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/ Zbe Urfbune Saturday. August 29.1914 Be of Good Cheer While we await newi that will make future history, let u remember proudly, but without vain, glory. England's record on Five Continent* and on the Seven Seaa, in the months of August and September. AUGUST Aug 29.— Naval Victory off Winchelsea,Edward III. crushed Spaniards, 1350. —:o:— The following telegram was despatched yesterday by His Excellency the Governor: Nassau, August 28th, British Ambassador, — :o:— The following reply has been received, in answer to Mis Ex cellency the Governors protest against stoppage of news tele grams: Washington 28th August. The Governor, The Bahamas. Your telegram of today, am making reprtsentations. Spring Rice. Again we find ourselves with out news of the war, owing to our being under obligations to foreign connection. Such news as we do get, "picked up" is vague and contradic tory, and the fact remains that we are dependent upon the ar rival of the mails for news, as much so today, as we were in the Crimean War; and but for the energy of our enterprizing citizen Mr. C. C. Saunders and his "Frances E." ouroppor'uni ties in the way of mails would not be near so good as they are; so we may just as well resign ourselves to fate and patiently wait for next Wednesday, fine weather, and the "Frances E." Such news as we do get leaves no room to doubt that the conflict is a most horrifying one a realization of which would fill our very souls with terror. It will be long before we know, perhaps we may never know, the destruction of human life, the misery and the suffer ing, sacaificed and endured by those engaged in this deadly strife and connected with them and those living <,n and around the site of the sanguinarv strug gle. Distant as we are from the frightful scene and only indi rectly participating therein we will not escape our share of suf fering; prolongation of the war means greater suffering for us, and the sooner our people com prehend the situation the better will it be for them. The expe rience will doubtless be unpre cedented, but its severity may be greatly modified by looking matters in the face, and intelli gently adjusting ourselves to the altered conditions. It is of no use to it down with folded hands and expect to be fed by ravens, via Govern ment Horise, l £o backto the land, and go nmv while there is yet time, there you will get bread, but you will have to dig for it. We advise plant, plentifully; yesterday's shower is a promise of the needed rain, your part is to plant. —:o: — (Communicated) Again wc are called upon to face overwhelming odds, to cast our lot in battle with the nation whose power and ambition has become the astonishment and dread of the world. The call has gone forth to the ends of the earth and already are the children of the Empire harnessing their hosts for the fray. Already have the sorrows and reverses of fortune on the field given cause for apprehension England is suffering and the hearts of her children must move in sympathy for her in her misfortune. What more fitting opportunity can be offered for a demonstration of our feeling toward the land that we have learned to love. Let us not await victory. It is well to join in the shouting and to rejoice when triumph is at hand? But it is far nobler and much more inspiring to cheer in the dark hour of adversity. Shall we reserve our patriotism for the jubilee and have no hope to offer in the dissaster of defeat. Our importance can have no bearing on this feature of national duty. It must cheer the heart of England to feel that the least of her children is not regardless of the sacrfices she is making and of the suffering that she endures. And that like her they are prepared to make sacrifices for the Flag. This war is the struggle between despotism and liberty, between the Milatarism of Germany and the independence of England. If we lose, monstrous supposition, militarism will fasten its iron fangs on the liberties of man. 11 we lose the fabric of our glorious Empire will crum ble away and the constitution that has given countless millions liberty totter to its fall. Germany's triumph will be a greater calamity than the inva sion of Huns under Attila or of the Moslems under Saladin it will mean the dissolution of the Empire whose Flag has won the respect and envy of the world, and the love and confidence of every creed and class under the sun. Let the people of Nassau, of the Bahamas unite in a Monster meeting at which there will be a representation of every class and that our unanimous vote will be. Sympathy. Confidence. Service. — :o:— SYMPATHY Fellow Feelings No condolence for defeat but indentification of interest. RADIOGRAMS. ~~ i PICKED UPJ L August 29th 19 rj? The Germans claim to have surrounded the right and left wings of the allies army and to have penetrated the centre. They assert that the allies are in full retreat in Belgium. The allies give out but little news claiming that the relative positions of the armies is practically the same. Both armies are worn out, and the Germans are suffering from lack of food. Russians continue to flood Germany in millions, also are over-running Austria where they are surrounding Lembary, the"capital of Galicia. The Kaiser has given orders for the rushing of troops to Prussia. The British fleet sunk two German cruisers and two torpedo boat destroyers near Heligoland. Tlie British did not hae any ships, but eight men were lulled. Turkey is at any moment expected to cast her lot with Germany. H M ll< IMPERIAL ANTHEM Word* by H. C. CHRISTIE Mualc by M.C. DeLotbinere Harwood One King, One Throne, One Flag forever free Following the sun from shining pole to pole, Emblem of honour, truth and unity Riding in glory to its destined goal. From oceans, islands, seas and continents Wher'eeron earth thy banner is unfurled, Millions will rise to die in its defence And prove their faithfulness to all the world. Children of Empire dwell in every zone None too remote to love anddionour thee They will defend the majesty and throne And sacrifice their lives for liberty. We love thee England, land of ancient fame Of mighty heroes who have fought for right No battle cry can rouse us like thy name And for'thy glory will thy children fight. No foes shall fright them no clangers appall When all thy legions arm for libity t^. What can withstand them when thy bugles caflfc* To follow where thou leadst to victory. Children of Empire dwell in every zone None too remote to love and honour thee They will defend the Majesty and Throne And sacrifice their lives for liberty.



