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Publication began at 6.15 p.m. Gbe tribune Thursday. September 17. 1914 %  M From the latest news received it appears that the enemy is practically cleared out of France, and the Allies are carrying the war into the enemy's country. The defensive retreat of the last week with the Allies bar* rassing their rear and the addition of heavy rain to their other difficulties must ere long simply exhaust the Germans to the last degree, equally so our own forces, and for physical reasons there must be a let up somewhere in which case both sides will probably receive reenforcements and the fight will stiffen. The Czars command To Berlin, Berlin the Hope of the French and the objeective of the English means a desperate struggle for Germany against heavy odds and consequently a hard fight for the Allies. The line of retreat of the Crown Prince cut off is au important circumstance and it would not be surprising ere long to hear of his surrender or annihilation. It is venturesome to forecast on aocouot of the apparent conflict of the reports which reach us, but if Russian, British and French reenforcements can be brought up promptly it is not improbable that the investment of Berlin will be accomplished in the not very distant future. The following published by authority. # 14 September. Governor, Bahamas. Following notice has been issued by Admirally: i*or the purpose of national doitnce it is considered necessary that certain channels in the appro.iches W the Thames should be closed. All incoming vessels flying foreign flags and all British vessels rom all foreign and colonial ports mutt call at the new pilot station now established in the vicinity of 'ne Tongue Light Vessel T at one of the established pilot stations nam-'iy the Sank ami n VeSsd> Mar ate l>al ?",. Dov f and be condu.-trd n"l f destinati n y licensed {>"• All outgoing vesself of me same description must before Ml IIng obtain the services of a Pilot to conduct them to Ml incoming vessels not included in the above before leaving their port of departure for Vhe Thames and all similar outgoing vessels must obtain instructions from the nearest custom authorities as to the channel to be used. These arrangements are to take effect from noon Monday fourteenth September. HARCOURr —:o: — Many requiries have reached us as to what is a "Dura dum" bullet that has been mentioned in some of the war news and the use of which is objected to by (both sides, while both sides acicused the other of using them [contrary to International Law. } We have made some inquiry, jfrom which it appears that the ."Dum dum" bullet is verv like 'the "hard-head and "soft-head" {bulletsof the Lee Metford Rifle; 1 the two latter are solid, one of 1 them being of soft metal which flattens out on contact making : larger wounds at egress than at f ingress the other of hard metal which makes a clean clear cut wound, easy to heal, but the "Dum dum" of soft metal and hollow which enables it on contact and ingress to flatten out mushroom like making a larger ragged and rough wound at egress, troublesome to heal. Several of the bullets may be seen at the Bank of Nassau on enquiry of Mr. William F. Albury. -:o:— The Motor "Frances E.," left Miami at Noon today with 15 passengers, ao. bags mail and Supply of Newspapers. BAHAMAS WAR RELIEF FUND The following Suliscribtions have been received : — Amount previously acknowledged £1039 12 o Daughters of the Em* pire:— National Chapter 500 Queen Victoria Chap ter 50 King Edward VII Chapter 10 10 Gordon Chapter 10 10 Mr. and Mrs. Paul E, Meeres Asa H. Pritchard Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Curry Cecil Curry Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Sands 15 Miss Laura D. Sands 5 Mrs. M. D. Moore 1 o Mr. and Mrs. T. H. C. Lofthouse 5 o C. L. Lofthouse i 1 Mr. Richard W. Sawyer 5 5 James W. Roberts 1 o G. H. Johnson 2 o Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Johnson 2 o Mr. and Mrs. H. E. M. Johnson 6 6 Neville Johnson r 1 Mary B. Johnson i i Beatrice Johnson 14 Winifred Johnson 12 Ellen Louise Johnson 6 Yacht Ranger 3 o Mrs Maria Moore 3 o Miss Hattie Moore 3 o Mr. and Mrs. Walter K. Moore 500 Miss Edith Duncombe 1 o o Mr. and Mrs. W. M. L. Wilson 200 Dr. and Mrs. E. R. Mallet 5 W. P. Sands 5 D. J. and R. M. de Gregory 1 J. S. Brooker 5 Christian Science Society 10 Mr. and Mrs. B. E Williams 5 Mr. and Mrs W. E. Fountain 220 GE Harcourt Johnson 200 1 larry Knowles 100 5 o 1 5 o 5 Total £"u8j 1 g 2 5 4 I o 5 o o o o o o o o o o o o o %  * N. B.— The time for planting is. passing. Plant, Bananas and Eddoes. —Tomatoes, Stone, Freedom, etc—Onions, Bermuda White and Red. OFFICIAL September 17th, 1014. London September iGtli Governor, Bahamas. September sixteenth, following from Press Bureau.-PDsition along the Aisne continue favour able. Enemy has delivered several counter attacks especially against first army corps. These have been repulsed and enemy has given way slightly I "fore our troops and French armlet on our right and left. Eneinvs loss very heavy. We have taken two hundred prisoners. (Signed) HARCOURT. Ml Latest frar News RADIOQf&klS. Special to The Nassau Guardian, The Germans are now fight, ing a defensive battle from Noy. on to Point North of Verdun, holding strong positions along a battle front of a hundred and ten miles. The Crown Prince has been beaten back from Varennesand the possible line of retreat to Metz which has been open to him has now been cut. GOVERNMENT NOTICES Misses Ellen Mcncndcz John son, Jessie Eliza Suttnn and Lillian Irene Peters have been appointed Assistant Clerks in the Post Office. —:o:— IN THE MAGISTRATES COURT. I914. Sep. 7.--Ellis Chipman— Found drunk and using profane and indecent language in Marlborough Street— 16s. or 14 da vs. 1 1. Assaulting and bating Constable No. 3-) AlfretfjBcll-£i. or 16 days. Alfred Gordon and Percy Rolle —Fighting in Market Street, S. — Each bound in their nun recognizance in £2. to appear for sentence if called upon. Albert Weft—Assaulting and beating Andrew Roberts—9 months Roger Adder ley—Assaulting and beating Edward Munro — 12s. 6d., and 3s. od. costs or 10 days. 8. Elijah Johnson and Alexander ChambersAssaulting and beating Zaccheus Williams. Adjourned until qtli intt • 9. Elijah Johnson and Alexander Chambers. As adjourned 1 from yesterday—Johnson Fined \£i. in default 20 days, Cham i ben Sentenced to six weeks imprisonment with hard labour. War Notes Here is a part of the la mental "The Left Behind" by another unknown potfWjn the Yorkshire Post:— It's hard to be left when the regiment's gone Fate dots seem a bit unkind To fix just on you to be. the one That's got to be left behind — To be left at home with the children and wives,



