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Publication hgn at 7.10 p.m. Cbe grtbu ne Tuesday. September 22,1914 Be of Good Cheer While we await news that will make future history, let ua remem. ber proudly, but without vain, •lory. England's record on Five Continents and on the Seven Seas. n the months of August and Sep. tember. SEPTEMBER Sept 23.—English and Dutch •Moated Spaniards at Zutphen. Death of Sir Philip Sidney i 5 86. —:o:— A very large number of persons assemhle.1 in G^oree Street on Sunday afternoon to witness the Procession and attend the Service of Intercession at the Cathedral. i recisely at 5 o'clock I lie procession of clergymen, choristers and laymen botlrmale and female moved off, singing the Litany of the Seven last Words; the s.nging led by three Cantors and I co-mpa med by brass instruments they proceeded up George to Piinces, trance into Frederick on to Hav an i up George Streets and into the C "' cdral which was filled to o\ Mflowing, many standing. The service included an address by the Lord Bishop and the singing of! he Litany concluding with the National Anthem. A collection was taken up. *r — :o: ~ The MailSteamer"Seguranca" arrived from New York this morning with the following pas sengers.— Misses G. Mayer and M. Sears; Mesdames G. Coffin and F. \1 Sears; Messrs J. K. Amoury, II Chipman, G. Coffin, G. Hearne, HMostyn, E. Stehr, and R. M Nrnpson; \faster George Sears Misses M.Tinker.andL.Cashi Mesdames E. Tinker, F. Miller, and M Cash; Mr. and Mrs E. L.ghtbourne Messrs G. Cupee, T Bain, T. Donathan, J.Davis, J. I'ergt.pjpn. F. Mc Kinney, G. Stirrup, P. Claridge, C Fill CaT Mi ,er E Casl anfI K — :o:— Notice BAHAMAS VOLUNTEERS FOR THE WAR | HK Sub-Committee on the 1 Volunteer movement in tend holding a series i[ meetings --for mqp only—in the Eastern, Western and Southern Districts, and at I-ox Hill on Tuesday,' WednesdayThursday and Friday nights of this week. The first meeting will be at St. Matthews Schoolroom tonight, at 8 o'clock sharp, when the speakers will be, Rev. Wilfred Stanhope Lovell Capt. W. A. Mather, E. V. Brigade John Butler, Esq. G. M. Cole, Esq., M. L. A. Notice of the other meetings will be given in the "Guardian" Supplement and in the "Tribune" a Ins. BAHAMAS VOLUNTEERS FOR. THE WAR.. A meeting will be held on Wednesday night in the Good Samaritan's Hall, Nassau Court, at 8 o'clock. The speakers will be, Chas. O. Anderson, Esq.. M.L.A. Frnest L. Bowen, Esq., M. L. A. George Weech, Esq., M. L. A. W. E. S. Callender, Esq., Barrister-at-law A meeting will also be held on Thursday evening at 8 o'clock in St. Agnes School room, Grants Town. His Lordship the Bishop will take the chair, and the Row H. W. Weigall, M. A., G. M. Cole, Esq., M. L. A. and S. A. Dillet, Esq., will be speakers. Notice of the meeting at Fox Hill will be given later on. GREAT BRITAIN AT WAR, By a Co-respondent The unanimity of the home land on this subject is verv striking. The "Manchester Guardian" and the "Liverpool Daily Post." two newspapers that support the Liberal Government and are opposed to militarism, contain articles every'bit as fierce as any printed by the most warlike papers on the other side. The "Daily Post" demands that the power of the Kaiser and of the Prussian Junkers be crushed once for all. The Trades Unions and the Labour Party call on their men to enlist in their thousands. The morning and evening papers contain a good deal of news gleaned from the letters of private soldiers at the front. These letters, and the accounts of news paper correspondents, bear tes timony to the magnificent fight iog of the British troops and of their French comrades on the allied left wing. They are re tiring before a vastly larger force, but they smile as they do it and say "Our turn will come soon. 25th at 1 p.m The birther the Germans march from their base, the easier it will be to entrap and crush them when the time comes for us to take the offensive." The Germans fight in close order and the British rifle fire has slaughtered them in heaps. The German infantry shoots badly, firing largely from the top, as the French did in 1870. The British marksmen aim cool ly and with a precision beyond what British troops have, I understand ever shown before. It appears that the British losses are largely from German shell! fire which is very accurate now | A story is told of a body of Bri-1 tish infantry in a trench, who dealt frightful execution among! the advancing Germans, and! beat them back with their with1 ering fire repeatedly. Then a' German aeroplane hovered over the British trench an.I dropped some papers right into it. This gave the German gunners the range and very soon shrapnel shells practically wiped out the whole of the offending riflemen. It is said, however, that the Ger man troops are alreadv losing s me of their nerve and dash in face of their British adversaries. They come on to the attack with less confidence and they break more easily. By this time some of our best native Indian troops are bearing the front. As the British reinforcements arrive, they will tell with increasing forerun the in vaders of France. JJtf) doubt the Germans will soon arrive before BAHAMAS WAR RELIE^JJ'UND The following Subscriptions have been received :— the French lines at Paris, but they can scarcely spare the enormous force that would be needed in order to invest it. Mean while the French have moved their Government to anotlrer capital, and are likely from the new centre to make the Germans wish before long that they had let France alone N. B. Plant corn, Native Indian, Sweet com, and Giunea Corn. Plant Thyme. MAILS Foreign Mails per '-i-Mncrs F" will be elos-,1 11,1 Wednesday 23rd. IllSt l 8 :\ III. Fofiun Mailtpei Mo! Steamer "Vigilancia"on TIIWSJM; 24M1 lost. •It I I .: Ill, Int.-r insular Ma ill for Harbour Island, Npii.ish Wells, Eleathern, Andros, \baco, Kxuin 1, Long!., Ragge I., Grand luiumas, Bimi. lies, and Mem blend* on Friday Amount previously acknowledged £1289 1 9 Mr. and Mrs. W. E. S. Strom bom 500 Everett Sands 1 1 0 The Olympic Club 440 In memorv of G. Cole, I. S. O. 880 Current Island Union Burial Society 4 1 o Mr. and Mrs. R .L. Kemp 220 H. S. Black 2100 Geo. Bertram Pyfrom 1 o o Mma Vargas 5 o Mrs. Josephine Pyfrom b o Louise Dalzell 2 o Victoria Royal Union 200 St. Mary's Church 5 o o Per Mr. Jerome Pyfrom on his Pineapple plantation in New Providence from Cove and Hatchet Bay men — W. II. Johnson 1 o John T. Brown ^^ 1 o Felix Finder ^1 o Israel Johnson 1 o Caleb Johnson 1 o Samuel Kemp 1 o William Thompson i Richard Johnson 1 o Samuel Johnson 1 Geo. Petty 1 o Gerald Ranger i o Geo. Dean 1 o Alex. Kemp 1 o Alex. Farrington 1 o Jonathan Johnson 1 0 Felix Stun up 1 o Geo. Higgs 1 o Peter Johnson l o Joseph St radian I o Mitchell Storr 1 o Zacheua Ingraham 1 0 Cornelius Wilson 1 o Lewis Thompson 1 o /.eke Miller I o Small amounts 9 2 Berry Islands Ltd. Sir Courtenay Honey* wood Director 500 Mr. and Mrs. Twynam 200 No. 1 Congo Society 200 Amos L Russel. I lope T. io o Miss Myrtle Kerr jfc 5 o Mr and" Mrs SIIC RarT'l 10 o Mr and Mrs G T Knowles ? 2 o Miss Hay 500 Imperial Theatre b b o i St Agnes Church 711 4 Mr and Mrs W G Albury.2 2 o Total £-301 11 3



