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Publication began at 7.20 p.m. Zhe Crfbune Saturday. September 19. 1914 Be of Good Cheer While we await news that will make future history, let us remember proudly, but without vainSlory, England's record on Five Continents and on the Seven Seas, in the months of August and Sep. tember. SEPTEMBER Sept IQth.—Edward Ill's famous victory at Poitiers 1156. British Flag raised in Auckland, 1850. 20th—Pemcrara captured bv British, 1804. Russians beaten at the Alma, 1854. Delhi relieved after a fourteen weeks siege 1857. BAHAMAS VOLUNTEERS FOR THE WAR %  Sub-Committee, appointed War elief (Committee are I 1 w iady to take the names of men of the Bahamas who are willing to Volunteer for set vice in HIS MAJESTY'S NAVY during the present war. rhe Commandant'sOffice at the barracks will be npen every day from now on till the end of the month from, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. and from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. where the-names and addresses of •II those who desire to volunteer will be registered and where all inI >rmation that it is at present DOS. sible to give will be given NOW IS THE TIME TO SHOW YOLK LOYALTY TO YOUR KING AND COUNTRY e —:o: Passengers per "Frances R" yesterday from Miami.— Miss Charlotte Rijjby; Mcsdames Beatrca-Burrows and infant, and Beatrice Moxey; Messrs George Campbell. Paul McK.nnev, Joe Farrington, Felix S.n.ms, Zedeblah Delaucy John Johnson, Alcana Feign',son, rhomas Frances, llv T Sturrup. SamCulmer, Leonard Higgs, nil Austin Johnson; Mrs. Georgian* Seymour. Repatriated. —:o-— The Motor "Frances E" will sail again on Wednesday morning for Miami and in future Wednesday will lie her sailing day from Nassau and Friday from Miami. —:o:— The S. S. "Seguranca" steamed from New York yesterday at 4 p. m. with 29 passengers and 5, 500 barrels freight for Nassau. The Schr. "Nellie Leonora" arrived this morning from Long Island, with the following salved from the cargo of the stranded steamer "Romsdal". 420 cases Kerosene Oil, 5 drums Gasoline, 2 cases Vacuum Oil. 1 bbls Cotton Seed Oil I Manilla Hawser, 1 box Window Curtains, 1 Rcfrigerater, 1 Crate Spring Cots. N. B.—Now is the time to plant. Fine showers continue to fall. Plant cabbage. Karly Jersey, Wakefield,Autumn King: etc. Plant Potatoes. Irish and Sweet. BAHAMAS WAR RELIEF FUND The following Subscriptions have been received: — Amount previously acknowledged. £\ 183 Zachary Taylor 1 Mrs. T. A. Higgs 2 E. Hastings Weech Mrs. [saian Sweeting 2 Miss Kuth Sweeting 1 Mi-s Wesolowski 5 Mrs. and the Misses Strombom 3 Chas. R. Arteaga 1 Mr. and Mrs. C. Cooke 2 Provident Tent No. 112 Independent Order of Rcchabites 20 o o Mr. and Mrs. S.Albert Dillet 220 Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Moore MisS Ednfl F. Moore The Misses Hall Rev S. J. Bennett Mr. and Mrs. II. A.. Brook The Misses Bethel Miss Lennra McNeal C, Kenneth Kelly Charles d. K. Kelly Trevor Kelly United Burial Society 5 Miss S J E Thompson Mrs LJ Thompson N. VouvaliscV Co. 5 A K. Sands 2 1 o o 5 1 1 5 10 1 10 2 10 1 o o o I I 10 10 5 5 4 0 2 Mr and Mrs A P. Stone 1 1 0 H Kemp 1 0 0 Mrs M. L A Solomon 2 0 0 Miss Marion Bethel 1 1 0 N Schainscham 1 0 0 Hon T Vincent Matthews 10 10 0 Fox Hill United Buria & ciety 5 5 0 F FC Sale of wk. etc. 12 0 0 up 1289 Total Our readers will doubtless be pleased to learn that The Royal Bank of Canada, through are falling back aiWAaking new positions. ^^ The French press discusses the reported project of mediation, declaring that hasty deceptive peace would give only a breath ing space and enable the Germans to prepare, for revenge and a war worse than the present one. German aeroplanes are report edas being out of commission owing to a shortage of gasolene. The famous Prussian Guard corps of the Germans was prac%  tically wiped out in the battles ,,.,!,, h on the Meuse, Marne and A.sne I Rivers. England $50,000 to the P subscribed triotic Fund. The Bank is also paying the" salaries of officers who have fr om lias had no peace directly or indirectly Germany or Austria and volunteered, until March 1st, '9L5Latest War News RADIOGRAMS. OFFICIAL London 19th. Governor. Bahama* Following from Press Bureau : No particular change in wai situation in France, The allied cavalry have show n some activity wit 11011 tat present a nv definite results. Lord Kitchener was approach ed by the Prince ol Wales who urgently desirestoaccomp my the first battalion Grenadiei Guards who are now under orders for the front. As His Royal Holiness has not completed his military training Lord Kitchener has submitted to His Majesty : has nothing to say on the subject. j It is stated that I'resident Wilson has practically decided .In abandon any idea of continu [ing tliu informal peace movement until he has a definite ex pression from some of the bel ligerents. United States government has made inquiry of theJAiitish gov eminent if an j MIM the state uient accredited to^ir Lionel lea is accurate. V complete repudiation of any, view Garden may bold on the American Mexican situation or policy is expected. Six Million Russians are march ing and preparing to march into Central Poland. I'H'KKI) UP September 19th 1914. London:—For live days the Allies have been trving to dis that for the present it4sundesir-[lodge the Germans from the able that ILs Royal Highness strong line of defence they havt should proceed on active constructed extending from the service. | K ie to the Meuse. (Signed) Main attacks and counter HARCOURT. Iattacks have been made but both London and Berlin agree GOVKHNMKNT I'KKss September ig 1914 A gigantic battle, or series of battles, continues day and night alongtheentirc front from Noj 11 to the frontier without a deci sive advantage to either "f the Opposing armies that neither side has any advan tage. It is believed that the com manding generals have not" yet found the opponents weal; spot. The Russians continue to re port successes against the Aus trians, though Berlin claims that the Austrians /have been troops in the battle on the Western frontier is repm ted R d especially in the ci ntia where rcinfori ementshave been receiv ed. ^ Russian advicesstate that the German offensive movement on the East Prussian frontier was Stopped on September 17th and at several points the Germans >eW< Russians are now ui*I I tion of the German successful in diivinidsfcck the Russians. 900.000 marching into Russian Poiai against the German army there and will be followed shortly by 2.000.000 additional troops. There is nothing new regard ing peace excepting a report that the basis for peace will be worked out in Washington.