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IT •* %  PRESS NEW8 Aug. 29th 1914. President W


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ve handled the Japanese ultrYnajm to Germany comes in part through the receipt by him today of a petition from the GermanAmerican Verein asking him to intervene with J.ip.in on behalf of Germany. Of course, such a course is impossible if the United States is to maintain its position of absolute neutrality. LOOK! The following Blank forms maybe had at "TheTribune" Office. Duty Entry. Free Entry. Warehouse Entries. Sponging Articles. In quantities at SpecialRates A 1 FOP Sale lot of land situate in the Southern suburbs; Boundaries East by Ian.I of Thomas Johnson ; West, by land of Ellis Mason ; North by land of Peter Storr, and South by a public lane. Apply to STANLEY MASON Rupture Cured The Brooks Appliance W A. MATHER UNDERTAKER D ESIRES lo inform his friends and the Public that re has just received a complete outfit of facilities for the buisness of an undertaker, which places him in a position to carry out Funerals that I may be entrusted to bis care with system and despatch ; and respect fully solicits their patronage Get my Prices first and pmve that these i are the very lowest for the first class | work. BESTJr:;76 2 Test. We do not sell it. B U we do sell and will, continue to sell Standard Oil Co. Gasoline. Test your Gasoline. We invite comparison with any in the City. Price 22cts. per gallon in 50 gallon Drums.Customers using 100 gals, or over per Month 2oc. gallon. Watch our Notice for Kerosene in June. C. C. SAUNDERS Notice T in's is to inform the public thfltif any person or persons are found trespassing on'mv l"t of land situate on Forbes Hill in I the Island of Little Exuina, they will be dealt with according to the Law. EARNEST CLARKE (Owner) JACOB CLARKE 9 (Overseer! Forbes Hill, Little Exunia July 23rd 1914. 1 Tke above la C. E. Brook*, who aai hern < 'arias flupturr for our 90 reara. If Ituiiiurrd, write aim today. My Appliance Sent on Trial If you have tried everything etna, rome to me. I have my greatest success where others fall. Send attached coupon today and I will sond you, free, my Illustrated book on Rupture and Its cure. Riving you the namea of many people who have tried my appliance and are extremely grateful. It gives constant relief where all others fall. I make It to your measure and aand It to you on a strict guarantee of satisfaction or money refunded, and I have put my price so low that anybody, rich or poor, can buy It. I send It on trial to prove what I say Is true. nU OFT TKT.T. COT-PON BELOW AMI IHMT TODAY Pootsie *.<-, Prnrr. or lr, In r. ., A. niEE INTORMATION COM ON C. I" Dronki, n HI si 111.. fit., Marshall, Michifsn, I.". 8. A. riciiw send mil by post, In plain wrappir, your lllimtrsieil Book ami full Infiirmsllon about your Appllaoce for th cura of rupturs. Nam* A CELLY C ib No 40. 1 Wk. For Sale n EFRIGERATOR in good able. condition. Price Reason* Apply "Tribune Office' TIME MONEY e.nd LABOUR. SAVER. **T*HE New VacuiHn Washer is I the latest invention for Washer women ; this is a new machine which will wash a tub full of clothes in ten minute*. It ij very Simple a child can use it. Try one and be convinced. W 11.1JAMS THE SHOE-MAN Kflsjust received a larger nssoi tment of LADIES. MISSES and GENTS SAPLE BOOTS and SHOES in ONE, TWO, AND THREE pair lots Thesizes for tadirare limited in ; %  ,',. 4 and 4] Misse***-—13, I and 2 Onis6, i'! iinil 7 The Shoes having been sold William*. The Shoemn.n at a liberal discount, the principal disadvantage being the limited sizes, he is disposing < f thorn at not leas than 20 percent leas than the regular prices such grade* would be. His kind patrons and the general public will please take Special Notice of the above sizes mentioned and in calling for them will see fm iliinis' hos that thev are obtaining Ueal Bargains Williams' Wholesale and Retail Shoe Establishment 277, 279 I5.iv Street (.City) .* For Result Advertise in The Tribune Sold by R. T. ROBEI Sponge Eichange GrdKry Sole Ager\t forth' Bahamas Johnson's Artistic Wood Finishes Johnson's Prepared Wax—.1 com* plats' finish ami polish, tut .ill furmtuie, w.i. idwi tk ;ni(l Noun. Johnson's Wood Dye—fur the artistic Dilorina of all wiinil, soft or hard Johnson's fnder Lac a spirit finish, very nuirli superior to shellac or vainish Johnson's Flrt Wood Finish—fnra beautiful, artistic, hand nibbed effete withnut the npenM of rubbing, Johnson's Pa.sfi Wood r iller 1 flllin;,' the grain ami jmres of wood, pra)pariiM( it f 1 the finish Johnson's Powdered Wax —for ball room Hours. FOR. SALE BY Chas. E. Albury Notice r ills is to inform my Patrons and the Public in General that I have npf>n*d my Pi I'lack Smith Shop; and am teadv In do anything in 1 -. I %  r (ieneial repair orjiew \\ rk Horse Shoeing Miecially. All ork done Mechanically. P. A. IIUYLER. •ncrai ""^aWr Buy East St. fWlwr') r



