become involved, and why her colonists should assist her. Ernest L. Bowen,Esq.,M. L. A.,, was the next speaker and he endeavoured to stimulate the patriotism of the audience by a glowing history of the deeds of those Englishmen who had made their lives famous, and if we may judge by the vociferous applause which frequently inter .upted him he was em nently successful. The veteran George Weech, Esq., M. L. A., with his to-beexpected fascinating brilliance and scholarly eloquence clinched tlie arguments of the two previous speakers, and W. E. S. Callender, Esq Barrister at Law showed the benefit to the world of the blotting out ol the German Empire, its failure as a Coloniser,its autocratic s> stems, the benefit which would natu rally accrue to the West Indies from the exclusion.of Germany from the Map of Europe, and urged the young elligible men to come foward and enrol them selves. Mr. H C. Christie upon spe cial invitation of the Chairman then addressed the meeting, and his burning words glowed like live-coals from the altars of our fathers. It is particularly grati tying to record the enrolment of twentythree young men, when it is remembered that the number of males in the Western Dis trict is far below the average of other districts. The hearty singing of the National Anthem concluded this intensely loval and patriotic meeting. Ralph G. Collins, W. M. L. Wil-1 way interfere with tl sou, Louis Goerg, J. P. Lynch,!employment. -^ pir present andK. E. Hatch. Messrs J. E. Sobers, Joe Arkin, John Robinson, E S. Ro berts, Karl Hanskens, "Oisten Kolsto, Loreutz Svearnoe. ( 20) Frances E." sailed from Nas sau 9 a.m. yesterday, reached Miami 7 a.m. today, making run in 22 hours. She carried Mails and passengers. —:o: — N, B.—Plant Carrots.— Darners, Chantenay, etc., Plant Squash. Long Island White bush. BAHAMAS VOLUNTEERS FOR. THE WAR.. The last of the series of meeting on the Volunteer Movement will be held at Fox Hill in the Public School room on Friday night at 8 o'clock. Speakers, Rev. C. B. Croft. G. M. Cole, Esq., M. L. A. L.Walton Young,Esq., M. L. A., W. E. S. Callender, Esq., Barrister-at Law Note: If any of the officers of the various societies or cluhs in Nassau would like to organize meetings of their own on the Volunteer Movement, the Com mand.int would be very glad to attend on any and every nigh: next week for the purpose of en. rolling volunteers. 4 -:o:— The Mail Steamer "Vivian Cia steaim-d for New Y For the present only un married men Who have no one dependent U| on them for a living are eligible. (d) Giving in their names now does not mean that they are en listed and it should in no e) After the names" nave been mitttd to me and if the men are required yoq will be further notified "at present the Committee are endeavouring to find out how many volunteers can be obtained before submitting pro posals to His Majesty's Govern ment. (f) The Committee would be glad of an early reply from you. (g) The name, age, occupation and address of each volun teer should be given. On behalf of the Committee, R. A. CRAWFORD Commandant. The Commissioner, —:o:— Latest War News RADIOGRAMS. OFFICIAL September 24th 1914. London 23rd 1914. Governor, Bahamas. Sept. 23rd, following from Press Bureau: Yesterday British )Ail aeroplanes attacked the Beppelin sheds at Du^seldorf, dropping three bombs on the shed. The extent of the damage done is not known. (Signed) HARCOURT. special to the Nassau Guardian New York Sept. 21th Alter a long struggle and ter rific loss of liUthe Germans have abandoned the attempts to break through the French near Rheims The centre German army has retreated. File Germans have pract ically abandoned North Lorraine to the French. Fifty thousand German wounded have passed through Liege en route to Germany. GOVF.KNMKNT BUM September 14th 1914 2067 officers and men are be lieved to have been sav the crews of the three cruisers sunk by a Germ •marine. A single submarine U. said to have sU-ik the cruisers and thene\aded pursuit. Servian troops have re captured Leubovia after violent fightting with the Austrians. The losses were heavy on both sides. 11 aie nan s ifrom tish sub 9. is three



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China disclaims responsibility for the lading of Japanese troops on Chinese soil and says that she is unable to defend her-' self against Japanese invasion. f Asiatic cholera has developed among the soldiers in Hungary. A Russian cruiser is reported sinking a German cruiser and two torpedo boats in the Baltic. TbeGerman'government ofTidairy states that orders were given to spare the cathedral at Rheims. The cruisers "Tennessee" and Three penny gifts of pupils of St. Francis Xaviers School Sacred Heart School Behring Point, Andros Capt, D. D. Messnier Robt. H. Sands Total £1509 l6 6 —:o: -!The Residency Mangrove Cay, Andros I7th-Sept. 1914 The Editor of The Tribune ..,...,, Will you kindlv allow me North Carolina have been | to ask throu h the m cdJum of ordered to remain indefinitely in your papei, the reading public European waters to afford fur ther relief if neccessary. The French announce that there is no change in the battle situation. The Aisne battle ap pears to be awaiting the Allies attempt "io outflank the Ger mans right. The Russians push steadily on in Gahcia on the German fron tier. They are in close touch with the enemy. Details have been received of the heroic deatli of Major Du pont of theJkitish artillery. The real^Suse of the recent resignation'df the French Cabi net has been divulged. It was caused by a British protest that the 1'rench military governor of Lille had failed to reinforce the British when they faced annihi lation at the battle of MODS. El Paso Texas :—General Villa has announced his ihde pendcnce of the Carran/.a gov eminent. He has sent several carloads of war munitions and supplies to assist in the revolt. BAHAMAS WAR RELIEF FUND The following subscriptions have been received: — Amount previously acknowledged £1361 II 3 Green Turtle Cay 770 Great Guano Cay 440 Marsh Harbour incl. Public School 32 0.0 Mangrove Cay 21 15 3 J. Knowles 1 o o Duke of Albermarle Chapter, Daughters of the fcjriipm: Miss L. .f^ethel Miss T N. Bethel Miss E M. Bethel Aubrey Farrington Hope Town Abaco Members of the Catholic Mission in the Bahamas 25 o o St. Francis Xayiers Academy 200 1 2 1 1 1 45 of Nassau, to please send me from time to time all their used News papers