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— Special tojm Nassau Guardian. The bifPKttle in France con tinuts, but no important change! have taken place. The Germans have been rein forced on their right and centre, but the Allies left has made some advanci: and is gradually pushing the Germans. Italy is expected to declare war on Austria on September 26. A Berlin despatch says that there will lie a pe&Ct confeiance in Washington shortly. War Notes SI 111' CARRYING SUPPLIES TO GERMAN CRUISERS CAPTURED BY BRITISH CRUISER. Kingston, Sept. 11.—The BetkanUs, <>f the HamburgAmerican Line, was captured by a British cruiser Monday morn in£ when she was two days out from Charleston. The prizes which wns brought here last night, had aboard MOM tons of coal and a six months' supply of [)io\i-io'.i#tor two G'TiiKincrui sers, the *r,'s {en and the Karl sruhe. The Beth xnia had been equip ped as an auxiliary cruiser, but threw her armament overboard on sighting her pursuer. The crew was composed of 500 re servists.— N. Y Herald. Xassau Guardian —:o: — THE WAR. IN EUROPE A Critique. By an American Military Officer The despatches of the last twenty-four hours are fraught witli the greatest possible consequences to the German army. The entire line of connections reinforce Von Kluck should by this time be to the southward of Maubeuge, and the circumstances of the last twenty foiu hours point to this German force being between the main body of the allies and the newallied army in Belgium. The success of tip British French arms along the Maine indicate that the allies have received large reinforcements. The new troops should have come in by Marseilles, Bordeaux, St. Naz aire and Garrone. All those ports are served by splendid modern railways, and English transports from the Suez Canal and from Umted Kingdom ports have probably been pouring troops in through these landing places The censorship, which has been so effectively placed by the allies on troop movements, has undoubtedly kept the world, in the dark regarding the tremen dous troop movement, but it stands to reason that a force which was driven 110 miles at B rate of 11 miles per day by the Germans would have been in no shape after reaching Paris to suddenly turn and assume SUCh a powerful offensive as the allies have exhibited all along tie 1 Maine. It can be pul down as ,1 certainty that.every day adds to the strength <>f the al lied forces in France. The Russian movement from Archangel and Fkatratrina has long passed the speculative point, and it is a certainty that the allies are receiving reinforcements surely, steadily and in large numbers. The Germans on the other hand are in the field to the last man. GERMANS FACE DIFFICULT TASK The situation with reference to von Kluck's corps indicates that this force can only be extricated by a display of the highest skill, and in the exhausted condition in which the German right wing now finds itself it may be seriously doubted if the German forces will be able to hold a line further west than Verdun. From Verdun to Met/., with its great fortress, the Germans will be compelled to present a front to an allied force coming down from the North by way of the Meuse. The result will he that even if von Kluck is able to reach the main body the Germans lines will be found well back against the FrancoGerman frontier. Prior to yesterday, the German right wing extended from the centre at vitry le-Francois 111 a northwesterly direction, reaching out toward Soissons. To-day the centre at Vitry leFrancois is gone, and the centre German centre and right wing is making to the eastward of the Argoane. ho fai as an attack on Paris is concerned, Von Kluck's attempt has failed, and every indication would now indicate that the German efforts are confined to extricating Von Kluck's force from complete annihilation. If the result is accomplished it will speak highly for the German resourcefulness, nor must the achievement of Von Kluck be overlooked in that tremendous pace set whereby he drove li inch and British from the Bel •.ian frontier to the very gatPS of Paris. What has happened was the unexpected. The Allies were never yet split in twain. They held intact, and instead of find ing an exhausted and beaten ar my in front of Paris Von Kluck has met with a force so strong and powerful, that his safety is now threatened, and with it the success of the entire German campaign in France. Unless the Germans can take Paris now, befo.e the \ I lies are in tin 11 fullest strength, it is up reas mable to ima jiue the) can take it lat.-r. The defeat on the Marne will probably be found of tremendous and fax reaching consequence to German arms. The New Herald Sept. 13, VJU IN THE MAGISTRATES COURT. 1914, Sept. 9. William ArmstrongBreach Cab Act. M, 6d. James Johnson— breach Cab Act 2S. 6d. Krskine Stubbs—Assaulting and beating Jane Romer. 1 months, 13. Felix Wildgoose.—Feloniously receiving aa bone fish value lus. goods and chattels of Percy Pinder, well knowing them to have been stolen. Sentenced to three months imprisonment with hard labour. Joshua Dean. — Found asleep while in charge of a licensed dray in Bay Street, as. Agnes Kemp-Using language within bearing of persons residing 111 the neighbourhood towards Carmelia Roker tending to a breach of the peace. Dismissed with a caution. A SACRED SERVICE of Song will be rendered by Zion Baptist Church Choir on Tuesday 22nd inst. at 7.30 p. m. A collection will be taken in aid of the Bahamas War Relict Fund. 2 las. T HE Scholars of Wesley Sunday School assisted by their Friends will give an Entertainment on Wednesday next, 23rd inst. in the School Room to commence at 7.45 p.m. Admission od. & is. 3 Ins. ^___^ The Chicago Ledger and Saturday Blade WEEKLY AMERICAN PAPERS With LATEST WAR NEWS 5 cts. The two together. From THOS. P. FERNANDER at "Tribune Office." Weekly American. Papers LATEST The Saturday Blade and Chicago Ledger FULL OF WAR NEWS The two together 5CtS. Apply to \. K. S1LVA Tribune Office. For Result Advertise in The Tribune



