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•day, September 15, 1914 The news that has reached us during the last two or three days justifies us in concluding that Germany is now the "under dog" in this stupendoros war of wars; instead of being the aggresively offensive party ;is at the begin ning; she is now on the defen sive retreat, and however stub born a defence she may put up; —and we are sure that she will put up a bitterly stubborn de fensive—conditions must change very materially and the Allied forces must sustain reverses which are away and beyond the realm of probability to prevent them eventually reaching ;ind occupying Berlin, there to die tate the terms of peace. In no other way will this var be conclusively ended nor do we assume tpo much in so say ing. Germany's plan was to strike a sudden heavy and sharp blow on France, and more than probably, having subdued France, to use it as a base from which to make its long threat enod attack upon Kngland, this Belgium prevented and averted. With a demoralized retreating army, reverse upon reverse heavy losses of men and material her one ally wanting men and want ing money, no hope of assistance from her one time ally Italy or any one other; what hope can she reasonably, entertain of standing against the combined forces of the allies who are able yet to throw in more and more reinforcements, it is simply de ferring the inevitabe and the sooner this is brought home to the mind of the Kaiser, the bet ter for humanity. It would apper that Naval operations in this war will be very limited, unless ((Juien rate?) the Knglish are planning a en Plant Beans, Bush, and Pole; Bush Lima, and Pole Lima; Na^ tive White pole, and Red pole. Plant! —:o: — Addington House. Sep. 15th 1914. SERVICE OF INTERCESSION. Sir, The open air Procession put off last Sunday owing to i the weather, will take place, all being well, on the coming Sunday at 5 p nl. Those, who have copies of the hymns will kindly preserve them for use on Sunday afternoon. With thanks Yours faithfully # WILFRED, NASSAU. Ed. Tribune. BAHAMAS WAR RELIEF FUND The following subscriptions have been received:— Amount previously acknowledged £853 13 o St. Andrews Society 52 to o Theoplulous Mango 5 0 0 A H. Kelly 1 1 0 Timothy W. R. Culmer Pembroke Saunders Blanche Drudge John Drudge Rev. G. H. Herbert Moon Mrs. M. L Moore P. J. Christie Geo. F. Christie J. B. Bethel O. P. Sturrup Victoria Burial Societv W. S. Wilson Rev. C. D. Lampen Mrs, C. D Lampen Mr. and Mrs. Stionge (i. K. K.^irace C. Webb Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Crawford Mrs. Adelaide Kemp Mr and Mrs E. L. Bowen Mrs. McDonald A. Friend J. A. McKinncy N. French 52 5 1 1 1 1 1 3 r anoeuvre which will astonish N. J. !• reach the world and Germany in par ticular, the execution of which •may be delayed until the allies have a good foothold in Genna ny on the road to Berlin. N. B.—It rains and rain* Are we planting? If we are not, much 6f which others would corfsider a blessing, is leglected and lost. Mr and MrsL. G. Brice Brice & Ranger T A Roker I Ion, Dr. and Mrs. McHattic Isabella J. Bethel Mrs. H. C and Natalie Allnnv Derbv and Joan Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Duncoinbe MissM barton 1 Miss Culmer 0 1 2 1 5 5 5 5 1 10 1 2 1 5 2 1 5 5 2 10 0 1 1 1 o 0 0 I 5 3 10 4 o o 5 .5 o .5 o o o O O 4 o o o 5 5 2 Mrs W. W. Duncombe 3 Mrs. 0"Bricn and daughters 1 \). A. McKinney 2 Rev. L. Simpson • 4 Mary A. Wilson 1 Mrs Geo. Wilson Mr. and Mrs. E R. Pashley C. A Thompson C. Brown Miss Sutton In Memory of a Crimean Soldier 1 Mrs. R Wand the Misses Farrington Dr. and Mrs W A Pitt Aziel Sweeting Mr and Mrs Roland B Cash and child Bahamas Timber Co. Ltd. Mr. and Mrs. Arthur B. Sutton Miss Brace Mr and Mrs. B. A. Bowe, Jr. Miss llalanan Rev and Mrs W II. F Blebv Dr and Mrs C. W. Blebs 2 Total i'1039 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 The Allies were abJ%to make oHp? Aisne 5 5 20 1 4 2 2 o 0 4 2 2 I 5 0 5 0 0 0 2 0 10 0 6 6 0 1 l 0 2 0 0 ; 5 0 3 3 0 3 3 2 0 12 O Latest War News RADIO'1RAMS. OFKIHAI. September 15th 1914. London. Sept. 14th 1914 Governor, Bahamas. Following from Press Bureau: All day yesterday the enemy stubbornly disputed the pssac,e of the River Aisne b\ our troops, but despite the difficulties <>f fording rivers against strong op positions nearly all crossings were secured b\ junspt, On out right and left the French troops were confronted with a similar task in which, like ourselves, 1 they succeeded. Many prisoners were taken. French headquateis report that the Crown Prince's army was driven back and his head quaten moved from St. Mene hold to \lmit Fnuchon, a dis tance of some 20 miles. (Signed) IARCOURT. Special tTlie Sassau Guardian New York, Sept. 15th The Allies continue to push back the Germans who have been unable .0 re-organize for a stand. good the crossings in spite of the German attempt to stop them. The Crown Prince's army at V*< rdun is in a critical position and must fall back at any moment. Three hundred thousand Russians have been landed atOstend and are ready to take the field. Russians continue their sue cesses in Galicia. Vienna is alarmed at the pros pect of Russian occupation and is preparing defences for a siege. PICKBD OT September 15th 1914. Paris officially announces tl it is thought the Germans \1 ir\ t>> make a stand at River Aisne. The Allies kept up the imrsi all day with e\ti .ordinal vigour. The German main bodj is approaching Belgium and their left wing issei 'king shelter in German Lorraine. P:e Allies, spurred by the \ let "i the pa-t jk* '-^ s show no fatigue. r It 1 believed that the next great battle will be on German soil. 'I he Russians announce that they lia\e • aptured 180.000 Austrian prisoners, 450 cannon and | 000 transport wagon*. Betwe MI 1 s 000 and 300.0001 Russians are in Belgium attack ing the Germans, i;<>\ KKNMKvr IM;I:SS It is announced that the German-are makinga stand "ii the Aisne River. Tin retreat ->f the i" treating Germans is being pnsht d with great vigoui The Flce'ngGerman have abandoned great qnantities of ammunition, stores and equipment. 1 he report that Russian-; have 'landed in Belgium is officially denier'. • Merlin admitsJ^it the Austnans hav swfl^pPa defeat. It is reported tliat the Austrinns rallied after a crushing &f fat and will attempt to stem the tide. s The French occupy Ike city of Amiens. A German general, with his staff, was taken prisoners and 1 conveyed to Paris, It is reported that the Germans have evacuated Poland with great loss. The Allies arc* keeping, in touch everywhere with the retreating Germans. L