and magazines, especially the illustrated ones, which contain any news? An effort is being made to get our people to contribute to the War Fund, and if we can circulate some pictorial literature on the operations at the front, it will help to explain matters and thus perhaps procure more support. I %  )ften receive requests for pict ure-on the war, and I should be thankful to all persons for any service thevmay render mc Very truly yours Geo. H. Clarke. —:o: — TROOPS FROM CANADA A Safe Arrival in England. The White Star Steamer Meganlic left Montreal on August 2u with Princess Patricia's Light Infantry and three batteries of artillery. It is understood that the steam er safely reached the port sever al days ago. [ Ibis Central News telegram has been passed by the Official Press Bureau). The departure of the troops was marked with scenes of great enthusiasm, says a Canadian pa per. The Duke and Duchess of Connauglit and the Princess Pa tricia reviewed the regiment of the Princess, and wished its members good fortune before they left the camp. The regiment was raised be R. B. Bennett, a member of thy Canadian Parliament and Ham ilton Gault a Montreal million aire. It is commanded by Colonel Karquhar.an officer of the Cold stream Guards, Buller, of the British Rifle Brigade, second in' command. Hamilton Gault has a captain's commission, while his wife goes under the badge of the Red Cross. Of the eleven hundred men, a thousand wear medals for pre vious service in South Africa, Philipines and Cuba chiefly. Abou*. three hundred men of the regiment are adventurers fresh from Mexico. Jack Munroe, who won his fame through gaining a decision over Jim Jefferies is a private in the ranks of the regiment, which is held by military authorities to be one of the most efficient re giinents ever assembled. THE NAMUR. VEIL LIFTED. 14.000 MEN LOST. The veil nas been lifted from Namur, and there is light on the fall of the fortress, which was said to be practically impregnable. A Press Association War Special message *.ells of the loss of 14,000 Belgians in the battle and the subsequent seven days retreat. Namur was strongly protected by modern forts, which had during the three weeks respite afford ed by the heroic defence of Liege been further strengthened in all sorts of WfrVs. Large areas had been mined. The held of fire from the forts bad been very largely cleared, all obstacles in the way of the guns being blown up by dynamite, while barbed wire obstructions carrying electric currents of 1,500 volts cover edall the approacnes. In Namur itself immense stores, ammunition, and provisions had been accumulated, ready for weeks of siege. The Germans brought to the attack thirty two of their great siege guns at positions -.liree miles from the forts,doing great havoc. Then there was a touch of treachery. As usual, the Germans proved to be most accurately in formed, a German officer who was taken prisoner having upon him photographs of new trenches dug up only a few days before. The story of the fall is thus told by one of the suvivors: — BRAVE MEN MOWN DOWN. "Without troubling about the forts, the Germans at first centred their rain of steel upon our entrenchui'-iits, where our men weie posted, awaiting the attack lor ten hours Our brave young fellows stood tins terrible ordeal without being able to fire a shot in return. Any man who put his head above the fire swept ram parts simply had it mown off. "We Were all burning, to emu late our valient brothers who fell at Liege But what human being would not be disheartened when he could not even see the enemy attacking him,'and could do nothing to protect himself, nothing to avenge the comrades falling around him? Whole regi ments were being decimated. "I still shudder at the memory of these horrors. The losses among the officers were terrible, and gradually the soldiers, de prived of their leaders, became demoralized. With one bound, they suddenly rose and fled—-a general sauve qui peut—and only when the lines were reform ed to the rear was it seen how many were missing. "Meanwhile'many of the Ger mans guns had been turned on the forts, especially those of Mai geret and Marchovelette. Armed with old fashioned guns of a much smaller calibre, they could offer hut a feeble resist auce, and Maig^ret, in fact, Only fired about ten shots, while it received no less than 1,200 shells, fired at the rate of twenty a, minute. "At Marchovelette seventy five men were killed in the bat teries, and both forts soon sur rendered Other works, however were still holding out when the' army left the town." T The result was that many,, stores and many guns fell into the enemy's hands. TERRIBLE SLAUGHTER. The survivor proceeded grf, "Our line of retreat was on St. Gerard, where we hoped to join the French brigade, winch %  had been asked for as are inforce .1. mentfroui Dinant. But we were doomed to disappointment 1 after disappointment The French having been overwhelmed at Dinant, had been obliged to fall back by way of Morvijle, and could only send us two regi ments, which bravely fought their way through to Us and join ed us not far from Namur, very : reduced in numbers... %  ,.. "At last we cut our way through, but at the price of. what osses I "Till?' Namur .dan-ism and ,, roops sent to ecupy intervals )etwetn forts 'numbered 36,000 nen; those who have returned to Belgian sojl number, 12,000;' so that, including sick and wounded left in French .hotpi tals, the Namur affair has cost Belgium 14,000 men." —Liverpool Echo, Sept. 'J, 1914 a. 1