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Latest W£r News RXDIOQRAMS. PICKED UP September 22nd 1914. Berlin:—Official reports from headquarters states that the German armies in France everywhere lias assumed the offensive against strongly entrenched enemy. No decisive result is announced at present. The Crown Council of Bucharest has decided to continue the strictest neutrality. The German war loan has The Germans made a cles perate attempt to capture Rheims and the French are equallydetermined to drive them from the hills on their left. The Germans have been reinforced and the French have received additional heavy artillery. The casualties among British Officers is reported to be out of all proportion to the losses in the ranks. The list contains 32 Colonels and Lieutenant Colonels; 85 Majors, and 246Captains. The Germans continue a tre been over-subscribed bv 260 mil "jendoul bombardment of lion marks Norway and Sweden have en te.ed into agreement to safe guard their neutrality. The great battle still continues. The entrenched artillery era fighting duels while the infantry are attacking, and counter attacking, one side occasionally losing ground and later regaining it. Military experts agree that only out flanking movements can effect either army. Accord A^-to the latest advices the Germans have been forced hack seven miles, contesting every inch. The destruction of RheJmjhaS caused great protest from France. The Pope has warned the Kaiser that Gods wrath will be visited upon him if he does not respect G ids Temples. The Russians claim that they have surro inded I'rzemsyl. GOVKKNMKXT PBOH Another Japanese torpedo boat is reported to have been sunk by a German cruiser outside of Kia Chau. A Japanese aeroplane is reported destroying two impor taut forts at Tsingtau. The German western wing was forced back seven miles after fort) eight hours contin nous fighting. Both armies de smie superhuman fatigue show determination not to yield an inch of ground French troops are aiding the allies. Emperor William is reported '.aking gttj h:s he.idqn irters at Luxemburg. The British cruisnr PegaSUS, recently dein ftged bv a I ierman cruiser, has be >n beached at Zanzibar. I'h" Aisne River battle hasde veloped into a siege and military authoritieshold the opinion that Ghent. The Austrian! attribute their reverses in Galicia to an elabor ate system of espionage' conduct ed by tin* Russian War Office. Austrian farmers are suffering severely for want of labourers and many of them are destitute. The Russians hold a reutless grip on the scattered Austrians In Galicia and are organizing n civil government foi there i 'io so sure are they of its capture General Beyers, commandant of the Union of South Africa de fence forces, has resigned be cause of his disapproval of send ing Boers to conquer Germans in Soutnwest Africa. The Montenegran army is re ported to have reached Savajcvo capital of Bosnia. London,September 22nd, 1914 Governor, Bahamas. 22nd September, following, from Press Bureau: Since the last report received from Sir John French several further counter attacks have been sue cessfully repulsed. (Signed) Harcourt —:o: — GOVERNMENT NOTICES An Order in Council amending the Post Office Money oiler System ispu jlishcd 1 he time for executing the Post Office Commission lias been extended for two months. The appoint 1 nenI ol \)t. II. Perigord as Act ing Medical Oilier at InHgUH i canceller), Applications for the appoint* mem of Caretakri UH "Se me no More" Cemetery are in* ii 1 Tenders ere invited P n king up of Unifo ms for ilii* ( ifii -INS of the Customs Dep irtn rut Letter hitxes In* e been placed at, Eastern District near Police Station, Corner bay mid Union, and near the Police Station, Grant ( Mr. Sampson Roker r, 1 tt ""-; I Mr. Lawrence Miller I IIP b'>xe will he cleared daily at Noun, except Sundays and Public Holiday's, and one hour before the tune for closing Foreign mails. — :o": — Mangrove Cay, Andros 17th Sept. 1914. To the Editor of the Tribune. Dear Sir, A well-attended and enthusiastic meetingof theinhabi tants of Mangrove Cay took place at the Police Office last afternoon for the purpose of considering what help we could r*ruler the mother Country in this her hour of grave peril. It was called and opened by the Commissioner who very clearly set forth our duty, in a speech which made everybody anxious It was evident that the audience were with him; there was no evidence of indifference or stoicism or skulking and every one, men and women alike evinced a common desire to help to the uttermost. The Rev. R. C. H. Duq ien y then gave a very im pressive address, and recounted several of the importautcngageincuts which had already occur red on the battle field. He fired the audience with greater en thusiasm when he said that he was willing to go to the front at once. Mr. F AY. Forsythe gave an address which was pregnant with information and in order to test the patriotism of his audi ence he appealed for 12 volunteers to help n'.au His Majes ty's Navy wheresoever theirser vice may be required and in an instant 26 offered themselves. Then the Commissioner put the appeal for help in money and he made it clear that no one must give the shilling wdiat he had no use for, but to give so.ne thing which he could hardly af ford to do without, for there is no patriotism where there isnot some sell -sacrifice. Committees of Ladies and Gentleman were appointed to make the appeal as widely known as possible throughout the settlement and to forward the movement. The amount collected was £17. -,. o The subscriptions received were: — I 2 4 3 1 10 Mr Joseph Green Mi. Octavius Rolle Mr Malachi Bullard Mr Albert Can-dell Mr Lacitas Sweeting 8 Mr. Levi Wright 4 Mr T. A. Bastian 4 Mr SylvanusThompson I o Mr John Pennerman 4 Mr \V. Green 4 Mr H. H. Gibson 1 o Mr Joshua Rolle 1 Mr Darius Rolle 1 Mr. John Whvlly 2 Mrs Sarah Russell I Mr Antonio Lewis 4 Mr J. M: Rahming 2 2 Mr Jabin Bastian I Mrs Christiana Flowers Mr Daniel Thompson 3 Mr. Alexander Thompson 1 The times are hard; our chief commodity sponge is not now in demand, but we hope to shew that we are not wanting in patriotism or human sympathy. Verv truly vours OL1VF L. BO WE. O o o o u o o o o o o o o o o o 6 o o o 9 o o T HE Scholars of Wesley Sunday School assisted by their Friends will give an Entertainment onWednesday next, 23rd inst. in the School Room to commence at 7.45 p.m. Admission 6d. & is. 3 Ins. Mr. and Mrs. Gc %  >. II. Clarke Anonymous Anonymous MrOs'iourne Lockhart Mr. Alfred Rolle £ r~~ r -.. ...„. .-M,*irui, i uiiici *>''J nuu 1 illi|i ( nothing but a flank movement j Bay and Geoige. Bay nod Nassau, will seriously affect either army. Cumberland and West Hill Street*, Mr. Andrew Rolle o o o 10 10 d o o o o b 0 COCOANUTS EAHAMA ISLANDS I T is now possible for owners V of land with fully bearing { trees to prove its value and ob Mk tain rents. *>., Land For Growing Cocoanut* Twenty yean Leases on Govern ment Land can now be acquired Free of Rent for the* first four yea rs. • On condition 80 cocoanuts per acre are planted during the fust year of the Lease. For further particulars %  \pplv to J TllKO. HARRINGTON Nassau, N. P. Agent for Bahamas Produce Marketing Company 139 Cpthall House i.'opthall Avenue 3 Mo. London, E. C,