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The Bcjjgians made a sortie from An4Pq> and prevented Germai." reinforcements from going south. Washington will sign peace treaties with thirdsof the nations a of the world. President Wilson and Secretnry Bryan guarantee i peace. No reply has yet heen re I ceiverl from the German Kmper or regarding the Inquiry regard ing peace. London:—The Allies are in close pursuit of the telreating Germans and rapidly driving them off Krench soil. The retreat is on the largest scale in the his torv of war. The Allies are pushing their tage hard, trying to turn a idefeat into disaster. JTCHMAN TELLS OF WOMEN SHOT IN LOl/VAIN HORROk. Rotterdam, August 30.ries of the sacking of Loukin, almosi null' liev able in leii horror, are reaching here )ne of the most vivid is told b\ Duti :i rtoid ut of I.oiivam rlvlio was H^Resrnan in a bicycle Store, lie sa\s: "At mid day on Tuesday there A'as a learful uproar in the trgets while we were at dinner; crackle of musketrv was ree it ioon followed by the roar of arllery. I lea I -lig shrieks in the streets I rush'd to the window and saw several houses in llaines. %  "Soldiers were smashing shop windows and looting in all directions, one had onearmful of groceries and the other stacked up with boxes of cigars. As the pe > IVple rushed into the streets from Yrrheir burning houses they were sho 1 down like rabbits." Driven To Street By Flames. The Dutchman told how he j r had hidden with his employers in the cellar. The shooting became more brisk after nightfall. Presently they found (heir own hoijs.blazing and ha I to chouse %  b-twiaeji making a dash for their I live* or roasting. They escaped by representing themselves as Germans, a knowledge of the German language enabling them Ito carry mk the impersonation. They nKe conducted to tbt ailwav station by German sol (iers The salesman continues. "Our walk through the streets to the railway station was like 1 a walk through hell. The beautiful town was a sea of llanie^ Bodies ot the (had lay thick uf the streets, Dreadful criescame from many houses. We reached the railway station at 5:30 o'clock in the morning. The soldiers were still going about the streets with lighted brands and explosives in their hands setting alight any building that remain ed intact. In the parks they had already begun to bury the dead. In many cases in the shallow graves in the large park each body was visible. "At the railway station were 50 citizens, men and women who had been brought from houses from which the soldiers swore shots had been fired. They were lined up in the street, pro testing with tears in their eyes that they were innocent. Then came a firing squad and volley followed volley and the 50 fell where tnev Stood." This incident was confirmed by a Dutch journalist, who said that 500 citizens were ranged It the station and a tenth part ware ordered shot. This was done regardless of sex or age, be fore the eyes of the others. I He journalist says that the Streets were piled with the dead, among them many priests. War Note* Belgium has again fra\vn world's attention toXts fight ing spirit. At the reo/nt si?ge of Liege the little JOavid of the nations&mote,helSand backed up the German atrny Goliath. It be comesknowjr now that was no chance d/fence that was so Yaliantlyxoiiducted. The Belgians were not by any means un expectedly driven to a desperate defence 01 their soil. More than siv. months ago the invasion of the Germans was pre dieted in Brussels, right to a do! of detail and nicumstance. The army of the little kingdom was tolled oil and stationed in a businesslike way to repel a possible foe. There was no thought of evading the clash, no whimpering that a Buccestiul fight might be waged if the nation were only bigger. The Belgians garrisoned the Liege forts completely and systematically and placed their troops to resist with telling force in the field as well as behind defence's any invasion. When the Germ in came he ran right into just what Belgium had prepared for him, I le rebounded, surprised and perplexed. His surp.ise was the surprise of the world in general, even though the result was temporary. But when the past of Belgium is considered, the rebuff was Y10 more than what might have been expected. And Belgian valor is accentuated by Belgian political acumen. Her military staff and .diplomats sensed finer than anybody else in Europe that what has happened would occur. "And there went out a champion out of the camp of the I'hilistines, named Goliath, / Gath, whose height was six cubits and a span. And the staff of his spear was like a weaver's beam; and his spear's head weighed six hundred shekel* of iron, and one bearing a shield -went before him. And David put his hand in his bag, and l"k thence a stone, and s/ae it, arid smote the Philistine in hisfrehead,aiid he fell upon his face (ii the earth. 1 Samuel xvii, 47 and 49. \',.e York Herald Aug 30th 1914. NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS FOR BRITISH ARMY As a result "f Kngland's latest call for volunteers, between 500 and boo men went to the English Consulate yesterday and notified Richard L. Noseworth.the vice consul, of their readiness to go to Canada and enlist. Among the patriots was a negro who said that at least !,ooo West In dianf now employed as hall boys and elevator operators in the city were anxious to go tothe front. \t last communication the British recruiting station at Ot tawa has suspended its activities on the understanding that no more volunteers were immediately needed Twelve British reservists were sent to Can ad 1 by the consulate yesterday, and preparations arc being mad'to forward more SOull .V,'.,• Yo/k Herat I Sept 6th. In the Magistrate's Court 1914. Sep. 3 IV'cy Roach -Using language towards John Light bourn tending to a breach of the peace— Dismissed. 