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r i: geant of .r-^JH W^irnent with a breast of -mealTs, a pension, arid asnue little tobacconists shop jvas asked why he had come out of his retirement. "Wad I be serving snuff," he asked, with infinite scorn, "when my country wants me and the auld regiment's fechtin?" Fortunately for the country, that is the spirit that animates these veterans. Without them Kitcheners army could make little progress, and certainly could not, as they are doing now, learn their new calling in one-fiftbof the ordinary time. There is no stipulating for an eight hour day when enlisting, although the War Office is trying to keep within that limit in practical training, plus odd half hours for lectures. "Non-coms." of the old brigade are satisfied with nothing short of sixteen hours. Color sergeants, who are drilling on parade at half past-five or six o'clock in the morning, return after breakfast to do duly as clerks in orderly room or quartermaster's store. In the afternoon they parade again to drill recruits anJ then at tea time come back to their ledg. ers and work until the bugles signal "Lights out." It is these men— the men who were born too late to take advan. tage of Colonel Seely'scommissitm scheme—who are transforming a mob into a trained army with a apiJity that would astonish the men who are fighting at the front. The recruits, many of them still without the uniforms of their particular units, are as keen as their mentors. They are learning more quickly by far than did that famous experimental company of Colonel Pollock's, and their keenness and curiosity make them the most grateful pupils in the world. Besides there is a friendship between taught and teachers that never be fore was known. Until last month no "non com." dared to be seen in the streets with a private, but now on any evening one may see even commissioned officers walking openly in the puolic streets with men of their cornman 1, and discussing with them the lesson of the day. The greatest fear has been that the physique of the men could hardly be improved in theshortened spell of training. The last week or two has%hown that in the great majority ni cases that fear is unfounded. The "freh air the -iunshine caiefollv unduat'-il *-xridses therrgulir fording ;mo* sle have worked wonders, in the army and those who saw slouchimv heterogeneous crowds which have been leaving the big towns of England for the last two or three weeks would not recognize them again in the brorzed upright alert young fellows who ace now the and ping IKW the half way or more on the roa i to the termination of their recruit drills and who every day become more infatuated with their calling and their mission. TOBrrerrmn B.VD. %  gnwITAIiTHAM slf'PtfS SELL'S IS.* CONQtNSfD MILK fe |VJ U I w 8 &J£I£BLfikX n i *: "PAReo BY t\ ti COCOANUTS BAHAMA ISLANDS I T is now possible for owners of land with fully bearing trees to prove its value and ob tain rents. For further particulars Apply to J. THEO. FARRINGTON Nassau, N. P. Agent for Bahamas Product Marketing Caapaajr 139 Copthall HOUH Copthall Avenue 3 Mo. London, R. C. For Result Advertise in The Tribune THE E is the largest inhabitant of the forest in the world. This is an undisputed fact. SUNLIGHT SOAP has the largest sale of any Soap in the world. This, also, is an undisputed fact. The great value of the Elephant's tusks is well known, but far better known to good housewives is the' great value of Sunlight It enjoys a well-deserved popularity. Its mission is cleanliness—its standard is purity, Increasing leisure, and reducing work, it is used !y delighted house* wives ill over ihe world in preference to any other. A TKIAI. WILi I'UOVK THIS "There was war in Heaven, once ago;" There is war in Europe now, THEREFORE The Choir of Wesley Church feels it incumbent upon them to render on Wcdno.do. v 30th inet. t> •election of PLANTATION MELODIES To commence at 8 p.m. Proceeds towards WAR RELIEF FUND RESERVED SEATS Not less than Is. General Admission 6d. N. B. Any person who do not wish to subscribe their Guineas to the Bank's lists will do well to help and swell this side of the fund. IMPERIAL THEATRE WEDNESDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY Door* open 7.50. Performance begin at 5.15 p.m. Mapes Fertilizers / now carry in stock the fol lowing formulas: Pineapple. —It has been prov en that thishasnoequa and a visit4Bfields usin same will convince you Vegetable.—Now is the tim to use this and increas. your yield in Tomatoes Potatoes, Onions and I other vegetables by i per cent. Orange Tree.— To assist the growth of Young Citrus Tree. Friut and Wine.— Increase the yield and growth of old Citrus trees. Eor further information and books on the use of these fertilizers, please apply to WALTER K. MOORE Agent for Mapes Fertilizer in the Bahamas. WANTED T O purchase A small house and lot in the Western or Southern suburbs. Communicate with W. Care of "Tribune Office" IWK. FOP Rent S EA FRONT PROPERTY recently occupied by Mr. Timothy Culmer with three Warehouses thereon. Storage capacity 1200 bales Sisal suitable for Spongrt^usiness also. Apply to WALTER K. MOORE Fresh Onion Seed FROM TENERIFFE At Toote's, 49 9 Bay Street



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to CD <• to a BT O CD CD (D P > "3 cr Nulllu* eddictu Jurare In verb* oie.git>trl. Being bound to •weo.r to the l)o|mM if no Mailer. B !" VOL.X. Nt 1. N. P.. Bah&mM, Thursday, September 24.1914 No. 224 L. GILBERT DUPUCH, Editor and Proprietor. OFFICE: 38-44 MARKET STREET Nassau, N. P., Bahamas P. 0. BOX 103 PUBLISHED DAILY Monday, Wednesday and Friday— single copy Jd Tuesday, Thursday and Saturdaysingle copy td Weekly 4 |d Monthly i s. 41I Quarterly .. 4s. Half Yearly 8 s. Yearly 1 6s. PAYABLE IN ADVANCE Advertising Rates :— Six pence per line for first insertion; three pence per line for second insertion ; and one penny per line for subsquent insertions. Advertisements under eight lines 4s. GERMAN SCHEME OF ATTACK AT SEA A TOTAL FAILURE London, h*pt. 3. Naval experts are now turning their attention to a fresh survey of the strategical situation at sea because one is bound to assume that the naval war staff at Berlin realizes that the condition 1 ; which confront Germany on the sea are very far removed from those which were anticipated, and many complications have occurred which the admiralty could never have t.iken into consideration when preparing its war plans. First it had been assumed that only a portion of the armored fleet of Great Britain would be available in the North Sea, Except for two battle ships and several armored cruisers, of which Britain is in the proportion of neirly f.