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v% When your bothers are fighting perhaps for there lives! I'm as keWas the next man to sleep in the dust, To eat once a dar—if vou've luck! I'd be ready to die, I hope, if I must— I suppose I've my share of pluck. But I've got to teach these recruities their drill, I've done it for years and I'm doing it still. My wife says, "your doing good work where vou are" (There's plenty of it, that's so !) "We can't all be under the Qory Star; Rut the King and the Country know There's a lot depends on your daily grind," Perhaps—yet it'shard to be left behind) —:o: — Songs lighten the marches and enliven the Camps of the Soldiers in the present as in all wars. "The Knglish troops when they uurdkt'l through London to the from in the present war sang a version of an American Civil war song : — "We are coming, Martha! Kitchener, Five hundred thou sand strong." "One: landed on foreign shores • the troops changed, their tune, tins tune for the song "Itsa Long Way to Tipperary," a song which this war is fast making famous." The Chorus follows.— "Itsa long way to Tipperary, Its a long WAV to go ; Its a long way to Tipperary, To the sweetest girl I know." Good bye Piccadilly, Farewell Leicester Square Its a long long way to Tipperary But my hearts right there]" THE COLOR. LINE IN WAR. In an article printed in the Independent, Count von Bern storff, the German Ambassador, express's himself as "urtenndi tionally" opposed to the use of Asiatic ,'IIKL Africai: troops in a Kuropeaitrrar. This is a curious prejudice oil the part of the diplomatic representative of • Government that is seeking to bring Turkey into the conflict and trying to persuade the Turk to instigate a "holy war" in J gypt and Indiaagainstall non r m When Germany went to war with the British Empire she must have expected to fight the British Empire, and not merely a selected part of the population the color of whose skin happened to meet the approval of Berlin. It is natural enough that Great Britain should bring up her Indian troops, who, by the way, are as completely indentified with the Aryan rare as tne Prussians. But no matter what their race mav be, they are part of the empire and part of Great Britain's regular military power. If Germany were at war with the United States her troops would have to meet our negro cavalry, than whom there are no better soldiers in uniform. German denunciationof the Indian troops is as futile as German denunciation of the Japanese as "jellow bellies." It is too late to draw the color line in war. That line was erased more than fifty years ago by Abraham Lincoln in that noble letter to the Spring field Convention: "And there will be some black men who can remember that, with silent tongue and clenched teeth and steady eye and well poised bayonet, they have helped mankind on to tliis great consummation." -:orLONDON READY FOR ZEPPLINS WITH SECRET DEFENCE SYSTEM London, Aug. 20. Germany's fleet of Zeppelin airships and the lurking danger of a midnight raid on London have aroused the authorities here to take unusual precautions The Germans say the attack by a Zeppelin on Antwerp was ."for moral effect" and the fact that the gianf craft successfully eluded the vigilance of the gun ners manning the far flung lines of the forts shows the possibility of avoiding detection under cover of darMfeess The Zeppelin came from the Cologne station and from this same station a fleet of Zeppelins could start out on any dark night, reach London and return before the first peep of dawn, as by the airtight route they could cover the distance from Cologne to London in less than five hours. The Germans have long talk ed of the possibilities of a sur prise Zeppelin attack in case of war with England. It was a popular theory exploited in every German newspaper for months before the outbreak of war. Certainly there has not been a correspondent of a Ger man newspaper in London dur ing the last two or three years who has not at some time or other sent fanciful reports to his paper emphasizing the British fear of Zeppelin attack and the apprehension caused by rumors of Zeppelin raids. With the war now these fantasies have assumed a very different shape. The British authorities have I taken prompt precautions. It would not do to outline them even if they were known except ing to say that a far-flung net work of defence has been out lined and that aeroplane guns are hidden away in nooks and crannies of many of the high buildings in the British Isles to bring aircraft down. However, it is likely that a fleet of Zeppelins would only venture over hostile territory at night and presumably on a very dark night, when, flying at a great height, it would form a very difficult target to see des pite its huge bulk. It must not be forgotten, however, that the operations of the Zeppelin are limited by the fact that it must return to its station and also because Germany has not enough of these craft to risk los ing them for the sake of tempo rary damage dune' by a single raid. IMPERIAL THE A TRE NASSAU Under the Patronage of His Excellency the Governor SPECIAL PROGRAMME ON FRIDAY 18th SEATS Is. 3d., Is. & 6d. Doors open 7.50 Commence* et 8.13 A Hoc Finish. Bred in the Bone. In Two Part* Cupid's Close Shave. The whole of the proceeds from the sale of seats on the above occasion will be given to the BAHAMAS WAR RELIEF FUND The Public are requested to fill the Theatre BOX OFFICE open FRIDAY Morning for BOOKING between 10 and 12 At the beginning of the war the German Zeppelin fleet con sisted of nine vessels, of which one belongs to the navy. The latter is a sister airship to the ill fated La, which exploded near Berlin last October, its en tire crew being killed. Its cubic capacity is 950,000 cubic feet, it can carry a useful load of ap proximately ten tons, sufficient with a full crew for a flight of sixty hours duration, and may be equipped with approximate ly two tons of high explosive. The other craft are of smaller size and inferior in power. They range from the Z2, scaling 630, 000 cubic feet, launched in 1910, to the Z7, completed last year, which has a capacity of 770,000 cubic feet. The smaller craft have a radius of action of about six hundred miles and it is small consolation to know that they can carry only a little more than a ton of the deadliest high explosive. Special Notice. JUST RECEIVED • Per S. S. "Santiago." Fresh New Potatoes. ( Irish) Selling at 4 cents Per lb. also Medium Size Onions at 8 Cents Per lb. Baker's Cocoa £ tins at is. Each Baker's Cocoa \ tms • at 6d. Each Call early at THE ROYAL STORE, J. L. SAUNPERS & Co. — ~— Fresh Onion Seed FROM TENER1FFE At Toote's, 49 9 Bay Street