4—Ellen Gaiter—Cruelly torturing and killing a cat —£t, in default one month. Wheelock Pindei Larceny of a Watch and fob value £ \. goods and chattels of Richard Chip in in Sentenced to one months imprisonment and to receive 10 Strokes on the morning of his dis charge. 5.—Alfred Symonctt—Breach Street Traffic Rules—Dismissed. ing s and d, blic IMPERIAL THEATRE Wednesday Friday and Saturday Doors open 7.30 Performance begin at 8.15 p.m. W ILLIAMS THE SHOEMAN hasjust received a larger assortment of LADIES. MISSES and CENTS SAPLE BOOTS *nd SHOES in ONE, TWO, AND THREE pair lots The sizes for ladies#re limited to 3I, 4 and 4J Misses—13, 1 and 2 Gents—6, 6J and 7 The Shoes having been sold Willie, ms. The Shoeme.n at a liberal discount, the principal disadvantage being the limited sizes, he is disposing c| them at not lew than 20 per cent lets than the regular prices such grades would be. His Kind patrons and the general public will please take Special Notice of the above sizes mentioned and in calling for them will see for themselves that they are obtaining Heal Bargains at Williams' Wholesale and R.ete.1? Shoe Establlthment 277, 279 Bay Street (City) Johnson's Artistic Wood Finishes ohnson's Prepared Wes-a .com plate finish sod polish for all furmtuisj, woodwork ami floors. • Johnson's Wood Dve-forthe artistic" coloring of all wood, soft or hard. Johnson's Under Lac-a spirit finish, very much Mlperior to shellac or varnish Johnson's Fla.1 Wood rinlsh-fora beautiful, artistic, haml-rubbcil elictc without the esperUN <>f rubhinit. Johnon's PuC Wood Filler for filliiiK the '^raiii and pores 11I woo.l, preparing itfor the finish Johnson's Powdered Wa-for b.il room floors. FORSALE BY Chas. E. Albun



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0 line is / O BEST Tett. We do not sell it. B UT we do sell and will, continue to sell Standard Oil Co. Gasoline. Test your Gasoline. We invite comparison with any in the City. Price 33Cts. per gallon in 50 gallon Drums. Customers using ioo gals, or over per Month 20c. gallon. Watch our Notice for Kerosene in June. C. C. SAUNDKRS THE REINDEER is an inhabitant of the Arctic Region, and it is possibly the most useful of all the animals which dwell in this part of the world. Unlike the Reindeer. SUNLIGHT SOAP is to be found in all parts of the civilised world, and its great utility is vouched for by millions of contented i housewives who would not be without it. SUNLIGHT SOAP enjoys a well-meriterd reputation, it is absolutely pure,and will not harm the most delicate fabric. A piece of Sunlight Soap used in your next wash will convince you of its excellence. with their women wees huddled. F~R-.,l. Advertise in ingverylitttle just sitting and jttre most of them occupied with the p^hng of sunflower seeds. ^At one or two the next morning Shingles Best \'o. i Heart 5in.Cyprcs Shingles at $9.60 per Lhdu*sand of 20 bundles Discounts on lots of over 5000 shingles. Special Price also on cheaper grades -also 5in. Cypress at §6.72 per I thousand of 20 bundles. This price made possible by u very large purchase. Fresh stock arriving every week. C. C. SAUNDKRS. FOP Sale /" %  "\\'K lot land in the South* ^^ ern Suburbs containing 3 houses one kitchen, water closet well, all in good order. apply to ALBERT RECK LEY Deans Road The Tribune T he undersigned d&sjjns form all Cave Karl* 0 Fresh Onion Seed FROM TENERIFFE At Toote's, 49 9 Bay Street Notice to in dealers that he can supply any quantity required of the very best grade and with a quick dispatch. Get our prices and send your orders. Everything promptly at terided to. LLOYD II. MAJOR Burrows Harbour South End, Long Island 4



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Nulliua addicttis (urare in verb* matfistri. Being bound to swear to the Dogmas if no Master. VOL. X. Nassau. N. P.. Bahamas. Tuesday. September 15, 1914 No. 216 CO 0) CO & 0) *L. OfLBKKT iHTPTJCH, Editor and Proprietor. OFFICE: 38-44 MARKET STUKKT Xa^ini, .V /', liahamas P. O. BOX 163 PUBLISHED DAILY Monday, Wednesday and Friday— single copy Jd Tuesday, Thursday and Saturdaysingle copy id Wetldv 4 Jd Monthly ... ... . ... is. 4er line for sutisiiuent insertions. Adveitisemctits under eijjht line-, is. Henry Chappell, a railway porter in tin' city of Ball), has sprung euddfuly into fame by his verses entitled "Tlie Day," printed m llie Daily Impress. They follow: — You boasted the Day and you touted the Day, And now the Day has rome. Blasphemer, braggart and coward all, Little yon reck of the numhling ball. The blasting shell of the "white arm's" fall, As they speed poor humans home. v '"# for the Day, vou lied for Day. And woke the Day's red Spleen, Monster who nsked God's aid DTvine. ThA strewed 11 is seas with ghastly '^ mine; N't all tin' waters of the Rhine Can wuh thy loul hands clean. You dieimed for the Day, you schemed for the D->y; Watch how the D.iV will go. Slaver of age and youth and piimc (Defenceless slain lot never a crime) Thou art steeped in blood as a hog in slime, False friend and cowardly foe. Ycu have sown for the Day, you %  have grown for the Day; Youm is th? harvest ipd. Can you III-;M the groans and the awful cries ? Can you see the heap of slain that lies, And, sightless turned to the flame split skies. The glassy eyes of the dead ? You have wronged for the Day, you have longed for the Day That lit the awful flune. 