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Russian and French point of view The allies firmly believe that in taking this unalterable stand they: are working for the end of war] Suppose peace were seriously considered now, diplomatists say, what could be the terms? In Belgium alone, it was esti. mated, the property damage several days ago amounted to $300,000,000. Since then several cities and towns have been bombarded and partly destroyed. France has been ravaged from the northern border to within a tew leagues of Paris. Vast armies have been called into the field and vast losses inflicted. The world might wellstand appalled at the price either combatant will have to pay when all this is over. Surrender of Germain Fleet Should the allies win, one of; the first matters, I am informed,: they will insist upon is the sunen-' der of the German fleet. T his de{ mand could only be prevented by j the fleet being destroyed in battle. ; But why speculate on terms of | peace? The mind turns away from the topic in bewilderment, stunned at its magnitude. Such a stranger is the British mind to any settlement short of the overthrow of the Hohenzol lerns and Hapsburps that the edi torial writers regard the determination of the supreme issue as a truism, and usually allude to it incidentally. The Daily Telegraph comments on Mr. F. F. Smith's speech last night, in which he said:—"Belgium must be restored to the position she occupied before the war," and descriped Germany as "slashing at the roots of public law in Europe, destroying every guarantee of International right and justice which had grown up since the Middle Ages." "All this," says the Telegraph, "must be righted oefore we sue ith our sword." The Daily Mail says: — "It is to be a fight to the finish. The only terms are Germany's absolute surrender." The Time* speaking of home politics says : — "It wi) be time enough to attend tnyhem when our supreme quarrel with a foreign enemy for life or death has been fought out." Thus it will be seen that unless every leader of the allies stultifies hirns"lf the slogan is foiinri in iheie words, "The Kai<"r mu-t |u." (fly Requttt) v; AR j AND RUMORS OF WARS The "Mends of peace," whose hope has been so to educate men as to make an end of wars, must feel cast down at tne present conditions in Europe. Those who believe God and are governed by His word, know that instead of the world moving on by human training toward a millennium of peace, it is near ing day by day a deluge of blood. When the disciples asked the Lord concerning the ] signs of'His coming again, He told them plainly that they would "hear of wars and rumors of wars : see that ye be not troubled: for all these things must come to pass, but the end is not yet. For nation shall rise against nation, and kingdom against kingdom; and there shall be famines, and pestilences, and earthquakes, in divers places. All these are the begin ning of sorrows" (Matt. 24: 6 8.) If men believe the word of God how undeceived they would be. How it would prevent their run ning after phantoms. Unprecedented wars and catas trophes are then to take place at the close of this dispensation, introductory to the establishments of the kingdom of the Son of Man. The "gospel of the kingdom," that is, the announce ment that the Lord as King of kings is about to return from Heaven to rule this world from east to west and from pole to pole, will be made throughout the world, and then shall he appear. Thank God, throughout that season of dire distress in the earth, the church (the company of all redeemed people,) will be safely sheltered, being, before the worst comes, translated to heaven t where her home is—where Christ has gone and prepared her a place "Wars and rumors of wars" therefore need not put us in anxiety, though we may well pity this poor world, and especially the Jews, who will be the chief sufferers in the coming tribula tion, and pray for them. It is doubtless out of the chaos produced by such B drend ful conflict of mighty nations that the first Beast of Kev. 13 comes forth— a man of extraor dinary powers who, with the [second Beast of the same chapter i are the devil's exponents of his %  hatred of God and the testimony I for God in theear'h. They cause "the great tr'bulfltion,!' of which the Lord warn* tli-J'ws iMatt. 24:21), and bids tiiein hide from its violencr (Matt. 24:10 20). Iw mediately upon this the Lord Himself appears and takes all in hand (Matt. 24: 29, 30). How near must be the rapture of the heavenly saints) Solemn and sweet are these closing ( days. We have waited long, but our hope is about tp be fulfilled. Then too, like the Lord, over Jerusalem, we may weep over the fields which we have evangelized and which have turned away from God's entreaties. LOOK! The following Blank forms maybe had at "TheTribune" Office. Duty Entry. Free Entry. Warehouse Entries. Sponging Articles. Ship's Reports. In quantities at Special Rates FOP Rent S EA FRONT PROPERTY recently occupied by Mr. Timothy Culmer with three Warehouses thereon. Storage capacity 1200 bales Sisal suitable for Sponge business also. • Apolv to WALTER" K. MOORE The Vogue^and the Au Bon Mkrche Store. (Removed to Bay Street one door West of Black's) Have received per S. S. "Cama guey," A large shipment of ladies Black, White and Coloured Straw Hats, New York latest styles a few, choice, ready to wear. White and Cream Chiffon Satin. Shadow laces and In sertions. White Ratine, double width at 2s. Another lot of 7 Jd. Crepes. White Figured Cudroy at 6d. White checked Crepes at Gd. White, Black, Pink, Blue, Cream, Purple and Green Satin. White Cotton Goods. Cambric at fid. Madapollam at iod. Nansooks at gd., is., is. 3d Drills fid., 9d. is. August 29th 1914. Johnson's Artistic Wood Finishes ohnton'i Prepared Wa-a com plete finish and polish for all furniture woodwork and floors. Johnson's Wood Dye—for the artistic coloruii: of all wood, soft or hard Johnson'* Under Lac—a spirit finish, very much superior to shellac or vamisli Johnson'* Fle.t Wood Ftnlsh-fora beautiful, artistic, hand-rubbed effete without the expense of rubbini'. Johnson's P&ste Wood Filler—for filling the grain and pores of wood, preparing it for the finish Johnson's Powdered Wax—for bal room floors. FOR. SALE BY Chas. E. Albury Notice T his is to inform the public that if any person or |>ersons are found trespassing oti^niy lot of laud.iiiuateon Forbes Hill in the Isbud of Littlr Exuma, they will hi dealt with according to tli. Law. EARNEST CLARKE (Owner) JACOB CLARKE (Overseer) Forbes Hill, Little Exuma July 23rd 1914. Shingles Best No. 1 Heart 5in.Cypres Shingles at $9.60 per thous sand of 20 bundles Discounts on Idwof over 5000 shingles. Special Price also on cheaper grades—also 5in. Cypress at $6.72 per thousand of 20 bundles. This price made possible by a very large purchase. Fresh stock arriving every week. C. C. SAUNDERS. Special Notice. Jusr RECEIVED Per S. S. "Santiago." Fresh New Potatoes (Irish) Selling at 4 cents Per lb. also Medium Size Onions at 8 Cents Per lb. Baker's Cocoa £ tins at is. Each Baker's Cocoa \ tins at 6d. Each Call early ft THE ROYAL STORE, J. L. SAUNDERS & Co. Fresh Onion Seed FROM TENERIFFE At Toote's, 49 9 Bay Street



