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r H TRIBUNE T ttbc Zxibune Tuesday. December 30. 1913 The Home Rule controversy iias reached a very interesting stage. %  Unionists drew nearer to the Government r,c. L we known tc vjuvernmeiit position whenthev t i tacitlv %  r>b mn CiLi_i ... lM V other contests. [high offices and were splendidly endorsed, whereas at Reading and Linlithgow leading liberal statesmen accepted high judici al preferment, thus putting the local Liberals to the painful necessity of bringing forward hastily chosen candidates against men who had become well known to the electors in tacitly acknowledged the position of three of the Irish Proymces to have a subordinate I arl.ament with an Kxecutive responsible to it, but insisted on the exclusion of Ulster or a part OI it, from the provisions of the JJi II Now leading Unionist journal?, and statesmen like Lord Lansdowne doubt the wisdom of cutting off Ulster from the other provinces in matters of legislation. Lord Lansdowne Mr %  Austen Chamberlain and other Unionist leaden are now tentatively suggesting H olll e Rule all round. As the Liberals are anxious to create subordinate Iegis alive bodies in England, Scotland and Wales, there is a i ssibihty that a settlement by cons, nt may be reached along the lines of Federalism. Hut the Government could only agree to this on the condition that Ireland, as the ripest for the change, should receive immediate treatment. 01course the "Die-Hards" in the Jouse of Lords may compel tlie (iovernine.it to pass I lie Mill entity as it stands, by either 'electing it on Second Keidin or by inserting wrecking amendments. We cannot see that recent byfactions reveal a weakening of the Liberal hold on the constituencies. Reading and Linbthgow.it is true, made a poor Showing |for the Government. On the other hand Keighlev and wick told a contrary story. The Governments blundering over the prosecution and imprisonme.it of James Laskin ensured the defeat of the Liberals at Heading by greatly strengthening (he Socialist vote, and caused working men at Linlithgow t"sl.ovv res. ntme.it by voting 2 9th December iqiv lory. It is believed also that at | Resolved that 'His Exceluie tatter place the 150 Irish ilency the Governor and Mem,"";" lsl %  %  "v..ss. rs turned a h^ohl.n Kxecutive Council ;; i ; n 4l % %  %  L^^^ t e ''•'' %  '.V^S MMlmlo the %  '" ul ^rHel PI P^fc'f Honour I'' work in one cortstituenev. At anTe James William Culmer, an .. 1 ll ;'> and Wick, Liberal unofficial Member of the KxeCaiK.ulat.-s simply sought recutive Council, and a Member election on being promoted to of the Honourable the House of While talking with the Com mtssioner of Governor's Harbour a couple of weeks ago, on the labour problem, our conversation turned to "Mack to the Land" as a solution, and the cultivation of onions was referred to, when Mr. Alburysaid : "Onions? yes, if the people could be encouraged to take up the cultivation of onions, and tlie Government, through the Board of Agriculture, would find a market for them, which is easy, either in Ameiica or Canada, and as and inducement, to start with, would guarantee them one penny per pound, HIKI anything obtained over one penny also hand over to the grower^ I am confident that there would be no better paying investment in the Bahamas. It would even take the place of tlie pineipple. A | e my per pound would pay, and I know that a market can be found without difficulty. 1 know that shipments have been made from Long Island, to America and Canada, which have been very remunerative." We believe that there is much in the foregoing that could he turned into good use in helping to a solution of the problem that is at present giving us so much concern. Mr. Alburv is not "talking through his hat," he is a thoughtful and practical man, and what he has said with reference to onion culture is not from hearsay, but from practical experience, and it would be wise if the Government; directly or through the Moard of Agriculture, would consult him upon the subject. J* Extract from Minutes of the i \ •cutive Council on Monday, Assembly, who died in Nassau on the 22nd of December 1913 W. M. HAi.l >()\' SMITH. Captain. Clerk of the Executive Council. St. Hilda's High School gave their annual Entertainment at "The Farm" yesterday after noon, at which Prize* and Cer tificates were distributed by His Lordship the Bishop. After the Bishop's remarks at the end of the prize giving, His Excellency the Governor made a very cheerful speech, sparkling and full of wit, our only regret is that that we are not able to give it to our readers verbatim for to give portions of it would be to spoil it. The :eachers arc to be complimented up )n the very successful rendering ol the French Play "Snow White," and also the more difficult one "The Death of Balder," from Norse mythology. The children took up their [.arts well, which went to show that no pnins had been spared in their trai ling. "The Tnl une" desires to t n der its congratulations to the School. We have been requested to announce that there will be a Watch Nightservice at St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church tomorrow (Wednesday) night, at eleven o'clock. A collection will be taken up in aid of the poor. The Management of the Imperial Theatre. anxious that its Patrons shall have the best Entertainment pos ible, iholding on until the arrival of the schooner "llattie Darling,' from Miami, due this week, which vessel has been cabled to bring new films. Mather than give a show that might be considered stale, they prefer to wait Look for announcements soon. A Grand Bazaar will be given in St. Matthews Schoolroom on Tuesday 10th 1914. The Police will be given on ing. The Cuban Steam Tug "Me, tuito" ariived yesterday after noon from Havana. This tug, will be employed as a Tender to the Ward Line. She is a much smaller vessel than the "Colonia" Nassau, 29 Dec. 1913 Dear Sir, I have read with much satisfaction in a lecent issue of The Tribune that the Kxecutive will not bring forward the proposed Mill relating to Friendly Societies in the ensuing session of the Legislature ; to do so would be highly impolitic in view of the. wide spread and determined opposition to the Bill. The author of this Mill isevi dently ignorant of Friendly Society principles or he would not for a moment attempt to introduce an element of compulsion, into a system that isesseutially and purely voluntary. One can quite understand compulsory governmental control of Banks, Insurant e Companies, Building Loan Associations, and Sharing Societies; these organisations arc organized silely for profit and g xin from the handling or mone\ belonging largely, if not chiefly, to others than their shareholders (Members) ; termed p itrons, depositors, customers & %  ; these patrons,etc., have no voice in the choice of the officers, who as a rule, are well paid ; the customers, patrons have no voice in the control of the organization beyond their individual accounts therefore arc at the mercy, or rather dependent upon the officers and shareholders, and the only protection they have for their interests is 1 o. %  eminent control and supervision. Hut it is entirely different with Friendly Societies, thev .ire organized for mutual aid and mutual ienefits; of their mem htm only, handling money be longing to them (the members) only, and thee only and all of them equally have a voice in the choice of the officers whose pay in most eases is nominal; the members Also have access to the books on reasonable request These Societies also h ive effective control of their funds, the %  mount held by a Treasurer is in most cases limitpd, one officer ,a Secretary f&o" are required to give bonds with two sureties, so it appears that they look well after their affairs.



