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Be of Good Cheer While we await news that will make future hletory. let us remember proudly, but without vainglory. England's record on Five Continents and on the Seven Seas. In the months of August and Sep. tern be r. SEPTEMBER Sept—13—Plains of Abraham, Wolfe and Montcalm fell. Canada gained for Britain, 1759 French and Spaniards totally defeated in naval engagement in Bay of Gibraltar, 1782. Egyptians conquered at Telet-Kebir. Arabi Pasha crushed, 1882. —:o:— The War Relief Committee met in the Council Chember on Thursday afternoon when the I following Report was receiv-' -ctsrl^ Colony; that such j ihaehave power to associate with themselves suit able assistants; that such sub committee decide on an arrange the details of the methods of collecting; and that such Sub Committee consist of the following:— Hon G. H. Johnson. Mr E. W. T. Mc Pherson. Mr W. C. B. Johnson. Mr W. A. Mather and S Mr W. E. Fountain. 2. That a Sub-Committee be appointed to solicit and receive contributions other than money and that such Subcommittee con/fst of the following. f MrsT. H. C. Lofthouse Mrs E. T. Higgs. / Miss Moseley. f 3. That a Sub Committee be appointed to consider the ques tion of obtaining local volun teers for active service out of the Colony and if deemed desirable and feasible to suggest measures for carrying out the scheme; and that such Sub-Committee consist of the following: — Mr R. H. C. Crawford, Com maudant. Mr G. M. Cole. Mr S. Albert Dillet. Nassau, N. P. loth—September 1914. By Order of The Executive Committee: Sd. HARCOURT MALCOLM Chairman. THE BAHAMAS WAR RELIEF FUND Throughout all the Dominions of our King there is but one d sire, to render whatever assis tance possible in the righteous war in which our beloved Em pire is engaged, those who are not able to fight want to serve in some other way. The people of the Bahamas tire second to none in loyalty to King and Empire, they are willing and eager to prove their patriotism. The Sub-Committee of the Bahamas War Relief Committee which has been appointed to collect contributions of money appeals, —to every inhabitant of these Islands to make a con tribution to the War Relief Fund, to every Church to hold special services at which collec tions shall be made for the Fund, to every Friendly Society or Charitable organization, to every Club, sorial or athletic, to every Association, to exert themselves to raise money to i aid those who are fighting, or wounded, or suffering in our stead. Every contribution will be acknowledged in the Newspa pens of the Colony. Contribu tions of the smallest denomina tion will be welcomed. Do not refrain from giving because you cannot give a hun dred guineas. Can you give a shilling ? Can you give three pence ? If you can, do not be ashamed to come forward at this time. A threepenny piece may mean a sacrifice. All hon our to the man who makes a sacrifice now. G H JOHNSON. Chairman Subcommittee. Contributions may be sent to The Bank of Nassau, The Rov al Bank of Canada and G M Cole, Esq, Hon. Treas. Bahamas War Relief-Committee. —:o:— BAHAMAS WAR. RELIEF FUND The following subscriptions have been recieved : — Previously acknowledged" £ 454 o 0 Mr. and Mrs. P. H. Burns 800 Miss Barbara Burns 1 o o G. Harold Adderley 10 00 Mr. and Mrs. C. O. Anderson 10 00 22 Parliament St. 10 o o Amelia Simon 200 R. H. Sawyer 5 5 o W. F. Albury 550 A Friend and his wife 660 J. K. Amoury & Son 660 Wm. Hilton c r Rev. and Mrs W. II F. Bleby 220 Hon. W. Hart Bennett 26 5 o Miss Hart Bennett < o W. C. & F A. Towssend 500 Miss E. F P.^m 1 1 o Mr. and Mrs. f, S. Hilton 550 J. A. Thompson 1 o o Emily L. Johnson 1 o o Mrs. Edward George s o o Rev C. W. Smith 500 Bruce A Bethel 230 Herbert B Bethel 2 3 o John Roberts 1 o o E. W. T. McPherson & family 40 o o T. H. K. Moulder 5 5 John T. Ageel. 2 00 Mr. and Mrs. Wolls Durrant 36 o o George Profit 200 Mi. an.I Mrs. G. H. Gamblin 10 o o Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Bethel 200 Jno. Percival Bethel 1 1 o Mr. and Mrs. V. H. Saunders ju 10 The Misses Matthetvl^ 5 E. Percy Matthews 5 Chas. H. Matthews 5 Constantine Christofilis 2 C. Menendez 5 Arthur G. Sweeting 5 H. Newell Kelley 5 Mrs. Amalia Dillet 6 Mr. and Mrs. R. C. deGlanville 5 F. A. Taylor 1 J. W. Matthews 5 Eastern Burial Socrety 10 Dr. and Mrs G. H. Johnson 20 o 0; Sandilands Village, Young Wome Association Miss May Holden 1 Miss Mable Stevenson 1 Mr. and Mr J Raymond Hall 2 Mr. and Mrs. C. Tucker Sands 5 50 T. E. D. Brace 20 o o H. May Johnson 1 1 0 A Gwendolin Weech 200 Lillian A Berger 1 o 0 Mr and Mrs S Sands 220 Mr and Mrs V. T Hi^djLao o 0 Mr and Mrs C R T~ Higgs 20 o 0 'age, "I en's r 400 2 o 853 '3 o —:o;— The Moir.r "Fiances K." left for Miami this morning. N. B. — Rain. Plant. Rain, PLANT. Rain. PLANT. Ye shall reap as ye sow. Addington House. Sep. lath 1914 Sir, Tomorrow iSundav) 5 p.m.— all being well -a procession will start from the West end of the Cathedral—passing via foot of Government House — Frederick Street—Bay Street, and so by the West door into the Cathedral. Litanies and Hymns will be sung, on returning to the Cathedral an addrpss will be given; and the Church Litany will be sung. Our desire is thus to move Almignty God to take


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* OBITUARY. Mary, relfet of Robert Kelly eMct who was^Prveyor General of the Bahama Islands early in the last century, died at Harbour Island on the first day of this month at the advanced age of 92 years and 3 months. This lady was the daughter of James Roberts a planter and married in her twenty second year,—Mr. Robert Kelly. By their marriage she became the mother of ten children and since her husband's death in 1872, forty two years ago, 27 xand children and 31 great rand children have grown up ound her. During her long widowhood rs. Kelly won the respect and ":eem of all who knew her. She voted herself to the Church nd in spite of her illness and g<* was a const nit communicant at St. John's Episcopalian Church at Harbour Island, her quiet unostentatious Charity and her unfailing piety made her beloved by all that knew her. Though expected, her death was f.