-ur to one, th* Admiralty now have available to deal with the Inch \tea fleet practicHlly every armored ^ship under the White Er,ign. IJrL tain is supieme in -hip-, and in men and also supreme in the types of ship* and men. Secondly, it was assumed that Paly and Austria would join forces and that the British and French fleets would have their work cut out for them to keep open the Mediterranean to the trading ships of the Entente. What has happened is that Italy has maintained her neutrality, and the Austrian fleet after suffering loss, has apparently been shut within the naval harbor at Pola, where it will be subject no doubt, to the continued attentions of the Anglo-French squadrons. Again in the Far East the German squadron was to have taken the bold defensive. Instead it has taken refuge, so it is reported in the harbor of Tsingato, where it has been blockaded by the Japanese navy sm:e August 27. Another Scheme Falls Further, a number of small cruisers and gunboats, m ost of them of slow speed, weie to have played havoc with British and French seaborne trade. Armed merchant criusers were to have assisted in this work. Owing apparently to the fact that ships of wai cannot live without coal and no effective arrangements had been made for coaling this scheme has proved a failure. One north German Lloyd steamship has been sunk and it is merely a matter of time before the Admiralty is able to give a certiflicaie that the Atlantic and Pacific are entirely clear of the few German men of war still at large Also the policy of the Admiral's staff was to regard the Russian navy with contempt, assuming that within a few days it would be destroyed. So far Germany has I'M one cruiser to tne Russsians and there is no evidence that ths Russian fleet has received a scratch. Mr. Alexander Hurd whose book on "Naval Efficiency the "War. Readiness of the Fleet" and "German Sea Power; 'tsRise, Progress, and Economic Basis, are regarded as authoritative works, discusses the situation in the Daily Telegraph. "On her eastern sea front iei," he says, "Germany has a sea power, winch is gradually gaining in strength inder the energetic action f British workmen and on the western frontier is the British Grand Fleet, which has already performed one of the aiost dashing cutting-out expeditions of which naval history contains any record, with the result that the enemy has lost three P rs cruisers and a number of destroy e This exploit was of a charact et calculated to demoralize the German crews. These men are for the Most part landsmen who are submitted to rather less than three years of intensive naval training. This piessure—under the German disciplinary code -does not contribute to produce that quiet sense of competency which characterizes British blue-jackets. German ships are floating barracks British ships are floating homes. In the former, officers, so we are given to understand, enforce discipline at the point of the pistol in the latter, the relations between the lower and quarter-deck are that, when a British officer falls in action, his men—strong men with stout hearts—weep without the feeling of shame." —:o:— LORD KITCHENER RAISES TWO BIG ARMIES AT ONCE London Sept. 3. It is somewhat difficult to write explicitly about Lord Kitchener's first army of one hundred thousand men, for one can hardly say wheie the first army eods and the second begins. Battalione of the new force whose war strength should be a thousand aie already eleven, twelve and thirteen thousand strong, and as it is not intended that they should go to the front bove war establishment the inference is that the "details," as the surplus are called are already the nucleus of the second army. It must not be imagined that Lord Kitchener's men are all youngsters and raw recruits. They are not. The bugle call has aroused thousands of old non-commision ed officers from their retirement, and these men, who have been called the backbone of the British army, are returning to ttar colors iii thousands. It is no mutter that they have served twenty years with the flag, that they saw fighting in Chitral, in Basutaland, or on the Modder River. They have come back and in many cases have made big sacrifices to do so. A quartermaster ser(Continued on fourth page)


The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02266
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Thursday, September 24, 1914
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
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General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
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Nulllu* eddictu Jurare In verb* oie.git>trl.
Being bound to weo.r to the l)o|mM if no Mailer.
B
VOL.X.
Nt
1. N. P.. Bah&mM, Thursday, September 24.1914
No. 224
L. GILBERT DUPUCH,
Editor and Proprietor.
OFFICE: 38-44 MARKET STREET
Nassau, N. P., Bahamas
P. 0. BOX 103
PUBLISHED DAILY
Monday, Wednesday and Friday
single copy......... Jd
Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday-
single copy......... td
Weekly ............ 4|d
Monthly ............is. 41I
Quarterly........ .. 4s.
Half Yearly............8s.
Yearly ............16s.
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
Advertising Rates : Six pence per line
for first insertion; three pence per line
for second insertion ; and one penny per
line for subsquent insertions.
Advertisements under eight lines 4s.
GERMAN SCHEME
' OF ATTACK AT SEA
A TOTAL FAILURE
London, h*pt. 3.
Naval experts are now turning
their attention to a fresh survey
of the strategical situation at sea
because one is bound to assume
that the naval war staff at Berlin
realizes that the condition1; which
confront Germany on the sea are
very far removed from those which
were anticipated, and many com-
plications have occurred which the
admiralty could never have t.iken
into consideration when preparing
its war plans.
First it had been assumed that
only a portion of the armored fleet
of Great Britain would be avail-
able in the North Sea, Except for
two battle ships and several ar-
mored cruisers, of which Britain
is in the proportion of neirly f.-ur
to one, th* Admiralty now have
available to deal with the Inch
\tea fleet practicHlly every armored
^ship under the White Er,ign. IJrL
' tain is supieme in -hip-, and in men
and also supreme in the types of
ship* and men.
Secondly, it was assumed that
Paly and Austria would join forces
and that the British and French
fleets would have their work cut
out for them to keep open the
Mediterranean to the trading ships
of the Entente. What has happen-
ed is that Italy has maintained her
neutrality, and the Austrian fleet
after suffering loss, has apparently
been shut within the naval harbor
at Pola, where it will be subject
no doubt, to the continued atten-
tions of the Anglo-French squad-
rons.
Again in the Far East the Ger-
man squadron was to have taken
the bold defensive. Instead it has
taken refuge, so it is reported in
the harbor of Tsingato, where it
has been blockaded by the Japanese
navy sm:e August 27.