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T I II R I K I r, U N B What need tl en for compulsory registration, and what are the benefits that registration < onfers ? The best testimony to the usefulness of these societies and the confidence the people have in them is the ever increasing number of societies and the number of members. I will not here dwell upon the value of these societies as mo ral educa ion il and tluift agencies or the rebel that they "arc to the government in the matter of indigen, e and sickness and death, I will only observe that it is wiser not to "Kill the goose that lays the golden e<'gs." Yours FRATERNITY. Allan-Breach Turtle Fisheries 19—Geo. Sponge and Act—3 months 20 —James Wallace —Breach Street Traffic Rules—5s. or 4 days! IN THE MAGISTRATES COURT December 15—Frank Roberts, and Harold rtiompson—Waving in possession j lbs brass value is. reasonably suspected of being stolen—Ordered to be given H and 5 strokes with tamarind rod respectively. Jos. Davis -I living in possession a bag containing £\, u.. IOJJ reasonably suspected of beinstolen — 2 months. 16—Win. Russell-Drunk and loud shouting 111 street-10s. or >^ d.iys. II,—Assaulting and beating Constable Ta)lor while in the execution of ins duty—20s. or 20 days. Elizabeth Sands—Conceal. mem of birth -Remanded till 2jrd lust. 17—Napoleon MinusDrunk and Using profane language in street—8s. or (, days. Clarence Johnson, and Thomas Ingrahan) -Larceny of fried fish and pan cakes value 2^. id. goods and chattels of Brunette layl..i -Johnson sentenced to one months imprisonment and to receive 6 strokes on admission and 6011 morning of discharge. Geo. Rolrer (the guardian of Ingraham) entered into his own recognizance in £\ for the appearance of the said Thomas %  higraham in the Court to re%  eiv.sentence if called upon. r Samuel Tail—Breach Do<; License Act —is. >N — Percy Smith —Assaultin ktarry Mitchell occasi ming actual bodily harm —Bound in his own recognizance in £\o to appear for sentence if called upon. December 30th K)l \. BY RADIO TELEGRAPH. New York; 2<) h c Inning quofAtions on Stock Ex* ange. Am il. Copper 74 1 1'.. .v 0. <";,n. Pic. 20 5 f St. Paul 100 New V'll; Central QJ I'rnn.i. IOC) J Me.idiog 168 ; Sou. 1' 10, '54 4 Union P.ic. U. S. Sle-.l 5M New York, ?y.—The police me confronted with another trunk mystery today when the bopy of a man bound hand an,I j foot was discovered in a trunk which had been dumped from %  push -art in front of 47 Put Street. The man was dead only a short time. The two men who trundled the cart into Pitt Street, after (lumping the trunk disappeared. New York, 39.—Edward M. Grout, former Comptroller of the city of New York wast od \ indicted for perjury in connection with investigations into the affairs of the defunct Union Bank of Brooklyn, San Sebastian,Spain, 29— A destructive fire is racing here. Circus, theatre and more than thirty buildings destroyed. A storm is greatly hampering the work of the firemen. Pektn, 20.—Under the leadership of General Yang Pa Pin in the Province of Yunnam three regiments of tiie Chinese army have revolted.lt is reported that they killed their officers and proclaimed independence of the province in the name of Sai Yat Sen, on December 8th. London, 29.—A large part of llurope is in expectance today of the first severe cold wave of the Winter. Snow has fallen over England, Prance, Northern Germany and Switzerland. Hempstead, 29.—Fire today destroyed three aeroplanes and four valuable motors at Hempstead aviation field. Loss thirty thousand dollars. Montreal, 29.—A disastrous fire is raging here ll|isHilrrnouu and the rircmen are tumble to check it because nf lack of water due to break in city watei mains. Twenty small buildings were destroyed in a short time and the firemen resorted to the use of dynamite to prevent the spread of the fire Albany, NI. Y. 89.—Navigation on the Hudson Rivet between here and NtW York was 1 losed to lay. New York, Lillian Nordica, wools a pas sender on the Dutch steamer Tasman, which went ashore in the Gulf of Papua north of \ustralia, cabled her husband today that the ship was in no danger thus far. The Tasman carries many passengers. New York, 29.—The Jury in the case of I Inns Schmidt murderer of Ann Aumueller retired shortly after t : 30 this afternoon and were still out this evening ST. MATTHEW'S GRAND BAZAAR TUESDAY, FEBRUARY10, 1914 P! THE STROMBUS EUSONS whose names nod d dresses appear in the City ;,n I Hns ness Direct Ties a?e herebv notified that our lureeinent for the year 1913 expired with. Ilu> publication of llie December number. Unless otherwise notified we will continue to publish the Directories as th-v now itund.aod will collect as. for each insertion, for the yarn ending December, 1914. Application for space shout I be made earl<•. L.GILBER1 DUPUCH. Manager. 'grams' and 'liters' and "centimeters'; be kn ws that the science upon which his agriculture is based depends upon in* vestigatinns in wlfjch only metric units are employed. Fof instance, in the Babcock milk test, which is familiar to every dairy farmer, 17.5 cubic centimeters of s'dphuric acid is added to 17. 6cubic centimeters of milk. Certified milk must, among other things, have less than 10.000 bacteria per cubic centimeter; and milk classified I is 'Grade A' must contain less 39.