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m,m w*mwn o si 7) 0) & £ ihme Nulliue addictua lurare In verba maglatri. Being bound to iw*r to the Dogma* if no Master. B VOL. X. Naaaau. N. P.. Bahamaa. Saturday. Saptambar 19.1914 No. 220 L. GILBERT DUPUCH. Editor and Proprietor. OFFICE: 38-44 MARKET STREET Nassau, N. P., Bahamas P. O. BOX 163 PUBLISHED DAILY Monday, Wednesday and Friday— single copy 4*1 Tuesday, Thursr second insertion ; and one penny per line for subsquent insertions. Advertisements under eight lines 4s. "THE KAISER MUST GO!" IS THE ANSWER OF ALLIES TO QUESTION Or PROSPECT TOR EARLY PEACE London, Saturday. Here in the centre of the world's diplomacy, so far as the allies are concerned, it is impossnle to unstand the currency which has been apparently given in America to the thought that an early peace is possible. It is only conceivable that the terms on which the allies would consider peace would be a surrender by the Kaiser on terms which the allies would dictate. I gather from talks with the highest diplomatists and from the views of journalists from Russia, England and France that there can be no compromise. This idea is deep rooted. 1 he cause of the aMiance is one for common defence. The elemental issue at stake, in the view of the allies, is their own destiuetion or Mie overthrow of German militarism,. I have heard no other suggestion made either by the press or bydiplomatist since the war began, but thai the war must continue until the Kaiser's power is permanently dissipated. England says there must be an end to it. Russia say there must be an end to it. France says there must be an end to it. There is no "peace at any price" element in any of these countries. The statesman who would make a suggestion of peace now would call down on his head such a storm of wrath that he would be glad to seek exile. Therefore it has been with astonishment that the friends of Oscar S. Straus here read that he has been busy trying to find some basis for peace. Attitude of the Alliea Mr. Straus, when here, had exceptional facilities to ascertain the. allies opinions exactly. As I have slated before he had a confidential talk with Sir Edward Grey and knew that Great Britain's purpose in going to war was to have restored the law of nations which the Katser nullifiiled in regaidii.g treaties as "Scraps of paper" and that Great Britain would not cease to fight so long as the allies held together and could put their arm ies in the field. Tfcis would be the attitude 0' the allies if Germany had continued her success before i'ovis, had defeated end rcutid the aliies' atmitt, had taken 1 cms, had dfivtn the Russians out of Eatt l'ruisia, had imadtd Kussia uiih rtvrj fnsfect

The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02262
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Saturday, September 19, 1914
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02262

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Full Text
m,m
w*mwn
o
si
7)
0)
&

ihme
Nulliue addictua lurare In verba maglatri.
Being bound to iw*r to the Dogma* if no Master.
B
VOL. X.
Naaaau. N. P.. Bahamaa. Saturday. Saptambar 19.1914
No. 220
L. GILBERT DUPUCH.
Editor and Proprietor.
OFFICE: 38-44 MARKET STREET
Nassau, N. P., Bahamas
P. O. BOX 163
PUBLISHED DAILY
Monday, Wednesday and Friday
single copy ......... 4*1
Tuesday, Thurs single copy......... id
Weekly ............ 4d
Monthly .............is. 4d
Suarterly........ ... 4s.
alfYearly............8s.
Yr.irlv .........' ... 16*.
*.
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
7
i-ertisiiig Rates:Six pence pec line
m bat insertion; three pence pat line
f< >r second insertion ; and one penny per
line for subsquent insertions.
Advertisements under eight lines 4s.
"THE KAISER MUST GO!"
IS THE ANSWER OF ALLIES
TO QUESTION Or PROSPECT
TOR EARLY PEACE
London, Saturday.
Here in the centre of the world's
diplomacy, so far as the allies are
concerned, it is impossnle to un-
stand the currency which has been
apparently given in America to
the thought that an early peace
is possible. It is only conceivable
that the terms on which the allies
would consider peace would be a
surrender by the Kaiser on terms
which the allies would dictate.
I gather from talks with the
highest diplomatists and from the
views of journalists from Russia,
England and France that there can
be no compromise. This idea is
deep rooted. 1 he cause of the
aMiance is one for common defence.
The elemental issue at stake, in
the view of the allies, is their own
destiuetion or Mie overthrow of
German militarism,.I have heard
no other suggestion made either
by the press or bydiplomatist since
the war began, but thai the war
must continue until the Kaiser's
power is permanently dissipated.
England says there must be an
end to it. Russia say there must
be an end to it. France says there
must be an end to it. There is no
"peace at any price" element in
any of these countries. The states-
man who would make a sugges-
tion of peace now would call
down on his head such a storm of
wrath that he would be glad to
seek exile. Therefore it has been
with astonishment that the friends
of Oscar S. Straus here read that
he has been busy trying to find
some basis for peace.
Attitude of the Alliea
Mr. Straus, when here, had ex-
ceptional facilities to ascertain the.
allies opinions exactly. As I have
slated before he had a confidential
talk with Sir Edward Grey and
knew that Great Britain's purpose
in going to war was to have re-
stored the law of nations which
the Katser nullifiiled in regaidii.g
treaties as "Scraps of paper" and
that Great Britain would not cease
to fight so long as the allies held
together and could put their arm ies
in the field.
Tfcis would be the attitude 0' the
allies if Germany had continued her
success before i'ovis, had defeated
end rcutid the aliies' atmitt, had
taken 1 cms, had dfivtn the Russians
out of Eatt l'ruisia, had imadtd
Kussia uiih rtvrj fnsfect ing Tetrograd ar.d had ruined bimbs
on London.
What folly then to say \here is im-
mediate prospect of peace.