-lt to be a severe loss and the 111 irksfjpppieciation in the form of flofW tributes were mute evidence of the feeling of the community towards her. Tile caskvt containing her body was borne, by her special request, by a nuaibei of her graudsnns and was followed iin mediately by the rest of her re latives and a numerous body of mourners. The interment took place m St. John's Churchyard, her husband's grave I.ring opened to receive the casket. The funeral rites were celebrated by the Rev. A F Homer, Priest of St. John*. riiis lad\ h is ived under six sovereigns George II, George III VViMinm IV., Victoria, Edward VII., and (ieorge V. It may be interesting to know that Mrs. Kelly was a sufferer in the historical calamity of the Glass Window, her eldest son having been one of the victims of the idal wave that swept so many into eternity. —:o:— OFFICIAL SqK nth. 1914. London,! ith. Governor, Nassau. Following from Press Bureau: On Wednesday and Thursday a strong British squadron and Flotilla completely swept the North Sea up to and into Heligoland Bight. The German fleet did not interfere and no German ships were seen. In an engagement in Nyassaland we captur ed two field and two machine guns. Further casualty list up to September 7th: Killed wounded-missing Officers 10 63 61 Other ranks 62 510 4863 (Signed) IIARCOUT. —:o: — OOVKKNMENT PKRS8 The bombardment of Belgrade has been resumed and considerable damage has been done. The Belgian army at Antwerp is reported 10 have assumed a triumphant offensive movement, driving the German right back to the environs of Louvain. I'ope Bent diet XV. has requested the ambassadors of the nations at war that recognize the Holy See to ascertain the sentiment of their governments regarding papal peace appeal. Floods delay the i< uvn\ of the Japanese at Isingiau. Mans lives have been lost ,nid it will be many months before the Japanese can invest the German Stronghold which is approach able only by boasts. The Belgians have routed the Germans at Aerschotaud rele is ed 2b Priests who had been in] prisoned in a cljurch. The British and French pur sue the Germans who have re treated from near the River Marne. During the four days battle in the neighbourhood of Paris the* Allies have pushed the Germans back 37 miles, taking inuny prisoners and machine guns. The Belgians have flooded tlie country to the south of Antwerp to prevent the Germans from reaching that city. Prince Joachim AI breed t of Prussia has been wounded in the thigh by a rifle bullet. The French view that the Ger mans are becoming exhausted is given credence by military ex perts. None of the events in France have been published in Berlin (during the past three days. The press of Berlin protest about alleged cruelties to prison 6SS by the allies It is reported that the German Crown Prince has been appointed commander-in-chief of the forces operating against the Russians. Hungary is irritated over the Roumanian movement and is favouring the triple entente. (2) September nth 1914 The Burgomaster of Ghent is praised by the populace for sav ing the city from attack by the Germans. News from the conflict in the east is very contradictory. The British losses to date are placed at 19.000. It is reported that the cruiser Pathfinder was destroyed by a submarine and not by a mine, as was at first reported. There is no present prospect of European peace. A protest has been made in House of Commons against meagre and false news of the war. Reports from Berlin stale that the Germans have lost 42.000 men to date. — .0: — OFFICIAL September 12th 1914. London, nth. I iovernor, Nassau. Following ft .m Press Bureau regarding position in France gerer.il retreat of German army '•niiinued yesterday. Between prisouersand wounded the British forces captured 1 500 besides several guns maxim and a large quantity of transport. The Enemy retired very rapid ly Fast of Soissons in some disorder. A later telegram states that yesterdays captures were larger than stated above. Considerable bodies of Infan try are being found hiding in the woods, they being left behind owing to the rapidity of the re treat. They surrender on sight. This and the rifling of villages and evidence of drunkenness point to the Demoralization of the routed army. Pursuit is being vigorously pressed. (Signed) Harcourt. — :o: — Special to The Xassau Guardian The Kaiser's concentrated troops made a desperate attempt by a night attack to break the Allies centre. The battle tasted all night but the Germans were pushed back along the whole front and rout ed. The German army shows signs of dru aliza Berlin was crushe PICKED UP The great battle still goes on The Germans however have fallen back 47 miles and are being closely pursued by the Allies who are hammering them unmercifully. The German left under the crown prince still holds its ground. The Kaiser has been located at Luxemburg. He narrowly escaped death when bombs were dropped by a Belgian or French aeroplane. German aeroplanes now search the heavens all night with searchlights so as to safeguard the Kaiser. Berlin advices state that Gene ral Von Stein admits the retreat and says that defeat is due to the allies superior numbers. Ostend advices are to the ef feet that Belgian forces are keep ing at the heels of the Germans who are being rushed towads France as reinforcement, and are harrassing them greatly. The Germans deny Russian successes and say that Cracow lias not been taken. They also say that the Austrians have be gun offensive movements near Lemberg. The Servians have captured Semlinon the opposite s.de of the river from Belgrade. London: —In the midst of the European war Great Britain, France, Russia, and China have agreed to sign peace commission treaties with the United States. One effect of the new conven lion would be to prevent the United States from being drawn suddenly into the conflict. Antwerp:—The Belgian gov ermneiit estimates the damage done to Belgium from the war, up to the present, will total up to two hundred million dollars. (Continued on Supplement) IMPERIAL THEATRE Wednesday Friday and Saturday Doors open 7.30 Performance begin at 8.15 p.m. L SB 1



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Supplement to The Tribune Saturday, September 12, 1914 September 1 2th i''4The German centre and right wing are retreating. The British have taken ii cannon and many prisoners President Wilson has called on the Turkish Ambassador to Washington to account for recent newspaper statements attributed to him. The statement which caused the inquiry charged that Great Britain was attempting t<> draw the United States into the European war by Biking that American warships go t<> Turkey; agitatirg "Before the eyes of the United States the sprctre of a massacre of Christians." He explained why there bail been some massacres in Turkey: The Victims suffered as political agitators trying to undermine the Ottoman State, and not as Christians. Tne Austrians are reported to have re-assumed the offensive in the Lemberg district. The Servian occupation of Semlin causes rejoicing among the people at having inflicted humiliation upon the powerful enemy. French military authorities issue a statement giving lengthy description* of the unit im| 01 tant battle since llie war began. The Germans arc abandoning the advance positions held by them. The French Embassy denies the German report that Nau beuge has been captured, with 400 guns and 40,000 men. President Poincaire denies that the French have used duni dum bullets, and • charges the Germans with committing such offense daily. The powers announce that they will not the abrogation of treaty rights to foreigners as announced by the Turkish government. The French have christened the great struggle as "The Battle of the Mame" The Germans have been de feated atTremonde, Belgium. The Pope is preparing to ap peal for a cessation of hostili ties. German troops have been re pulsed in Russian Finland with he;ivy losses. New Orleans: —Bubonic plague is about stamped out for tlie first time since June 27th No cases arc under treatment Special Notice. Jf.ST RECEIVED Per S. S. "Santiago." Fresh New Potatoes (Irish) Selling at 4 cents Per ll>. also Medium Size Onions at 8 Cents Pec lb. Baker's Cocoa I tins at is. Eacii Baker's Cocoa \ tins at Od. Each Call early at THE ROYAL STORE, J. L. SAINDEKS 8t CO.