—Madame; than 100.000 bacteria per cubic centimeter before pasteurisation, and less than 10,000 afterward. '•The health officer determines the fitness of water for use by the number and kind of bacteria. He seldom approves of water containing more than a few hundred bacteria per cubic centimeter, regardless of the kind ; and water is labeled 'good' only if it contains less than a hundred bacteria per cubic centimeter. It is worth mertion that in case of serious illness the bulletins issued by the physicians for public information now usually give the number of leucocytes and phagocytes per cubic centimeter of blood. "Scientific housekeepers use metric units constantly. A balanced diet is of extreme importance in reducing the cost of food; and in figuring dietaries metric units on!v are employed." EVERYDAY USF.S OF THE METRIC SYSTEM Few people realize how wide ly the metric system of weights and measures is employed in this country. Yet sportsman and si it ntist, druggist and jeweler, farmer and physical director, housewife and health officer, lib i.iiian and manufacturer, even the Federal government—all know and use the metric system. In the December Popular Mechanics Magazine, 1'i'd Tclford says: The scientific farmer no long jer wonders at 'calorie*' and Popular Mechanics Magazine -WRITTEN o rou CAN UNDERSTAND IT" A ORE A T Continued Story of the World'. %  Prosross which you may begin reading at any lime, and which will hold your inten-st forever. You are living in the best year, of the most wonderful age, of what is doubtless the greatest world in the universe. A resident of Mars would gladly pay — <1 fififi FOR ONE YEAR'S J>I,UUU SUBSCRIPTION to this m.-iKJt/inr.in order to keep informed of our progrrs. in Engineering and Mechanics. Are you reading it t Two millions of your neighbors are. atnl it is the favorite mag... line in thousand* of the best American homes. It api^.tls to all classes old and young %  men and women. The "Bhop Votes" Department '•!<* page. ) giro* e.t.y ws/. to do tiling. — how to roako useful articles tor uoiua anil .Imp. ropwlm, ele. Amateur Bterhanies" tlO pages i tell. Iiowto make Mi.-ii'n furniturt), RlraksMoutm.. imats, eiik'iot'.. luagu*. ami all the tssusESA boj torsjfi SI.SO r YEAR. SINGLE COPIES 2S CENTS) Ajfc roar h*is.M to ih y.*i on. or WRITE row FREE SAMPLE COPY TODAY POPULAR MKCHANICS CO. IIS W. W..SI—. %  —CHSOACO, VU ffl



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I T H £ J R I B 11 N £ were puzzled by this change of feeling. I hey did n<>t attribute it to any such mean idea as dissatisfaction with their policy of selling cheap abroad and dear at home That is a well-understood Protectionist privilege. They believed that the trouble was that (hey were not sulficienily well represented at Berlin. (To be continued; S. H. 0. CLUTSAM ATTORNEY AT LAW OFFICE CORNER GF SHIRLEY ANDFREDKICK STREETS. NOTICE Gasoline S TANDARD Oil. GO'S GASOLINE. Sold in quantities of One Gallon and upwards for one shilling a gallon. Drums of 50 gallons at accents a gallon, subject to return when empty. These special Drums do away with the necessity of buying a Storage Tank. C. C. SAUNDERS. ANNA E.RAE Proprietress Of The Vogue,", "Au Bon Marche Stores" and Bijou A LARGE ASSORTMENT TO SELECT FROM L A OIKS Dress ("mods, in Lustres,.Serges, Ratines white and Coloured Cordings, Crepes, Crepons, Marquisettes, Benga lines, Lands(iowues, Spot-Muslins, Embroidered Muslins, Velvets, Embroidered Batistes, Tussore Suitings, Embroidery FlouQcings, Overall Embroidery and Overall Lace. Laces and Insertions, Ribbons plain and fancy Latest Style Belts Lace Collars. Embroidery Collars. Ladies White, Black, Pink, Blue, Heliotrope, and Grey Silk Stockings Men's White, Black, Grey Navy Blue, Alice Blue, Helio, ;m


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P 3 CD *? &f CD ^ CO XT o CD T ibmt Nulllxia addictus Ivirure in verbs ma.giatrl. Being bound to awecr to the Dogme.a >f no Master. VOL. XI. N&MU, N. P.. Bo.hMn.vs. Tuesday. December 30. 1913 No. 24 LEON E. H DUPI'CH. HKITOB *MI'kl.l'H i r I I u OKKICE 38 4 A MARKET STREET N'.i^au N. P., BAHAMAS. I'. (I. Hox 1'.;: PUBLISHED DAILY. Monday, Wednesday and Friday— singleropy Jd Tuesday. Thursday and Saturday— single copy id Weekly ... 4 |d Monthly is. 4d Quarterly 4 1. HalfYearlv ..8s. Yearly ... .,. tf>s f'AYAnLE IN ADVANCE. Advertising Rates: -Six pence per line (or first insertion ; three pence per line for second insertion, and one penny per line for subsequent insert ions, Advertisements under eight lines 4s. From "The Daily New and-Leadei" Nov. 15th. THE CASK OF HERR BRANDT AND THE OCTOPUS ARMAMENTS. OF It was not without a certain fitness that on the day that Mi. Churchill was raiting cheers at the Guildhall by his promise of new and unexampled naval estimates, Herr Brandt, in Berlin, was making his exit from the stage. Ue has been sentenced to four months' imprisonment for bribing Govern* ment official*, and before he passes inlo obscurity he merits lome attention, for he is significant of much. If we understand Herr l''i;ni'|i aright we shall understand manv things. We shall understand, for example, why we nte going to be asked by Mr. Churchill to spend next year fifty million Sterling on the X.ivv, glonf, We ">h#H iiiwler r J ith .. .lerr Liel>neckt, the