Another Scheme Falls
Further, a number of small cruis-
ers and gunboats, most of them of
slow speed, weie to have played
havoc with British and French
seaborne trade. Armed merchant
criusers were to have assisted in
this work. Owing apparently to
the fact that ships of wai cannot
live without coal and no effective
arrangements had been made for
coaling this scheme has proved a
failure. One north German Lloyd
steamship has been sunk and it is
merely a matter of time before the
Admiralty is able to give a certi-
flicaie that the Atlantic and Paci-
fic are entirely clear of the few
German men of war still at large
Also the policy of the Admiral's
staff was to regard the Russian
navy with contempt, assuming
that within a few days it would be
destroyed. So far Germany has
I'M one cruiser to tne Russsians
and there is no evidence that ths
Russian fleet has received a scratch.
Mr. Alexander Hurd whose book
on "Naval Efficiency the "War.
Readiness of the Fleet" and "Ger-
man Sea Power; 'tsRise, Progress,
and Economic Basis, are regarded
as authoritative works, discusses
the situation in the Daily Tele-
graph.
"On her eastern sea front iei," he
says, "Germany has a sea power,
winch is gradually gaining in
strength inder the energetic
action f British workmen
and on the western frontier
is the British Grand Fleet, which
has already performed one of the
aiost dashing cutting-out expedi-
tions of which naval history con-
tains any record, with the result
that the enemy has lost three
Prs
cruisers and a number of destroye
This exploit was of a charactet
calculated to demoralize the Ger-
man crews. These men are for the
Most part landsmen who are sub-
mitted to rather less than three
years of intensive naval training.
This piessureunder the German
disciplinary code -does not con-
tribute to produce that quiet sense
of competency which characterizes
British blue-jackets. German ships
are floating barracks British ships
are floating homes. In the former,
officers, so we are given to under-
stand, enforce discipline at the
point of the pistol in the
latter, the relations between the
lower and quarter-deck are that,
when a British officer falls in ac-
tion, his menstrong men with
stout heartsweep without the
feeling of shame."
:o:
LORD KITCHENER
RAISES TWO BIG
ARMIES AT ONCE
London Sept. 3.
It is somewhat difficult to write
explicitly about Lord Kitchener's
first army of one hundred thousand
men, for one can hardly say wheie
the first army eods and the second
begins. Battalione of the new force
whose war strength should be a
thousand aie already eleven, twelve
and thirteen thousand strong, and
as it is not intended that they
should go to the front bove war
establishment the inference is that
the "details," as the surplus are
called are already the nucleus of
the second army.
It must not be imagined that
Lord Kitchener's men are all
youngsters and raw recruits. They
are not. The bugle call has aroused
thousands of old non-commision
ed officers from their retirement,
and these men, who have been
called the backbone of the British
army, are returning to ttar colors
iii thousands. It is no mutter that
they have served twenty years with
the flag, that they saw fighting in
Chitral, in Basutaland, or on the
Modder River.
They have come back and in
many cases have made big sacrifi-
ces to do so. A quartermaster ser-
(Continued on fourth page)


Publication began at 6.13 p.m.
ttb* tttibune
Thursday, Soptoiber-24. 1914
The situation at the seat of
War continues to be, so far as
can be gathered from the con-
flicting reports which reach us,
a case of the most strenuous and
persistent fighting that can pos
sibly be imagined without defi-
nite result.
Day after day there rages a
conflict that well might he term
ed an inferno, in which sea-saw
fashion the Germans are putting
up a fiercely stubborn hght'on
one hand and the Allies are
making a fierce and persistent
attack on the other hand; either
side alternately advancing and
retreating.
Up to today there is no change
in the situation.
However this state of affairs
cannot continue interminably;
before long something must hap
pen and it is to be hoped that
the reinforcement of the Allies
will be of such force that they
may break through this stubborn
German stand and rout them
completely.
The sinking of three of our
cruisers was the disquieting
news received yesterday, and is
subject for grave reflection; if
one Submarine, as is now said,
can inflict such a terrible blow
what might five or ten subma
rines do in the midst of a large
fleet, as there seem no positive
defence against the attacks of
these formidable engines of des
traction.
Thus the fortune of war.
However it is consoling to
know by today Vnews that many
more of the crews of these ves
sels have been saved, than were
reported yesterday.
We can only await develop
ments and trust that the courage
skill and ability- of our forces
cooly and wisely guided by
those in c?>mmand will ulti
mately vanquish .the stubborn
foe.
:q.-:~-.
BAHAMAS
NAVY VOLUNTEERS
The me*tinn called for the
emolment of Volunteers for The i
British Navy, was held last I
evening at the .Boys' Central'
School, Nassau .Court. There |
was a fairly good .and attentive
attendance. '
Punctually t 8 o'clock
George Weech, Esq., M. L. A.
took' the dais and moved that
Charles O. Anderson,Esq., M. L.
A., be elected chairman of the
meeting aiid upon its being
seconded by W. E S. Callender,
Esq., Barrister at Law, Mr. An-
derson announced himself as the
first of the speakers invited by
the Subcommittee of the War
Relief Committee. In a few well
chosen words he set before his
hearers the causes of the present
War, how England had become
involved, and why her colonists
should assist her.
Ernest L. Bowen,Esq.,M. L. A.,,
was the next speaker and he en-
deavoured to stimulate the pa-
triotism of the audience by a
glowing history of the deeds of
those Englishmen who had made
their lives famous, and if we
may judge by the vociferous ap-
plause which frequently inter
.upted him he was em nently
successful.
The veteran George Weech,
Esq., M. L. A., with his to-be-
expected fascinating brilliance
and scholarly eloquence clinch-
ed tlie arguments of the two pre-
vious speakers, and W. E. S.
Callender, Esq Barrister at Law
showed the benefit to the world
of the blotting out ol the Ger-
man Empire, its failure as a
Coloniser,its autocratic s> stems,
the benefit which would natu
rally accrue to the West Indies
from the exclusion.of Germany
from the Map of Europe, and
urged the young elligible men
to come foward and enrol them
selves.