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of voting age—seventy per cent had renounced the Fatherland and had become American citizens. They were lost to Germany: they had no part in or of her they contributed nothing to her and could not be accounted longer her children. To what extent the same condition exists elsewhere would be mere guesswork, though, as the German is by instinct a good citizen, it is to be presumed his thrifty consideration of his property rights would lead him to take citizenship wberesver he might be. THE POLITICIANS OF EUROPE SCOVT GERMAN DEFENCE TALK but against the United States, with the object of smashing the Monroe Doctrineand taking what was needed of Brazil. The German babies need room to move. (To be continued.) Germany's navy and merchant marine are of recent origin. The former has never struck a blow, nor for that matter felt one, yet it ranks second alone to Great Britain and is regarded as highly efficient. Ostensibly it is organized to protect German commerce on the high seas, yet one cannot go among the politicians of Europe with such a statement and find' genial credence. On the contrary | grins and open jeers will greet any such theory, and it is more than likely that the person accosted will pull down an atlas of the world and point out the spare German settlements outside of Europe. No one familiar with the trend of European diplomacy believes for one moment tint Germany is content with her position among the nations All, on the contrary, know that she has had in view the wresting from Great Britain of her atari time supremacy, that she wants the ships, and wants to own the ports to which many of them steim." In Southern IV.izil, in the States of Sao Paulo and Miuas Geraps, are many Germans, most of them unnaturalized, because they find it possible to hold property and conduct their business without the necessity of renouncing their German allegiance. Three years ago Brnfil was in a ferment. It was knowu that 500,000 Germans were in those provinces and that practically the wlrole number weie trained soldiers; it wasknown that; German officers had been brought' over to officer the Brazilian ar.ny, presumably, and it was vvll estiblljked that Brazil was migntily uneasy in her consciousness that she bad an army 0 great, and muchfitore efficient, than her own within her borders There was a rumuor, that persisted fof,n year tint the Germans might rise*tt any nvnuie and claim the two Sui^s f„r Germany, throw ing the Mohroe Doctrine to the winds. In Vearson's Magazine during 1911 appealed two articles by I'heron Brant, in N\hich it was argued that Germany's war pn-pnrslims were not dWted against tn-! ,nd— as feared at that time— W ILLIAMS THE SHOEMAN has just received a larger assortment of LADIES. MISSES and GENTS SAPLE BOOTS and SHOES in ONE, TWO, AND THREE pair lots The sizes for ladies are limited to 3£, 4 and 4* Misses—13, 1 and 2 Gents—6, 6\ and 7 The Shoes having been sold William*. The Shoeman at a liberal discount, the principal disadvantage being the limited sizes, he is disposing of them at not IBM than 20 per cent less than the regular prices such grades would be. .His kind patrons and the general public will please take Special Notice of the above sizes mentioned and in calling for them will see for themselves that they are obtaining Real Bargains at Williams' Wholesale and R.etail Shoe Establishment 277, 279 Bay Street (City) For Rent S EA FRONT PROPERTY recently occupied by Mr. Timothy Culmer with three Warehouses thereon. Storage capacity 1200 bales Sisal suitable for Sponge business also. Apply to WALTER" K. MOORE. Johnson's Artistic Wood Finishes ohnson's Prepared Wax -a com plete finish and polish for all (urnituie, woodwork and Duals, Johnson's Wood Dye—for the artistic coloring of all wood, soft or hard Johnson's Under Lac a spirit finish, very much superior to shellac or varnish Johnson's Flat Wood Finish -fora beautiful, artistic, hand nibbed elfetc without the expense of rubbing. Johnson's Pe.ste Wood Filler— for filling the grain and pores of wood, preparing it for the finish. Johnson's Powdered Wax —for bal room floors. FOR. SALE BY Chas. E. Albury AS THE CAMEL traveller crossing the African deserts, so indispensable to a careful housewife A is indispensable to the also is SUNLIGHT SOAP Camel can go for several days without drinking, but a good housewife cannot afTord to let a single day pass without putting Sunlight Soap to some use. The first duty of every housewife is the duty of SUNLIGHT SOAP is to help the housewife to economise. The daily use ot SUNLIGHT SOAP is practical economy. It does the most washing in the shortest time, with least labour, and with no discomfort. Use a piece in your next wash, and you will be convinced as to its value. to economise; •Ml BEST&762 Tett. We do not sell it. B UT we do sell and will, continue to sell Standard Oil Co. Gasoline. Test your Gasoline. We invite comparison with any in the City. Price 22cts. per gallon in 50 gallon Drums. Customers using 100 gals, or over per Month 20c. gallon. Watch our Notice for Kerosene in June. C. C. SAUNDERS Notice r has For Result Advertise in The Tribune been said that &f .he Doctors of Nassau say that Pure Fresh Milk is unobtainable in Nassau. I hereby invite any Doctor in Nassau to come up *.o my Dairy and show wherein the milk supplied by me is in anyway impure. T. M. KNOWLES Dairyman. T Notice IIS is to inform my Patrons and the Public in General that I have opened my Public Blark Smith Shop; and am now ready to do anything in 1 e line of Cienetal repair or new w rk Horse Shoeing Specially. All \ ork done Mechanically. P. A. HUYLER. Buy East St. CWharf .^JLL -* -•*•* Ai one The Vogue, and the Au Bon Marche Store. (Removed to Bay door West of Have received per S. gey." • A large shipment of ladies Black, White and Coloured Straw Hats, New York latest styles a few, choice, ready to wear. White and Cream Chiffon Satin. Shadow laces and In sertions. White Ratine, double width at 2S. Another lot of 7id. Crepes, White Figured Cudroy at 6d. White checked Crepes at 6d. White, Black, Pink, Blue, Cream, Purple and Green Satin. White Cotton Goods. Cambric at 6d. Madapollam at iod. Nansooks at gd., is., is. 3d Drills 6d., gd. is. August 29th 1914. Shingles Best No. 1 Heart 5m. Cypres Shingles at $9.60per Ihoussand of 20 bundles Discounts on lots of over 5000 shingles. Special Price also on cheaper graJpi—also 5in. Cypress at $6.72 per thousand of 20 bundles. This price made possible by a very large purchase. Fresh stock arriving evejy week. C..C. SAUNDERS. 1