English statesmen with whom
I have talked decline to think of
any torm of peace short of the ab-
dication of the Kaiser when Ger-
many is losing on land and is
afraid to fight on the sea.
In response to the Herald's re.
qu"St for a statement of the views
abroad regarding the prospects of
peace and what would be the
Kaiser's terms in case he won, and
what would be the allies' terms
in case they won I can only spy,
in the language of the fighting
Irishman, "We'll talkabot dividin,
the property after we are dead."
Germany Haa Annexed Belgium
As (or Germany, she has already
annexed Belgium as the first spoil
of war but she must yet demon-
strate her ability to hold it. She
would want to dominate over the
Baltic and would iusist on the re-
storation of her colonies, the
annexation of Servia by Austiia
and the extension of Austrian in-
fluence in the Adriatic. She would
demand sovereignty over Holland
and would probably swallow Den-
mark. She would demand from
France an indemnity which would
make that exacted in 1870 appear
like a farthing.
But it would seem idle to dis-
cuss question of war settlements
when every energy is being exerted
by England France and Russia to,
keep the war going for one, two
or three years or so long as is ne-
cessary to overcome the Teutons.
England has practically raised
her first half million men and is
actually now raising a second half
million. When that is complete
she will begin on her second mil-
lion and keep it going. It is openly
admitted that she must keep a
million men in Europe until peace
is signed. The colonies already are
prepared to qundruple their first
offers. Russia has just begun to
fight and her army is growing at
the rate of one hundred thou-
sand men a day, as distant
points send in their quotas. Then
she will continue indefinitely. As
for France youths who ordinarily
would not be called for military
duty until this winter are now un-
der training. These soon will make
b place for a yet younger line.
Expect a Long War
It is a long war thsse allies are
expecting, but they are ready, so
that until it is won life will be not
worth living. When the bill comes
to be paid either Germany, Aus-
tria-Hungary or the allies will
be the length of a generation in
paying it.
I write thus fully about the situa-
tion in order that America may re.
gain the point of view which has
been obscured. Philanthropists,
peace advocates and reformed
armor plate makers may get their
fingers burned if they meddle with
this matter which obviously they
do not understand. The deep re-
solve of the allies is not only
branded in.it is burned to the bone.
German militarism must go.
That is a requisite of the restora-
tfon of peace form the English,
Continued on fourth Page
S
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a*


Publication began at 7.20 p.m.
Zhe Crfbune
Saturday. September 19. 1914
Be of Good Cheer
While we await news that will
make future history, let us remem-
ber proudly, but without vain-
Slory, England's record on Five
Continents and on the Seven Seas,
in the months of August and Sep.
tember.
SEPTEMBER
Sept IQth.Edward Ill's fa-
mous victory at Poitiers 1156.
British Flag raised in Auck-
land, 1850.
20thPemcrara captured bv
British, 1804.
Russians beaten at the Alma,
1854.
Delhi relieved after a four-
teen weeks siege 1857.
BAHAMAS VOLUNTEERS
FOR
THE WAR
Sub-Committee, appointed
War elief (Committee are
I
1 w iady to take the names of
men of the Bahamas who are will-
ing to Volunteer for set vice in HIS
MAJESTY'S NAVY during the
present war.
rhe Commandant'sOffice at the
barracks will be npen every day
from now on till the end of the
month from,
8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
and from
6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
where the-names and addresses of
II those who desire to volunteer
will be registered and where all in-
I >rmation that it is at present DOS.
sible to give will be given
NOW IS THE TIME TO SHOW
YOLK LOYALTY TO YOUR
KING AND COUNTRY
e :o: -
Passengers per "Frances R"
yesterday from Miami.
Miss Charlotte Rijjby; Mcs-
dames Beatrca-Burrows and in-
fant, and Beatrice Moxey;
Messrs George Campbell. Paul
McK.nnev, Joe Farrington, Fe-
lix S.n.ms, Zedeblah Delaucy
John Johnson, Alcana Feign',-
son, rhomas Frances, llv T
Sturrup. SamCulmer, Leonard
Higgs, nil Austin Johnson;
Mrs. Georgian* Seymour. Re-
patriated.
:o-
The Motor "Frances E" will
sail again on Wednesday morn-
ing for Miami and in future
Wednesday will lie her sailing
day from Nassau and Friday
from Miami.
:o:
The S. S. "Seguranca" steamed
from New York yesterday at 4
p. m. with 29 passengers and 5,
500 barrels freight for Nassau.
The Schr. "Nellie Leonora"
arrived this morning from Long
Island,with the following salved
from the cargo of the stranded
steamer "Romsdal".
420 cases Kerosene Oil, 5
drums Gasoline, 2 cases Vacuum
Oil. 1 bbls Cotton Seed Oil I
Manilla Hawser, 1 box Window
Curtains, 1 Rcfrigerater, 1 Crate
Spring Cots.
N. B.Now is the time to
plant.
Fine showers continue to
fall.
Plant cabbage. Karly Jer-
sey, Wakefield,Autumn King:
etc.
Plant Potatoes. Irish and
Sweet.
BAHAMAS
WAR RELIEF FUND
The following Subscriptions
have been received:
Amount previously
acknowledged. \ 183
Zachary Taylor 1
Mrs. T. A. Higgs 2
E. Hastings Weech
Mrs. [saian Sweeting 2
Miss Kuth Sweeting 1
Mi-s Wesolowski 5
Mrs. and the Misses
Strombom 3
Chas. R. Arteaga 1
Mr. and Mrs. C. Cooke 2
Provident Tent No. 112
Independent Order of
Rcchabites 20 o o
Mr. and Mrs. S.Albert
Dillet 220
Mr. and Mrs. A. F.
Moore
MisS Ednfl F. Moore
The Misses Hall
Rev S. J. Bennett
Mr. and Mrs. II. A..