Socialist who cap. tured the seat at Potsdam and so made the Kaiser one of his constituents, threw his memorable bombshell into the Reichstag. Mis in. dictment disclosed ihe conspiracy of the armour-plate firms in all its aspects. He showed (1) how they stimulated trade by circulating false statements as to the intention of other Governments; (2) how they formed a seciet ring for preventing free competition and dividing profits ; (3) how they employed agents to worm secrets out of Government Officials, A BUSINESS LETTER The evidence on the first point consisted o( a letter which is at illuminating as a flash of lightning in the daikness. My its help we see the conspirators in a blaze of understanding. It was written by the Ge. man Ammunition and Arms Works to their representative in Paris, and the full text was published in "Vorwearts," the leading Socialist paper in Berlin. It was as follows : "We have* just wired to you asking yon to await in Paris our today's letter. The reason for the teb'giam was that we should like to obtain the insertion in one of the most widely-read French journals—preferably the "Figaro"—an article to the effect that the French military authorities have decided to accelerate considerably the rearming of the troops with new machine guns, and to outer double the quantity of the latter as against their original intention. We shall be much obliged if you could succeed in getting such an article published." (Then follow the signatures of two directors.) The letter makes one gasp. The contrast between the simple matter-of-fnet terms and the enormity of the proposal is shattering. Here we see two men, heads of a great "patriotic" industry, moving in the highest circles, doubtless decorated •w their sovereign, deliberately tmg a panic in order lo make ..ness, and attempting to use a rench newspaper as the instalment of their designs. One sees at a glance how the thing is done. A French papr, inspired by a German agent, announces that the Frercli Government are doubling their arms in a certain direction. The announcement is promptly copied in the German Press. The Geimar. Government take alarm and meet the threat" ned increase with new orders to the firm that specialises in the particular arm. The French Government reply by an equivalent increase. The countries are in precisely the same relative position, but the taxpayers of both are the poorer and the dividends of the armaments firms the fatter. France and Germany have passed through another crisis and the directors congratulate their shareholders on a prosperous year. It is all as simple as it is incredible—and true. KRUPP'S DILEMMA. Compared with this, the Brandt episode is mean and ordinary. But it illustrates another phase of the armourplate drama and it had the advantage of dragging it into the light of the law courts. The facts as they were revealed in the course of the trial, are simple. TheKrupp firm is of course the greatest armourplate enterprise in the world. It is the mailed fist of Germany. Its heads have been honoured by the Kaiser who has attended their funerals and stood godfather to their babies. If we might expect the purest patriotism anywhere, it should be here. But the fact about all armourplate firms is that while they live and thrive on patriotic panics they do not desecrate so fine a thing ns patriotism by mixing it up with business. As Herr Liebneckt reminded the Reichstag, Krupp's made overtures to Napoleon III. for business purposesand some years ago supplied the American Government with steel plates at £20 a ton less than the price charged to the Geiman Government for the same goods, and made similar reductions to other foreign countries svhen purchasing cannon. There is no false sentiment, it will be seen, about Krupp's Unfoitunately this preferential treatment of the foreigner had unpleasant consequences at home. You cannot supply the foreigner below cost without making someone pay. And'' —--•• %  .. the G*"~ ..nt M .\uefli.i v^niw turn* sen-' tenced Brandt, they lost their position and were "cold-shouldered" by the Army authorities. They (continued on 4H1 page )


The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02168
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Tuesday, December 30, 1913
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02168

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Full Text
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ibmt
Nulllxia addictus Ivirure in verbs ma.giatrl.
Being bound to awecr to the Dogme.a >f no Master.
VOL. XI.
N&mu, N. P.. Bo.hMn.vs. Tuesday. December 30. 1913
No. 24
LEON E. H DUPI'CH.
HkITOB *M- I'kl.l'H i r I I u
OKKICE 38 4a MARKET STREET
N'.i^au N. P., Bahamas.
I'. (I. Hox 1'.;:
published daily.
Monday, Wednesday and Friday
singleropy ........ Jd
Tuesday. Thursday and Saturday
single copy ........ id
Weekly ... ......4|d
Monthly ......is. 4d
Quarterly ........41.
HalfYearlv ..8s.
Yearly ... .,. tf>s
f'AYAnLE IN ADVANCE.
Advertising Rates: -Six pence per line
(or first insertion ; three pence per line
for second insertion, and one penny per
line for subsequent insert ions,
Advertisements under eight lines 4s.
From "The Daily New and-Leadei"
Nov. 15th.
THE CASK OF HERR
BRANDT
AND THE OCTOPUS
ARMAMENTS.
OF
It was not without a certain fit-
ness that on the day that Mi.