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Nulllua eddlctue |umr In verb* m&glatri. Being bound to *w.r to the Dojmn if no Msilir, ea? VOL. X. NMIU, N. P.. Bsh&mBi, Thursday, September 17,1914 No. 21ft L. G1LBKRT DUPUCH, Editor and Proprietor. CD P > <-> (D •• 0) K sr 0 (D CD OFFICE: 38-44 MAHKKT STREET Nassau, .V. P., liahamas P. O. BOX 163 PUBLISHED DAILY i Monday, Wednesday and Friday— single copy Tuasday, Thursday and Saturday— single copy ... id Weekly 4jd Monthly i s. 4d Quarterly .. ... 4s. fin If Yearly S Yearly 1 6s. PAYABLE IN ADVANCE A**rti Advertising Kates :— Six pence per line for lirst insertion; three pence per line for second insertion ; and <>ne penny per line for subsquent insertions. Advertisements under eight lines 4s. WHAT IS BASIC CAUSE OF BIG WAR? GERMAN BABIES Anawera Campbell MacCulloch. A thousand men have a thousand differing opinions eis to the MUM of the European conflagration. Many incline to the opinion that it all is due to the prideful lust of the Kaiser to display his battalions in battle; other! will asseverate that Hie German war lord has gone mad with militarism and cannot be restrained, whil^ still others are convinced that the Teutonic Emperor is a much abused individual who has been thrust into a cor ner and a sabre forced into his unwilling hand. All are wrong and none is right, for the wpr is not a military display it is not based on anger and hate, it is not the pro. duct of one man's energy or folly. The blaze that has arisen in Europe is an economic situation with fit parallel in many years, for it Hue entirely to the German baes. The German babies, two million of them arriving yearly have brought about a struggle that cannot but result in geographical changes The pink and white infants have sent battalions into the firing zone, the dreadnoughts into the deep Nine nations are locked in a death struggle all because the German baby must have room to grow. Ten million men are at war with one another on land and two million more upon the sea all because a chubby German fist is reaching yearly for more land to spread its blanket upon. In a word' it is land hunger, territorial greed if you like, that has precipitated the greatest war modern centuries have seen, and no man knows where it will end nor what it will involve. Japan has already entered the war as an ally of Great Britain, and Italy may move for war any day. The German Empire has no history back of 1871. In that year and later afier the Franco-Prussian War, began the causes that have led up lo the present horror. Germany is the youngest of the nations. The genius of Bismarck welded. United Germany; the mailed fist of the Iron Chancellor took the fragments of the Confederation and forged an empire. The dimpled fist of the German baby bids fair to undo, or increase, that construction. GREAT GERMAN EMPIRE FOUND NO TERRITORY FOR EXPANSION When Germany came to the point of peace after the Franco-Prussian War and recognized herself as one of the Powers of Europe she naturally glanced about her to see what should be her next step. Obviously a European Power could not be a Power when hemmed in by other countries and a short two hundred miles of open seaboard. Other nations were explaining, so'why not Germany ? Unfortunately, the colonial bargain counter had been all too weli picked over by the time Germany began to look about her foreign possessions. She had little or no merchant marine, no navy to speak of and not a foot of land that lay without her own borders until 1884. Then she found some corners rff Africa—Togoland, Cameroon, a bit of Southwest Africa, and a spare bit of the East Coast. In the next fifteen years she found some of the islands of the South Pacific and that has been all, with the exception of a bit of China, Kiaochoif which is but a pocket handkerchief in size. At first the situation was not visibly serious. Immediately after the war the whole population was but 42,000,000 or thereabouts, and in the next three years it had progressed but a few hundred thcu. sand ; then it began to grow vigorously, and the babies arrived promptly and continuously, grew up, stretched and looked about. The Fatherland was beginning to get cramped, and there was no room for expansion. Less than 209,000 square miles of territory in Europe, with boundaries as fixed and immovable as steel bands, and in that constricted area—barely the combined size of Missouri and Montana, which shelter approximately 500,000 babies—were 57,. 000,000 Germans in 1900, and the babies continued to arrive steadily, continuously. And they stretched and crowed and grew up, and when there was little more room for them they emigrated. It would seem that this emigration was the solution of the problem. English babies grew up and emigrated ; French babies grew up and did likewise ; Italian, Spaflish, Dutch babies crossed the seas and made new homes, so one might ask why the German baby should have been a problem at all, and why '.lie land hunger ? The problem lay in the colonies again. As before stated, England had dealt largely at the colonial bargain counter, France had taken her share, so had Italy and Spain all quite some time before there ever was a United Germany in Europe. When those English and French and Spanish and Italian and Dutch babies grew up and emigrated they did so largely to their own possessions over seas, and those that did not came to the Uuited States. Now, it is plain that an Englishman emigrating to Australia or New Zealand or Canada continues to be a British subject, but it is not so positive that the German emigrating to any of those countries or the United Stati I will continue to remain a German subject. In fact, the statistics show that he doesn't. Of the 1,278,679 Germans resident in fhe United States according to the last census —and this refers merely to males Continued on fourth Peg* y*. MuJB I #


The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02260
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Thursday, September 17, 1914
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
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General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02260

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Full Text
Nulllua eddlctue |umr In verb* m&glatri.
Being bound to *w.r to the Dojmn if no Msilir,
ea?
VOL. X.
Nmiu, N. P.. Bsh&mBi, Thursday, September 17,1914
No. 21ft
L. G1LBKRT DUPUCH,
Editor and Proprietor.
CD
P
>
<->
(D

0)
K
sr
0
(D
CD
OFFICE: 38-44 MAHKKT STREET
Nassau, .V. P., liahamas
P. O. BOX 163
PUBLISHED DAILY
i
Monday, Wednesday and Friday
single copy .........
Tuasday, Thursday and Saturday
single copy ...... ... id
Weekly ............ 4jd
Monthly ............is. 4d
Quarterly......, .. ... 4s.
fin If Yearly............S.
Yearly .........16s.
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
A**rti
Advertising Kates :Six pence per line
for lirst insertion; three pence per line
for second insertion ; and <>ne penny per
line for subsquent insertions.
Advertisements under eight lines 4s.
WHAT IS BASIC CAUSE
OF BIG WAR?
GERMAN BABIES
Anawera Campbell MacCulloch.
A thousand men have a thousand
differing opinions eis to the MUM
of the European conflagration.