Brook
The Misses Bethel
Miss Lennra McNeal
C, Kenneth Kelly
Charles d. K. Kelly
Trevor Kelly
United Burial Society 5
Miss S J E Thompson
Mrs LJ Thompson
N. VouvaliscV Co. 5
A K. Sands 2
1
o
o
5
1
1
5
10
1
10
2
10
1
o
o
o
I
I
10
10
5
5
4
0
2
Mr and Mrs A P. Stone 1 1 0
H Kemp 1 0 0
Mrs M. L A Solomon 2 0 0
Miss Marion Bethel 1 1 0
N Schainscham 1 0 0
Hon T Vincent
Matthews 10 10 0
Fox Hill United Buria
& ciety 5 5 0
F FC Sale of wk. etc. 12 0 0
up
1289
Total
Our readers will doubtless be
pleased to learn that The Royal
Bank of Canada, through
are falling back aiWAaking
new positions. ^^
The French press discusses the
reported project of mediation,
declaring that hasty deceptive
peace would give only a breath
ing space and enable the Ger-
mans to prepare, for revenge and
a war worse than the present
one.
German aeroplanes are report
edas being out of commission
owing to a shortage of gasolene.
The famous Prussian Guard
corps of the Germans was prac-
tically wiped out in the battles
,,.,!,, h on the Meuse, Marne and A.sne
I Rivers.
England
$50,000 to
the P
subscribed
triotic Fund.
The Bank is also paying the"
salaries of officers who have
fr
om
lias had no peace
directly or indirectly
Germany or Austria and
volunteered, until March 1st,
'9L5-
Latest War News
RADIOGRAMS.
OFFICIAL
London 19th.
Governor.
Bahama*
Following from Press Bureau :
No particular change in wai
situation in France, The allied
cavalry have show n some activi-
ty wit 11011 tat present a nv definite
results.
Lord Kitchener was approach
ed by the Prince ol Wales who
urgently desirestoaccomp my the
first battalion Grenadiei Guards
who are now under orders for
the front. As His Royal Holi-
ness has not completed his mili-
tary training Lord Kitchener
has submitted to His Majesty
: has nothing to say on the subject.
j It is stated that I'resident
Wilson has practically decided
.In abandon any idea of continu
[ing tliu informal peace move-
ment until he has a definite ex
pression from some of the bel
ligerents.
United States government has
made inquiry of theJAiitish gov
eminent if an j miM the state
uient accredited to^ir Lionel
lea is accurate.
V complete repudiation of any,
view Garden may bold on the
American Mexican situation or
policy is expected.
Six Million Russians are march
ing and preparing to march into
Central Poland.
I'H'KKI) UP
September 19th 1914.
London:For live days the
Allies have been trving to dis
that for the present it4sundesir-[lodge the Germans from the
able that ILs Royal Highness strong line of defence they havt
should proceed on active constructed extending from the
service. | K ie to the Meuse.
. (Signed) Main attacks and counter
HARCOURT. Iattacks have been made but
both London and Berlin agree
GOVKHNMKNT I'KKss
September ig 1914
A gigantic battle, or series of
battles, continues day and night
alongtheentirc front from Noj 11
to the frontier without a deci
sive advantage to either "f the
Opposing armies
that neither side has any advan
tage.
It is believed that the com
manding generals have not" yet
found the opponents weal; spot.
The Russians continue to re
port successes against the Aus
trians, though Berlin claims
that the Austrians /have been
troops in the battle on the
Western frontier is repm ted R d
especially in the ci ntia where
rcinfori ementshave been receiv
ed.
^ Russian advicesstate that the
German offensive movement on
the East Prussian frontier was
Stopped on September 17th and
at several points the Germans
>eW<
Russians are
now
ui*I
I tion of the German successful in diivinidsfcck the
Russians.
900.000
marching into Russian Poiai
against the German army there
and will be followed shortly by
2.000.000 additional troops.
There is nothing new regard
ing peace excepting a report
that the basis for peace will be
worked out in Washington.



Special tojm Nassau Guardian.
The bifPKttle in France con
tinuts, but no important change!
have taken place.
The Germans have been rein
forced on their right and centre,
but the Allies left has made
some advanci: and is gradually
pushing the Germans.
Italy is expected to declare
war on Austria on September 26.
A Berlin despatch says that
there will lie a pe&Ct confeiance
in Washington shortly.
War Notes
SI 111' CARRYING
SUPPLIES TO GERMAN
CRUISERS CAPTURED BY
BRITISH CRUISER.
Kingston, Sept. 11.The
BetkanUs, <>f the Hamburg-
American Line, was captured by
a British cruiser Monday morn
in when she was two days out
from Charleston. The prizes
which wns brought here last
night, had aboard mom tons of
coal and a six months' supply of
[)io\i-io'.i#tor two G'TiiKincrui
sers, the *r,'s {en and the Karl
sruhe.
The Beth xnia had been equip
ped as an auxiliary cruiser, but
threw her armament overboard
on sighting her pursuer. The
crew was composed of 500 re
servists.
N. Y Herald.
Xassau Guardian
:o:
THE WAR. IN EUROPE
A Critique.
By an American Military Officer
The despatches of the last
twenty-four hours are fraught
witli the greatest possible con-
sequences to the German army.
The entire line of connections the great force which thundered
down through Belgium and
Northern Fiance to the very
wall of Paris is threatened, and
Lite reports indicate a serious
movement on the part of the
British cavalry to cut in behind
General von Kluck's corps and
prevent a juncture with the army
of tne Crown Prince The lattei
force Mil the vicinity of Verdun,
and at last accounts was eilgag
ed in an effort to reduce the for
titled works of the Verdun sys
tern of defence.
The falling hack of the 1 iei
man army, all despatches indi-
cate, was more than a retreat It
approximated closely to a rout.
When one considers that the
German army in 1870 never ex-
perienced a real check from the
French, the moral effect of the
present victory of the allied
forces cannot be over estimated.
Even now comes the report that
the Preach government will
be moved back to Paris, since the
French capitol is considered safe.
But if Von Kluck's whole
corps is likely to be cut off, what
of the German force sent down
from Belguim to reinforce the
right wing of the Germai.s?
This corps is even now in aseri-
ous situation, for simultaneous
[with the news of the breaking of
[the German centre, at Vitry-le-
Francois comes the announce
mem that a Belgian force is
moving south from Antwerp and
that the occupation of Brussels
may be hourly expected'. This
news can have but one sign in
cance; namely,that strong bodies
of English-Russian troops are in
Belgium and that a new allied
army will be soon taking the of
fensive in the Belgian country.