Mr. H C. Christie upon spe
cial invitation of the Chairman
then addressed the meeting, and
his burning words glowed like
live-coals from the altars of our
fathers. It is particularly grati
tying to record the enrolment of
twentythree young men, when
it is remembered that the num-
ber of males in the Western Dis
trict is far below the average of
other districts.
The hearty singing of the
National Anthem concluded
this intensely loval and patrio-
tic meeting.
Ralph G. Collins, W. M. L. Wil-1 way interfere with tl
sou, Louis Goerg, J. P. Lynch,!employment. -^
pir present
andK. E. Hatch.
Messrs J. E. Sobers, Joe Arkin,
John Robinson, E S. Ro
berts, Karl Hanskens, "Oisten
Kolsto, Loreutz Svearnoe. (20)
" Frances E." sailed from Nas
sau 9 a.m. yesterday, reached
Miami 7 a.m. today, making
run in 22 hours. She carried
Mails and passengers.
:o:
N, B.Plant Carrots.
Darners, Chantenay, etc.,
Plant Squash. Long Island
White bush.
BAHAMAS VOLUNTEERS
FOR. THE WAR..
The last of the series of meet-
ing on the Volunteer Movement
will be held at Fox Hill in the
Public School room on Friday
night at 8 o'clock.
Speakers, Rev. C. B. Croft.
G. M. Cole, Esq., M. L. A.
L.Walton Young,Esq., M. L. A.,
W. E. S. Callender, Esq.,
Barrister-at Law
Note: If any of the officers of
the various societies or cluhs in
Nassau would like to organize
meetings of their own on the
Volunteer Movement, the Com
mand.int would be very glad to
attend on any and every nigh:
next week for the purpose of en.
rolling volunteers.
4
-:o:
The Mail Steamer "Vivian
Cia steaim-d for New Y afternoon taking the following,
passengers: -
Misses Mary Moseley, Enid
Abbot,- Mary A. Atkinson, and
F. M. Halanan; Mrs. Helen M.
Wilson; Mr. and Mrs. Wil lard
Brown; Messrs Walter King
:o:
Copy of Circular Senf to the
Commissioners of the Out Is-
land District,
Bahamas Volunteers for War
CIRCULAR
Sir,
The Sub Committee appointed
on the Volunteer movement by
the War Relief Committee
would be glad of your co-opera
tion in btaining volunteers to
serve in His Majesty's Navy
during the present war.
2 The following are the par-
ticulars as far as can be given at
present.
(a) You are asked to take the
names of all men between the
ayes of t8 and 55 who are wil
ling to volunteer.
(b) The men should be of good
physique.
(c> For the present only un
married men Who have no one
dependent U| on them for a
living are eligible.
(d) Giving in their names now
does not mean that they are en
listed and it should in no
e) After the names" nave been
mitttd to me and if the men
are required yoq will be further
notified "at present the Commit-
tee are endeavouring to find out
how many volunteers can be ob-
tained before submitting pro
posals to His Majesty's Govern
ment.
(f) The Committee would be
glad of an early reply from you.
(g) The name, age, occupa-
tion and address of each volun
teer should be given.
On behalf of the Committee,
R. A. CRAWFORD
Commandant.
The Commissioner,
:o:
Latest War News
RADIOGRAMS.
OFFICIAL
September 24th 1914.
London 23rd 1914.
Governor,
Bahamas.
Sept. 23rd, following from
Press Bureau:
Yesterday British )Ail aero-
planes attacked the Beppelin
sheds at Du^seldorf, dropping
three bombs on the shed. The
extent of the damage done is
not known.
(Signed)
HARCOURT.
special to the Nassau Guardian
New York Sept. 21th
Alter a long struggle and ter
rific loss of liU- the Germans
have abandoned the attempts
to break through the French
near Rheims
The centre German army has
retreated.
File Germans have pract ically
abandoned North Lorraine to
the French.
, Fifty thousand German
wounded have passed through
Liege en route to Germany.
GOVF.KNMKNT BUM
September 14th 1914
2067 officers and men are be
lieved to have been sav
the crews of the three
cruisers sunk by a Germ
marine.
A single submarine U.
said to have sU-ik the
cruisers and thene\aded pursuit.
Servian troops have re captur-
ed Leubovia after violent fight-
ting with the Austrians. The
losses were heavy on both sides.
11 aie
nan s
ifrom
tish
sub
9. is
three


China disclaims responsibility
for the lading of Japanese
troops on Chinese soil and says
that she is unable to defend her-'
self against Japanese invasion.
f Asiatic cholera has developed
among the soldiers in Hungary.
A Russian cruiser is reported
sinking a German cruiser and
two torpedo boats in the Baltic.
TbeGerman'government ofTi-
dairy states that orders were
given to spare the cathedral at
Rheims.
The cruisers "Tennessee" and
Three penny gifts of
pupils of St. Francis
Xaviers School
Sacred Heart School
Behring Point, Andros
Capt, D. D. Messnier
Robt. H. Sands
Total 1509 l6 6
:o: -!-
The Residency
Mangrove Cay, Andros
I7th-Sept. 1914
The Editor of The Tribune
..,...,, Will you kindlv allow me
North Carolina have been | to ask throu ,h the'mcdJum of
ordered to remain indefinitely in your papei, the reading public
European waters to afford fur
ther relief if neccessary.
The French announce that
there is no change in the battle
situation. The Aisne battle ap
pears to be awaiting the Allies
attempt "io outflank the Ger
mans right.
The Russians push steadily on
in Gahcia on the German fron
tier. They are in close touch
with the enemy.
Details have been received of
the heroic deatli of Major Du
pont of theJkitish artillery.