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ill to the more to the to interview Chancellor r The matter was brought up when the ambassador was asked if there was a way of getting the German viewpoint on these questions direct from the Imperial chancellor of Germany. "I am representing the German nation in this country," he said, and have been authorized to present the German viewpoint. It would be very difficult if not im possible to receive any direct statement from the Imperial chancel lor." Count Von Bernstorff discussed the justification of the Germans in bombarding Antwerp from air ships. "You ask me if the dropping of bombs on Antwerp is justifiable. My opinion is that it is justifiable, because Antwerp is a fortress which we are besieging and which we intend to take if we can." "Have any of the belligerents atticked unfortified cities from the air ?" the ambassador was asked. Suggests Non.Combatants Leave. "Well, the French did it over Nuremburg," he said. "As to the report that Germans have done likewise, certainly not. But, if a report that Germans have been dropping bombs on Paris, which just reached me this afternoon, is true, I believe it to be justifiable — the same motive applying as in the case of Antwerp. Fortresses have always been built for the purpose of resisting attacks. Non-belligerents should leave:* besieged city or else take the consequences." "In your opinion was the burning of I.ouvam in accordance with the rules of war?" was another query put by the Free Press reporter. "I certainly do," the count replied willi feeling "especially after having the official staiement of the German authorities concerning the mistreatment of German soldiers by civilians. War is always and under all circumstances, a terrible oideal for those concerned. To mitigate this trial, which the people have to stand, the principle of civilized warfare rests on the assumptiou that #n1y soldiers '>' one nation shoujd fi^ht against .Idiers of another oat ion, — :o — CZAR RENAMES CAPITAL London, !fept a i. — A despatch lo the Reuter Telegram Co, from St. Petersburg, says, that by Imperial rder, the city of St. Pe'tersbuig, lital of the Russian Empire %  p. 1712, and founded by Peter Great in 1703, will henceforth aown as Petrograd. This change eliminates the Teuton construction in the name by which it has been known since it was founded. Burg or berg is a German word and means a Mountain, mount, fortress. [Fditor. FOP Rent S EA FRONT PROPERTY recently occupied by Mr. Timothy Culmer with three Warehouses thereon. Storage capacity 1200 bales Sisal suitable for Sponge business also. Applvto WALTER K. MOORE. i # FUSSELp CONDENSED MILK B ITTER FLY g '" %  PARED BT .,„ FUSSELL&C-^ AoHw/iyfShingles Best No. 1 Heart 5m. Cypres Shingles at $9.60 per thoussand of 20 bundles Discounts on lots of over 5000 shingles. Special Price also on cheaper grades—also 5in. Cypress at $6.72 per thousand of 20 bundles. This price made possible by a very large purchase. Fresh stock arriving every week. •C. C. SAUNDERS. LOOK! The followjagBljVlk forms maybe had at "T^JribunC Office. Duty EntryifFree Entry. Warehouse Entries. Sponging Articles. In quantities at SpecialRates Johnson's Artistic Wood Finishes ohmon'i Prepared Wu- com plete finish and polish for all furniture, woodwork and floors. Johnson'* Wood Dye—for the artistic coloring of all wood, soft or hard Johnson's Under Lac—a spirit finish, very much superior to shellac or varnish Johnson's Flo.t Wood Finish f< r.1 beautiful, artistic, hand-rubbed effete without thi 4 expense of rubbini.'. Johnson's Pevste Wood Filler—for filling the grain anil pores of wood, preparing it for the finish. Johnson's Powdered Wax—for ball room floors. FOR. SALE BY Chas. E. Albury W A. MATHER UNDERTAKER D ESIRES to inform his friends and the Public that he has just received a complete outfit of facilities for the buisness of an undertaker, which places him in a position to carry out Funerals that may be entrusted to his care with system and despatch ; and respect fully solicits their patronage Get my Prices first and piove that these are the very lowest for thefirst class work. W ILLIAMS THE SHOE-] MAN hasjust received a larger assortment of LADIES. MISSES and CENTS SAPLE BOOTS e.nd SHOES inONE, TWO. ANDTHKLE-I pair lots The sizes for ladies are limitedj to 3J, 4 and 4^ Misses—13, 1 and 2 Gents—6, 6£ and 7 The Shoes having been solt Williams. The Shoeman at a liberal discount, the pn pal disadvantage being th limited sizes, lie is disposing of them at not lees the.n 20 percent leee thai the regular prices such grades would be. His kind patrons and the gen-| eral public will please take Special Notice of the above size* mentioned and in calling MBtliam will see for themselvftthat they are obtaining Real Bargains at I Williams' Wholesale and Rate.!] Shoe Establishment 2?7, 279 Bay Street (City) Notice T his is lo inform the public thatif any person or persons are found trespassing onjmv lot of land situate on Forbes Hill in the Island rff Little Exuma, they will he dealt with according to the Law. EARNEST CLARKE (Owner) JACOB CLARKE (Overseer) Forbes Hill, Little Exuma July 23rd 1914. Kerosene 1502 I N New 50 gallon Galvanized Iron Drums at i8cts per Gallon. In 10 gallon Cans at 20cts per. Gallon. Drums and Cans returnable Ifull particulars at Office "Frances E.," Nassau N. P.. C. C. SAUNDERS "NEW NATIONAL"* "IDEAL" HAND MACHINES NEW HOME"


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3 CD P > b*e CD rf CD (0 OS 3o (D CD Nulliue e-ddtctus (uraro In verb* magletrl. Being bound to iwear to the Dogmas if no Master. VOL. X. Nassau. N. P.. Bahamas, Ssturdsy, September 12.1914 No. 214 L. GILBERT DUPUCH, Editor and Proprietor. OFFICE: 38-44 MARKET STREET Nassau, N. P., Bahamas P. O. BOX 163 PUBLISHED DAILY Monday, Wednesday and Friday— single ropy \<\ Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday— single copy td Weekly M Monthly i s. 41! Q uarterly ... 4s. alfYearly 8 s. Yearly 1 6s. PAYABLE IN ADVANCE Advertising Rates :—Six |>cnce ir line for first insertion; three tience rwr line .for second insertion ; and one |>enny |>er line for subsquent insertions. Advertisements under eight lines 4s. BELGIANS CROWD LONDON WITH TALES OF HORROR —:o:— All week trains have been bringing stricken Belgians They arrived, dazed, in the crowded station nnd quickly disappear in the almost equally dazed population of London. Few of them spe=k English. There are members of the Women's Emergency Corps to meet those who speak French. The Flemish tongue makes difficulties, but all can understand at a glance that they have sufhred—that they are all but helpless. Many come as familier; several are all that aie left of families after the marauder has passed. They arepailieticrlly patient. A woman stands with a baby in her arms A child holds her skirt; another has his hand in his father's. An American girl hastens by with a potter intent on recovering her lucgage. An Fnglish party passes with golf sticks and tennis rackets. The little group stands unmoved A woman with a badge on her arm steps Up and speaks to them in French. I he woman smiles wanly. "Have you had anything to cat?