Reinforcement* In Trap
The German corps despatched
south t"> reinforce Von Kluck
should by this time be to the
southward of Maubeuge, and the
circumstances of the last twenty
foiu hours point to this German
force being between the main
body of the allies and the new-
allied army in Belgium.
The success of tip British
French arms along the Maine
indicate that the allies have re-
ceived large reinforcements. The
new troops should have come in
by Marseilles, Bordeaux, St. Naz
aire and Garrone. All those
ports are served by splendid
modern railways, and English
transports from the Suez Canal
and from Umted Kingdom ports
have probably been pouring
troops in through these landing
places
The censorship, which has
been so effectively placed by the
allies on troop movements, has
undoubtedly kept the world, in
the dark regarding the tremen
dous troop movement, but it
stands to reason that a force
which was driven 110 miles at
B rate of 11 miles per day by
the Germans would have been
in no shape after reaching Paris
to suddenly turn and assume
SUCh a powerful offensive as the
allies have exhibited all along
tie1 Maine. It can be pul down
as ,1 certainty that.every day
adds to the strength <>f the al
lied forces in France. The Rus-
sian movement from Archangel
and Fkatratrina has long pass-
ed the speculative point, and it
is a certainty that the allies are
receiving reinforcements surely,
steadily and in large numbers.
The Germans on the other hand
are in the field to the last man.
GERMANS FACE DIFFICULT
TASK
The situation with reference
to von Kluck's corps indicates
that this force can only be extri-
cated by a display of the highest
skill, and in the exhausted con-
dition in which the German
right wing now finds itself it
may be seriously doubted if the
German forces will be able to
hold a line further west than
Verdun. From Verdun to Met/.,
with its great fortress, the Ger-
mans will be compelled to pre-
sent a front to an allied force
coming down from the North
by way of the Meuse. The result
will he that even if von Kluck
is able to reach the main body
the Germans lines will be found
well back against the Franco-
German frontier.
Prior to yesterday, the Ger-
man right wing extended from
the centre at vitry le-Francois
111 a northwesterly direction,
reaching out toward Soissons.
To-day the centre at Vitry le-
Francois is gone, and the centre
German centre and right wing
is making to the eastward of the
Argoane.
ho fai as an attack on Paris is
concerned, Von Kluck's attempt
has failed, and every indication
would now indicate that the
German efforts are confined to
extricating Von Kluck's force
from complete annihilation. If
the result is accomplished it will
speak highly for the German re-
sourcefulness, nor must the
achievement of Von Kluck be
overlooked in that tremendous
pace set whereby he drove
li inch and British from the Bel
.ian frontier to the very gatPS
of Paris.
What has happened was the
unexpected. The Allies were
never yet split in twain. They
held intact, and instead of find
ing an exhausted and beaten ar
my in front of Paris Von Kluck
has met with a force so strong
and powerful, that his safety
is now threatened, and with it
the success of the entire German
campaign in France.
Unless the Germans can take
Paris now, befo.e the \ I lies are
in tin 11 fullest strength, it is up
reas mable to ima jiue the) can
take it lat.-r. The defeat on the
Marne will probably be found
of tremendous and fax reaching
consequence to German arms.
The New Herald Sept. 13, VJU
IN THE
MAGISTRATES COURT.
1914,
Sept. 9. William Armstrong-
Breach Cab Act. M, 6d. James
Johnson breach Cab Act 2S. 6d.
Krskine StubbsAssaulting and
beating Jane Romer. 1 months,
13. Felix Wildgoose.Felo-
niously receiving aa bone fish value
lus. goods and chattels of Percy
Pinder, well knowing them to have
been stolen. Sentenced to three
months imprisonment with hard
labour.
Joshua Dean. Found asleep
while in charge of a licensed dray
in Bay Street, as.
Agnes Kemp-Using language
within bearing of persons residing
111 the neighbourhood towards
Carmelia Roker tending to a
breach of the peace. Dismissed
with a caution.
A SACRED SERVICE of
Song will be rendered by
Zion Baptist Church Choir
on Tuesday 22nd inst. at 7.30
p. m.
A collection will be taken
in aid of the Bahamas War
Relict Fund.
2 las.
THE Scholars of Wesley
Sunday School assisted
by their Friends will give an
Entertainment on Wednesday
next, 23rd inst. in the School
Room to commence at 7.45
p.m.
Admission od. & is.
3 Ins. ^___^
The Chicago Ledger
and
Saturday Blade
WEEKLY AMERICAN PAPERS
With
LATEST WAR NEWS
5 cts.
The two together.
From
THOS. P. FERNANDER
at "Tribune Office."
Weekly American. Papers
LATEST
The Saturday Blade
and
Chicago Ledger
FULL OF WAR NEWS
The two together 5CtS.
Apply to \. K. S1LVA
Tribune Office.
For Result
Advertise in
The Tribune


Russian and French point of view
The allies firmly believe that in
taking this unalterable stand they:
are working for the end of war]
Suppose peace were seriously con-
sidered now, diplomatists say,
what could be the terms?
In Belgium alone, it was esti.
mated, the property damage sever-
al days ago amounted to $300,000,-
000. Since then several cities and
towns have been bombarded and
partly destroyed. France has been
ravaged from the northern border
to within a tew leagues of Paris.
Vast armies have been called into
the field and vast losses inflicted.
The world might wellstand appall-
ed at the price either combatant
will have to pay when all this is
over.
Surrender of Germain Fleet
Should the allies win, one of;
the first matters, I am informed,:
they will insist upon is the sunen-'
der of the German fleet. T his de- {
mand could only be prevented by j
the fleet being destroyed in battle. ;
But why speculate on terms of |
peace? The mind turns away from
the topic in bewilderment, stunned
at its magnitude.
Such a stranger is the British
mind to any settlement short of
the overthrow of the Hohenzol
lerns and Hapsburps that the edi
torial writers regard the determi-
nation of the supreme issue as a
truism, and usually allude to it in-
cidentally.
The Daily Telegraph comments
on Mr. F. F. Smith's speech last
night, in which he said:"Belgium
must be restored to the position
she occupied before the war," and
descriped Germany as "slashing at
the roots of public law in Europe,
destroying every guarantee of In-
ternational right and justice which
had grown up since the Middle
Ages."