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_ •* % % %  I ZZ** CD IB > 3 c N Me CD (D fa 05 Nulliue fvddicttis |urare In verbs rruvglstri. Being bound to swear to the DogmM %  ! no Master VOL. X. Nassau. N. P.. Bahamas. Saturday. Auguat 29. 1914 No. 215 L. GILBKUT DUI'CCII, Editor and Proprietor. OFKICK: 38-41 MARKRT STHKKT Nassau, N. P., Bahamas P. O. BOX 183 PUBLISHED DAILY Monday, Wednesday and Fiiday single copy ... ... ... JJ Tuesday, Tlmrsilay and Saturday— single copy ,,| Weekly .1,1 Monthfy •... ;:; l i .-{J d Quarterly 4 S HalfYearly '" ,' Year 'y u k PATABLBIN ADVANCE ne ne rivertiting Rates:— Six pence |*r li f_"i first insertion; three pence pec I, ITtecood insertion ; and one penny per ne for sul>squent insertion... Advertisements under eight lines 4s. WILSON AIMS BLOW AT ALARMISTS WHO STRESS PERIL OF JAPS WASHINGTON. AIM. 18Pretidant Wilson h is sm ill patience with the alarmists who perceive trouble for the United States in every new development of the war in Europe. Today he felt called upon to issue a statement to this effect. He himself has the situation so well in hand and knows so thoroughly lhat the United States is not involved and believes it cannot !>•• involved that he regard's with contempt the attempts ol the alarmists to stir up the country. At the same time lie realizes that, ii not checked, they may contaminate the public confidence. There, fore he h is prepared and issued a statement advising all the citizens of the country to keep coof and rest easy. The President's statement follows: "My fellow countrymen, Isuppose Jiat every thoughtful man in Amend lias asked himself during the last troubled weeks, what Influence the European war may evert upon the United States and I take the liberty of addressing a few words to you in order to point out that it entirely within our own choice hat its effects upon us will lie and to urge very earnestly upon you the sort of speech and conduct which will best safeguard the nation against distress and disaster. The effect of the, war upon the United States will depend upon what American citizens say and do. Every man who really loves America will act and speak in the true spirit of neutrality which is the spirit of impariality and fairness and friendliness to all concerned. The spirit of the nation in this critical matter will be determined largely by what individuals in society and those gathered in public meetings do and say, upon what newspapers and magazinescontain, upon what our ministers utter in their pulpits and men proclaim as their opinions on the streets. NATURALLY DIVIDED "The people of the United States are drawn from many nations and chiefly from the nations now at war. It is natural and inevitable that there should be the utmost variety of sympathy and deire among them with regard to the issues and circumstances of the conflict. Some will wish one nation, others another, to succeed in the momentous struggle. It will be easy to excite passion and difficult to allay it. Those responsible for exciting it will assume a he ivy responsibility-responsibility for no less a thing than that the people of the United States, whose I >veof their country and whose loyalty to Us government should unite them as Americans all, bound in honor and affection to think first of her and her interests, may be divided into camps of hostile opinions, hot against each other, involved in the war itself in impulse and opinion if not in action. Such diversions amongst us would be fatal to our peace of mind, and might seriously stand in the way of the proper performance of our duty as the one great nation at p^acthe one people holding itself ready to play a pirt of impartial mediation and speak thecounselsof pe.-me and accommodation, not as a patisan but as a friend. MUST BE IMPARTIAL "I venture therefore, my fellow countrymen, to speak a solemn word of warning to you against that deepest, most subtle, most essential breach of neutrality which may spring out of partisanship, out of passionately taking sides. The United States must be neutral in fact as well as in name during these days that are to try men's souls. We must be impartial in thought as well as in action must put a curb upon our sentiments as well as upon every transaction that might be construed as a preference of one party to the struggle before another. •"My thought is of America. I am speaking, I feel sure, the earnest wish and purpose of every thought ful American that this great country of ours, which is of course, the first in our thoughts and in our hearts, should show herself in this time of peculiar trhl a nation fit beyond others to exhibit the fine poise of undisputed judgment, the dignity of self-control', the efficiency of dispassionate action a match that neither sits in judgment upon others nor is disturbed in her own cousels and which keeps herself fit and free to do what is honest and disinterested and truly serviceable for the peace of the world. "Shall we not resolve to put up on ourselves the restraint which will bring to our people the happiness and the great find lasting influence for p*ace we covet for the m ?" VEREIN PETITI )^J CONCERNED. The president's statement has a direct bearing on someoig.inizations endeavoring to work up sympathy and prejudice. The president doesn't care about these attempts in themselves, but is fearful of their effect on the masses of Unpeople. They are calculated to produce excitement and r.ice prejudice than which there is nothing more unreasonable to deal with in times of excitement. Therefore the president's request ran be interpreted as a plea to the German \mericans the IrishAmcricans the Anglo-Americans and all the hyphenated stocks of European descent. The president's desire to warn the country against the inflammatory manner in which some newspaper-*


The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02248
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Saturday, August 29, 1914
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02248

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Nulliue fvddicttis |urare In verbs rruvglstri.