Many incline to the opinion that
it all is due to the prideful lust of
the Kaiser to display his battalions
in battle; other! will asseverate
that Hie German war lord has gone
mad with militarism and cannot
be restrained, whil^ still others
are convinced that the Teutonic
Emperor is a much abused individ-
ual who has been thrust into a cor
ner and a sabre forced into his
unwilling hand. All are wrong and
none is right, for the wpr is not a
military display it is not based on
anger and hate, it is not the pro.
duct of one man's energy or folly.
The blaze that has arisen in Eu-
rope is an economic situation with
fit parallel in many years, for it
Hue entirely to the German ba-
es.
The German babies, two million
of them arriving yearly have
brought about a struggle that can-
not but result in geographical
changes The pink and white in-
fants have sent battalions into the
firing zone, the dreadnoughts into
the deep Nine nations are locked
in a death struggle all because the
German baby must have room to
grow. Ten million men are at war
with one another on land and two
million more upon the sea all be-
cause a chubby German fist is
reaching yearly for more land to
spread its blanket upon. In a word'
it is land hunger, territorial greed
if you like, that has precipitated
the greatest war modern centuries
have seen, and no man knows
where it will end nor what it
will involve. Japan has already
entered the war as an ally of Great
Britain, and Italy may move for
war any day.
The German Empire has no his-
tory back of 1871. In that year
and later afier the Franco-Prussian
War, began the causes that have
led up lo the present horror. Ger-
many is the youngest of the nations.
The genius of Bismarck welded.
United Germany; the mailed fist
of the Iron Chancellor took the
fragments of the Confederation and
forged an empire. The dimpled
fist of the German baby bids fair
to undo, or increase, that construc-
tion.
GREAT GERMAN EMPIRE
FOUND NO TERRITORY
FOR EXPANSION
When Germany came to the point
of peace after the Franco-Prussian
War and recognized herself as one
of the Powers of Europe she natu-
rally glanced about her to see what
should be her next step. Obvious-
ly a European Power could not be
a Power when hemmed in by other
countries and a short two hundred
miles of open seaboard. Other na-
tions were explaining, so'why not
Germany ? Unfortunately, the colo-
nial bargain counter had been all
too weli picked over by the time
Germany began to look about her
foreign possessions. She had little
or no merchant marine, no navy to
speak of and not a foot of land
that lay without her own borders
until 1884. Then she found some
corners rff AfricaTogoland, Cam-
eroon, a bit of Southwest Africa,
and a spare bit of the East Coast.
In the next fifteen years she found
some of the islands of the South
Pacific and that has been all, with
the exception of a bit of China,
Kiaochoif which is but a pocket
handkerchief in size.
At first the situation was not
visibly serious. Immediately after
the war the whole population was
but 42,000,000 or thereabouts, and
in the next three years it had pro-
gressed but a few hundred thcu.
sand ; then it began to grow vigor-
ously, and the babies arrived
promptly and continuously, grew
up, stretched and looked about.
The Fatherland was beginning to
get cramped, and there was no room
for expansion. Less than 209,000
square miles of territory in Europe,
with boundaries as fixed and im-
movable as steel bands, and in
that constricted areabarely the
combined size of Missouri and
Montana, which shelter approxi-
mately 500,000 babieswere 57,.
000,000 Germans in 1900, and the
babies continued to arrive steadily,
continuously. And they stretched
and crowed and grew up, and when
there was little more room for
them they emigrated. It would
seem that this emigration was the
solution of the problem. English
babies grew up and emigrated ;
French babies grew up and did
likewise ; Italian, Spaflish, Dutch
babies crossed the seas and made
new homes, so one might ask why
the German baby should have been
a problem at all, and why '.lie land
hunger ?
The problem lay in the colonies
again. As before stated, England
had dealt largely at the colonial
bargain counter, France had taken
her share, so had Italy and Spain
all quite some time before there
ever was a United Germany in
Europe. When those English and
French and Spanish and Italian
and Dutch babies grew up and
emigrated they did so largely to
their own possessions over seas,
and those that did not came to the
Uuited States. Now, it is plain
that an Englishman emigrating to
Australia or New Zealand or Cana-
da continues to be a British sub-
ject, but it is not so positive that
the German emigrating to any of
those countries or the United Stati I
will continue to remain a German
subject. In fact, the statistics show
that he doesn't. Of the 1,278,679
Germans resident in fhe United
States according to the last census
and this refers merely to males
Continued on fourth Peg*
y*.
M-
uJB___ _
I
. *
#


Publication began at 6.15 p.m.
Gbe tribune
Thursday. September 17. 1914
M
From the latest news receiv-
ed it appears that the enemy is
practically cleared out of France,
and the Allies are carrying the
war into the enemy's country.
The defensive retreat of the
last week with the Allies bar*
rassing their rear and the addi-
tion of heavy rain to their other
difficulties must ere long simply
exhaust the Germans to the last
degree, equally so our own
forces, and for physical reasons
there must be a let up some-
where in which case both sides
will probably receive reenforce-
ments and the fight will stiffen.
The Czars command To Ber-
lin, Berlin the Hope of the
French and the objeective of the
English means a desperate strug-
gle for Germany against heavy
odds and consequently a hard
fight for the Allies.
The line of retreat of the
Crown Prince cut off is au im-
portant circumstance and it
would not be surprising ere long
to hear of his surrender or anni-
hilation.
It is venturesome to forecast on
aocouot of the apparent conflict
of the reports which reach us,
but if Russian, British and
French reenforcements can be
brought up promptly it is not
improbable that the investment
of Berlin will be accomplished
in the not very distant future.
The following published by
authority.
# 14 September.
Governor, Bahamas.
, Following notice
has been issued by Admirally:
i*or the purpose of national do-
itnce it is considered necessary that
certain channels in the appro.iches
W the Thames should be closed.
All incoming vessels flying
foreign flags and all British vessels
rom all foreign and colonial ports
mutt call at the new pilot station
now established in the vicinity of
'ne Tongue Light Vessel
T at one of the established
pilot stations nam-'iy the Sank
ami nVeSsd> Marate' l>al
?",. .Dovf and be condu.-trd
n"l f .destinati"n y licensed
{>" All outgoing vesself of
me same description must before
Ml IIng obtain the services of a
' Pilot to conduct them to
Ml incoming vessels not
included in the above before
leaving their port of departure for
Vhe Thames and all similar out-
going vessels must obtain instruc-
tions from the nearest custom au-
thorities as to the channel to be used.