Churchill was raiting cheers at the
Guildhall by his promise of new
and unexampled naval estimates,
Herr Brandt, in Berlin, was mak-
ing his exit from the stage. Ue
has been sentenced to four months'
imprisonment for bribing Govern*
ment official*, and before he pas-
ses inlo obscurity he merits lome
attention, for he is significant of
much. If we understand Herr
l''i;ni'|i aright we shall understand
manv things. We shall understand,
for example, why we nte going to
be asked by Mr. Churchill to spend
next year fifty million Sterling on
the X.ivv, glonf, We ">h#H iiiwlerr J
ith
.. .lerr
Liel>neckt, the Socialist who cap.
tured the seat at Potsdam and so
made the Kaiser one of his consti-
tuents, threw his memorable bomb-
shell into the Reichstag. Mis in.
dictment disclosed ihe conspiracy
of the armour-plate firms in all its
aspects. He showed (1) how they
stimulated trade by circulating
false statements as to the intention
of other Governments; (2) how
they formed a seciet ring for pre-
venting free competition and divi-
ding profits ; (3) how they employ-
ed agents to worm secrets out of
Government Officials,
A BUSINESS LETTER
The evidence on the first point
consisted o( a letter which is at
illuminating as a flash of lightning
in the daikness. My its help we
see the conspirators in a blaze of
understanding. It was written
by the Ge. man Ammunition and
Arms Works to their representa-
tive in Paris, and the full text was
published in "Vorwearts," the lea-
ding Socialist paper in Berlin. It
was as follows :
"We have* just wired to you ask-
ing yon to await in Paris our to-
day's letter. The reason for the
teb'giam was that we should like
to obtain the insertion in one of
the most widely-read French jour-
nalspreferably the "Figaro"an
article to the effect that the French
military authorities have decided
to accelerate considerably the
rearming of the troops with new
machine guns, and to outer double
the quantity of the latter as against
their original intention. We shall
be much obliged if you could suc-
ceed in getting such an article
published." (Then follow the sig-
natures of two directors.)
The letter makes one gasp. The
contrast between the simple mat-
ter-of-fnet terms and the enormity
of the proposal is shattering. Here
we see two men, heads of a great
"patriotic" industry, moving in the
highest circles, doubtless decorated
w their sovereign, deliberately
tmg a panic in order lo make
..ness, and attempting to use a
. rench newspaper as the instal-
ment of their designs. One sees at
a glance how the thing is done. A
French papr, inspired by a Ger-
man agent, announces that the
Frercli Government are doubling
their arms in a certain direction.
The announcement is promptly
copied in the German Press. The
Geimar. Government take alarm
and meet the threat" ned increase
with new orders to the firm that
specialises in the particular arm.
The French Government reply by
an equivalent increase. The coun-
tries are in precisely the same rela-
tive position, but the taxpayers of
both are the poorer and the divi-
dends of the armaments firms the
fatter. France and Germany have
passed through another crisis and
the directors congratulate their
shareholders on a prosperous year.
It is all as simple as it is incredi-
bleand true.
KRUPP'S DILEMMA.
Compared with this, the Brandt
episode is mean and ordinary. But
it illustrates another phase of the
armourplate drama and it had the
advantage of dragging it into the
light of the law courts. The facts
as they were revealed in the course
of the trial, are simple. TheKrupp
firm is of course the greatest ar-
mourplate enterprise in the world.
It is the mailed fist of Germany.
Its heads have been honoured by
the Kaiser who has attended their
funerals and stood godfather to
their babies. If we might expect
the purest patriotism anywhere, it
should be here. But the fact about
all armourplate firms is that while
they live and thrive on patriotic
panics they do not desecrate so fine
a thing ns patriotism by mixing it
up with business. As Herr Lieb-
neckt reminded the Reichstag,
Krupp's made overtures to Napo-
leon III. for business purposesand
some years ago supplied the Am-
erican Government with steel
plates at 20 a ton less than the
price charged to the Geiman Gov-
ernment for the same goods, and
made similar reductions to other
foreign countries svhen purchasing
cannon. There is no false senti-
ment, it will be seen, about Krupp's
Unfoitunately this preferential
treatment of the foreigner had un-
pleasant consequences at home.
You cannot supply the foreigner
below cost without making some-
one pay. And'' -- ..
the G*"~
..nt m .\- uefli.i v^niw turn* sen-'
tenced Brandt, they lost their posi-
tion and were "cold-shouldered"
by the Army authorities. They
(continued on 4H1 page )


r h
TRIBUNE
T
ttbc Zxibune
Tuesday. December 30. 1913
The Home Rule controversy
iias reached a very interesting
stage.
Unionists drew nearer to the
Government r,c. l we" known tc
vjuvernmeiit position whenthev ti
tacitlv r>bmnCiLi_i ... lMV other contests.
[high offices and were splendidly
endorsed, whereas at Reading
and Linlithgow leading liberal
statesmen accepted high judici
al preferment, thus putting the
local Liberals to the painful
necessity of bringing forward
hastily chosen candidates
against men who had become
well known to the electors in
tacitly acknowledged the posi-
tion of three of the Irish Pro-
ymces to have a subordinate
I arl.ament with an Kxecutive
responsible to it, but insisted on
the exclusion of Ulster or a part
OI it, from the provisions of the
JJi II
Now leading Unionist journal?,
and statesmen like Lord Lans-
downe doubt the wisdom of
cutting off Ulster from the other
provinces in matters of legisla-
tion. Lord Lansdowne Mr
Austen Chamberlain and other
Unionist leaden are now tenta-
tively suggesting Hollle Rule
all round. As the Liberals are
anxious to create subordinate
Iegis alive bodies in England,
Scotland and Wales, there is a
i ssibihty that a settlement by
cons, nt may be reached along
the lines of Federalism. Hut the
Government could only agree to
this on the condition that Ire-
land, as the ripest for the
change, should receive imme-
diate treatment.
01course the "Die-Hards" in
the Jouse of Lords may compel
tlie (iovernine.it to pass I lie Mill
entity as it stands, by either
'electing it on Second Keidin
or by inserting wrecking amend-
ments.
We cannot see that recent by-
factions reveal a weakening of
the Liberal hold on the consti-
tuencies. Reading and Linbth-
gow.it is true, made a poor
Showing |for the Government.