Being bound to swear to the DogmM ! no Master
VOL. X.
Nassau. N. P.. Bahamas. Saturday. Auguat 29. 1914
No. 215
L. GILBKUT DUI'CCII,
Editor and Proprietor.
OFKICK: 38-41 MARKRT STHKKT
Nassau, N. P., Bahamas
P. O. BOX 183
PUBLISHED DAILY
Monday, Wednesday and Fiiday__
single copy ... ... ... jj
Tuesday, Tlmrsilay and Saturday
single copy .......... ,,|
Weekly ......... .1,1
Monthfy ...... ... ;:;li.-{Jd
Quarterly....... 4S
HalfYearly......... '" ,'
Year'y .........uk
PATABLBIN ADVANCE

ne
ne
rivertiting Rates: Six pence |*r li
f_"i first insertion; three pence pec I, _
ITtecood insertion ; and one penny per
ne for sul>squent insertion...
Advertisements under eight lines 4s.
WILSON AIMS BLOW
AT ALARMISTS WHO
STRESS PERIL OF JAPS
WASHINGTON. Aim. 18-
Pretidant Wilson h is sm ill patience
with the alarmists who perceive
trouble for the United States in
every new development of the war
in Europe. Today he felt called up-
on to issue a statement to this effect.
He himself has the situation so
well in hand and knows so thor-
oughly lhat the United States is
not involved and believes it can-
not !> involved that he regard's
with contempt the attempts ol the
alarmists to stir up the country.
At the same time lie realizes that,
ii not checked, they may contami-
nate the public confidence. There,
fore he h is prepared and issued a
statement advising all the citizens
of the country to keep coof and rest
easy.
The President's statement follows:
"My fellow countrymen, Isuppose
Jiat every thoughtful man in Ame-
nd lias asked himself during the
last troubled weeks, what Influence
the European war may evert upon
the United States and I take the
liberty of addressing a few words
to you in order to point out that it
" entirely within our own choice
hat its effects upon us will lie
and to urge very earnestly upon
you the sort of speech and con-
duct which will best safeguard the
nation against distress and disaster.
" The effect of the, war upon the
United States will depend upon
what American citizens say and
do. Every man who really loves
America will act and speak in the
true spirit of neutrality which is
the spirit of impariality and fair-
ness and friendliness to all concern-
ed. The spirit of the nation in this
critical matter will be determined
largely by what individuals in so-
ciety and those gathered in public
meetings do and say, upon what
newspapers and magazinescontain,
upon what our ministers utter in
their pulpits and men proclaim as
their opinions on the streets.
Naturally Divided
"The people of the United States
are drawn from many nations and
chiefly from the nations now at
war. It is natural and inevitable
that there should be the utmost
variety of sympathy and deire
among them with regard to the
issues and circumstances of the con-
flict. Some will wish one nation,
others another, to succeed in the
momentous struggle. It will be
easy to excite passion and difficult
to allay it. Those responsible for
exciting it will assume a he ivy
responsibility-responsibility for no
less a thing than that the people
of the United States, whose I >veof
their country and whose loyalty to
Us government should unite them
as Americans all, bound in honor
and affection to think first of her
and her interests, may be divided
into camps of hostile opinions, hot
against each other, involved in the
war itself in impulse and opinion
if not in action.
Such diversions amongst us would
be fatal to our peace of mind, and
might seriously stand in the way
of the proper performance of our
duty as the one great nation at
p^ac- the one people holding itself
ready to play a pirt of impartial
mediation and speak thecounselsof
pe.-me and accommodation, not as
a patisan but as a friend.
MUST BE IMPARTIAL
"I venture therefore, my fellow
countrymen, to speak a solemn
word of warning to you against
that deepest, most subtle, most
essential breach of neutrality which
may spring out of partisanship, out
' of passionately taking sides. The
United States must be neutral in
fact as well as in name during
these days that are to try men's
souls. We must be impartial in
thought as well as in action must
put a curb upon our sentiments as
well as upon every transaction
that might be construed as a pre-
ference of one party to the struggle
before another.
"My thought is of America. I am
speaking, I feel sure, the earnest
wish and purpose of every thought
ful American that this great coun-
try of ours, which is of course, the
first in our thoughts and in our
hearts, should show herself in this
time of peculiar trhl a nation fit
beyond others to exhibit the fine
poise of undisputed judgment, the
dignity of self-control', the effici-
ency of dispassionate action a
match that neither sits in judgment
upon others nor is disturbed in her
own cousels and which keeps her-
self fit and free to do what is hon-
est and disinterested and truly
serviceable for the peace of the
world.
"Shall we not resolve to put up
on ourselves the restraint which will
bring to our people the happiness
and the great find lasting influence
for p*ace we covet for the m ?"
VEREIN PETITI )^J
CONCERNED.
The president's statement has a di-
rect bearing on someoig.inizations
endeavoring to work up sympathy
and prejudice. The president
doesn't care about these attempts
in themselves, but is fearful of
their effect on the masses of Un-
people. They are calculated to pro-
duce excitement and r.ice prejudice
than which there is nothing more
unreasonable to deal with in times
of excitement.
Therefore the president's request
ran be interpreted as a plea to the
German \mericans the IrishAmcri-
cans the Anglo-Americans and all
the hyphenated stocks of European
descent.