These arrangements are to take
effect from noon Monday fourteenth
September.
HARCOURr
:o:
Many requiries have reached
us as to what is a "Dura dum"
bullet that has been mentioned
in some of the war news and the
use of which is objected to by
(both sides, while both sides ac-
icused the other of using them
[contrary to International Law.
} We have made some inquiry,
jfrom which it appears that the
."Dum dum" bullet is verv like
'the "hard-head and "soft-head"
{bulletsof the Lee Metford Rifle;
1 the two latter are solid, one of
1 them being of soft metal which
! flattens out on contact making :
larger wounds at egress than at f
ingress the other of hard metal
which makes a clean clear cut
wound, easy to heal, but the
"Dum dum" of soft metal and
hollow which enables it on con-
tact and ingress to flatten out
mushroom like making a larger
ragged and rough wound at
egress, troublesome to heal.
Several of the bullets may be
seen at the Bank of Nassau on
enquiry of Mr. William F. Al-
bury.
-:o:
The Motor "Frances E.," left
Miami at Noon today with 15
passengers, ao. bags mail and
Supply of Newspapers.
BAHAMAS
WAR RELIEF FUND
The following Suliscribtions
have been received :
Amount previously
acknowledged 1039 12 o
Daughters of the Em- *
pire:
National Chapter 500
Queen Victoria Chap
ter 50
King Edward VII
Chapter 10 10
Gordon Chapter 10 10
Mr. and Mrs. Paul E,
Meeres
Asa H. Pritchard
Mr. and Mrs. J. B.
Curry
Cecil Curry
Mr. and Mrs. J. P.
Sands 15
Miss Laura D. Sands 5
Mrs. M. D. Moore 1 o
Mr. and Mrs. T. H. C.
Lofthouse 5 o
C. L. Lofthouse i 1
Mr. Richard W.
Sawyer 5 5
James W. Roberts 1 o
G. H. Johnson 2 o
Mr. and Mrs. A. L.
Johnson 2 o
Mr. and Mrs. H. E. M.
Johnson 6 6
Neville Johnson r 1
Mary B. Johnson i i
Beatrice Johnson 14
Winifred Johnson 12
Ellen Louise Johnson 6
Yacht Ranger 3 o
Mrs Maria Moore 3 o
Miss Hattie Moore 3 o
Mr. and Mrs. Walter
K. Moore 500
Miss Edith Duncombe 1 o o
Mr. and Mrs. W. M. L.
Wilson 200
Dr. and Mrs. E. R.
Mallet 5
W. P. Sands 5
D. J. and R. M. de
Gregory 1
J. S. Brooker 5
Christian Science
Society 10
Mr. and Mrs. B. E
Williams 5
Mr. and Mrs W. E.
Fountain 220
GE Harcourt Johnson 200
1 larry Knowles 100
5
o
1
5
o
5
Total "u8j 1 g
2
5
4
I
o
5
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
*.
* *
N. B. The time for plant-
ing is. passing. Plant, Bana-
nas and Eddoes. Tomatoes,
Stone, Freedom, etcOnions,
Bermuda White and Red.
OFFICIAL
September 17th, 1014.
London September iGtli
Governor,
Bahamas.
September sixteenth, follow-
ing from Press Bureau.-PDsition
along the Aisne continue favour
able. Enemy has delivered sev-
eral counter attacks especially
against first army corps.
These have been repulsed and
enemy has given way slightly
I "fore our troops and French
armlet on our right and left.
Eneinvs loss very heavy. We
have taken two hundred prison-
ers.
(Signed)
HARCOURT.
Ml
Latest frar News
RADIOQf&klS.
Special to The Nassau Guardian,
The Germans are now fight,
ing a defensive battle from Noy.
on to Point North of Verdun,
holding strong positions along a
battle front of a hundred and ten
miles.
The Crown Prince has been
beaten back from Varennesand
the possible line of retreat to
Metz which has been open to
him has now been cut.
GOVERNMENT NOTICES
Misses Ellen Mcncndcz John
son, Jessie Eliza Suttnn and
Lillian Irene Peters have been
appointed Assistant Clerks in
the Post Office.
:o:
IN THE
MAGISTRATES COURT.
I914.
Sep. 7.--Ellis Chipman
Found drunk and using profane
and indecent language in Marl-
borough Street 16s. or 14 da vs.
1 1. Assaulting and bating Con-
stable No. 3-) AlfretfjBcll-i.
or 16 days.
Alfred Gordon and Percy Rolle
Fighting in Market Street, S.
Each bound in their nun re-
cognizance in 2. to appear for
sentence if called upon.
Albert WeftAssaulting and
beating Andrew Roberts9
months
Roger Adder leyAssaulting
and beating Edward Munro
12s. 6d., and 3s. od. costs or 10
days.
8. Elijah Johnson and Alex-
ander Chambers- Assaulting
and beating Zaccheus Williams.
Adjourned until qtli intt
9. Elijah Johnson and Alex-
ander Chambers. As adjourned
1 from yesterdayJohnson Fined
\i. in default 20 days, Cham
i ben Sentenced to six weeks im-
prisonment with hard labour.
War Notes
Here is a part of the la
mental "The Left Behind" by
another unknown potfWjn the
Yorkshire Post: *
It's hard to be left when the regi-
ment's gone !
Fate dots seem a bit unkind
To fix just on you to be. the one
That's got to be left behind
To be left at home with the
children and wives,


v%
When your bothers are fighting
perhaps for there lives!
I'm as keWas the next man to
sleep in the dust,
To eat once a darif vou've
luck!
I'd be ready to die, I hope, if I
must
I suppose I've my share of pluck.
. But I've got to teach these re-
cruities their drill,
I've done it for years and I'm
doing it still.
My wife says, "your doing good
work where vou are"
(There's plenty of it, that's so !)
"We can't all be under the Qory
Star;
Rut the King and the Country
know
There's a lot depends on your
daily grind,"
Perhapsyet it'shard to be left
behind)
:o:
Songs lighten the marches
and enliven the Camps of the
Soldiers in the present as in all
wars.
"The Knglish troops when
they uurdkt'l through London
to the from in the present war
sang a version of an American
Civil war song :
"We are coming, Martha!
Kitchener, Five hundred thou
sand strong."