"All this," says the Telegraph,
"must be righted oefore we sue ith
our sword."
The Daily Mail says:
"It is to be a fight to the finish.
The only terms are Germany's ab-
solute surrender."
The Time* speaking of home
politics says :
"It wi) be time enough to at-
tend tnyhem when our supreme
quarrel with a foreign enemy for
life or death has been fought out."
Thus it will be seen that unless
every leader of the allies stultifies
hirns"lf the slogan is foiinri in iheie
words, "The Kai<"r mu-t |u."
(fly Requttt)
v; AR j AND
RUMORS OF WARS
The "Mends of peace," whose
hope has been so to educate men
as to make an end of wars, must
feel cast down at tne present
conditions in Europe. Those
who believe God and are gov-
erned by His word, know that
instead of the world moving on
by human training toward a
millennium of peace, it is near
ing day by day a deluge of
blood. When the disciples
asked the Lord concerning the ]
signs of'His coming again, He
told them plainly that they
would "hear of wars and rumors
of wars : see that ye be not
troubled: for all these things
must come to pass, but the end
is not yet. For nation shall rise
against nation, and kingdom
against kingdom; and there
shall be famines, and pestilences,
and earthquakes, in divers
places. All these are the begin
ning of sorrows" (Matt. 24: 6 8.)
If men believe the word of God
how undeceived they would be.
How it would prevent their run
ning after phantoms.
Unprecedented wars and catas
trophes are then to take place
at the close of this dispensation,
introductory to the establish-
ments of the kingdom of the Son
of Man. The "gospel of the
kingdom," that is, the announce
ment that the Lord as King of
kings is about to return from
Heaven to rule this world from
east to west and from pole to
pole, will be made throughout
the world, and then shall he ap-
pear. Thank God, throughout
that season of dire distress in
the earth, the church (the com-
pany of all redeemed people,)
will be safely sheltered, being,
before the worst comes, translat-
ed to heavent where her home
iswhere Christ has gone
and prepared her a place
"Wars and rumors of wars"
therefore need not put us in anx-
iety, though we may well pity
this poor world, and especially
the Jews, who will be the chief
sufferers in the coming tribula
tion, and pray for them.
It is doubtless out of the
chaos produced by such B drend
ful conflict of mighty nations
that the first Beast of Kev. 13
comes forth a man of extraor
dinary powers who, with the
[second Beast of the same chapter
i are the devil's exponents of his
' hatred of God and the testimony
I for God in theear'h. They cause
"the great tr'bulfltion,!' of which
the Lord warn* tli-J'ws iMatt.
24:21), and bids tiiein hide from
its violencr (Matt. 24:10 20). Iw
mediately upon this the Lord
Himself appears and takes all
in hand (Matt. 24: 29, 30). How
near must be the rapture of the
heavenly saints) Solemn and
sweet are these closing( days.
We have waited long, but our
hope is about tp be fulfilled.
Then too, like the Lord, over
Jerusalem, we may weep over
the fields which we have evan-
gelized and which have turned
away from God's entreaties.
LOOK!
The following Blank forms
maybe had at "TheTribune"
Office.
Duty Entry.
Free Entry.
Warehouse Entries.
Sponging Articles.
Ship's Reports.
In quantities at Special Rates
Fop Rent
SEA FRONT PROPERTY
recently occupied by Mr.
Timothy Culmer with three
Warehouses thereon. Stor-
age capacity 1200 bales Sisal
suitable for Sponge business
also.
Apolv to
WALTER" K. MOORE
The Vogue^and the
Au Bon Mkrche
Store.
(Removed to Bay Street one
door West of Black's)
Have received per S. S. "Cama
guey,"
A large shipment of ladies
Black, White and Coloured
Straw Hats, New York latest
styles a few, choice, ready to
wear. White and Cream Chiffon
Satin. Shadow laces and In
sertions. White Ratine, double
width at 2s. Another lot of 7 Jd.
Crepes. White Figured Cudroy
at 6d. White checked Crepes
at Gd. White, Black, Pink,
Blue, Cream, Purple and Green
Satin. White Cotton Goods.
Cambric at fid. Madapollam
at iod. Nansooks at gd., is., is.
3d Drills fid., 9d. is.
August 29th 1914.
Johnson's
Artistic Wood
Finishes
ohnton'i Prepared Wa-a com
plete finish and polish for all furniture
woodwork and floors.
Johnson's Wood Dyefor the artistic
coloruii: of all wood, soft or hard
Johnson'* Under Laca spirit
finish, very much superior to shellac or
vamisli
Johnson'* Fle.t Wood Ftnlsh-fora
beautiful, artistic, hand-rubbed effete
without the expense of rubbini'.
Johnson's P&ste Wood Fillerfor
filling the grain and pores of wood,
preparing it for the finish
Johnson's Powdered Waxfor bal
room floors.
FOR. SALE BY
Chas. E. Albury
Notice
This is to inform the public
that if any person or |>ersons
are found trespassing oti^niy lot of
laud.iiiuateon Forbes Hill in
the Isbud of Littlr Exuma, they
will hi dealt with according to
tli. Law.
EARNEST CLARKE
(Owner)
JACOB CLARKE
(Overseer)
Forbes Hill, Little Exuma
July 23rd 1914.
Shingles
Best No. 1 Heart 5in.Cypres
Shingles at $9.60 per thous
sand of 20 bundles
Discounts on Idwof over
5000 shingles.
Special Price
also on cheaper gradesalso
5in. Cypress at $6.72 per
thousand of 20 bundles. This
price made possible by a very
large purchase.
Fresh stock arriving every
week.
C. C. SAUNDERS.
Special
Notice.
Jusr Received
Per S. S. "Santiago."
Fresh New Potatoes (Irish)
Selling at 4 cents Per lb.
also
Medium Size Onions at
8 Cents Per lb.
Baker's Cocoa tins
at is. Each
Baker's Cocoa \ tins
at 6d. Each
Call early ft
THE ROYAL STORE,
J. L. Saunders & Co.
Fresh Onion Seed
FROM TENERIFFE
At Toote's, 49 9 Bay Street


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