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-M EL. sous and brothers are being ten derly nursed back to health and vigor. Just take one days scene at the London Hospital where hun dreds of England's warriors are being cares! for. All through the day the place is beseiged by re lativesof the wounded. Anxious ly inquiring for the latest tidings of the patients, or waiting, pa tiently hopeful. Inside, many touching scenes, pathetic reunion of husband and wife mother and son. A hospital! inevitably sees much of the drama of life, even in peace; in, times of wnr it is there perhaps | that the human factor is upper most. One who had lost. his left hand wondered why he had been i sent home. "I can still do a bit j of damage with this" shaking: his right list. A private of the King's Own' Royal Lancasters said whenever the Germans saw a rei flag fly-. ing they fired on it. Firing on | the Uetl Cross was a usual thing with the Germans, he said. "The German soldiers do not fight," he added. "They are more cowards than soldiers. They have to be spurred on behind with shrapnel before they will attack." A West Kent private who was in the Boer war, said that was a game of skittles in comparison with this. "What slaughter!" he said. "The Germans came at us in great masses. It was like shooting rabbits, only as fast as you shot one lot down another lot took their place. You could not help hitting them. We had plenty of time to take aim, and if we weren't reaching Bisley standard all the time we must have done a mighty lot of damage. One poor fellow, whose head was so smothered in bandages that his features could not be seen, remarked:—"We could burning desire to returu to the front and have another go at their enemy. Popular Mechanics Magazine "WWTOH M YOU CAN UNDMMtND IT" A GREAT Cant inu*d Story of taa World'* *^ Pro *m Which you may rx'gin reading at any tuna, and which will bold your interest forever. You are living In the beat year, of the moat wonderful age. of what ia doubtleas the greatest work) in the universe. A resident of Mara would gladly pay— < 1 fa/VA FOR ONE YEAR'S *>1,UUU SUBSCRIPTION to this magatina.in order to keep Informed of our progreaa ta Engineering and Mechanic*). Are you reading it ? Two millions of your neighbors are. and it is the favorite magazine in thousands of the best American homes. It appeals to all classes—old and young —men and women. Th* "Shay aTstaa" Draartaaaat (20 pwaa) give* wr ways to do Uilugs-how touiaka useful articles for home and shop, repaint, ete. ApaUar MMhmnios (10 nam* > tells how to muki* Mission furniture, wlruloiw outfit* boat*, eiigliu-a, magic, and all the things a boy lovss. U.ionsrua. IINOH corns as CENTS Ash jtw fcUwxlMl.r I thaw ,..„,„,,,.. wait! worn wrrs ttmnM cor>v TODAY POPULAR MECHANICS CO. J1 a W. WsaUaajm St., CHICAGO, USA. Shingles Best No. i Heart 5m. Cypres Shingles at §9.60 per thoussand of 20 bundles Discounts on lots of over 5000 shingles. Special Price also on cheaper grades—also 5in. Cypress at $6.72 per thousand of 20 bundles. This price made possible by a very large purchase. Fresh stock arriving every week. C. C. SAUNDERS. ^ CHP GasoDaCiOl line is beat them w.th bladder sticks if: Test. We do not sell it. it were not f„r the shells, which 'jjr we do sell and will, were appallmp he effect could IW continue to sell not be described. !*• J J Al <" Soldiers with minor wounds Ol&lla&ni IF 11 tO. chatted about their experiences Gasoline. Test your Gasotellmghow tremendous were the li ne We invite comparison odds against them, how they wiUl anv in thc City I it • 1 vi 10 r. 1, I t >.> o a-* A a-vt a < aWaaidi *U < % %  aa _,_ it • Price 22cts. per gallon in peppered the enemy and how cruel the Germans were to the wounded even breaking their wrists so that they would never again be affle to handle a rifle when they recovered from their gun shot wounds. All appeared possessed of a 50 gallon Drums. Customers using 100 gals, or over per Month 20c. gallon. Watch our Notice for Kerosene in June. C. C. SAUNDERS LADIES. MISSES and CENTS SAPLE BOOTS *vnd SHOES in ONE, TWO, AND THREE pair lots The sizes for ladies are limited to 3I, 4 and 4} Misses—13, 1 and 2 Gents— 6, 6J and 7 The Shoes having been sold Willirxma. The Shoerrmn at a liberal discount, the principal disadvantage being the limited sizes, he is disposing cf them at not lean them 20 per cent leaa than the regular prices such grades would be. His kind patrons and the general public will please.take Special Notice of the above sizes mentioned and in calling for them will set' for themselves that they are obtaining Real Bargains at Williams' Wholesale and Retitir Shoe Establishment 277, 279 Bav Street (City) Notice I T has been said that the Doctors of Nassau say that Pure Fresh Milk is unobtainable in Nassau. I hereby invite any Doctor in Nassau to come up to my Dairy and show wherein the milk sup plied by me is in anyway impure. T. M. KNOWLES Dairyman. W A. MATHER UNDERTAKER D ESIRES to inform Ins friends and the Public that I e has hist received a complete outfit of facilities for the buisness of an undertaker, which places him in a position to carry out Funerals that may be entrusted to his rare wilh syMem and despatch ; and respect fully solicits theit patronage Get my Prices first and proVI that these are the very lowest for thefirst clmi work. Fresh Onion Seed FROM TENERIFFfi At Toote's, 4) y Bay Street For Result Advertise in The Tribune Kerosene 150* I N New 50 gallon Galvanized Iron Drums at i8cts per Gallon. In 10 gallon Cans at aocts per. Gallon. Drums and Cans returnable Full particulars at Office "Frances E.," Nassau N. P. C. C. SAUNDERS Notice T he undersigned desires to in form all Cave Earth dealers that he can supply any quantity required of the very best grade and with a quick dispatch. Get our prices and send vour orders. Everything promptly at tended to. LLOYD H. MAJOR Burmws Harbour South End, Lon? Island Johnson s Artistic Wood Finishes ;—a com lurnituie. ohnson'e Prepared Way plete finish and polish Iwflf' woodwork iod floors. Johnson's Wood Dye-lorthe artistic coloring of all wood, soft or hard Johnson'* Under Lac-a spirit finish, very much superior to shellac or vainish Johnson's rie.t Wood Finishfor a beautiful, artistic, hand-rubbed effete without the rx|>ense of rubbing. Johnson's Paste Wood Tiller— for filling the grain and p >res of wood, preparing it foi the finish. Johnson's Powdered Wax —for bal room floors. FOR. SALE BY Chas. E. Albury The Vogue, and the Au Bon Marche Store. (Removed to Bay Street one door West of Black's) Have received per S. S. "Cama guey," A large shipment of ladies Black, White and Coloured Straw Mats, New York latest styles a few, choice, ready to wear. White and Cream Chiffon Satin. Shadow laces and In sertions. White Rating double width at 2s. Another lflpjtof 7 il. Crepes. White Figured Cudroy at fid White checked Crepes at 6d. White, Black, Pink, Blue, Cream, Purple and Green Satin. White Cotton Goods. Cambric at 6d. Madapollam at iod. Nansooks at ad., is., 15. 3d Drills 6d., gd. is.