The president's desire to warn the
country against the inflammatory
manner in which some newspaper-*


/
Zbe Urfbune
Saturday. August 29.1914
Be of Good Cheer
While we await newi that will
make future history, let u remem-
ber proudly, but without vain,
glory. England's record on Five
Continent* and on the Seven Seaa,
in the months of August and Sep-
tember.
AUGUST
Aug 29. Naval Victory off
Winchelsea,Edward III. crushed
Spaniards, 1350.
:o:
The following telegram was
despatched yesterday by His
Excellency the Governor:
Nassau, August 28th,
British Ambassador,
:o:
The following reply has been
received, in answer to Mis Ex
cellency the Governors protest
against stoppage of news tele
grams:
Washington 28th August.
The Governor,
The Bahamas.
Your telegram of today, am
making reprtsentations.
Spring Rice.
Again we find ourselves with
out news of the war, owing to
our being under obligations to
foreign connection.
Such news as we do get, "pick-
ed up" is vague and contradic
tory, and the fact remains that
we are dependent upon the ar
rival of the mails for news, as
much so today, as we were in
the Crimean War; and but for
the energy of our enterprizing
citizen Mr. C. C. Saunders and
his "Frances E." ouroppor'uni
ties in the way of mails would
not be near so good as they are;
so we may just as well resign
ourselves to fate and patiently
wait for next Wednesday, fine
weather, and the "Frances E."
Such news as we do get
leaves no room to doubt that the
conflict is a most horrifying one
a realization of which would fill
our very souls with terror.
It will be long before we
know, perhaps we may never
know, the destruction of human
life, the misery and the suffer
ing, sacaificed and endured by
those engaged in this deadly
strife and connected with them
and those living <,n and around
the site of the sanguinarv strug
gle.
Distant as we are from the
frightful scene and only indi
rectly participating therein we
will not escape our share of suf
fering; prolongation of the war
means greater suffering for us,
and the sooner our people com
prehend the situation the better
will it be for them. The expe
rience will doubtless be unpre
cedented, but its severity may
be greatly modified by looking
matters in the face, and intelli
gently adjusting ourselves to the
altered conditions.
It is of no use to it down
with folded hands and expect
to be fed by ravens, via Govern
ment Horise, lo back- to the
land, and go nmv while there is
yet time, there you will get
bread, but you will have to dig
for it.
We advise plant, plentifully;
yesterday's shower is a promise
of the needed rain, your part is
to plant. .
:o:
(Communicated)
Again wc are called upon
to
face overwhelming odds, to cast
our lot in battle with the nation
whose power and ambition has
become the astonishment and
dread of the world.
The call has gone forth to
the ends of the earth and already
are the children of the Empire
harnessing their hosts for the fray.
Already have the sorrows and
reverses of fortune on the field
given cause for apprehension
England is suffering and the
hearts of her children must
move in sympathy for her in her
misfortune.
What more fitting opportuni-
ty can be offered for a dem-
onstration of our feeling toward
the land that we have learned
to love. Let us not await vic-
tory. It is well to join in the
shouting and to rejoice when
triumph is at hand? But it is far
nobler and much more inspiring
to cheer in the dark hour of ad-
versity. Shall we reserve our
patriotism for the jubilee and
have no hope to offer in the dis-
saster of defeat.
Our importance can have no
bearing on this feature of na-
tional duty. It must cheer the
heart of England to feel that the
least of her children is not re-
gardless of the sacrfices she is
making and of the suffering that
she endures. And that like her
they are prepared to make sac-
rifices for the Flag.
This war is the struggle be-
tween despotism and liberty,
between the Milatarism of Ger-
many and the independence of
England. If we lose, monstrous
supposition, militarism will fas-
ten its iron fangs on the liberties
of man. 11 we lose the fabric of
our glorious Empire will crum !
ble away and the constitution
that has given countless millions
liberty totter to its fall.
Germany's triumph will be a
greater calamity than the inva
sion of Huns under Attila or of
the Moslems under Saladin it
will mean the dissolution of the
Empire whose Flag has won the
respect and envy of the world,
and the love and confidence of
every creed and class under the
sun.
Let the people of Nassau, of
the Bahamas unite in a Monster
meeting at which there will be
a representation of every class
and that our unanimous vote will
be.
Sympathy. Confidence. Service.
:o:
SYMPATHY
Fellow Feelings
No condolence for defeat
but indentification of interest.
RADIOGRAMS.
~~ i
PICKED UP-jL
August 29th 19 rj?
The Germans claim to have
surrounded the right and left
wings of the allies army and to
have penetrated the centre.
They assert that the allies are in
full retreat in Belgium.
The allies give out but little
news claiming that the relative
positions of the armies is prac-
tically the same.
Both armies are worn out,
and the Germans are suffering
from lack of food.
Russians continue to flood
Germany in millions, also are
over-running Austria where
they are surrounding Lembary,
the"capital of Galicia.
The Kaiser has given orders
for the rushing of troops to
Prussia.
The British fleet sunk two
German cruisers and two tor-
pedo boat destroyers near Heli-
goland. Tlie British did not
hae any ships, but eight men
were lulled.
Turkey is at any moment ex-
pected to cast her lot with Ger-
many.
H M ll< .