On the other hand Keighlev and
wick told a contrary story. The
Governments blundering over
the prosecution and imprison-
me.it of James Laskin ensured
the defeat of the Liberals at
Heading by greatly strengthen-
ing (he Socialist vote, and caus-
ed working men at Linlithgow ,
t"sl.ovv res. ntme.it by voting'29th December iqiv
lory. It is believed also that at | Resolved that 'His Excel-
uie tatter place the 150 Irish ilency the Governor and Mem-
,"";"lsl '"v..ss.!rs turned a h^ohl.n Kxecutive Council
,;;i;n" 4l L^^^te......
'''''.V^S MMlmlo the
'"ul^rHel PI P^fc'f Honour
I'' work in one cortstituenev. At anTe James William Culmer, an
..,',-1'll;'> and Wick, Liberal unofficial Member of the Kxe-
CaiK.ulat.-s simply sought re- cutive Council, and a Member
election on being promoted to of the Honourable the House of
While talking with the Com
mtssioner of Governor's Harbour
a couple of weeks ago, on the
labour problem, our conversation
turned to "Mack to the Land" as
a solution, and the cultivation
of onions was referred to,
when Mr. Alburysaid : "Onions?
yes, if the people could be en-
couraged to take up the culti-
vation of onions, and tlie Gov-
ernment, through the Board of
Agriculture, would find a mar-
ket for them, which is easy,
either in Ameiica or Canada,
and as and inducement, to start
with, would guarantee them one
penny per pound, hikI anything
obtained over one penny also
hand over to the grower^ I am
confident that there would be no
better paying investment in the
Bahamas. It would even take the
place of tlie pine- ipple. A | e my
per pound would pay, and I
know that a market can be
found without difficulty. 1 know
that shipments have been made
from Long Island, to America
and Canada, which have been
very remunerative."
We believe that there is much
in the foregoing that could he
turned into good use in helping
to a solution of the problem
that is at present giving us so
much concern. Mr. Alburv is not
"talking through his hat," he is
a thoughtful and practical man,
and what he has said with refer-
ence to onion culture is not from
hearsay, but from practical ex-
perience, and it would be wise
if the Government; directly or
through the Moard of Agricul-
ture, would consult him upon
the subject.
j*
Extract from Minutes of the
i \ cutive Council on Monday,
Assembly, who died in Nassau
on the 22nd of December 1913
W. M. HAi.l >()\' SMITH.
Captain.
Clerk of the Executive Council.
St. Hilda's High School gave
their annual Entertainment at
"The Farm" yesterday after
noon, at which Prize* and Cer
tificates were distributed by His
Lordship the Bishop. After the
Bishop's remarks at the end of
the prize giving, His Excellency
the Governor made a very cheer-
ful speech, sparkling and full
of wit, our only regret is that
that we are not able to give it
to our readers verbatim for to
give portions of it would be to
spoil it.
The :eachers arc to be com-
plimented up )n the very suc-
cessful rendering ol the French
Play "Snow White," and also
the more difficult one "The
Death of Balder," from Norse
mythology. The children took
up their [.arts well, which went
to show that no pnins had been
spared in their trai ling.
"The Tnl une" desires to t n
der its congratulations to the
School.
We have been requested to
announce that there will be a
Watch Nightservice at St. An-
drew's Presbyterian Church to-
morrow (Wednesday) night, at
eleven o'clock.
A collection will be taken up
in aid of the poor.
The Management of the
Imperial Theatre. anxious
that its Patrons shall have the
best Entertainment pos ible, i-
holding on until the arrival of
the schooner "llattie Darling,'
from Miami, due this week,
which vessel has been cabled to
bring new films. Mather than
give a show that might be con-
sidered stale, they prefer to wait
Look for announcements soon.
A Grand Bazaar will be given
in St. Matthews Schoolroom
on Tuesday 10th 1914.
The Police
will be given on
ing.
The Cuban Steam Tug "Me,
tuito" ariived yesterday after
noon from Havana.
This tug, will be employed
as a Tender to the Ward Line.
She is a much smaller vessel
than the "Colonia"
Nassau, 29 Dec. 1913
Dear Sir,
I have read with much satis-
faction in a lecent issue of The
Tribune that the Kxecutive will
not bring forward the proposed
Mill relating to Friendly Socie-
ties in the ensuing session of the
Legislature ; to do so would be
highly impolitic in view of the.
wide spread and determined op-
position to the Bill.
The author of this Mill isevi
dently ignorant of Friendly So-
ciety principles or he would not
for a moment attempt to intro-
duce an element of compulsion,
into a system that isesseutially
and purely voluntary.
One can quite understand
compulsory governmental con-
trol of Banks, Insurant e Com-
panies, Building Loan Associa-
tions, and Sharing Societies;
these organisations arc organiz-
ed s- ilely for profit and g xin from
the handling or mone\ belong-
ing largely, if not chiefly, to
others than their shareholders
(Members) ; termed p itrons, de-
positors, customers & ; these
patrons,etc., have no voice in
the choice of the officers, who as
a rule, are well paid ; the custo-
mers, patrons have no voice in
the control of the organization
beyond their individual ac-
counts therefore arc at the
mercy, or rather dependent upon
the officers and shareholders,
and the only protection they
have for their interests is 1 o.
eminent control and supervi-
sion.
Hut it is entirely different
with Friendly Societies, thev
.ire organized for mutual aid and
mutual ienefits; of their mem
htm only, handling money be
longing to them (the members)
only, and thee only and all of
them equally have a voice in
the choice of the officers whose
pay in most eases is nominal;
the members Also have access to
the books on reasonable request
These Societies also h ive effec-
tive control of their funds, the
mount held by a Treasurer is
in most cases limitpd, one officer
,a
Secretary f&o" are required to
give bonds with two sureties,
so it appears that they look
well after their affairs.