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CD P 1 > Ms 0) CD a) a sr o (D 00 Nulllus addlctus (urare In verb* m&gistrl. Being bound to iwe&r to the Uogmm >f no .Matter VOL.X. Nassau. N. P.. Ba.ha.maa, Tuesday. September 22. 1914 No. 222 L. GILBP.RT DUPUCH, Editor and Proprietor. OFFICB: 38-41 MARKBT 8TKKET Nassau, N. P., Bahamas P. O. BOX 163 PUBLISHED DAILY Monday, Wednesday and Friday— single copy Jd Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday— single copy td Weekly 4l'l Monthly • 4<1 Quarterly ... .. 4s. RallYearly 8 s. Yearly 1 6s. PAYABLE IN ADVANCE Atffctising Rates :—Six pence pet line Wr first insertion; three pence per line for second insertion ; and one penny per line for subsquent insertions. Advertisements under eight lines 4s. HINDU AND ARAB IN EUROPE Fierce Native Troops In Battle for Britain and France London, England, Sept. 10.— British East Indian troops have reached the front and have defeat, ed the Germans in several battles in Belgium, the Hindus fighting with their fierce bravery. The censor refuses to make public the numerical strength of the East Indian forces in Belgium and France, but 60,000 troops from India are known to have been sent pnd their arrival is believed to have been a factor in the German retreat. Other East Indian troops are on ths way, with a large part of the "Canadian contingent. f at only ire native troops of fighting in Europe's great war soldiers from Africa as well. Legions, of Hindus, Sikhs and 'Bengalis artat the front or on the w.iy fur Gieat Britain. Troops from the Soudan, in Egypt, aie to be sent into the fray. From throughout all its important colonies Biitain is drawing up a great force—Canadians, Australians, South Africans, New Zea. landers and the picturesque and barbaric fighters who have been trained by British officers in modem war. France already has sent Arabs from her African possessions into battle and they have done valiant service near Paris. Germany has not yet imported warriors from her outside possessions, but is counting upon the Boers in Southwest Africa to aid her against the British if such action becomes necessary. Great Britain, having the greatest colonial resources, is drawing most heavily on India. Native troops have been landed in great numbers on the Pacific Coast of Canada and railroaded to transports on the other side. These movements have been kept as secret as possible, but have continued from day to day. In addi tiou to the native soldiers, it is understood that the British are calling in part of their regular army in India. If Turkey gets into the war, as she is threatening to do as an ally of Germany, Britain may have trouble with her Mohammedan soldiery. This is a contingency which has been duly considered and as many of the troops as possible will be sent ihto Europe. Asia entered the war with the mobilization of the Russian forces. One-third of the Czar's great army is composed of the Asiatic tioops and many of them are already in Europe, including those which were recently sent to France. The extraordinary news that a large force of Russians had been hnded to join the French and British foices opposing the Germans has been confirmed. The Russians were transported from Archangel, Russia's northernmost port on the White Sea, to Aberdeen, Scotland and thence by rail to Dover, from where they were taken across the channel. Because of the secrecy with which the British war office env. loped this movement, the num. her of Russians is unknown, but there were at Icist 7(1,000 "f them end the number is variously estimate I as being from 150.000 to 250,000. Patrick O'Malley a Chicago alderman just returned from Europe, was an eyewitness to the 1 mding of the Russiansat Aberdeen —— ——— %  .. g g Thousands of soldiers, Cossacks, artillery and cavalry, were there, he reports. Further evidence was brought by Vance Thompson, the author, arriving from Liverpool. He said that the Red Star liner Lapland took 10,000 Russians across the channel and that at least 160,000 Russians, who had come from Archangel, were taken to Calais and Boulogne, France; and Ostend, Belgium, on trasports. A Rome newspaper states tnat there are a total of 250,000 Russians now in France. "It is reported in England," said one American who witnessed part of the moving of the Russians for re-enforcements, "that 350,000 more Russians will be brought down and that two months has been allowed for their transporting. In addition to aiding in sending the Russians to France, the British Navy has assisted in escotting native troops from Algeria to France the Mediterranean fleet having done most of the transporting. From reliable sources in England comes the news that 100,000 Indian troops, including regiments of Sikhs and the Ninth Bengal Lancers are expected to land at Marseilles, France shortly. A large part of the native Indian troops already at the front came to Vancouver, B. C, from Hong Kong. What part Japan will play in the great conflict outside of warring on German possessions in the Far East, is problematical. It would not be suprising however, to see Japanese troops moved across to Europe by way of the trans-Siberian railroad. —:o:— PAGES OF THE DRAMA OF WAR TURN RAPIDLY IN LONDON HOSPITALS London September 3rd 'Men must work, and women must weep." While men must fi

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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02264
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Tuesday, September 22, 1914
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02264

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Nulllus addlctus (urare In verb* m&gistrl.
Being bound to iwe&r to the Uogmm >f no .Matter
VOL.X.
Nassau. N. P.. Ba.ha.maa, Tuesday. September 22. 1914
No. 222
L. GILBP.RT DUPUCH,
Editor and Proprietor.
OFFICB: 38-41 MARKBT 8TKKET
Nassau, N. P., Bahamas
P. O. BOX 163
PUBLISHED DAILY
Monday, Wednesday and Friday
single copy ......... Jd
Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday
single copy ......... td
Weekly ............ 4l'l
Monthly ............" 4<1
Quarterly ... ..... .. 4s.
RallYearly............8s.
Yearly ............16s.
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
Atffctising Rates :Six pence pet line
Wr first insertion; three pence per line
for second insertion ; and one penny per
line for subsquent insertions.
Advertisements under eight lines 4s.
HINDU AND ARAB IN
EUROPE
Fierce Native Troops In
Battle for Britain
and France
London, England, Sept. 10.
British East Indian troops have
reached the front and have defeat,
ed the Germans in several battles
in Belgium, the Hindus fighting
with their fierce bravery. The cen-
sor refuses to make public the
numerical strength of the East
Indian forces in Belgium and
France, but 60,000 troops from In-
dia are known to have been sent
pnd their arrival is believed to have
been a factor in the German re-
treat.