'Tis nothing to you that hill and plain Yield sheaves of dead men amid lite a TM in ; That ulows mourn f> i I heir loved nes slain, And mothers CUtM thy name. Hut nfter the Day there's a price |.p |i i v I'm ih Sleepers it iderthesod, An>I II'' \on have n.oi i>i .1 for many i dayl.i-i>n NB)d hoar what He has to to siy : — Vengencc is Mine, I will repay." What can you say to God? — :o:— NO BANDS PLAYED WHEN THE RUSSIAN ARMY MOBILIZED Ol ..M thp nations it present eng I,III is a Slav lust and a meigber of the RussiMn Empire afterward, and the tale of the scratched Slav rouses (he lartar in e\ery Russian, An expei ienci il Russian ger.eral o.ces;iid: — "Russia fust declaies war And then prepares for il." Hut Mr. Arthur Ransome, inohc course of a graphic story which he contribute! to the Westminister Gazette, shows how Russia was mobilizing for a consideiahle time before the declaration of war. He was staying on the Gulf of Finland fishirg, making fishing tackle and translating laity stoiiff, w1ie,i news c.iine of the Austrain note to Servia. m I he war did not become real, an iminirent thing," Mr. Rnnsomc writes, "until a day or two Inter. 1 came back from fishing and met my friend's sister in the garden. She told me : — "Stefan Stefanovitch must leave tonight. They have taken him. He goes to Key with his regiment." "Stefan Stefanovitch was sitting alone on a seat in a corner of the garden. He had been in Petersburg the night before and had only come down to the country that afternoon. "He shook me by both hands. "It is war, he said; 'and I hate war. We all hate war. And now I have got to go and kill people I never saw before in my life." He laughed, but went on to tell how the porter at his rooms in town had also received the paper ordering him to join the colors; how he had seen that there was a similar paper for his master; and Itow he had brought the letter in, with tears running down his face. "Presently a boy ran in to say that after the 11:30 train that night the regular service to Petersburg would be suspended and the line occupied by troops trains. We decided to go up to town together. "At half-past ten we started to walk through the forest. "The woods were extraordinarily empty and quiet. The only noises were the occasional tinkle of a cow bell and the b-r-r-r of a moths wings"TfTe Fnglish fleet put out to sea, and there was singing of patriotic songs Stefan Stefanovitch quoted from the newspapers. 'What sort of songs?' "Rule Britannia.' I supposed, and The Uniisli Grenadiers,' Auld Lang Syne, perhaps but more likely songs from the music halls. "Ah! he said. 'Our songs are different— not joyful." "And then as he walked through the woods, a thoroughly peace loving person going sturdily to war he sang song after song good songs to march to, melancholy, soi ions songs without the flaunting cheer iness of ours. Song after son? lp s '"g as he went to war walking through the ejnply forest, "All over Russia alcng the forest paths, quiet men hating war, were going singing from their homes. "We came at last to the station. Continued on fourth Peg*


The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02258
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Tuesday, September 15, 1914
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
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Full Text

Nulliua addicttis (urare in verb* matfistri.
Being bound to swear to the Dogmas if no Master.
VOL. X.
Nassau. N. P.. Bahamas. Tuesday. September 15, 1914
No. 216
CO
0)
CO
&
0)
*L. OfLBKKT iHTPTJCH,
Editor and Proprietor.
OFFICE: 38-44 MARKET STUKKT
Xa^ini, .V /', liahamas
P. O. BOX 163
PUBLISHED DAILY
Monday, Wednesday and Friday
single copy ......... Jd
Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday-
single copy ......... id
Wetldv............ 4Jd
Monthly ... ... . ... is. 4 i Quarterly ... ..... 4s.
Hall Yearly............8s.
Xoaily ............16s.
^ 1'AYABLK IX ADVANCE
Advertising Rates:Mix pence per line
foi first insertion: three pence per line
for second insertion : and wie penny |>er
line for sutisiiuent insertions.
Adveitisemctits under eijjht line-, is.
Henry Chappell, a railway por-
ter in tin' city of Ball), has sprung
euddfuly into fame by his verses
entitled "Tlie Day," printed m llie
Daily Impress. They follow:
You boasted the Day and you
touted the Day,
And now the Day has rome.
Blasphemer, braggart and coward
all,
Little yon reck of the numhling
ball.
The blasting shell of the "white
arm's" fall,
As they speed poor humans
home.
v'"#
for the Day, vou lied for
Day.
* And woke the Day's red Spleen,
Monster who nsked God's aid
DTvine.
ThA strewed 11 is seas with ghastly
'^ mine;
N't all tin' waters of the Rhine
Can wuh thy loul hands clean.
You dieimed for the Day, you
schemed for the D->y;
Watch how the D.iV will go. '
Slaver of age and youth and piimc
(Defenceless slain lot never a crime)
Thou art steeped in blood as a hog
in slime,
False friend and cowardly foe.
Ycu have sown for the Day, you
have grown for the Day;
Youm is th? harvest ipd.
Can you Iii-;m the groans and the
awful cries ?
Can you see the heap of slain that
lies,
And, sightless turned to the flame
split skies.
The glassy eyes of the dead ?
You have wronged for the Day,
you have longed for the Day
That lit the awful flune.
'Tis nothing to you that hill and
plain
Yield sheaves of dead men amid
lite aTm in ;
That ulows mourn f> i I heir loved
nes slain,
And mothers CUtM thy name.
Hut nfter the Day there's a price
|.p |i i v
I'm ih Sleepers it iderthesod,
An>I II'' \on have n.oi i>i .1 for many
i day-
l.i-i>n NB)d hoar what He has to
to siy :
Vengencc is Mine, I will repay."
What can you say to God?
:o:
. NO BANDS PLAYED
WHEN THE RUSSIAN ARMY
MOBILIZED
Ol ..M thp nations it present en-
g entliusiiistic French, is MHgirg war
wgh Mn.ie fervor ih.ni have the
u-si .us. For the Ku->i,iii is a
Slav lust and a meigber of the
RussiMn Empire afterward, and
the tale of the scratched Slav rouses
(he lartar in e\ery Russian,
An expei ienci il Russian ger.eral
o.ces;iid: "Russia fust declaies
war And then prepares for il." Hut
Mr. Arthur Ransome, inohc course
of a graphic story which he con-
tribute! to the Westminister
Gazette, shows how Russia was
mobilizing for a consideiahle time
before the declaration of war. He
was staying on the Gulf of Finland
fishirg, making fishing tackle and
translating laity stoiiff, w1ie,i news
c.iine of the Austrain note to
Servia. m
" I he war did not become real,
an iminirent thing," Mr. Rnnsomc
writes, "until a day or two Inter.