T
I II R I K I r, U N B
What need tl en for compul-
sory registration, and what are
the benefits that registration
< onfers ?
The best testimony to the
usefulness of these societies and
the confidence the people have
in them is the ever increasing
number of societies and the
number of members.
I will not here dwell upon the
value of these societies as mo
ral educa ion il and tluift agen-
cies or the rebel that they "arc
to the government in the mat-
ter of indigen, e and sickness and
death, I will only observe that
it is wiser not to "Kill the goose
that lays the golden e<'gs."
Yours
FRATERNITY.
Allan-Breach
Turtle Fisheries
19Geo.
Sponge and
Act3 months
20 James Wallace Breach
Street Traffic Rules5s. or 4
days!
IN THE
MAGISTRATES COURT
December
15Frank Roberts, and
Harold rtiompsonWaving in
possession j lbs brass value is.
reasonably suspected of being
stolenOrdered to be given H
and 5 strokes with tamarind rod
respectively.
Jos. Davis -I living in posses-
sion a bag containing \, u..
ioJj reasonably suspected of be-
in- stolen 2 months.
16Win. Russell-Drunk and
loud shouting 111 street-10s. or
>^ d.iys.
II,Assaulting and beating
Constable Ta)lor while in the
execution of ins duty20s. or
20 days.
Elizabeth SandsConceal.
mem of birth -Remanded till
2jrd lust.
17Napoleon Minus- Drunk
and Using profane language in
street8s. or (, days.
Clarence Johnson, and
Thomas Ingrahan) -Larceny of
fried fish and pan cakes value
2^. id. goods and chattels of
Brunette layl..i -Johnson sen-
tenced to one months imprison-
ment and to receive 6 strokes
on admission and 6011 morning
of discharge.
Geo. Rolrer (the guardian of
Ingraham) entered into his own
recognizance in \ for the ap-
pearance of the said Thomas
higraham in the Court to re-
eiv.- sentence if called upon.
r Samuel TailBreach Do<;
License Act is.
>N Percy Smith Assaultin
ktarry Mitchell occasi ming
actual bodily harm Bound in
his own recognizance in \o to
appear for sentence if called
upon.
December 30th K)l \.
BY RADIO TELEGRAPH.
New York; 2<) h
c Inning quofAtions on Stock Ex*
ange.
Am il. Copper 74 1
1'.. .v 0.
<";,n. Pic. 205 f
St. Paul 100
New V'll; Central qj
I'rnn.i. IOC) J
Me.idiog 168 ;
Sou. 1' 10, '54 4
Union P.ic.
U. S. Sle-.l 5M
New York, ?y.The police
me confronted with another
trunk mystery today when the
bopy of a man bound hand an,I
j foot was discovered in a trunk
which had been dumped from
push -art in front of 47 Put
Street. The man was dead only
a short time. The two men
who trundled the cart into Pitt
Street, after (lumping the trunk
disappeared.
New York, 39.Edward M.
Grout, former Comptroller of
the city of New York wast od \
indicted for perjury in connec-
tion with investigations into the
affairs of the defunct Union
Bank of Brooklyn,
San Sebastian,Spain, 29 A
destructive fire is racing here.
Circus, theatre and more than
thirty buildings destroyed. A
storm is greatly hampering the
work of the firemen.
Pektn, 20.Under the leader-
ship of General Yang Pa Pin in
the Province of Yunnam three
regiments of tiie Chinese army
have revolted.lt is reported that
they killed their officers and
proclaimed independence of the
province in the name of Sai Yat
Sen, on December 8th.
London, 29.A large part of
llurope is in expectance today
of the first severe cold wave of
the Winter. Snow has fallen
over England, Prance, North-
ern Germany and Switzerland.
Hempstead, 29.Fire today
destroyed three aeroplanes and
four valuable motors at Hemp-
stead aviation field. Loss thir-
ty thousand dollars.
Montreal, 29.A disastrous
fire is raging here ll|isHilrrnouu
and the rircmen are tumble to
check it because nf lack of
water due to break in city watei
mains. Twenty small buildings
were destroyed in a short time
and the firemen resorted to the
use of dynamite to prevent the
spread of the fire
Albany, NI. Y. 89.Naviga-
tion on the Hudson Rivet be-
tween here and NtW York was
1 losed to lay.
New York,
Lillian Nordica, wools a pas
sender on the Dutch steamer
Tasman, which went ashore in
the Gulf of Papua north of
\ustralia, cabled her husband
today that the ship was in no
danger thus far. The Tasman
carries many passengers.
New York, 29.The Jury in
the case of I Inns Schmidt mur-
derer of Ann Aumueller retired
shortly after t : 30 this afternoon
and were still out this evening
ST. MATTHEW'S
GRAND
BAZAAR
TUESDAY,
FEBRUARY10, 1914
P!
THE STROMBUS
EUSONS whose names nod
d dresses appear in the City
;,n I Hns ness Direct Ties a?e herebv
notified that our lureeinent for the
year 1913 expired with. Ilu> publi-
cation of llie December number.
Unless otherwise notified we will
continue to publish the Directories
as th-v now itund.aod will collect
as. for each insertion, for the yarn
ending December, 1914.
Application for space shout I be
made earl<.
L.GILBER1 DUPUCH.
Manager.
'grams' and 'liters' and "centi-
meters'; be kn ws that the
science upon which his agricul-
ture is based depends upon in*
vestigatinns in wlfjch only me-
tric units are employed. Fof
instance, in the Babcock milk
test, which is familiar to every
dairy farmer, 17.5 cubic centi-
meters of s'dphuric acid is add-
ed to 17. 6cubic centimeters of
milk. Certified milk must,
among other things, have less
than 10.000 bacteria per cubic
centimeter; and milk classified
I is 'Grade A' must contain less
39.Madame; than 100.000 bacteria per cubic
centimeter before pasteurisation,
and less than 10,000 afterward.