Other East Indian troops are on
ths way, with a large part of the
"Canadian contingent.
fat only ire native troops of
fighting in Europe's great war
soldiers from Africa as well.
Legions, of Hindus, Sikhs and
'Bengalis art- at the front or on the
w.iy fur Gieat Britain. Troops
from the Soudan, in Egypt, aie to
be sent into the fray. From
throughout all its important
colonies Biitain is drawing up a
great forceCanadians, Austra-
lians, South Africans, New Zea.
landers and the picturesque and
barbaric fighters who have been
trained by British officers in modem
war. France already has sent Arabs
from her African possessions into
battle and they have done valiant
service near Paris. Germany has
not yet imported warriors from her
outside possessions, but is counting
upon the Boers in Southwest Africa
to aid her against the British if
such action becomes necessary.
Great Britain, having the great-
est colonial resources, is drawing
most heavily on India. Native
troops have been landed in great
numbers on the Pacific Coast of
Canada and railroaded to trans-
ports on the other side. These
movements have been kept as
secret as possible, but have con-
tinued from day to day. In addi
tiou to the native soldiers, it is un-
derstood that the British are call-
ing in part of their regular army
in India.
If Turkey gets into the war, as
she is threatening to do as an ally
of Germany, Britain may have
trouble with her Mohammedan
soldiery. This is a contingency
which has been duly considered
and as many of the troops as pos-
sible will be sent ihto Europe.
Asia entered the war with the
mobilization of the Russian forces.
One-third of the Czar's great army
is composed of the Asiatic tioops
and many of them are already in
Europe, including those which
were recently sent to France. The
extraordinary news that a large
force of Russians had been hnded
to join the French and British
foices opposing the Germans has
been confirmed. The Russians were
transported from Archangel, Rus-
sia's northernmost port on the
White Sea, to Aberdeen, Scotland
and thence by rail to Dover, from
where they were taken across the
channel. Because of the secrecy
with which the British war office
env. loped this movement, the num.
her of Russians is unknown, but
there were at Icist 7(1,000 "f them
end the number is variously esti-
mate I as being from 150.000 to
250,000.
Patrick O'Malley a Chicago
alderman just returned from Eu-
rope, was an eyewitness to the
1 mding of the Russiansat Aberdeen
.. ____gg
Thousands of soldiers, Cossacks,
artillery and cavalry, were there,
he reports. Further evidence was
brought by Vance Thompson, the
author, arriving from Liverpool.
He said that the Red Star liner
Lapland took 10,000 Russians
across the channel and that at least
160,000 Russians, who had come
from Archangel, were taken to
Calais and Boulogne, France; and
Ostend, Belgium, on trasports.
A Rome newspaper states tnat
there are a total of 250,000 Rus-
sians now in France.
"It is reported in England," said
one American who witnessed part
of the moving of the Russians for
re-enforcements, "that 350,000
more Russians will be brought
down and that two months has
been allowed for their transporting.
In addition to aiding in sending
the Russians to France, the British
Navy has assisted in escotting na-
tive troops from Algeria to France
the Mediterranean fleet having
done most of the transporting.
From reliable sources in England
comes the news that 100,000 In-
dian troops, including regiments of
Sikhs and the Ninth Bengal Lancers
are expected to land at Marseilles,
France shortly. A large part of the
native Indian troops already at the
front came to Vancouver, B. C,
from Hong Kong.
What part Japan will play in
the great conflict outside of warring
on German possessions in the Far
East, is problematical. It would
not be suprising however, to see
Japanese troops moved across to
Europe by way of the trans-Siber-
ian railroad.
:o:
PAGES OF THE DRAMA OF
WAR TURN RAPIDLY IN
LONDON HOSPITALS
London September 3rd
'Men must work, and women
must weep." While men must
fi like men, the real anguish of
war is the lot of their women
folk. It is a fact sadly in evi-
dence just now at the hospitals,
where their soldier husbands and
(Continued on fourth page)
1
. *


Publication hgn at 7.10 p.m.
Cbe grtbune
Tuesday. September 22,1914
Be of Good Cheer
While we await news that will
make future history, let ua remem.
ber proudly, but without vain,
lory. England's record on Five
Continents and on the Seven Seas.
n the months of August and Sep.
tember.
SEPTEMBER
Sept 23.English and Dutch
Moated Spaniards at Zutphen.
Death of Sir Philip Sidney i586.
:o:
A very large number of persons
assemhle.1 in G^oree Street on Sun-
day afternoon to witness the Pro-
cession and attend the Service of
Intercession at the Cathedral.
i recisely at 5 o'clock I lie pro-
cession of clergymen, choristers
and laymen botlrmale and female
moved off, singing the Litany of
the Seven last Words; the s.nging
led by three Cantors and I co-mpa
med by brass instruments they
proceeded up George to Piinces,
trance into Frederick on to Hav
an i up George Streets and into the
C "'cdral which was filled to
o\ Mflowing, many standing.
The service included an address
by the Lord Bishop and the sing-
ing of! he Litany concluding with
the National Anthem.
A collection was taken up.
*r :o: ~
The MailSteamer"Seguranca"
arrived from New York this
morning with the following pas
sengers.
Misses G. Mayer and M. Sears;
Mesdames G. Coffin and F. \1
Sears; Messrs J. K. Amoury, II
Chipman, G. Coffin, G. Hearne,
H- Mostyn, E. Stehr, and R. M
Nrnpson; \faster George Sears
Misses M.Tinker.andL.Cashi
Mesdames E. Tinker, F. Miller,
and M Cash; Mr. and Mrs E.
L.ghtbourne Messrs G. Cupee,
T Bain, T. Donathan, J.Davis,
J. I'ergt.pjpn. F. Mc Kinney, G.
Stirrup, P. Claridge, C Fill
CaT Mi',er* E- Casl' anfI K-
:o:
Notice
BAHAMAS VOLUNTEERS
FOR THE WAR
| HK Sub-Committee on the
1 Volunteer movement in
tend holding a series i[ meetings
--for mqp onlyin the Eastern,
Western and Southern Districts,
and at I-ox Hill on Tuesday,'
, WednesdayThursday and Friday
nights of this week.
The first meeting will be at
St. Matthews Schoolroom to-
night, at 8 o'clock sharp,
when the speakers will be,
Rev. Wilfred Stanhope Lovell
Capt. W. A. Mather, E. V.
Brigade
John Butler, Esq.
G. M. Cole, Esq., M. L. A.
Notice of the other meetings
will be given in the "Guardian"
Supplement and in the "Tri-
bune"
a Ins. ,
BAHAMAS VOLUNTEERS
FOR. THE WAR..
A meeting will be held on
Wednesday night in the Good
Samaritan's Hall, Nassau Court,
at 8 o'clock.
The speakers will be,
Chas. O. Anderson, Esq.. M.L.A.
Frnest L. Bowen, Esq., M. L. A.
George Weech, Esq., M. L. A.