IMPERIAL ANTHEM
Word* by
H. C. CHRISTIE
Mualc by
M.C. DeLotbinere Harwood
One King, One Throne, One Flag forever free
Following the sun from shining pole to pole,
Emblem of honour, truth and unity
Riding in glory to its destined goal.
From oceans, islands, seas and continents
Wher'eeron earth thy banner is unfurled,
Millions will rise to die in its defence
And prove their faithfulness to all the world.
Children of Empire dwell in every zone
None too remote to love anddionour thee
They will defend the majesty and throne
And sacrifice their lives for liberty.
We love thee England, land of ancient fame
Of mighty heroes who have fought for right
No battle cry can rouse us like thy name
And for'thy glory will thy children fight.
No foes shall fright them no clangers appall
When all thy legions arm for libity t^.
What can withstand them when thy bugles caflfc*
To follow where thou leadst to victory.
Children of Empire dwell in every zone
None too remote to love and honour thee
They will defend the Majesty and Throne
And sacrifice their lives for liberty.


IT *
PRESS NEW8
Aug. 29th 1914.
President W proclamation of neutrality be-
tween tm United States and
Austria. Hungary.
The United States will send
the cruiser North Carolina to
Turkey with gold for the relief
of Americans in that country.
British marines have occu-
pied Ostend to prevent the Ger
mans from getting a foothold
on the English Channel.
The new French Cabinet has
made a declaration of the situa-
tion to the people.
French troops in the Vosges
Moutains assume the offensive
in the Vosges Mountains and
drive the Germans back. The
losses have bcftO heavy.
The Japanese naval attack on
Tsingtau reported repelled by
the Germans. The Japanese
'Ambassador at Washington de
dares that M such attack has
been made.
The British war office an
iruinces a change in the position
of the allied troops. The mor
ale of both armies is excellent.
The German Ambassador be-
gins au investigation of
AmericwiV<'iisofshipof German
wireless plants.
The Marconi Company has re
eeivedthe following: Field Mar
shut Von de Golta leaves for Bel
gium to administer all territory
in possession of the Germans.
The Kim,'of Bavaria goes to
the western part of war.
The German cruiser Magde-
berg ran aground in a fog and
w is destroyed by the Germans to
prevent her falling into the hands
of the enemy. 1; of the crew were
killed and many injured by the
(ire from the Russian fleet.
Sixty thousand Americans
have applied for permission to
join the Canadian volunteers for
service in Europe.
Germany will organize a press
bureau in Rome so as to get
more accurate management of
news.
Special to the Nassau Guardian
The advance of the Germans
lias been stopped along the whole
line from Lille to the Franco
Swiss frontier. The French have
evacuated Lille, which has been
occftp
any further advance there.
The Czar of Russia has invad
ed Germany with two million
men and six million in reserve.
Italy has called out her re
serves.
-Jipied by the Germans.
The allies will probably take
the offensive again and are at
present holding the German army
Wcheck.
The French force on the Alsace
line'lias firmly established itself
in position and have prevented
August 29th 1914.
Tne announcement has been
made by Lord Kitchener that
the British army will be further
increased. Troops from India
will be used.
British warships are reported
as having destroyed five German
vessels off Heligoland. The Bri
tish lost do ships, and but a
small number of lives in the en
gagement.
Japanese cruisers drew the fire
of the fortifications at Tsingtau
The British torpedo boat des
troyer Wei land sunk the German
Destroyer "8 90."
The Germans are reported to
be retreating before the Russians
in Eastern Prussia.
1 Military observers interested
in the strength of the fortifica-
tions about Paris, which is said
to be the objective of the Ger-
mans, regard those fortifications
as being among the strongest in
the world.
Louv tin wasdestrov ~d by the
Germans following an.istakeof
the Germans guarding the en
trance in firing on a German
force who were retreatingto that
place.
Two merchant vessels (Ger-
man) were taken by British and
French cruisers.
Only $200 000 of the $40000.
000 war tax levied upon Brus
sels by the Germans has been
paid.
The French press is loud in
its praise of the value of the aero
plane in scout work-
Both armies are reported ex
hausted from the several daysof
fierce fighting. The Germans
continue to bombard Malines,
but have not entered the city.
Russians occupy Allenstein in
Eastern Prussia, and the advance
continues in Gallicia.
The sea light was an easy win
for the Brisish fleet who sank
two cruisers and two torpedo
boat destroyers. Two merchant
vessels were also taken. A third
German cruiser was set on fire
and left in a sinking condition.
London hears that the Ger-
mans fired on their own men at
Louvain.and as a result the town
lia-- been laid in ashes by order
of the German commander', who
claims the firing was done by
civilians.
Women and children have
been rushed away on trains,
their destination being unknown.
Several notable citizens of Lou-
vain were shot.
London hears, from many
sources, that Emperor Francis
Joseph is dying. The aged
monarch has occupied the
throne for 66 years.
Special to The Nassau Guardian
LATER.
German warships off Heligo-
land during a fog attacked a
British Squadron of light cruisers
torpedo boats and submarines.
Two German cruisers were
sunk also two torpedo boats and
others were badly damaged.
The damage to British ships
and loss of life was not serious.
The Germans have occupied
Nacy and Longwy and have des
troved Louvain.
The Allies are standing off.
The Germans have reached Arras
about 50 miles south of Calais.