1 came back from fishing and met
my friend's sister in the garden.
She told me :
"Stefan Stefanovitch must leave
tonight. They have taken him. He
goes to Key with his regiment."
"Stefan Stefanovitch was sitting
alone on a seat in a corner of the
garden. He had been in Petersburg
the night before and had only come
down to the country that after-
noon.
"He shook me by both hands.
"It is war, he said; 'and I hate
war. We all hate war. And now I
have got to go and kill people I
never saw before in my life." He
laughed, but went on to tell how
the porter at his rooms in town
had also received the paper order-
ing him to join the colors; how he
had seen that there was a similar
paper for his master; and Itow he
had brought the letter in, with
tears running down his face.
"Presently a boy ran in to say
that after the 11:30 train that
night the regular service to Peters-
burg would be suspended and the
line occupied by troops trains. We
decided to go up to town together.
"At half-past ten we started to
walk through the forest.
"The woods were extraordinarily
empty and quiet. The only noises
were the occasional tinkle of a
cow bell and the b-r-r-r of a moths
wings-
"TfTe Fnglish fleet put out to
sea, and there was singing of
patriotic songs Stefan Stefanovitch
quoted from the newspapers. 'What
sort of songs?'
"Rule Britannia.' I supposed,
and The Uniisli Grenadiers,' Auld
Lang Syne, perhaps but more like-
ly songs from the music halls.
"Ah! he said. 'Our songs are differ-
ent not joyful."
"And then as he walked through
the woods, a thoroughly peace
loving person going sturdily to
war he sang song after song good
songs to march to, melancholy,
soi ions songs without the flaunt-
ing cheer iness of ours. Song after
son? 'lp s'"g as he went to war
walking through the ejnply forest,
"All over Russia alcng the forest
paths, quiet men hating war, were
going singing from their homes.
"We came at last to the station.
Continued on fourth Peg*


day, September 15, 1914
The news that has reached us
during the last two or three days
justifies us in concluding that
Germany is now the "under dog"
in this stupendoros war of wars;
instead of being the aggresively
offensive party ;is at the begin
ning; she is now on the defen
sive retreat, and however stub
born a defence she may put up;
and we are sure that she will
put up a bitterly stubborn de
fensiveconditions must change
very materially and the Allied
forces must sustain reverses
which are away and beyond the
realm of probability to prevent
them eventually reaching ;ind
occupying Berlin, there to die
tate the terms of peace.
In no other way will this var
be conclusively ended nor do
we assume tpo much in so say
ing.
Germany's plan was to strike
a sudden heavy and sharp blow
on France, and more than
probably, having subdued
France, to use it as a base from
which to make its long threat
enod attack upon Kngland, this
Belgium prevented and averted.
With a demoralized retreating
army, reverse upon reverse heavy
losses of men and material her
one ally wanting men and want
ing money, no hope of assistance
from her one time ally Italy or
any one other; what hope can
she reasonably, entertain of
standing against the combined
forces of the allies who are able
yet to throw in more and more
reinforcements, it is simply de
ferring the inevitabe and the
sooner this is brought home to
the mind of the Kaiser, the bet
ter for humanity.
It would apper that Naval
operations in this war will be
very limited, unless ((Juien
rate?) the Knglish are planning
a en
Plant Beans, Bush, and Pole;
Bush Lima, and Pole Lima; Na^
tive White pole, and Red pole.
Plant!
:o:
Addington House.
Sep. 15th 1914.
SERVICE
OF INTERCESSION.
Sir,
The open air Procession put
off last Sunday owing to i the
weather, will take place, all be-
ing well, on the coming Sunday
at 5 p nl.
Those, who have copies of the
hymns will kindly preserve them
for use on Sunday afternoon.
With thanks
Yours faithfully
# WILFRED, NASSAU.
Ed. Tribune.
BAHAMAS
WAR RELIEF FUND
The following subscriptions
have been received:
Amount previously
acknowledged 853 13 o
St. Andrews Society 52 to o
Theoplulous Mango 5 0 0
A H. Kelly 1 1 0
Timothy W. R. Culmer
Pembroke Saunders
Blanche Drudge
John Drudge
Rev. G. H. Herbert
Moon
Mrs. M. L Moore
P. J. Christie
Geo. F. Christie
J. B. Bethel
O. P. Sturrup
Victoria Burial Societv
W. S. Wilson
Rev. C. D. Lampen
Mrs, C. D Lampen
Mr. and Mrs. Stionge
(i. K. K.^irace
C. Webb
Mr. and Mrs. A. C.
Crawford
Mrs. Adelaide Kemp
Mr and Mrs E. L. Bowen
Mrs. McDonald
A. Friend
J. A. McKinncy
N. French
52
5
1
1
1
1
1
3
r
anoeuvre which will astonish N. J. ! reach
the world and Germany in par
ticular, the execution of which
may be delayed until the allies
have a good foothold in Genna
ny on the road to Berlin.
N. B.It rains and rain*
Are we planting? If we are
not, much 6f which others
would corfsider a blessing, is
leglected and lost.
Mr and MrsL. G. Brice
Brice & Ranger
T A Roker
I Ion, Dr. and Mrs.
McHattic
Isabella J. Bethel
Mrs. H. C and Natalie
Allnnv
Derbv and Joan
Mr. and Mrs. R. H.