W. E. S. Callender, Esq.,
Barrister-at-law
A meeting will also be held
on Thursday evening at 8 o'clock
in St. Agnes School room, Grants
Town.
His Lordship the Bishop will
take the chair, and the Row
H. W. Weigall, M. A., G. M.
Cole, Esq., M. L. A. and S. A.
Dillet, Esq., will be speakers.
Notice of the meeting at Fox
Hill will be given later on.
GREAT BRITAIN AT WAR,
By a Co-respondent
The unanimity of the home
land on this subject is verv
striking.
The "Manchester Guardian"
and the "Liverpool Daily Post."
two newspapers that support
the Liberal Government and
are opposed to militarism, con-
tain articles every'bit as fierce
as any printed by the most war-
like papers on the other side.
The "Daily Post" demands that
the power of the Kaiser and of
the Prussian Junkers be crushed
once for all. The Trades Unions
and the Labour Party call on
their men to enlist in their
thousands.
The morning and evening pa-
pers contain a good deal of news
gleaned from the letters of pri-
vate soldiers at the front. These
letters, and the accounts of news
paper correspondents, bear tes
timony to the magnificent fight
iog of the British troops and of
their French comrades on the
allied left wing. They are re
tiring before a vastly larger force,
but they smile as they do it and
say "Our turn will come soon. 25th at 1 p.m
The birther the Germans march
from their base, the easier it
will be to entrap and crush them
when the time comes for us to
take the offensive."
The Germans fight in close
order and the British rifle fire
has slaughtered them in heaps.
The German infantry shoots
badly, firing largely from the
top, as the French did in 1870.
The British marksmen aim cool
ly and with a precision beyond
what British troops have, I un-
derstand ever shown before. It
appears that the British losses
are largely from German shell!
fire which is very accurate now |
A story is told of a body of Bri-1
tish infantry in a trench, who
dealt frightful execution among!
the advancing Germans, and!
beat them back with their with-1
ering fire repeatedly. Then a'
German aeroplane hovered over
the British trench an.I dropped
some papers right into it. This
gave the German gunners the
range and very soon shrapnel
shells practically wiped out the
whole of the offending riflemen.
It is said, however, that the Ger
man troops are alreadv losing
s me of their nerve and dash in
face of their British adversaries.
They come on to the attack
with less confidence and they
break more easily.
By this time some of our best
native Indian troops are bearing
the front. As the British rein-
forcements arrive, they will tell
with increasing forerun the in
vaders of France. JJtf) doubt the
Germans will soon arrive before
BAHAMAS
WAR RELIE^JJ'UND
The following Subscriptions
have been received :
the French lines at Paris, but
they can scarcely spare the enor-
mous force that would be need-
ed in order to invest it. Mean
while the French have moved
their Government to anotlrer
capital, and are likely from the
new centre to make the Ger-
mans wish before long that they
had let France alone
N. B. Plant corn, Na-
tive Indian, Sweet com, and
Giunea Corn. Plant Thyme.
MAILS
Foreign Mails per '-i-Mncrs F"
will be elos-,1 11,1 Wednesday 23rd.
IllSt l 8 :\ III.
Fofiun Mailtpei Mo! Steamer
"Vigilancia"on TIiwsJm; 24M1 lost.
It I I .: Ill,
Int.-r insular Ma ill for Harbour
Island, Npii.ish Wells, Eleathern,
Andros, \baco, Kxuin 1, Long!.,
Ragge I., Grand luiumas, Bimi.
lies, and Mem blend* on Friday
Amount previously
acknowledged 1289 1 9
Mr. and Mrs. W. E.
S. Strom bom 500
Everett Sands 1 1 0
The Olympic Club 440
In memorv of G.
Cole, I. S. O. 880
Current Island
Union Burial Society 4 1 o
Mr. and Mrs. R .L.
Kemp 220
H. S. Black 2100
Geo. Bertram Pyfrom 1 o o
Mma Vargas 5 o
Mrs. Josephine Pyfrom b o
Louise Dalzell 2 o
Victoria Royal Union 200
St. Mary's Church 5 o o
Per Mr. Jerome Pyfrom on
his Pineapple plantation in
New Providence from Cove
and Hatchet Bay men
W. II. Johnson 1 o
John T. Brown ^^ 1 o
Felix Finder ^- 1 o
Israel Johnson 1 o
Caleb Johnson 1 o
Samuel Kemp 1 o
William Thompson i
Richard Johnson 1 o
Samuel Johnson 1
Geo. Petty 1 o
Gerald Ranger i o
Geo. Dean 1 o
Alex. Kemp 1 o
Alex. Farrington 1 o
Jonathan Johnson 1 0
Felix Stun up 1 o
Geo. Higgs 1 o
Peter Johnson l o
Joseph St radian I o
Mitchell Storr 1 o
Zacheua Ingraham 1 0
Cornelius Wilson 1 o
Lewis Thompson 1 o
/.eke Miller I o
Small amounts 9 2
Berry Islands Ltd.
Sir Courtenay Honey*
wood Director 500
Mr. and Mrs. Twynam 200
No. 1 Congo Society 200
Amos L Russel. I lope T. i- o o
Miss Myrtle Kerr jfc 5 o
Mr and" Mrs SIIC RarT'l 10 o
Mr and Mrs G T
Knowles ? 2 o
Miss Hay 500
Imperial Theatre b b o i
St Agnes Church 711 4
Mr and Mrs W G Albury.2 2 o
Total -301 11 3


Latest Wr News
RXDIOQRAMS.
PICKED UP
September 22nd 1914.
Berlin:Official reports from
headquarters states that the Ger-
man armies in France every-
where lias assumed the offensive
against strongly entrenched
enemy. No decisive result is an-
nounced at present.
The Crown Council of Bucha-
rest has decided to continue the
strictest neutrality.
The German war loan has
The Germans made a cles
perate attempt to capture
Rheims and the French are
equallydetermined to drive them
from the hills on their left. The
Germans have been reinforced
and the French have received
additional heavy artillery.
The casualties among British
Officers is reported to be out of
all proportion to the losses in
the ranks.
The list contains 32 Colonels
and Lieutenant Colonels; 85
Majors, and 246Captains.
The Germans continue a tre
been over-subscribed bv 260 mil "jendoul bombardment of
lion marks
Norway and Sweden have en
te.ed into agreement to safe
guard their neutrality.
The great battle still con-
tinues. The entrenched artillery
era fighting duels while the in-
fantry are attacking, and counter
attacking, one side occasionally
losing ground and later regain-
ing it.
Military experts agree that
only out flanking movements
can effect either army.
Accord A^-to the latest advices
the Germans have been forced
hack seven miles, contesting
every inch.
The destruction of RheJmjhaS
caused great protest from
France.
The Pope has warned the
Kaiser that Gods wrath will be
visited upon him if he does not
respect G ids Temples.
The Russians claim that they
have surro inded I'rzemsyl.