*' "Not since mornigg." It is then four in the afternoon. "Come and have, coffee, then I will take you to a place where you can spend the night." Each member of the corps has a list, which she consults when she meets the refugees. "Lady—will take two Belgian ladies; Mrs.—will entertain a family; Mrs.—will take three Belgians at half price in her boarding house, she can't afford to take them free'." So run the memoranda, and the refugees are disposed of accordingly. Several of them have luggage, queerly assorted lots picked up hurriedly, bringing bags hand em broidered and battered boxes. Others have nothing but the clothes they wear. I talked with one. "I had a nice home. I shall never see it again," he said. "The Germans came that way and there was nothing left, I went to Brussels and they came there, then 1 went to Ostend—now I've come to England." "The guns roar so horribly it seems as if you can never hear again," said another. "And if you try to run away bombs are dropped on you, and that is worse. And then the spiss! There was a German in our town, Bruges, who was going to blow up the locks and drown us. It was discovered just in time." Until they have found food, shelter and kindness those who have suffered most speak little of what they have gone through. Later, they speak shudderingly of the crippled and maimed, often of little children mercilessly abused by a wanton soldiery, of wounds and dea'hs which they have witnessed, of pillaging and burning of farms and villages. Most of them have lost their all, homes, savings in the bank, the accumulations of their life and their prospects of regaining anything, hut blotting out the misery of this destitution is the horror of scenes of carnage that they have witnessed. Help is extended to these unfortunate refugees in many way*. The Belgian Ambassador and Consul are looking out for them as far a< protection and direction go. Individuals meet trains and offer assistance and the Women's F.mer. gency Corps give early aid. I he most important angency however, is the War Refugees' Committee of which Lord Hugh Cecil is chairman, Lord Gladstone honorary treasurer and H. E. Morgan honorary secretary. On the executive committee ate Lady Lugard, Lady Gladstone, Hon. Mrs. Alfred Lyttleton, Major Humphrey Leggett, Sir Charles Allom, Mrs. Walter Runciman and Sir Albert Stanley. The comittee has rooms in a central location where proferred homes and rooms for refugees are registered and investigated interpreters and helpers of all kinds are at hand and where the direction of relief in a large way is carried on. Boy Scouts act as guides to the Belgians and automobiles have been placed at the disposal of the committee. Now that it is in working order, it sends representatives to meet the arriving refugees and take them to accredited lodgings. Lady Somerset has opened her house as have other prominent persons, and the use of a great hall where five hundred may be taken care of temporarily, and a larger place, which may serve as a sort of barracks for a longer period, has been granted by the government. ENVOY BERNSTOR.FF BACKS UP GERMAN CONDUCT OF WAR. New Yotk. August 30.—Discussing the advent of Indian, African and Japanese troops in the field against Germany, Count Von Bernstorff, the German ambassador, at the Ritz Carlton this afternoon told the Free Press that the German nation greatly resented being called upon to fight these black and vellow races. "While I do not resent, personally, any criticism we have been receiving as we have nothing to excuse or to conceal,' he said, "f do resent any attack on the fair name of the German army when the flower of the German nation has taken up arms to defend their country against tremendous odds, and in doing so has to fight with Africans, East Indians.-and other men of the Asiatic races." Count Von Bernstoff was laying special stress, he said, on the (Continued on the 4th page.) •


The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02256
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Saturday, September 12, 1914
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02256

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Full Text
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Nulliue e-ddtctus (uraro In verb* magletrl.
Being bound to iwear to the Dogmas if no Master.
VOL. X.
Nassau. N. P.. Bahamas, Ssturdsy, September 12.1914
No. 214
L. GILBERT DUPUCH,
Editor and Proprietor.
OFFICE: 38-44 MARKET STREET
Nassau, N. P., Bahamas
P. O. BOX 163
PUBLISHED DAILY
Monday, Wednesday and Friday
single ropy ......... \<\
Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday
single copy......... td
Weekly ............ M
Monthly ............is. 41!
Quarterly......... ... 4s.
alfYearly............8s.
Yearly ............16s.
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
*
Advertising Rates :Six |>cnce ir line
for first insertion; three tience rwr line
.for second insertion ; and one |>enny |>er
line for subsquent insertions.
Advertisements under eight lines 4s.
BELGIANS
CROWD LONDON
WITH TALES OF HORROR
:o:
All week trains have been bring-
ing stricken Belgians They ar-
rived, dazed, in the crowded station
nnd quickly disappear in the al-
most equally dazed population of
London.
Few of them spe=k English. There
are members of the Women's
Emergency Corps to meet those
who speak French. The Flemish
tongue makes difficulties, but all
can understand at a glance that
they have sufhredthat they are
all but helpless.
Many come as familier; several
are all that aie left of families af-
ter the marauder has passed. They
arepailieticrlly patient. A woman
stands with a baby in her arms A
child holds her skirt; another has
his hand in his father's. An Ameri-
can girl hastens by with a potter
intent on recovering her lucgage.
An Fnglish party passes with golf
sticks and tennis rackets. The little
group stands unmoved A woman
with a badge on her arm steps Up
and speaks to them in French. I he
woman smiles wanly.
"Have you had anything to cat?*'
"Not since mornigg." It is then
four in the afternoon.
"Come and have, coffee, then
I will take you to a place where
you can spend the night."
Each member of the corps has a
list, which she consults when she
meets the refugees. "Ladywill
take two Belgian ladies; Mrs.will
entertain a family; Mrs.will take
three Belgians at half price in her
boarding house, she can't afford to
take them free'." So run the memo-
randa, and the refugees are dispos-
ed of accordingly.