The real^Suse of the recent
resignation'df the French Cabi
net has been divulged. It was
caused by a British protest that
the 1'rench military governor of
Lille had failed to reinforce the
British when they faced annihi
lation at the battle of Mods.
El Paso Texas :General
Villa has announced his ihde
pendcnce of the Carran/.a gov
eminent. He has sent several
carloads of war munitions and
supplies to assist in the revolt.
BAHAMAS
WAR RELIEF FUND
The following subscriptions
have been received:
Amount previously
acknowledged 1361 II 3
Green Turtle Cay 770
Great Guano Cay 440
Marsh Harbour incl.
Public School 32 0.0
Mangrove Cay 21 15 3
J. Knowles 1 o o
Duke of Albermarle
Chapter, Daughters
of the fcjriipm:
Miss L. .f^ethel
Miss T N. Bethel
Miss E M. Bethel
Aubrey Farrington
Hope Town Abaco
Members of the
Catholic Mission
in the Bahamas 25 o o
St. Francis Xayiers
Academy 200
1
2
1
1
1
45
of Nassau, to please send me
from time to time all their used
News papers and magazines,
especially the illustrated ones,
which contain any news? An
effort is being made to get our
people to contribute to the War
Fund, and if we can circulate
some pictorial literature on the
operations at the front, it will
help to explain matters and thus
perhaps procure more support. I
)ften receive requests for pict ure--
on the war, and I should be
thankful to all persons for any
service thevmay render mc
Very truly yours
Geo. H. Clarke.
:o:
TROOPS FROM CANADA
A Safe Arrival in England.
The White Star Steamer Me-
ganlic left Montreal on August
2u with Princess Patricia's Light
Infantry and three batteries of
artillery.
It is understood that the steam
er safely reached the port sever
al days ago.
[ Ibis Central News telegram
has been passed by the Official
Press Bureau).
The departure of the troops
was marked with scenes of great
enthusiasm, says a Canadian pa
per. The Duke and Duchess of
Connauglit and the Princess Pa
tricia reviewed the regiment of
the Princess, and wished its
members good fortune before
they left the camp.
The regiment was raised be
R. B. Bennett, a member of thy
Canadian Parliament and Ham
ilton Gault a Montreal million
aire.
It is commanded by Colonel
Karquhar.an officer of the Cold
stream Guards, Buller, of the
British Rifle Brigade, second in'
command. Hamilton Gault has
a captain's commission, while
his wife goes under the badge of
the Red Cross.
Of the eleven hundred men, a
thousand wear medals for pre
vious service in South Africa,
Philipines and Cuba chiefly.
Abou*. three hundred men of the
regiment are adventurers fresh
from Mexico.
Jack Munroe, who won his
fame through gaining a decision
over Jim Jefferies is a private in
the ranks of the regiment, which
is held by military authorities to
be one of the most efficient re
giinents ever assembled.
THE NAMUR. VEIL LIFTED.
14.000 MEN LOST.
The veil nas been lifted from
Namur, and there is light on the
fall of the fortress, which was
said to be practically impreg-
nable.
A Press Association War Spe-
cial message *.ells of the loss of
14,000 Belgians in the battle and
the subsequent seven days re-
treat.
Namur was strongly protected
by modern forts, which had dur-
ing the three weeks respite afford
ed by the heroic defence of Liege
been further strengthened in all
sorts of WfrVs. Large areas had
been mined. The held of fire
from the forts bad been very
largely cleared, all obstacles in
the way of the guns being blown
up by dynamite, while barbed
wire obstructions carrying elec-
tric currents of 1,500 volts cover
edall the approacnes.
In Namur itself immense stores,
ammunition, and provisions had
been accumulated, ready for
weeks of siege.
The Germans brought to the
attack thirty two of their great
siege guns at positions -.liree
miles from the forts,doing great
havoc.
Then there was a touch of
treachery. As usual, the Germans
proved to be most accurately in
formed, a German officer who
was taken prisoner having upon
him photographs of new trenches
dug up only a few days before.
. The story of the fall is thus
told by one of the suvivors:
BRAVE MEN MOWN '
DOWN.
"Without troubling about the
forts, the Germans at first centred
their rain of steel upon our en-
trenchui'-iits, where our men
weie posted, awaiting the attack
lor ten hours Our brave young
fellows stood tins terrible ordeal
without being able to fire a shot
in return. Any man who put his
head above the fire swept ram
parts simply had it mown off.
"We Were all burning, to emu
late our valient brothers who
fell at Liege But what human
being would not be disheartened
when he could not even see the
enemy attacking him,'and could
do nothing to protect himself,
nothing to avenge the comrades
falling around him? Whole regi
ments were being decimated.
"I still shudder at the memory
of these horrors. The losses
among the officers were terrible,
and gradually the soldiers, de
prived of their leaders, became
demoralized. With one bound,
they suddenly rose and fled-a
general sauve qui peutand
only when the lines were reform
ed to the rear was it seen how
many were missing.
"Meanwhile'many of the Ger
mans guns had been turned on
the forts, especially those of Mai
geret and Marchovelette. Armed
with old fashioned guns of a
much smaller calibre, they
could offer hut a feeble resist
auce, and Maig^ret, in fact, Only
fired about ten shots, while it re-
ceived no less than 1,200 shells,
fired at the rate of twenty a,
minute.
"At Marchovelette seventy
five men were killed in the bat
teries, and both forts soon sur
rendered Other works, however
were still holding out when the'
army left the town." T
The result was that many,,
stores and many guns fell into
the enemy's hands.
TERRIBLE SLAUGHTER. -
The survivor proceeded grf,
"Our line of retreat was on St. _
Gerard, where we hoped to join .
the French brigade, winch had
been asked for as are inforce .1.
mentfroui Dinant. But we were
doomed to disappointment1 after
disappointment The French
having been overwhelmed at
Dinant, had been obliged to fall
back by way of Morvijle, and
could only send us two regi
ments, which bravely fought
their way through to Us and join
ed us not far from Namur, very:
reduced in numbers... ,..