Duncoinbe
MissM barton
1 Miss Culmer
0
1
2
1
5
5
5
5
1
10
1
2
1
5
2
1
5
5
2
10
0
1
1
1
o
0
0
I
5
3
10
4
o
o
5
.5
o
.5
o
o
o
O
O
4
o
o
o
5
5
2
Mrs W. W. Duncombe 3
Mrs. 0"Bricn and
daughters 1
\). A. McKinney 2
Rev. L. Simpson 4
Mary A. Wilson 1
Mrs Geo. Wilson
Mr. and Mrs. E R.
Pashley
C. A Thompson
C. Brown
Miss Sutton
In Memory of a Crimean
Soldier 1
Mrs. R Wand the
Misses Farrington
Dr. and Mrs W A Pitt
Aziel Sweeting
Mr and Mrs Roland B
Cash and child
Bahamas Timber Co.
Ltd.
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur
B. Sutton
Miss Brace
Mr and Mrs. B. A.
Bowe, Jr.
Miss llalanan
Rev and Mrs W II. F
Blebv
Dr and Mrs C. W.
Blebs 2
Total i'1039
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
5 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
The Allies were abJ%to make
oHp? Aisne
5 5
20
1
4
2
2
o
0
4
2
2
I 5 0
5 0 0
0 2 0
10 0
6 6 0
1 l 0
2 0 0
; 5 0
3 3 0
3 3
2 0
12 O
Latest War News
RADIO'1RAMS.
OFKIHAI.
September 15th 1914.
London. Sept. 14th 1914
Governor,
Bahamas.
Following from Press Bureau:
All day yesterday the enemy
stubbornly disputed the pssac,e
of the River Aisne b\ our troops,
but despite the difficulties <>f
fording rivers against strong op
positions nearly all crossings
were secured b\ junspt, On out
right and left the French troops
were confronted with a similar
task in which, like ourselves,
1 they succeeded. Many prisoners
were taken.
French headquateis report
that the Crown Prince's army
was driven back and his head
quaten moved from St. Mene
hold to \lmit Fnuchon, a dis
tance of some 20 miles.
(Signed)
IARCOURT.
Special tTlie Sassau Guardian
New York, Sept. 15th
The Allies continue to push
back the Germans who have
been unable .0 re-organize for
a stand.
good the crossings
in spite of the German attempt
to stop them.
The Crown Prince's army at
V*< rdun is in a critical position
and must fall back at any mo-
ment.
Three hundred thousand Rus-
sians have been landed atOstend
and are ready to take the field.
Russians continue their sue
cesses in Galicia.
Vienna is alarmed at the pros
pect of Russian occupation and
is preparing defences for a siege.
PICKBD OT
September 15th 1914.
Paris officially announces tl
it is thought the Germans \1
ir\ t>> make a stand at
River Aisne.
The Allies kept up the imrsi
all day with e\ti .ordinal
vigour. The German main bodj
is approaching Belgium and
their left wing issei'king shelter
in German Lorraine.
P:e Allies, spurred by the
\ let "i the pa-t jk* '-^ s.
show no fatigue. r
It 1 believed that the next
great battle will be on German
soil. 'I he Russians announce
that they lia\e aptured 180.000
Austrian prisoners, 450 cannon
and | 000 transport wagon*.
Betwe mi 1 s 000 and 300.0001
Russians are in Belgium attack
ing the Germans,
i;<>\ KKNMKvr im;i:ss
It is announced that the Ger-
man-- are makinga stand "ii the
Aisne River. Tin retreat ->f the
i" treating Germans is being
pnsht d with great vigoui The
Flce'ngGerman have abandon-
ed great qnantities of ammuni-
tion, stores and equipment.
1 he report that Russian-; have
'landed in Belgium is officially
denier'.
Merlin admitsJ^it the Aus-
tnans hav swfl^pPa defeat. It
is reported tliat the Austrinns
rallied after a crushing ?fat
and will attempt to stem the
tide. s
The French occupy Ike city of
! Amiens.
A German general, with his
staff, was taken prisoners and
1 conveyed to Paris,
It is reported that the Ger-
mans have evacuated Poland
with great loss.
The Allies arc* keeping, in touch
everywhere with the retreating
Germans.
L


The Bcjjgians made a sortie
from An4Pq> and prevented
Germai." reinforcements from go-
ing south.
Washington will sign peace
treaties with thirdsof the nations
a of the world. President Wilson
and Secretnry Bryan guarantee
i peace. No reply has yet heen re
I ceiverl from the German Kmper
or regarding the Inquiry regard
ing peace.
London:The Allies are in
close pursuit of the telreating
Germans and rapidly driving
them off Krench soil. The retreat
is on the largest scale in the his
torv of war.
The Allies are pushing their
tage hard, trying to turn a
idefeat into disaster.
Jtchman tells
of women shot in
LOl/VAIN HORROk.
Rotterdam, August 30.-
ries of the sacking of Lou-
kin, almosi null' liev able in
leii horror, are reaching here
)ne of the most vivid is told b\
Duti :i rtoid ut of I.oiivam
rlvlio was H^Resrnan in a bicycle
Store, lie sa\s:
"At mid day on Tuesday there
A'as a learful uproar in the
trgets while we were at dinner;
crackle of musketrv was
ree
it
ioon followed by the roar of ar-
llery. I lea I -lig shrieks in the
streets I rush'd to the window
and saw several houses in llaines.
"Soldiers were smashing shop
windows and looting in all direc-
tions, one had onearmful of gro-
ceries and the other stacked up
with boxes of cigars. As the pe >
IVple rushed into the streets from
Yrrheir burning houses they were
sho1. down like rabbits."
Driven To Street By Flames.
The Dutchman told how he
jr had hidden with his employers
in the cellar. The shooting be-
came more brisk after nightfall.
Presently they found (heir own
hoijs.- blazing and ha I to chouse
b-twiaeji making a dash for their
I live* or roasting. They escaped
by representing themselves as
Germans, a knowledge of the
German language enabling them
Ito carry mk the impersonation.
They nKe conducted to tbt
ailwav station by German sol
(iers The salesman continues.