Several of them have luggage,
queerly assorted lots picked up
hurriedly, bringing bags hand em
broidered and battered boxes.
Others have nothing but the cloth-
es they wear. I talked with one.
"I had a nice home. I shall never
see it again," he said. "The Ger-
mans came that way and there
was nothing left, I went to Brussels
and they came there, then 1 went
to Ostendnow I've come to Eng-
land."
"The guns roar so horribly it seems
as if you can never hear again," said
another. "And if you try to run
away bombs are dropped on you,
and that is worse. And then the
spiss! There was a German in our
town, Bruges, who was going to
blow up the locks and drown us.
It was discovered just in time." .
Until they have found food, shelter
and kindness those who have suf-
fered most speak little of what they
have gone through. Later, they
speak shudderingly of the crippled
and maimed, often of little chil-
dren mercilessly abused by a wan-
ton soldiery, of wounds and dea'hs
which they have witnessed, of pill-
aging and burning of farms and
villages. Most of them have lost
their all, homes, savings in the
bank, the accumulations of their
life and their prospects of regain-
ing anything, hut blotting out the
misery of this destitution is the
horror of scenes of carnage that
they have witnessed.
Help is extended to these un-
fortunate refugees in many way*.
The Belgian Ambassador and Con-
sul are looking out for them as far
a< protection and direction go. In-
dividuals meet trains and offer
assistance and the Women's F.mer.
gency Corps give early aid. I he
most important angency however,
is the War Refugees' Committee
of which Lord Hugh Cecil is
chairman, Lord Gladstone honor-
ary treasurer and H. E. Morgan
honorary secretary. On the execu-
tive committee ate Lady Lugard,
Lady Gladstone, Hon. Mrs. Alfred
Lyttleton, Major Humphrey
Leggett, Sir Charles Allom, Mrs.
Walter Runciman and Sir Albert
Stanley.
The comittee has rooms in a
central location where proferred
homes and rooms for refugees are
registered and investigated inter-
preters and helpers of all kinds are
at hand and where the direction of
relief in a large way is carried on.
Boy Scouts act as guides to the
Belgians and automobiles have
been placed at the disposal of the
committee. Now that it is in work-
ing order, it sends representatives
to meet the arriving refugees and
take them to accredited lodgings.
Lady Somerset has opened her
house as have other prominent per-
sons, and the use of a great hall
where five hundred may be taken
care of temporarily, and a larger
place, which may serve as a sort
of barracks for a longer period,
has been granted by the govern-
ment.
ENVOY BERNSTOR.FF
BACKS UP GERMAN
CONDUCT OF WAR.
New Yotk. August 30.Discuss-
ing the advent of Indian, African
and Japanese troops in the field
against Germany, Count Von Bern-
storff, the German ambassador, at
the Ritz Carlton this afternoon
told the Free Press that the Ger-
man nation greatly resented being
called upon to fight these black
and vellow races.
"While I do not resent, person-
ally, any criticism we have been
receiving as we have nothing to
excuse or to conceal,' he said, "f
do resent any attack on the fair
name of the German army when
the flower of the German nation
has taken up arms to defend their
country against tremendous odds,
and in doing so has to fight with
Africans, East Indians.-and other
men of the Asiatic races."
Count Von Bernstoff was laying
special stress, he said, on the
(Continued on the 4th page.)



Be of Good Cheer
While we await news that will
make future hletory. let us remem-
ber proudly, but without vain-
glory. England's record on Five
Continents and on the Seven Seas.
In the months of August and Sep.
tern be r.
SEPTEMBER
Sept13Plains of Abra-
ham, Wolfe and Montcalm fell.
Canada gained for Britain, 1759
French and Spaniards totally
defeated in naval engagement
in Bay of Gibraltar, 1782.
Egyptians conquered at Tel-
et-Kebir. Arabi Pasha crushed,
1882.
:o:
The War Relief Committee
met in the Council Chember on
Thursday afternoon when the
I following Report was receiv and adopted. There was a full
attendance.
Report of the Executive Com
mittae appointed to consider
and recommend what steps
should be taken to appeal most
widely and effectually to the in
habitants of this Colony for aid
to the Empire in the present
crisis.
The Executive Committee beg
to report that they met on the
afternoon of Wednesday the 9th
instant when the following
members were present:
Hon. Harcourt Malcolm,
Chairman, His Honour, F. C.
Wells Durrant, Hon. W. Hart
Bennett, His Lordship theBishop,
MrG. Weech, Hon G. H. John
son, Mr W. C. B. Johnson, Mr S.
Albert Dillet, Mr Jas. M. Rae,;
Rev W. H. F. Blebv, Hon J. R. I
C. Young, Mr W.'A. Mather.'
Mrs. T. H. C. Lofthouse, Miss
Moseley, Mrs E. T. Higgsand
Frank Holmes
It wa% unanimously agreed to
make tb,e following Rccommen
dations to the General Com
mittee
1. Thai a Sub Committee be
appointed to solicit and receive
monetary subscriptions by plac
ing subscription Lists "at The
"%ank of Nassau and the local
wuch of The Royal Bank of
pa*Ua, and by authorizing col
lectorfc^o collect personally
through^ the various Elector.. 1
l>-' -ctsrl^ Colony; that such j
ihaehave power to
associate with themselves suit
able assistants; that such sub
committee decide on an arrange
the details of the methods of
collecting; and that such Sub
Committee consist of the
following:
Hon G. H. Johnson.
Mr E. W. T. Mc Pherson.
Mr W. C. B. Johnson.
Mr W. A. Mather and
S Mr W. E. Fountain.
2. That a Sub-Committee be
appointed to solicit and receive
contributions other than money
and that such Subcommittee
con/fst of the following.
f MrsT. H. C. Lofthouse
Mrs E. T. Higgs. /
Miss Moseley. f
3. That a Sub Committee be
appointed to consider the ques
tion of obtaining local volun
teers for active service out of the
Colony and if deemed desirable
and feasible to suggest measures
for carrying out the scheme; and
that such Sub-Committee consist
of the following:
Mr R. H. C. Crawford, Com
maudant.
Mr G. M. Cole.
Mr S. Albert Dillet.
Nassau, N. P.
lothSeptember 1914.
By Order of The Executive
Committee:
Sd. HARCOURT MALCOLM
Chairman.
THE BAHAMAS
WAR RELIEF FUND
Throughout all the Dominions
of our King there is but one d
sire, to render whatever assis
tance possible in the righteous
war in which our beloved Em
pire is engaged, those who are
not able to fight want to serve
in some other way.