GOVKKNMKXT PBOH
Another Japanese torpedo boat
is reported to have been sunk by
a German cruiser outside of Kia
Chau. A Japanese aeroplane is
reported destroying two impor
taut forts at Tsingtau.
The German western wing
was forced back seven miles
after fort) eight hours contin
nous fighting. Both armies de
smie superhuman fatigue show
determination not to yield an
inch of ground French troops
are aiding the allies.
Emperor William is reported
'.aking gttj h:s he.idqn irters at
Luxemburg.
The British cruisnr PegaSUS,
recently dein ftged bv a I ierman
cruiser, has be >n beached at
Zanzibar.
I'h" Aisne River battle hasde
veloped into a siege and military
authoritieshold the opinion that
Ghent.
The Austrian! attribute their
reverses in Galicia to an elabor
ate system of espionage' conduct
ed by tin* Russian War Office.
Austrian farmers are suffering
severely for want of labourers
and many of them are destitute.
The Russians hold a reutless
grip on the scattered Austrians
In Galicia and are organizing n
civil government foi there i 'io
so sure are they of its capture
General Beyers, commandant
of the Union of South Africa de
fence forces, has resigned be
cause of his disapproval of send
ing Boers to conquer Germans in
Soutnwest Africa.
The Montenegran army is re
ported to have reached Savajcvo
capital of Bosnia.
London,September 22nd, 1914
Governor,
Bahamas.
22nd September, following,
from Press Bureau: Since the
last report received from Sir
John French several further
counter attacks have been sue
cessfully repulsed.
(Signed)
Harcourt
:o:
GOVERNMENT NOTICES
An Order in Council amending
the Post Office Money oiler Sys-
tem ispu jlishcd
1 he time for executing the Post
Office Commission lias been ex-
tended for two months.
The appoint 1 nenI ol \)t. II. Peri-
gord as Act ing Medical Oilier at
InHgUH i canceller),
Applications for the appoint*
mem of Caretakri Uh "S- e me no
More" Cemetery are in* ii 1
Tenders ere invited P n king
up of Unifo ms for ilii* ( ifii -ins of
the Customs Dep irtn rut
Letter hitxes In*e been placed at,
Eastern District near Police
Station, Corner bay mid Union,
and near the Police Station, Grant ( Mr. Sampson Roker
r,.,1tt""-; I Mr. Lawrence Miller
I Iip b'>xe will he cleared daily
at Noun, except Sundays and Pub-
lic Holiday's, and one hour be-
fore the tune for closing Foreign
mails.
:o":
Mangrove Cay, Andros
17th Sept. 1914.
To the Editor of the Tribune.
Dear Sir,
A well-attended and en-
thusiastic meetingof theinhabi
tants of Mangrove Cay took
place at the Police Office last
afternoon for the purpose of
considering what help we could
r*ruler the mother Country in
this her hour of grave peril. It
was called and opened by the
Commissioner who very clearly
set forth our duty, in a speech
which made everybody anxious
It was evident that the audience
were with him; there was no
evidence of indifference or stoic-
ism or skulking and every one,
men and women alike evinced
a common desire to help to the
uttermost. The Rev. R. C. H.
Duq ien y then gave a very im
pressive address, and recounted
several of the importautcngage-
incuts which had already occur
red on the battle field. He fired
the audience with greater en
thusiasm when he said that he
was willing to go to the front at
once. Mr. F AY. Forsythe gave
an address which was pregnant
with information and in order to
test the patriotism of his audi
ence he appealed for 12 volun-
teers to help n'.au His Majes
ty's Navy wheresoever theirser
vice may be required and in an
instant 26 offered themselves.
Then the Commissioner put the
appeal for help in money and
he made it clear that no one
must give the shilling wdiat he
had no use for, but to give so.ne
thing which he could hardly af
ford to do without, for there is
no patriotism where there isnot
some sell -sacrifice. Committees
of Ladies and Gentleman were
appointed to make the appeal
as widely known as possible
throughout the settlement and
to forward the movement. The
amount collected was 17. -,. o
The subscriptions received
were:
I
2
4
3
1
10
Mr Joseph Green
Mi. Octavius Rolle
Mr Malachi Bullard
Mr Albert Can-dell
Mr Lacitas Sweeting 8
Mr. Levi Wright 4
Mr T. A. Bastian 4
Mr SylvanusThompson I o
Mr John Pennerman 4
Mr \V. Green 4
Mr H. H. Gibson 1 o
Mr Joshua Rolle 1
Mr Darius Rolle 1
Mr. John Whvlly 2
Mrs Sarah Russell I
Mr Antonio Lewis 4
Mr J. M: Rahming 2 2
Mr Jabin Bastian I
Mrs Christiana Flowers
Mr Daniel Thompson 3
Mr. Alexander Thompson 1
The times are hard; our chief
commodity sponge is not now
in demand, but we hope to shew
that we are not wanting in
patriotism or human sympathy.
Verv truly vours
" OL1VF L. BO WE.
O
o
o
o
u
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
6
o
o
o
9
o
o
THE Scholars of Wesley
Sunday School assisted
by their Friends will give an
Entertainment onWednesday
next, 23rd inst. in the School
Room to commence at 7.45
p.m.
Admission 6d. & is.
3 Ins.
Mr. and Mrs. Gc >. II.
Clarke
Anonymous
Anonymous
MrOs'iourne Lockhart
Mr. Alfred Rolle

------r~~r.------.. .... .-M,*irui, i uiiici *>''J nuu 1 illi|i(
nothing but a flank movement j Bay and Geoige. Bay nod Nassau,
will seriously affect either army. Cumberland and West Hill Street*, Mr. Andrew Rolle
o
o
o
10
10
d
o
o
o
o
b
0
COCOANUTS
EAHAMA ISLANDS
IT is now possible for owners V
of land with fully bearing {
trees to prove its value and ob Mk
tain rents. *>., *
Land For Growing Cocoanut* *
Twenty yean Leases on Govern
ment Land can now be acquired
Free of Rent for the* first four
yea rs.
On condition 80 cocoanuts
per acre are planted during the
fust year of the Lease.
For further particulars
\pplv to
J TllKO. HARRINGTON
Nassau, N. P.
Agent for
Bahamas Produce Marketing
Company
139 Cpthall House
i.'opthall Avenue
3 Mo. London, E. C,


-M______EL.
sous and brothers are being ten
derly nursed back to health and
vigor.
Just take one days scene at
the London Hospital where hun
dreds of England's warriors are
being cares! for. All through the
day the place is beseiged by re
lativesof the wounded. Anxious
ly inquiring for the latest tidings
of the patients, or waiting, pa
tiently hopeful.
Inside, many touching scenes,
pathetic reunion of husband and
wife mother and son. A hospital!
inevitably sees much of the
drama of life, even in peace; in,
times of wnr it is there perhaps |
that the human factor is upper
most.
One who had lost. his left
hand wondered why he had been i
sent home. "I can still do a bit j
of damage with this" shaking:
his right list.