"At last we cut our way
through, but at the price of. what
osses I
"Till?' Namur .dan-ism and ,,
roops sent to ecupy intervals
)etwetn forts 'numbered 36,000
nen; those who have returned .
to Belgian sojl number, 12,000;' .
so that, including sick and
wounded left in French .hotpi
tals, the Namur affair has cost
Belgium 14,000 men."
Liverpool Echo, Sept. 'J, 1914
a.
1


r

i:
geant of .r-^JH W^irnent
with a breast of -mealTs, a pension,
arid asnue little tobacconists shop
jvas asked why he had come out of
his retirement.
"Wad I be serving snuff," he
asked, with infinite scorn, "when
my country wants me and the auld
regiment's fechtin?"
Fortunately for the country, that
is the spirit that animates these
veterans. Without them Kitchen-
ers army could make little pro-
gress, and certainly could not, as
they are doing now, learn their
new calling in one-fiftbof the or-
dinary time.
There is no stipulating for an
eight hour day when enlisting, al-
though the War Office is trying to
keep within that limit in practical
training, plus odd half hours for
lectures. "Non-coms." of the old
brigade are satisfied with nothing
short of sixteen hours.
Color sergeants, who are drill-
ing on parade at half past-five or
six o'clock in the morning, return
after breakfast to do duly as clerks
in orderly room or quartermaster's
store. In the afternoon they parade
again to drill recruits anJ then at
tea time come back to their ledg.
ers and work until the bugles sig-
nal "Lights out."
It is these menthe men who
were born too late to take advan.
tage of Colonel Seely'scommissitm
schemewho are transforming a
mob into a trained army with a
apiJity that would astonish the
men who are fighting at the front.
The recruits, many of them still
without the uniforms of their par-
ticular units, are as keen as their
mentors. They are learning more
quickly by far than did that famous
experimental company of Colonel
Pollock's, and their keenness and
curiosity make them the most
grateful pupils in the world. Be-
sides there is a friendship between
taught and teachers that never be
fore was known.
Until last month no "non com."
dared to be seen in the streets with
a private, but now on any evening
one may see even commissioned
officers walking openly in the puo-
lic streets with men of their corn-
man 1, and discussing with them
the lesson of the day.
The greatest fear has been that
the physique of the men could
hardly be improved in theshorten-
ed spell of training. The last week
or two has%hown that in the great
majority ni cases that fear is un-
founded.
The "freh air the -iunshine
caiefollv unduat'-il *-xridses
therrgulir fording ;mo* sle
have worked wonders, in the
army and those who saw
slouchimv heterogeneous crowds
which have been leaving the big
towns of England for the last two
or three weeks would not recognize
them again in the brorzed upright
alert young fellows who ace now
the
and
ping
IKW
the
half way or more on the roa i to
the termination of their recruit
drills and who every day become
more infatuated with their calling
and their mission.
TOBrrerrmn
B.VD.
gnwITAIiTHAM
slf'PtfS SELL'S
IS.* CONQtNSfD
MILK
fe
|VJU
I
w 8 &JIBLfikX n
i *: "PAReo by t\ti
COCOANUTS
BAHAMA ISLANDS
IT is now possible for owners
of land with fully bearing
trees to prove its value and ob
tain rents.
For further particulars
Apply to
J. THEO. FARRINGTON
Nassau, N. P.
Agent for
Bahamas Product Marketing
Caapaajr
139 Copthall Houh
Copthall Avenue
3 Mo. London, R. C.
For Result
Advertise in
The Tribune
THE E
is the largest inhabitant of the forest in the world.
This is an undisputed fact. Sunlight Soap has
the largest sale of any Soap in the world. This,
also, is an undisputed fact. The great value of
the Elephant's tusks is well known, but far better
known to good housewives is the' great value of
Sunlight
It enjoys a well-deserved
popularity. Its mission is
cleanlinessits standard is
purity, Increasing leisure,
and reducing work, it is
used !y delighted house*
wives ill over ihe world in
preference to any other.
A TKIAI. WILi I'UOVK THIS
"There was war in Heaven,
once ago;"
There is war in Europe now,
THEREFORE
The Choir of Wesley Church
feels it incumbent upon them
to render on
Wcdno.do. v 30th inet.
t> election of
PLANTATION MELODIES
To commence at 8 p.m.
Proceeds towards
WAR RELIEF FUND
RESERVED SEATS
Not less than Is.
General Admission 6d.
N. B. Any person who
do not wish to subscribe their
Guineas to the Bank's lists
will do well to help and
swell this side of the fund.
IMPERIAL
THEATRE
WEDNESDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
Door* open 7.50. Performance
begin at 5.15 p.m.
Mapes Fertilizers
/ now carry in stock the fol
lowing formulas:
Pineapple.It has been prov
en that thishasnoequa
and a visit4Bfields usin
same will convince you
Vegetable.Now is the tim
to use this and increas.
your yield in Tomatoes
Potatoes, Onions and I
other vegetables by i
per cent.
Orange Tree.To assist the
growth of Young Citrus
Tree.
Friut and Wine.Increase the
yield and growth of old
Citrus trees.
Eor further information
and books on the use of these
fertilizers, please apply to
WALTER K. MOORE
Agent for Mapes Fertilizer
in the Bahamas.
WANTED
TO purchase A small house
and lot in the Western
or Southern suburbs.
Communicate with W.
Care of "Tribune Office"
IWK.
Fop Rent
SEA FRONT PROPERTY
recently occupied by Mr.
Timothy Culmer with three
Warehouses thereon. Stor-
age capacity 1200 bales Sisal
suitable for Spongrt^usiness
also.
Apply to
WALTER K. MOORE
Fresh Onion Seed
FROM TENERIFFE
At Toote's, 49 9 Bay Street


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