The people of the Bahamas tire
second to none in loyalty to King
and Empire, they are willing and
eager to prove their patriotism.
The Sub-Committee of the
Bahamas War Relief Committee
which has been appointed to
collect contributions of money
appeals, to every inhabitant
of these Islands to make a con
tribution to the War Relief
Fund, to every Church to hold
special services at which collec
tions shall be made for the
Fund, to every Friendly Society
or Charitable organization, to
every Club, sorial or athletic,
to every Association, to exert
themselves to raise money to i
aid those who are fighting, or
wounded, or suffering in our
stead.
Every contribution will be
acknowledged in the Newspa
pens of the Colony. Contribu
tions of the smallest denomina
tion will be welcomed.
Do not refrain from giving
because you cannot give a hun
dred guineas. Can you give a
shilling ? Can you give three
pence ? If you can, do not be
ashamed to come forward at
this time. A threepenny piece
may mean a sacrifice. All hon
our to the man who makes a
sacrifice now.
G H JOHNSON.
Chairman Subcommittee.
Contributions may be sent to
The Bank of Nassau, The Rov
al Bank of Canada and G M
Cole, Esq, Hon. Treas. Bahamas
War Relief-Committee.
:o:
BAHAMAS
WAR. RELIEF FUND
The following subscriptions
have been recieved :
Previously acknow-
ledged" 454 o 0
Mr. and Mrs. P. H.
Burns 800
Miss Barbara Burns 1 o o
G. Harold Adderley 10 00
Mr. and Mrs. C. O.
Anderson 10 00
22 Parliament St. 10 o o
Amelia Simon 200
R. H. Sawyer 5 5 o
W. F. Albury 550
A Friend and his wife 660
J. K. Amoury & Son 660
Wm. Hilton c r ,
Rev. and Mrs W. II F.
Bleby 220
Hon. W. Hart Bennett 26 5 o
Miss Hart Bennett < o
W. C. & F A. Tows-
send 500
Miss E. F P.^m 1 1 o
Mr. and Mrs. f, S.
Hilton 550
J. A. Thompson 1 o o
Emily L. Johnson 1 o o
Mrs. Edward George s o o
Rev C. W. Smith 500
Bruce A Bethel 230
Herbert B Bethel 2 3 o
John Roberts 1 o o
E. W. T. McPherson
& family 40 o o
T. H. K. Moulder 5 5
John T. Ageel. 2 00
Mr. and Mrs. Wolls
Durrant 36 o o
George Profit 200
Mi. an.I Mrs. G. H.
Gamblin 10 o o
Mr. and Mrs. J. A.
Bethel 200
Jno. Percival Bethel 1 1 o
Mr. and Mrs. V. H.
Saunders ju 10
The Misses Matthetvl^ 5
E. Percy Matthews 5
Chas. H. Matthews 5
Constantine Christo-
filis 2
C. Menendez 5
Arthur G. Sweeting 5
H. Newell Kelley 5
Mrs. Amalia Dillet 6
Mr. and Mrs. R. C.
deGlanville 5
F. A. Taylor 1
J. W. Matthews 5
Eastern Burial Socrety 10
Dr. and Mrs G. H. John-
son 20 o 0;
Sandilands Village,
Young Wome
Association
Miss May Holden 1
Miss Mable Stevenson 1
Mr. and Mr J Ray-
mond Hall 2
Mr. and Mrs. C. Tucker
Sands 5 50
T. E. D. Brace 20 o o
H. May Johnson 1 1 0
A Gwendolin Weech 200
Lillian A Berger 1 o 0
Mr and Mrs S Sands 220
Mr and Mrs V. T Hi^djLao o 0
Mr and Mrs C R T~
Higgs 20 o 0
'age, "I
en's r
400
2 o
853 '3 o
:o;
The Moir.r "Fiances K." left for
Miami this morning.
N. B. Rain. Plant.
Rain, plant. Rain. PLANT.
Ye shall reap as ye sow.
Addington House.
Sep. lath 1914
Sir,
Tomorrow iSundav) 5 p.m.
all being well -a procession
will start from the West end of
the Cathedralpassing via foot
of Government House Fred-
erick StreetBay Street, and so
by the West door into the Ca-
thedral. Litanies and Hymns
will be sung, on returning to the
Cathedral an addrpss will be
given; and the Church Litany
will be sung.
Our desire is thus to move
Almignty God to take lors and Soldiers into F|p pro
tection; and to give Peace in
His own good time.
All are invited to assist whe
thar in the Procession or in
Church.
Yours faithfully
* WILFRED NASSAU.
Ed. Tribune


*
OBITUARY. *
Mary, relfet of Robert Kelly
eMct
who was^Prveyor General of
the Bahama Islands early in the
last century, died at Harbour
Island on the first day of this
month at the advanced age of
92 years and 3 months.
This lady was the daughter
of James Roberts a planter and
married in her twenty second
year,Mr. Robert Kelly.
By their marriage she became
the mother of ten children and
since her husband's death in
1872, forty two years ago, 27
xand children and 31 great
rand children have grown up
ound her.
During her long widowhood
rs. Kelly won the respect and
":eem of all who knew her. She
voted herself to the Church
nd in spite of her illness and
g<* was a const nit communi-
cant at St. John's Episcopalian
Church at Harbour Island, her
quiet unostentatious Charity
and her unfailing piety made her
beloved by all that knew her.
Though expected, her death
was f.-lt to be a severe loss and
the 111 irksfjpppieciation in the
form of flofW tributes were mute
evidence of the feeling of the
community towards her.
Tile caskvt containing her
body was borne, by her special
request, by a nuaibei of her
graudsnns and was followed iin
mediately by the rest of her re
latives and a numerous body of
mourners.
The interment took place m
St. John's Churchyard, her hus-
band's grave I.ring opened to
receive the casket. The funeral
rites were celebrated by the Rev.
A F Homer, Priest of St. John*.
riiis lad\ h is ived under six
sovereigns George II, George III
VViMinm IV., Victoria, Edward
VII., and (ieorge V.
It may be interesting to know
that Mrs. Kelly was a sufferer in
the historical calamity of the
Glass Window, her eldest son
having been one of the victims
of the idal wave that swept so
many into eternity.
:o:
OFFICIAL
SqK nth. 1914.
London,! ith.
Governor,
Nassau.
Following from Press Bureau:
On Wednesday and Thursday
a strong British squadron and
Flotilla completely swept the
North Sea up to and into Heli-
goland Bight. The German fleet
did not interfere and no German
ships were seen. In an engage-
ment in Nyassaland we captur
ed two field and two machine
guns.