"Our walk through the streets
to the railway station was like
1 a walk through hell. The beau-
tiful town was a sea of llanie^
Bodies ot the (had lay thick uf
the streets, Dreadful criescame
from many houses. We reached
the railway station at 5:30 o'-
clock in the morning. The sol-
diers were still going about the
streets with lighted brands and
explosives in their hands setting
alight any building that remain
ed intact. In the parks they had
already begun to bury the dead.
In many cases in the shallow
graves in the large park each
body was visible.
"At the railway station were
50 citizens, men and women
who had been brought from
houses from which the soldiers
swore shots had been fired. They
were lined up in the street, pro
testing with tears in their eyes
that they were innocent. Then
came a firing squad and volley
followed volley and the 50 fell
where tnev Stood."
This incident was confirmed
by a Dutch journalist, who said
that 500 citizens were ranged It
the station and a tenth part
ware ordered shot. This was
done regardless of sex or age, be
fore the eyes of the others. I He
journalist says that the Streets
were piled with the dead,
among them many priests.
War Note*
Belgium has again fra\vn
world's attention toXts fight
ing spirit. At the reo/nt si?ge of
Liege the little JOavid of the
nations&mote,helSand backed up
the German atrny Goliath. It be
comesknowjr now that was no
chance d/fence that was so
Yaliantlyxoiiducted. The Bel-
gians were not by any means un
expectedly driven to a desperate
defence 01 their soil.
More than siv. months ago the
invasion of the Germans was pre
dieted in Brussels, right to a do!
of detail and nicumstance. The
army of the little kingdom was
tolled oil and stationed in a busi-
nesslike way to repel a possible
foe. There was no thought of
evading the clash, no whimper-
ing that a Buccestiul fight might
be waged if the nation were only
bigger.
The Belgians garrisoned the
Liege forts completely and sys-
tematically and placed their
troops to resist with telling force
in the field as well as behind
defence's any invasion. When the
Germ in came he ran right into
just what Belgium had prepared
for him, I le rebounded, surprised
and perplexed. His surp.ise was
the surprise of the world in
general, even though the result
was temporary. But when the
past of Belgium is considered,
the rebuff was Y10 more than what
might have been expected. And
Belgian valor is accentuated by
Belgian political acumen. Her
military staff and .diplomats
sensed finer than anybody else
in Europe that what has happen-
ed would occur.
"And there went out a champion
out of the camp of the I'hilistines,
named Goliath,/ Gath, whose
height was six cubits and a span.
And the staff of his spear was like a
weaver's beam; and his spear's head
weighed six hundred shekel* of iron,
and one bearing a shield -went before
him.
And David put his hand in his
bag, and l"k thence a stone, and
s/ae it, arid smote the Philistine in
hisfrehead,aiid he fell upon his face
(ii the earth.
1 Samuel xvii, 47 and 49.
\',.e York Herald Aug 30th 1914.
NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS
' FOR BRITISH ARMY
As a result "f Kngland's latest
call for volunteers, between 500
and boo men went to the Eng-
lish Consulate yesterday and no-
tified Richard L. Noseworth.the
vice consul, of their readiness to
go to Canada and enlist. Among
the patriots was a negro who
said that at least !,ooo West In
dianf now employed as hall boys
and elevator operators in the
city were anxious to go to- the
front.
\t last communication the
British recruiting station at Ot
tawa has suspended its activities
on the understanding that no
more volunteers were immedi-
ately needed
Twelve British reservists were
sent to Can ad 1 by the consulate
yesterday, and preparations arc
being mad'- to forward more
SOull
.V,'., Yo/k Herat I Sept 6th.
In the Magistrate's Court
1914.
Sep. 3 IV'cy Roach -Using
language towards John Light
bourn tending to a breach of the
peace Dismissed.
4Ellen GaiterCruelly tor-
turing and killing a catt, in
default one month.
Wheelock Pindei Larceny of
a Watch and fob value\. goods
and chattels of Richard Chip
in in Sentenced to one months
imprisonment and to receive 10
Strokes on the morning of his dis
charge.
5.Alfred SymoncttBreach
Street Traffic RulesDismissed.
ing s
and d,
blic
IMPERIAL
THEATRE
Wednesday
Friday
and Saturday
Doors open 7.30
Performance begin
at 8.15 p.m.
WILLIAMS THE SHOE-
MAN hasjust received a
larger assortment of
LADIES. MISSES and CENTS
SAPLE BOOTS *nd SHOES
in ONE, TWO, AND THREE
pair lots
The sizes for ladies#re limited
to 3I, 4 and 4J
Misses13, 1 and 2
Gents6, 6J and 7
The Shoes having been sold
Willie, ms. The Shoeme.n
at a liberal discount, the princi-
pal disadvantage being the
limited sizes, he is disposing
c| them at
not lew than 20 per cent lets than
the regular prices such
grades would be.
His Kind patrons and the gen-
eral public will please take
Special Notice
of the above sizes mentioned
and in calling for them will
see for themselves that they
are obtaining Heal Bargains
at
Williams' Wholesale and R.ete.1?
Shoe Establlthment
277, 279 Bay Street (City)
Johnson's
Artistic Wood
Finishes
ohnson's Prepared Wes-a .com
plate finish sod polish for all furmtuisj,
woodwork ami floors.
Johnson's Wood Dve-forthe artistic"
coloring of all wood, soft or hard.
Johnson's Under Lac-a spirit
finish, very much Mlperior to shellac or
varnish ,
Johnson's Fla.1 Wood rinlsh-fora
beautiful, artistic, haml-rubbcil elictc
without the esperUN <>f rubhinit.
Johnon's PuC Wood Filler for
filliiiK the '^raiii and pores 11I woo.l,
preparing itfor the finish
Johnson's Powdered Wa-for b.il
room floors.
FOR- SALE BY
Chas. E. Albun


ours
id to
once
w- TaRe^i Wice for
Miind. It wasi^T of re-
, ,__, iTs. Some were alone, others
came with their wives and mothers
and children. At every station there
were more of them. At every sta-
tion there were weeping women,
seeing perhaps the last of their men.