"One: landed on foreign shores
the troops changed, their tune,
tins tune for the song "Itsa Long
Way to Tipperary," a song
which this war is fast making
famous."
The Chorus follows.
"Itsa long way to Tipperary,
Its a long wav to go ;
Its a long way to Tipperary,
To the sweetest girl I know."
Good bye Piccadilly,
Farewell Leicester Square
Its a long long way to Tipperary
But my hearts right there]"
THE COLOR. LINE IN WAR.
In an article printed in the
Independent, Count von Bern
storff, the German Ambassador,
express's himself as "urtenndi
tionally" opposed to the use of
Asiatic ,'iikL Africai: troops in a
Kuropeaitrrar. This is a curious
prejudice oil the part of the dip-
lomatic representative of
Government that is seeking to
bring Turkey into the conflict
and trying to persuade the Turk
to instigate a "holy war" in
Jgypt and Indiaagainstall non
r...............
m
When Germany went to war
with the British Empire she
must have expected to fight the
British Empire, and not merely
a selected part of the population
the color of whose skin happen-
ed to meet the approval of Ber-
lin.
It is natural enough that Great
Britain should bring up her In-
dian troops, who, by the way,
are as completely indentified
with the Aryan rare as tne Prus-
sians. But no matter what their
race mav be, they are part of the
empire and part of Great Bri-
tain's regular military power.
If Germany were at war with
the United States her troops
would have to meet our negro
cavalry, than whom there are no
better soldiers in uniform.
German denunciationof the In-
dian troops is as futile as German
denunciation of the Japanese as
"jellow bellies." It is too late to
draw the color line in war. That
line was erased more than fifty
years ago by Abraham Lincoln
in that noble letter to the Spring
field Convention: "And there
will be some black men who can
remember that, with silent
tongue and clenched teeth and
steady eye and well poised
bayonet, they have helped man-
kind on to tliis great consum-
mation."
-:or-
LONDON READY FOR
ZEPPLINS WITH SECRET
DEFENCE SYSTEM
London, Aug. 20.
Germany's fleet of Zeppelin
airships and the lurking danger
of a midnight raid on London
have aroused the authorities here
to take unusual precautions The
Germans say the attack by a
Zeppelin on Antwerp was ."for
moral effect" and the fact that
the gianf craft successfully
eluded the vigilance of the gun
ners manning the far flung lines
of the forts shows the possibility
of avoiding detection under
cover of darMfeess The Zeppelin
came from the Cologne station
and from this same station a fleet
of Zeppelins could start out on
any dark night, reach London
and return before the first peep
of dawn, as by the airtight route
they could cover the distance
from Cologne to London in less
than five hours.
The Germans have long talk
ed of the possibilities of a sur
prise Zeppelin attack in case of
war with England. It was a
popular theory exploited in
every German newspaper for
months before the outbreak of
war. Certainly there has not
been a correspondent of a Ger
man newspaper in London dur
ing the last two or three years
who has not at some time or
other sent fanciful reports to his
paper emphasizing the British
fear of Zeppelin attack and the
apprehension caused by rumors
of Zeppelin raids. With the
war now these fantasies have
assumed a very different shape.
The British authorities have
I taken prompt precautions. It
would not do to outline them
even if they were known except
ing to say that a far-flung net
work of defence has been out
lined and that aeroplane guns
are hidden away in nooks and
crannies of many of the high
buildings in the British Isles to
bring aircraft down.
However, it is likely that a
fleet of Zeppelins would only
venture over hostile territory at
night and presumably on a very
dark night, when, flying at a
great height, it would form a
very difficult target to see des
pite its huge bulk. It must not
be forgotten, however, that the
operations of the Zeppelin are
limited by the fact that it must
return to its station and also
because Germany has not
enough of these craft to risk los
ing them for the sake of tempo
rary damage dune' by a single
raid.
IMPERIAL
THE A TRE
NASSAU
Under the Patronage of His
Excellency the Governor
SPECIAL PROGRAMME
ON
FRIDAY 18th
SEATS
Is. 3d., Is. & 6d.
Doors open 7.50
Commence* et 8.13
A Hoc Finish.
Bred in the Bone.
In Two Part*
Cupid's Close Shave.
The whole of the proceeds
from the sale of seats on the
above occasion will be given
to the
BAHAMAS
WAR RELIEF FUND
The Public are requested
to fill the Theatre
BOX OFFICE open FRIDAY
Morning for BOOKING between
10 and 12
At the beginning of the war
the German Zeppelin fleet con
sisted of nine vessels, of which
one belongs to the navy. The
latter is a sister airship to the
ill fated La, which exploded
near Berlin last October, its en
tire crew being killed. Its cubic
capacity is 950,000 cubic feet,
it can carry a useful load of ap
proximately ten tons, sufficient
with a full crew for a flight of
sixty hours duration, and may
be equipped with approximate
ly two tons of high explosive.
The other craft are of smaller
size and inferior in power. They
range from the Z2, scaling 630,
000 cubic feet, launched in 1910,
to the Z7, completed last year,
which has a capacity of 770,000
cubic feet. The smaller craft
have a radius of action of about
six hundred miles and it is small
consolation to know that they
can carry only a little more than
a ton of the deadliest high ex-
plosive.
Special
Notice.
Just Received
Per S. S. "Santiago."
Fresh New Potatoes.(Irish)
Selling at 4 cents Per lb.
also
Medium Size Onions at
8 Cents Per lb.
Baker's Cocoa tins
at is. Each
Baker's Cocoa \ tms
at 6d. Each
Call early at
THE ROYAL STORE,
J. L. SaunpeRS & Co.
____ -------------~
Fresh Onion Seed
FROM TENER1FFE
At Toote's, 49 9 Bay Street


of voting ageseventy per cent
had renounced the Fatherland and
had become American citizens.
They were lost to Germany: they
had no part in or of her they con-
tributed nothing to her and could
not be accounted longer her chil-
dren. To what extent the same
condition exists elsewhere would
be mere guesswork, though, as the
German is by instinct a good citi-
zen, it is to be presumed his thrif-
ty consideration of his property
rights would lead him to take
citizenship wberesver he might be.
THE POLITICIANS OF
EUROPE SCOVT GERMAN
DEFENCE TALK
but against the United States, with
the object of smashing the Monroe
Doctrineand taking what was need-
ed of Brazil. The German babies
need room to move.