Further casualty list up to
September 7th:
Killed wounded-missing
Officers 10 63 61
Other ranks 62 510 4863
(Signed)
IIARCOUT.
:o:
OOVKKNMENT PKRS8
The bombardment of Belgrade
has been resumed and consider-
able damage has been done.
The Belgian army at Antwerp
is reported 10 have assumed a
triumphant offensive movement,
driving the German right back
to the environs of Louvain.
I'ope Bent diet XV. has re-
quested the ambassadors of the
nations at war that recognize
the Holy See to ascertain the
sentiment of their governments
regarding papal peace appeal.
Floods delay the i< uvn\ of
the Japanese at Isingiau. Mans
lives have been lost ,nid it will
be many months before the
Japanese can invest the German
Stronghold which is approach
able only by boasts.
The Belgians have routed the
Germans at Aerschotaud rele is
ed 2b Priests who had been in]
prisoned in a cljurch.
The British and French pur
sue the Germans who have re
treated from near the River
Marne. During the four days
battle in the neighbourhood of
Paris the* Allies have pushed the
Germans back 37 miles, taking
inuny prisoners and machine
guns.
The Belgians have flooded tlie
country to the south of Antwerp
to prevent the Germans from
reaching that city.
Prince Joachim AI breed t of
Prussia has been wounded in
the thigh by a rifle bullet.
The French view that the Ger
mans are becoming exhausted is
given credence by military ex
perts.
None of the events in France
have been published in Berlin
(during the past three days.
The press of Berlin protest
about alleged cruelties to prison
6SS by the allies
* It is reported that the German
Crown Prince has been appoint-
ed commander-in-chief of the
forces operating against the
Russians.
Hungary is irritated over the
Roumanian movement and is
favouring the triple entente.
(2) September nth 1914
The Burgomaster of Ghent is
praised by the populace for sav
ing the city from attack by the
Germans.
News from the conflict in the
east is very contradictory.
The British losses to date
are placed at 19.000.
It is reported that the cruiser
Pathfinder was destroyed by a
submarine and not by a mine, as
was at first reported.
There is no present prospect
of European peace.
A protest has been made in
House of Commons against
meagre and false news of the
war.
Reports from Berlin stale that
the Germans have lost 42.000
men to date.
.0:
OFFICIAL
September 12th 1914.
London, nth.
I iovernor,
Nassau.
Following ft .m Press Bureau
regarding position in France
gerer.il retreat of German army
'niiinued yesterday.
Between prisouersand wound-
ed the British forces captured
1 500 besides several guns maxim
and a large quantity of trans-
port.
The Enemy retired very rapid
ly Fast of Soissons in some dis-
order.
A later telegram states that
yesterdays captures were larger
than stated above.
Considerable bodies of Infan
try are being found hiding in
the woods, they being left behind
owing to the rapidity of the re
treat.
They surrender on sight. This
and the rifling of villages and
evidence of drunkenness point
to the Demoralization of the
routed army.
Pursuit is being vigorously
pressed.
(Signed)
Harcourt.
:o:
Special to The Xassau Guardian
The Kaiser's concentrated
troops made a desperate attempt
by a night attack to break the
Allies centre.
The battle tasted all night but
the Germans were pushed back
along the whole front and rout
ed.
The German army shows signs
of dru
aliza
Berlin
was crushe
PICKED UP
The great battle still goes on
The Germans however have fal-
len back 47 miles and are being
closely pursued by the Allies
who are hammering them un-
mercifully.
The German left under the
crown prince still holds its
ground.
The Kaiser has been located
at Luxemburg. He narrowly
escaped death when bombs were
dropped by a Belgian or French
aeroplane.
German aeroplanes now search
the heavens all night with
searchlights so as to safeguard
the Kaiser.
Berlin advices state that Gene
ral Von Stein admits the retreat
and says that defeat is due to the
allies superior numbers.
Ostend advices are to the ef
feet that Belgian forces are keep
ing at the heels of the Germans
who are being rushed towads
France as reinforcement, and are
harrassing them greatly.
The Germans deny Russian
successes and say that Cracow
lias not been taken. They also
say that the Austrians have be
gun offensive movements near
Lemberg.
The Servians have captured
Semlinon the opposite s.de of
the river from Belgrade.
London: In the midst of the
European war Great Britain,
France, Russia, and China have
agreed to sign peace commission
treaties with the United States.
One effect of the new conven
lion would be to prevent the
United States from being drawn
suddenly into the conflict.
Antwerp:The Belgian gov
ermneiit estimates the damage
done to Belgium from the war,
up to the present, will total up
to two hundred million dollars.
(Continued on Supplement)
IMPERIAL
THEATRE
Wednesday
Friday
and Saturday
Doors open 7.30
Performance begin
at 8.15 p.m.
L
SB
1


Supplement to
The Tribune
Saturday, September 12, 1914
September 1 2th i''4-
The German centre and right
wing are retreating. The Brit-
ish have taken ii cannon and
many prisoners
President Wilson has called on
the Turkish Ambassador to
Washington to account for re-
cent newspaper statements at-
tributed to him.
The statement which caused
the inquiry charged that Great
Britain was attempting t<> draw
the United States into the Eu-
ropean war by Biking that
American warships go t<> Tur-
key; agitatirg "Before the eyes
of the United States the sprctre
of a massacre of Christians."
He explained why there bail
been some massacres in Turkey:
The Victims suffered as political
agitators trying to undermine
the Ottoman State, and not
as Christians.
Tne Austrians are reported to
have re-assumed the offensive in
the Lemberg district.
The Servian occupation of
Semlin causes rejoicing among
the people at having inflicted
humiliation upon the powerful
enemy.
French military authorities
issue a statement giving lengthy
description* of the unit im| 01
tant battle since llie war began.
The Germans arc abandoning
the advance positions held by
them.
The French Embassy denies
the German report that Nau
beuge has been captured, with
400 guns and 40,000 men.
President Poincaire denies
that the French have used duni
dum bullets, and charges the
Germans with committing such
offense daily.
The powers announce that
they will not the abrogation of
treaty rights to foreigners as
announced by the Turkish
government.
The French have christened
the great struggle as "The
Battle of the Mame"
The Germans have been de
feated atTremonde, Belgium.
The Pope is preparing to ap
peal for a cessation of hostili
ties.
German troops have been re
pulsed in Russian Finland with
he;ivy losses.
New Orleans: Bubonic
plague is about stamped out for
tlie first time since June 27th No
cases arc under treatment
Special
Notice.
Jf.ST RECEIVED
Per S. S. "Santiago."