France is rushing reinforce
meats.
Smith, Ward Line Pier 14
Bast River, New York
Am informed by merchants that
you have charged higher rates
by Camaguey, this is contrary
to our agreement, trusting on
your bona fides I stopped Gov-
ernment steamship, would be
clad to know from you defi
iiitely by telegram whether you
intend to repudiate your agree-
ment.
Desp. 26/8/14. GOVERNOR
"Governor, Nassau. 28.8.14.
Directors meeting yesterday
approved contract retroactive
from August twenty first, tins
covering Camaguey provided
following schedule satisfactory.
Beginning southbound passen-
ger ships eighteenth northbound
twenty fourth in addition South
bound Santiago fourth, north-
bound Seguranca third upon re
ceipt of your approval will in
struct agent correct freights
Camaguey. Smith."
"Smith. Ward Line Pier 14
East River, New York.
"Reference your telegram
twenty eighth Council agree pro
posed schedule. I trust for fu
ture terms of agreement will be
strictly adhered to.
GOVERNOR.
MAILS
Interir.sular Mails to be des-
patched per Sch. Columbia for
Inagua, Long Cay, Acklins Is ,
land, Rum Cav. Clarence hi. t
Long Is., The Bight, Mathew n
Town, San Salvador will be'
made up and closed on Thurs- j
day the 3rd Sept. at 11 a.m.
Foreign Mails to be des
patched per S. S. Seguranca,
will be made up and closed on
Thursday next the 3rd Septem-
ber at 11 a.m.
N. B. Stop playing War-
ry.Pull up the weeds out
of your lots and put in sweet
potatoes or cassava.
:o:
Nassau, N. P.,
August 29 1914-
To the Editor of The Tribune.
Dear Sir:
Where is the boasted patno- j
tism of.the Bahamas, is it in men
talking of great Britain's powers, j
what she can do, and will do; j(
and how proud they are of call- ,,
ing themselves Britishers. Or is
it in the same men taking ad- ,.
vantage of the War, raising their .1
prices to such an extent that the n
poor (of the same Empire) are
almost excluded from buying. "
True patriots would be content
with smaller profits, and be glad -
to do all they can in helping
their poorer bretheren. War is
not a time for huge profits and f
monopolies; but a time of self
sacrifice for others.
So when we find merchantsr
raising their prices on articles; [
01 stock long before war was' de-
clared; we can boldly say that,
they are not Patriots; but selfish''
money seekers
I am, Yours Truly ''
____________BAHAMIAN.
The Vogue, and the;',
Au Bon Marche m
Store o
(Removed to Bay Street one
door West of Black's)
Have received per S. S. "Cama _
suey"
A large shipment of ladies
Black, White and Coloured H
Straw Hats, New York latest
styles a few, choice, ready to,,
wear. White and Cream Chiffon -
Satin. Shadow laces and In ;
sertions. White Ratine, double
width at 2s. Another lot of 7 VI. ,
Crepes. White Figured Cudrov
at fid. White checked Crepes
at 6d. White, Black, Pink.
Blue, Cream, Pur|Je and Green
Satin. Wli ite Cotton Goods.
Cambric at fid. Madapollam
at lod. Nainsooks at gd., is., is.*
3d Drills fid., gd. is.
\


ve handled the Japanese ultrYna-
jm to Germany comes in part
through the receipt by him today
of a petition from the German-
American Verein asking him to
intervene with J.ip.in on behalf
of Germany. Of course, such a
course is impossible if the United
States is to maintain its position
of absolute neutrality.
LOOK!
The following Blank forms
maybe had at "TheTribune"
Office.
Duty Entry.
Free Entry.
Warehouse Entries.
Sponging Articles.
In quantities at SpecialRates
A1
Fop Sale
lot of land situate in the Sou-
thern suburbs; Boundaries
East by Ian.I of Thomas Johnson ;
West, by land of Ellis Mason ;
North by land of Peter Storr, and
South by a public lane.
Apply to
STANLEY MASON
Rupture Cured
The Brooks Appliance
W A. MATHER
UNDERTAKER
DESIRES lo inform his friends
and the Public that re has
just received a complete outfit of
facilities for the buisness of an un-
dertaker, which places him in a
position to carry out Funerals that I
may be entrusted to bis care with
system and despatch ; and respect
fully solicits their patronage Get
my Prices first and pmve that these i
are the very lowest for the first class |
work.
BESTJr:;762
Test. We do not sell it.
BU we do sell and will,
continue to sell
Standard Oil Co.
Gasoline. Test your Gaso-
line. We invite comparison
with any in the City.
Price 22cts. per gallon in
50 gallon Drums.Customers
using 100 gals, or over per
Month 2oc. gallon.
Watch our Notice for Ker-
osene in June.
C. C. SAUNDERS
Notice
Tin's is to inform the public
thfltif any person or persons '
are found trespassing on'mv l"t of
land situate on Forbes Hill in I
the Island of Little Exuina, they
will be dealt with according to
the Law.
EARNEST CLARKE
(Owner)
JACOB CLARKE
9 (Overseer!
Forbes Hill, Little Exunia
July 23rd 1914. 1
Tke above la C. E. Brook*, who aai
hern < 'arias flupturr for our 90 reara.
If Ituiiiurrd, write aim today.