(To be continued.)
Germany's navy and merchant
marine are of recent origin. The
former has never struck a blow,
nor for that matter felt one, yet it
ranks second alone to Great Bri-
tain and is regarded as highly ef-
ficient. Ostensibly it is organized
to protect German commerce on
the high seas, yet one cannot go
among the politicians of Europe
with such a statement and find'
genial credence. On the contrary |
grins and open jeers will greet any
such theory, and it is more than
likely that the person accosted will
pull down an atlas of the world
and point out the spare German
settlements outside of Europe. No
one familiar with the trend of Eu-
ropean diplomacy believes for one
moment tint Germany is content
with her position among the na-
tions All, on the contrary, know
that she has had in view the wrest-
ing from Great Britain of her atari
time supremacy, that she wants
the ships, and wants to own the
ports to which many of them
steim."
In Southern IV.izil, in the States
of Sao Paulo and Miuas Geraps,
are many Germans, most of them
unnaturalized, because they find
it possible to hold property and
conduct their business without
the necessity of renouncing their
German allegiance. Three years
ago Brnfil was in a ferment. It
was knowu that 500,000 Germans
were in those provinces and that
practically the wlrole number weie
trained soldiers; it wasknown that;
German officers had been brought'
over to officer the Brazilian ar.ny,
presumably, and it was vvll estib-
lljked that Brazil was migntily
uneasy in her consciousness that
she bad an army 0 great, and
muchfitore efficient, than her own
within her borders
There was a rumuor, that per-
sisted fof,n year tint the Germans
might rise*tt any nvnuie and claim
the two Sui^s fr Germany, throw
ing the Mohroe Doctrine to the
winds. In Vearson's Magazine
during 1911 appealed two articles
by I'heron Brant, in N\hich it was
argued that Germany's war pn-pnr-
slims were not dWted against
tn-! ,ndas feared at that time
WILLIAMS THE SHOE-
MAN has just received a
larger assortment of
LADIES. MISSES and GENTS
SAPLE BOOTS and SHOES
in ONE, TWO, AND THREE
pair lots
The sizes for ladies are limited
to 3, 4 and 4*
Misses13, 1 and 2
Gents6, 6\ and 7
The Shoes having been sold
William*. The Shoeman
at a liberal discount, the princi-
pal disadvantage being the
limited sizes, he is disposing
of them at
not Ibm than 20 per cent less than
the regular prices such
grades would be.
.His kind patrons and the gen-
eral public will please take
Special Notice
of the above sizes mentioned
and in calling for them will
see for themselves that they
are obtaining Real Bargains
at
Williams' Wholesale and R.etail
Shoe Establishment
277, 279 Bay Street (City)
For Rent
SEA FRONT PROPERTY
recently occupied by Mr.
Timothy Culmer with three
Warehouses thereon. Stor-
age capacity 1200 bales Sisal
suitable for Sponge business
also.
Apply to
WALTER" K. MOORE.
Johnson's
Artistic Wood
Finishes
ohnson's Prepared Wax -a com
plete finish and polish for all (urnituie,
woodwork and Duals,
Johnson's Wood Dyefor the artistic
coloring of all wood, soft or hard
Johnson's Under Lac-a spirit
finish, very much superior to shellac or
varnish
Johnson's Flat Wood Finish -fora
beautiful, artistic, hand nibbed elfetc
without the expense of rubbing.
Johnson's Pe.ste Wood Fillerfor
filling the grain and pores of wood,
preparing it for the finish.
Johnson's Powdered Wax for bal
room floors.
FOR. SALE BY
Chas. E. Albury
AS THE CAMEL
traveller crossing the African deserts, so
indispensable to a careful housewife A
is indispensable to the
also is Sunlight Soap
Camel can go for several days without drinking, but a good house-
wife cannot afTord to let a single day pass without putting
Sunlight Soap
to some use. The first duty of every housewife is
the duty of Sunlight Soap is to
help the housewife to economise.
The daily use ot Sunlight Soap
is practical economy. It does the
most washing in the shortest
time, with least labour, and
with no discomfort. Use a piece
in your next wash, and you will
be convinced as to its value.
to economise;
Ml
BEST&762
Tett. We do not sell it.
BUT we do sell and will,
continue to sell
Standard Oil Co.
Gasoline. Test your Gaso-
line. We invite comparison
with any in the City.
Price 22cts. per gallon in
50 gallon Drums. Customers
using 100 gals, or over per
Month 20c. gallon.
Watch our Notice for Ker-
osene in June.
C. C. SAUNDERS
Notice
r
has
For Result
Advertise in
The Tribune
been said that ?.he
Doctors of Nassau say that
Pure Fresh Milk is unobtainable
in Nassau.
I hereby invite any Doctor in
Nassau to come up *.o my Dairy
and show wherein the milk sup-
plied by me is in anyway im-
pure.
T. M. KNOWLES
Dairyman.
T
Notice
IIS is to inform my Patrons
and the Public in General
that I have opened my Public
Blark Smith Shop; and am now
ready to do anything in 1 e line of
Cienetal repair or new w rk Horse
Shoeing Specially. All \ ork done
Mechanically.
P. A. HUYLER.
Buy East St. CWharf
.^jLL -* -** Ai
one
The Vogue, and the
Au Bon Marche
Store.
(Removed to Bay
. door West of
Have received per S.
gey."
A large shipment of ladies
Black, White and Coloured
Straw Hats, New York latest
styles a few, choice, ready to
wear. White and Cream Chiffon
Satin. Shadow laces and In
sertions. White Ratine, double
width at 2S. Another lot of 7id.
Crepes, White Figured Cudroy
at 6d. White checked Crepes
at 6d. White, Black, Pink,
Blue, Cream, Purple and Green
Satin. White Cotton Goods.
Cambric at 6d. Madapollam
at iod. Nansooks at gd., is., is.
3d Drills 6d., gd. is.
August 29th 1914.
Shingles
Best No. 1 Heart 5m. Cypres
Shingles at $9.60per Ihous-
sand of 20 bundles
Discounts on lots of over
5000 shingles.
Special Price
also on cheaper graJpialso
5in. Cypress at $6.72 per
thousand of 20 bundles. This
price made possible by a very
large purchase.
Fresh stock arriving evejy
week.
C..C. SAUNDERS.
1


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