Fresh New Potatoes (Irish)
Selling at 4 cents Per ll>.
also
Medium Size Onions at
8 Cents Pec lb.
Baker's Cocoa I tins
at is. Eacii
Baker's Cocoa \ tins
at Od. Each
Call early at
THE ROYAL STORE,
J. L. Saindeks 8t Co.


ill
to the
more
to the
to interview Chancellor
rThe matter was brought up
when the ambassador was asked
if there was a way of getting the
German viewpoint on these ques-
tions direct from the Imperial chan-
cellor of Germany.
"I am representing the German
nation in this country," he said,
and have been authorized to pre-
sent the German viewpoint. It
would be very difficult if not im
possible to receive any direct state-
ment from the Imperial chancel
lor."
Count Von Bernstorff discussed
the justification of the Germans in
bombarding Antwerp from air
ships.
"You ask me if the dropping of
bombs on Antwerp is justifiable.
My opinion is that it is justifiable,
because Antwerp is a fortress which
we are besieging and which we
intend to take if we can."
"Have any of the belligerents at-
ticked unfortified cities from the
air ?" the ambassador was asked.
Suggests Non.Combatants Leave.
"Well, the French did it over
Nuremburg," he said. "As to the
report that Germans have done
likewise, certainly not. But, if a
report that Germans have been
dropping bombs on Paris, which
just reached me this afternoon, is
true, I believe it to be justifiable
the same motive applying as in the
case of Antwerp. Fortresses have
always been built for the purpose
of resisting attacks. Non-belliger-
ents should leave:* besieged city or
else take the consequences."
"In your opinion was the burn-
ing of I.ouvam in accordance with
the rules of war?" was another
query put by the Free Press report-
er.
"I certainly do," the count replied
willi feeling "especially after hav-
ing the official staiement of the
German authorities concerning the
mistreatment of German soldiers by
civilians. War is always and under
all circumstances, a terrible oideal
for those concerned. To mitigate
this trial, which the people have
to stand, the principle of civilized
warfare rests on the assumptiou
that #n1y soldiers '>' one nation
shoujd fi^ht against .Idiers of an-
other oat ion,
:o-
CZAR RENAMES CAPITAL
London, !fepta i. A despatch lo
the Reuter Telegram Co, from St.
Petersburg, says, that by Imperial
rder, the city of St. Pe'tersbuig,
lital of the Russian Empire
p. 1712, and founded by Peter
Great in 1703, will henceforth
aown as Petrograd. This
change eliminates the Teuton con-
struction in the name by which it
has been known since it was found-
ed.
Burg or berg is a German word
and means a Mountain, mount,
fortress. [Fditor.
Fop Rent
SEA FRONT PROPERTY
recently occupied by Mr.
Timothy Culmer with three
Warehouses thereon. Stor-
age capacity 1200 bales Sisal
suitable for Sponge business
also.
Applvto
WALTER K. MOORE.
i#FUSSELp
CONDENSED
MILK
BITTER FLY g
'"PARED BT .,
Fussell&c-^
AoHw/iyf-
Shingles
Best No. 1 Heart 5m. Cypres
Shingles at $9.60 per thous-
sand of 20 bundles
Discounts on lots of over
5000 shingles.
Special Price
also on cheaper gradesalso
5in. Cypress at $6.72 per
thousand of 20 bundles. This
price made possible by a very
large purchase.
Fresh stock arriving every
week.
C. C. SAUNDERS.
LOOK!
The followjagBljVlk forms
maybe had at "T^JribunC
Office. .
Duty Entryif-
Free Entry.
Warehouse Entries.
Sponging Articles.
In quantities at SpecialRates
Johnson's
Artistic Wood
Finishes
ohmon'i Prepared Wu- com
plete finish and polish for all furniture,
woodwork and floors.
Johnson'* Wood Dyefor the artistic
coloring of all wood, soft or hard
Johnson's Under Laca spirit
finish, very much superior to shellac or
varnish
Johnson's Flo.t Wood Finish f< r.1
beautiful, artistic, hand-rubbed effete
without thi4 expense of rubbini.'.
Johnson's Pevste Wood Fillerfor
filling the grain anil pores of wood,
preparing it for the finish.
Johnson's Powdered Waxfor ball
room floors.
FOR. SALE BY
Chas. E. Albury
W A. MATHER
UNDERTAKER
DESIRES to inform his friends
and the Public that he has
just received a complete outfit of
facilities for the buisness of an un-
dertaker, which places him in a
position to carry out Funerals that
may be entrusted to his care with
system and despatch ; and respect
fully solicits their patronage Get
my Prices first and piove that these
are the very lowest for thefirst class
work.
WILLIAMS THE SHOE-]
MAN hasjust received a
larger assortment of '
LADIES. MISSES and CENTS
SAPLE BOOTS e.nd SHOES
inONE, TWO. ANDTHKLE-I
pair lots
The sizes for ladies are limitedj
to 3J, 4 and 4^
Misses13, 1 and 2
Gents6, 6 and 7
The Shoes having been solt
Williams. The Shoeman
at a liberal discount, the pn
pal disadvantage being th
limited sizes, lie is disposing
of them at
not lees the.n 20 percent leee thai
the regular prices such
grades would be.
His kind patrons and the gen-|
eral public will please take
Special Notice
of the above size* mentioned '
and in calling MBtliam will
see for themselvftthat they
are obtaining Real Bargains
at I
Williams' Wholesale and Rate.!]
Shoe Establishment
2?7, 279 Bay Street (City)
Notice
This is lo inform the public
thatif any person or persons
are found trespassing onjmv lot of
land situate on Forbes Hill in
the Island rff Little Exuma, they
will he dealt with according to
the Law.
EARNEST CLARKE
(Owner)
JACOB CLARKE
(Overseer)
Forbes Hill, Little Exuma
July 23rd 1914.
Kerosene
1502
IN New 50 gallon Galvaniz-
ed Iron Drums at i8cts
per Gallon.
In 10 gallon Cans at 20cts
per. Gallon.
Drums and Cans returnable
Ifull particulars at Office
"Frances E.," Nassau N. P..
C. C. SAUNDERS
"NEW NATIONAL"*
"IDEAL"
HAND MACHINES
NEW HOME" FOOT MACHINES
FOR SALE BY
chas.e.albur:
Notice
IT has been said that til
Doctors of Nassau say tin
I'ure Fresh Milk i* unobtainab|
in Nassau.
I hereby invite any Doctor
Nassau to come u||e my Dait
and show wherein me milksii|
plied by me is in anyway in
pare.
T. M. KNOWLES
Dairyman.


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