A private of the King's Own'
Royal Lancasters said whenever
the Germans saw a rei flag fly-.
ing they fired on it. Firing on |
the Uetl Cross was a usual thing
with the Germans, he said. "The
German soldiers do not fight,"
he added. "They are more
cowards than soldiers. They
have to be spurred on behind
with shrapnel before they will
attack."
A West Kent private who was
in the Boer war, said that was a
game of skittles in comparison
with this.
"What slaughter!" he said.
"The Germans came at us in
great masses. It was like shoot-
ing rabbits, only as fast as you
shot one lot down another lot
took their place. You could not
help hitting them. We had
plenty of time to take aim, and
if we weren't reaching Bisley
standard all the time we must
have done a mighty lot of dam-
age.
One poor fellow, whose head
was so smothered in bandages
that his features could not be
seen, remarked:"We could
burning desire to returu to the
front and have another go at
their enemy.
Popular Mechanics
Magazine
"WWTOH M YOU CAN UNDMMtND IT"
A GREAT Cant inu*d Story of taa World'*
*^ Pro *m* Which you may rx'gin reading
at any tuna, and which will bold your
interest forever. You are living In the beat
year, of the moat wonderful age. of what ia
doubtleas the greatest work) in the universe.
A resident of Mara would gladly pay
< 1 fa/VA FOR ONE YEAR'S
*>1,UUU SUBSCRIPTION
to this magatina.in order to keep Informed of
our progreaa ta Engineering and Mechanic*).
Are you reading it ? Two millions of your
neighbors are. and it is the favorite maga-
zine in thousands of the best American
homes. It appeals to all classesold and
young men and women.
Th* "Shay aTstaa" Draartaaaat (20 pwaa)
give* wr ways to do Uilugs-how touiaka
useful articles for home and shop, repaint, ete.
" ApaUar MMhmnios (10 nam* > tells how to
muki* Mission furniture, wlruloiw outfit* boat*,
eiigliu-a, magic, and all the things a boy lovss.
U.ionsrua. iinoh corns as cents
Ash jtw fcUwxlMl.r I thaw ,..,,,,..
wait! worn wrrs ttmnM cor>v today
POPULAR MECHANICS CO.
J1 a W. WsaUaajm St., CHICAGO, USA.
Shingles
Best No. i Heart 5m. Cypres
Shingles at 9.60 per thous-
sand of 20 bundles
Discounts on lots of over
5000 shingles.
Special Price
also on cheaper gradesalso
5in. Cypress at $6.72 per
thousand of 20 bundles. This
price made possible by a very
large purchase.
Fresh stock arriving every
week.
C. C. SAUNDERS.
^ CHP Gaso-
DaCiOl line is
beat them w.th bladder sticks if: Test. We do not sell it.
it were not fr the shells, which 'jjr we do sell and will,
were appallmp he effect could IW continue to sell
not be described. !* J J Al <"
Soldiers with minor wounds Ol&lla&ni IF 11 tO.
chatted about their experiences Gasoline. Test your Gaso-
tellmghow tremendous were the line. We invite comparison
odds against them, how they wiUl anv in thc City.
I it 1 vi 10 r. 1, I t >.> o a-* a a-vt a < aWaaidi *U < aa _,_ it
Price 22cts. per gallon in
peppered the enemy and how
cruel the Germans were to the
wounded even breaking their
wrists so that they would never
again be affle to handle a rifle
when they recovered from their
gun shot wounds.
All appeared possessed of a
50 gallon Drums. Customers
using 100 gals, or over per
Month 20c. gallon.
Watch our Notice for Ker-
osene in June.
C. C. SAUNDERS
LADIES. MISSES and CENTS
SAPLE BOOTS *vnd SHOES
in ONE, TWO, AND THREE
pair lots
The sizes for ladies are limited
to 3I, 4 and 4}
Misses13, 1 and 2
Gents 6, 6J and 7
The Shoes having been sold
Willirxma. The Shoerrmn
at a liberal discount, the princi-
pal disadvantage being the
limited sizes, he is disposing
cf them at
not lean them 20 per cent leaa than
the regular prices such
grades would be.
His kind patrons and the gen-
eral public will please.take
Special Notice
of the above sizes mentioned
and in calling for them will
set' for themselves that they
are obtaining Real Bargains
at
Williams' Wholesale and Retitir
Shoe Establishment
277, 279 Bav Street (City)
Notice
IT has been said that the
Doctors of Nassau say that
Pure Fresh Milk is unobtainable
in Nassau.
I hereby invite any Doctor in
Nassau to come up to my Dairy
and show wherein the milk sup
plied by me is in anyway im-
pure.
T. M. KNOWLES
Dairyman.
W A. MATHER
UNDERTAKER
DESIRES to inform Ins friends
and the Public that I e has
hist received a complete outfit of
facilities for the buisness of an un-
dertaker, which places him in a
position to carry out Funerals that
may be entrusted to his rare wilh
syMem and despatch ; and respect
fully solicits theit patronage Get
my Prices first and proVI that these
are the very lowest for thefirst clmi
work.
Fresh Onion Seed
FROM TENERIFFfi
At Toote's, 4) y Bay Street
For Result
Advertise in
The Tribune
Kerosene
150*
IN New 50 gallon Galvaniz-
ed Iron Drums at i8cts
per Gallon.
In 10 gallon Cans at aocts
per. Gallon.
Drums and Cans returnable
Full particulars at Office
"Frances E.," Nassau N. P.
C. C. SAUNDERS
Notice
The undersigned desires to in
form all Cave Earth dealers
that he can supply any quantity
required of the very best grade
and with a quick dispatch.
Get our prices and send vour
orders. Everything promptly at
tended to.
LLOYD H. MAJOR
Burmws Harbour
South End, Lon? Island
Johnson s
Artistic Wood
Finishes
;a com
lurnituie.
ohnson'e Prepared Way
plete finish and polish Iwflf'
woodwork iod floors.
Johnson's Wood Dye-lorthe artistic
coloring of all wood, soft or hard
Johnson'* Under Lac-a spirit
finish, very much superior to shellac or
vainish
Johnson's rie.t Wood Finish-for a
beautiful, artistic, hand-rubbed effete
without the rx|>ense of rubbing.
Johnson's Paste Wood Tillerfor
filling the grain and p >res of wood,
preparing it foi the finish.
Johnson's Powdered Waxfor bal
room floors.
FOR. SALE BY
Chas. E. Albury
The Vogue, and the
Au Bon Marche
Store.
(Removed to Bay Street one
door West of Black's)
Have received per S. S. "Cama
guey,"
A large shipment of ladies
Black, White and Coloured
Straw Mats, New York latest
styles a few, choice, ready to
wear. White and Cream Chiffon
Satin. Shadow laces and In
sertions. White Rating double
width at 2s. Another lflpjtof 7il.
Crepes. White Figured Cudroy
at fid White checked Crepes
at 6d. White, Black, Pink,
Blue, Cream, Purple and Green
Satin. White Cotton Goods.
Cambric at 6d. Madapollam
at iod. Nansooks at ad., is., 15.
3d Drills 6d., gd. is.


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