There was an army doctor saying
goodbye to his family, the servants
Jtissing his hand and praying, his
wife rubbing bis wrist up and
down mechanically. There was one
man who talked, too gleefully, f
thought, and too much too excited,
ly. He was not going to the war.
!!'h"e Was 'ittledpmor|stration,
little shouting. At each station was
a Russian flag and a small group
cheering; but it was so small in
comparison with the silent crowd
as to be almost unnoticeable. We
realized a little clearer how very
many were going but not for day's
afterwpid did I understand that on
that night there were such scenes
not only in one or two or twenty
districts, but that all over Russia
everywhere at once, the mobiliza-
tion was proceeding. On that night
all over the largest country in
Europe, was this silent parting,
this quiet setting out.
' The most remarkable thing
during the days that followed the
mobilization order was the silence.
The men were silent or very quiet
The place seemed at first stunned,
and then too serious to shout. Such
shouting as there was came I be
lieve, from the throats of hooligans
except in a few instances of sudden
and explicable enthusiasm.
"Down the Nevsky Prospect a
group of Reservists trudged in
their working clothes, colored
shirts, broad belts, high boot?, rope
shoes or even with raps wound
about their feet. They cairn d
their belongings in little boxes, or
handkerchiefs, or string bags. Some
of them had brought their own
kettles with them. A number of
women, many with little children,
walked with them. The tears were
running down the f;tces of some.
They rr:arched quite silently, ex.
cept when people on the pavement
cheered them, arid then they cheer-
ed back, dreadfully, like men only
partly wakened from a dream.
Jil'here was no music. I did not
hey a military band all day. Ev-
erywhere I met these groups of si-
lent man,with serious faces, march-
ing *tong with two or three regu-
. far soldiers to the depots, offices,
public baths, riding schools where
they camped, were fnedicallv ex-
amined and fitted with uniforms.
In many places a company of them
I met a company already in uni
form, marching to' the Warsaw
Station, to go directly to the front
Nobody was watching them. Their
farewells were over. They were
just a company of soldiers walking
through thrl early morning twi
light, with none of the pomp of
war. I remembered how our Eng-
lish regiments went off to South
Africa, with martial music in their
heads, and reflected on the courage
it must need to walk off, almost
unnoticed, to a war of utter horror
long anticipated, to a possible
even probable death on the field,
an exit from life entirely unre-
marked.
Then came the news of the actual
declaration of war.
"Then the arrival of the last
train from the German frontier
with the news that the Germans
seemed to have drawn hack, and
that theRussian soldiers were lying
with rifles ready all along the
quiet little river that mark the
frontier at Wirballen, that the
place was deserted, and that for
many miles the roads were crowd-
ed with the people of the country-
side in carts of all kinds, with a
few of their hastily collected be-
longings, hurrying to escape, any-
where into Russia fi-m the expect-
ed Germans "
Fop Rent
SEA FRONT PROPERTY
recently occupied by Mr.
Timothy Culmer with three
Warehouses thereon. Stor-
age capacity 1200 bales Sisal
suitable for Sponge business
also.
Applvto
WALTER K. MOORE.
Special
Notice.
Just Received
Per S. S. "Santiago."
Fresh New Potatoes (Irish)
Selling at 4 cents Per lb.
also
Medium Size Onions at
8 Cents Per lb.
Baker's Cocoa \ tins
at is. Each
Baker's Cocoa \ tins
at 6 Call early at
THE ROYAL STORE,
J. L. Sacndkrs & Co.
*T
LOO
4
The following Blank forms
mavbehad at "TheTribune"
Office. *.
Duty Entry.
Free Entry.
Warehouse Entries.
Sponging Articles.
Ship's Reports.
In quantities at Special Rates
Thompson Brothers
Palmetto Point
Canned Tomatoes
Packed this year
9s. per case of 2 dozl
No. 3 cans
Gaso- *7^>0
line is / O
BEST
Tett. We do not sell it.
BUT we do sell and will,
continue to sell
Standard Oil Co.
Gasoline. Test your Gaso-
line. We invite comparison
with any in the City.
Price 33Cts. per gallon in
50 gallon Drums. Customers
using ioo gals, or over per
Month 20c. gallon.
Watch our Notice for Ker-
osene in June.
C. C. SAUNDKRS
THE REINDEER
is an inhabitant of the Arctic Region, and it is possibly
the most useful of all the animals which dwell in this
part of the world. Unlike the Reindeer.
SUNLIGHT SOAP
is to be found in all parts of the civilised world, and its
great utility is vouched for by millions of contented i
housewives who would not
be without it. Sunlight
Soap enjoys a well-meriterd
reputation, it is absolutely
pure,and will not harm the
most delicate fabric. A piece
of Sunlight Soap used in
your next wash will con-
vince you of its excellence.
with their women wees huddled. F~- R-.,l.
Advertise in
ingverylitttle just sitting and jttre
most of them occupied with the
p^hng of sunflower seeds.
^At one or two the next morning
Shingles
Best \'o. i Heart 5in.Cyprcs
Shingles at $9.60 per Lhdu*-
sand of 20 bundles
Discounts on lots of over
5000 shingles.
Special Price
also on cheaper grades -also
5in. Cypress at 6.72 per
I thousand of 20 bundles. This
price made possible by u very
large purchase.
Fresh stock arriving every
week.
C. C. SAUNDKRS.
Fop Sale
/""\\'K lot land in the South*
^^ ern Suburbs containing
3 houses one kitchen, water
closet well, all in good order.
apply to
ALBERT RECK LEY
Deans Road
The Tribune
The undersigned d&sjjns
form all Cave Karl* 0
Fresh Onion Seed
FROM TENERIFFE
At Toote's, 49 9 Bay Street
Notice
to in
dealers
that he can supply any quantity
required of the very best grade
and with a quick dispatch.
Get our prices and send your
orders. Everything promptly at
terided to.
LLOYD II. MAJOR
Burrows Harbour
South End, Long Island
4


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