My Appliance Sent on Trial
If you have tried everything etna,
rome to me. I have my greatest suc-
cess where others fall. Send attached
coupon today and I will sond you, free,
my Illustrated book on Rupture and
Its cure. Riving you the namea of many
people who have tried my appliance
and are extremely grateful. It gives
constant relief where all others fall. I
make It to your measure and aand It
to you on a strict guarantee of satis-
faction or money refunded, and I have
put my price so low that anybody,
rich or poor, can buy It. I send It on
trial to prove what I say Is true.
nU OFT TKT.T. COT-PON BELOW
AMI IHMT TODAY
Pootsie *.<-, Prnrr. or lr, In r. ., A.
niEE INTORMATION COM ON
C. I" Dronki, nhi si 111.. fit.,
Marshall, Michifsn, I.". 8. A.
riciiw send mil by post, In plain wrap-
pir, your lllimtrsieil Book ami full In-
fiirmsllon about your Appllaoce for th
cura of rupturs.
Nam*
A (Please write plainly)
Attorney Oeneral's Chambers,
Fort-of-8paln.
Trinidad, B. w. I.
l-U-'lt.
Dear Sirs!
1 am glad to be able to Inform you that
the "truss" (?) I got from you In September
la a cumplete aucoeas. It has supported my
rupture perfectly since I flrat wore It. I
have been ruptured since I can remember
and tried at different intervals severai makes
of truss without success. I was beginning
to think I should have to undergo an opera-
tion, as the rupture was gradually getting
worae. Now. however, I consider myself
practically cured. To my mind one of the
great points about your Invention Is that
one doea not feel Its presaureianywhere, al-
though that pressure never actually relaxes.
After the first few days I have not felt Its
pressure any more than I do my trouser
auspendera. You are quite welcome to make
any use you like of this letter.
Yours truly,
J. li. Whltcaead,
To Brooks Rupture Appliance Co.
Shingles
Best No. 1 Heart 5m. Cypres
Shingles at $9.60 per t'lious-
sand of 20 bundles
Discounts on lots of over
I 5000 shingles.
Special Price
also on cheaper gradesalso
5in. Cypress at $6.72 per
thousand of 20 bundles. This
price made possible by a very
large purchase.
Fresh stock arriving every
week.
' C. C. SAUNDERS.
Kerosene
150%
IN New 50 gallon wlvaniz-
ed Iron Drums at. i8cts
per Gallon.
In 10 gallon Cans at 2octs
per. Gallon.
Drums and Cans returnable
Full particulars at Office
"Frances E.," Nassau N. P.
C. C. SAUNDERS
For Sale
A HufM 'm.iri't and earring**
t\ (II K'kinv tali No. App'y in fej
.1 \\ll'> CELLY
C ib No 40.
1 Wk.
For Sale
n EFRIGERATOR in good
able.
condition. Price Reason*
Apply
"Tribune Office'
TIME MONEY e.nd LABOUR.
SAVER.
**T*HE New VacuiHn Washer is
I the latest invention for
Washer women ; this is a new
machine which will wash a tub
full of clothes in ten minute*. It
ij very Simple a child can use it.
Try one and be convinced.
W 11.1JAMS THE SHOE--
MaN Kflsjust received a
larger nssoi tment of
LADIES. MISSES and GENTS
SAPLE BOOTS and SHOES
in ONE, TWO, AND THREE
pair lots
Thesizes for tadirare limited
in ;,',. 4 and 4]
Misse***-13, I and 2
Onis- 6, i'! iinil 7
The Shoes having been sold
William*. The Shoemn.n
at a liberal discount, the princi-
pal disadvantage being the
limited sizes, he is disposing
< f thorn at
not leas than 20 percent leas than
the regular prices such
grade* would be.
His kind patrons and the gen-
eral public will please take
Special Notice
of the above sizes mentioned
and in calling for them will
see fm iliinis' hos that thev
are obtaining Ueal Bargains
Williams' Wholesale and Retail
Shoe Establishment
277, 279 I5.iv Street (.City)
.*
For Result
Advertise in
The Tribune
Sold by
R. T. ROBEI
Sponge Eichange GrdKry
Sole Ager\t forth' Bahamas
Johnson's
Artistic Wood
Finishes
Johnson's Prepared Wax.1 com*
plats' finish ami polish, tut .ill furmtuie,
w.i. idwi tk ;ni(l Noun.
Johnson's Wood Dyefur the artistic
Dilorina of all wiinil, soft or hard
Johnson's fnder Lac a spirit
finish, very nuirli superior to shellac or
vainish
Johnson's Flrt Wood Finishfnra
beautiful, artistic, hand nibbed effete
withnut the npenM of rubbing,
Johnson's Pa.sfi Wood r iller 1
flllin;,' the grain ami jmres of wood,
pra)pariiM( it f1" the finish
Johnson's Powdered Wax for ball
room Hours.
FOR. SALE BY
Chas. E. Albury
Notice
rills is to inform my Patrons
and the Public in General
that I have npf>n*d my Pi
I'lack Smith Shop; and am
teadv In do anything in 1 -. I r
(ieneial repair orjiew \\ rk Horse
Shoeing Miecially. All ork done
Mechanically.
P. A. IIUYLER.
ncrai
""^aWr
Buy East St. fWlwr')
r



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