'The health officer deter-
mines the fitness of water for use
by the number and kind of bac-
teria. He seldom approves of
water containing more than a
few hundred bacteria per cubic
centimeter, regardless of the
kind ; and water is labeled
'good' only if it contains less
than a hundred bacteria per cu-
bic centimeter. It is worth mer-
tion that in case of serious ill-
ness the bulletins issued by the
physicians for public informa-
tion now usually give the num-
ber of leucocytes and phagocy-
tes per cubic centimeter of
blood.
"Scientific housekeepers use
metric units constantly. A bal-
anced diet is of extreme im-
portance in reducing the cost of
food; and in figuring dietaries
metric units on!v are employed."
EVERYDAY USF.S OF
THE METRIC SYSTEM
Few people realize how wide
ly the metric system of weights
and measures is employed in
this country. Yet sportsman and
si it ntist, druggist and jeweler,
farmer and physical director,
housewife and health officer, lib
i.iiian and manufacturer, even
the Federal governmentall
know and use the metric system.
In the December Popular Me-
chanics Magazine, 1'i'd Tclford
says:
" The scientific farmer no long
jer wonders at 'calorie*' and
Popular Mechanics
Magazine
-written o rou can understand it"
A ORE A T Continued Story of the World'.
* Prosross which you may begin reading
at any lime, and which will hold your
inten-st forever. You are living in the best
year, of the most wonderful age, of what is
doubtless the greatest world in the universe.
A resident of Mars would gladly pay
<1 fififi FOR ONE YEAR'S
J>I,UUU SUBSCRIPTION
to this m.-iKJt/inr.in order to keep informed of
our progrrs. in Engineering and Mechanics.
Are you reading it t Two millions of your
neighbors are. atnl it is the favorite mag...
line in thousand* of the best American
homes. It api^.tls to all classes - old and
young - men and women.
The "Bhop Votes" Department '!<* page. )
giro* e.t.y ws/. to do tiling. how to roako
useful articles tor uoiua anil .Imp. ropwlm, ele.
" Amateur Bterhanies" tlO pages i tell. Iiowto
make Mi.-ii'n furniturt), RlraksMoutm.. imats,
eiik'iot'.. luagu*. ami all the tssusESA boj torsjfi
SI.SO r YEAR. SINGLE COPIES 2S CENTS)
Ajfc roar h*is.M to ih y.*i on. or
WRITE row FREE SAMPLE COPY TODAY
POPULAR MKCHANICS CO.
IIS W. W..SI." - CHSOACO, VU
ffl


I
T H J R I B 11 N
were puzzled by this change of feel-
ing. I hey did n<>t attribute it to
any such mean idea as dissatisfac-
tion with their policy of selling
cheap abroad and dear at home
That is a well-understood Protect-
ionist privilege. They believed
that the trouble was that (hey were
not sulficienily well represented at
Berlin.
(To be continued;
S. H. 0. CLUTSAM
ATTORNEY AT LAW
OFFICE
Corner gf Shirley andfredkick
Streets.
NOTICE
Gasoline
STANDARD Oil. GO'S GAS-
OLINE. Sold in quantities
of One Gallon and upwards for
one shilling a gallon.
Drums of 50 gallons at accents
a gallon, subject to return when
empty.
These special Drums do away
with the necessity of buying a
Storage Tank.
C. C. SAUNDERS.
ANNA E.RAE
Proprietress Of
The Vogue,",
"Au Bon Marche Stores"
and Bijou
A LARGE ASSORTMENT TO
SELECT FROM
LA OIKS Dress ("mods, in
Lustres,.Serges, Ratines
white and Coloured Cor-
dings, Crepes, Crepons, Mar-
quisettes, Benga lines, Lands-
(iowues, Spot-Muslins, Em-
broidered Muslins, Velvets,
Embroidered Batistes, Tus-
sore Suitings, Embroidery
FlouQcings, Overall Embroi-
dery and Overall Lace.
Laces and Insertions, Rib-
bons plain and fancy Latest
Style Belts Lace Collars.
Embroidery Collars.
Ladies White, Black, Pink,
Blue, Heliotrope, and Grey
Silk Stockings
Men's White, Black, Grey
Navy Blue, Alice Blue, Helio,
;m Silk Ties to match
Silk Shirts. Pyjamas
Ladies Superfine Silk Para-
sols, Silk Evening Scarves,
Beautiful Handb.i
Handsome Japanese Goods
Gequine Irish Linens of all
kin.L.
J. C. COAKLEY'S
PennyCigar
"Ladysmith Brand''
It is better than a 2d. Cigar
elsewhere.
Try one and be convince of
its excellent quality.
NOTICE !
Gasoline
STANDARD Oil Co'l Motor
Spirits sold in quantities of 5
gallons and upward for one shilling
per gallon fit Garage.
Bring a Vessel for small quanti-
ties.
Drums may he had with "drum
lots," subject to return when empty
Peo the Fifth Cars sold at
$1175, less 10 per cent dis-
count f. o. b. factory.
Reo Cars also for Hire.
Hicjcles rented fur ics. a week.
Automobile and bicycle supplies
j kept in stock. Cylinder oil and
Auto Grease ;\ specialty.
Can even sell you a verv conve-
nient storage drum with faucil to
keep gasoline. Come and see
them.
Apply to
J. P. SIMMs,
47 Market Street.
Nov. 18, I913,
Shingles
Best No. 1 Heart 5in. Cypress
Shingles at $9.60 per thou-
sand of 20 bundles
Discounts on lots of over
5000 shingles.
Special Price
also on cheaper gradesalso
5111. Cypress at 6.72 per
thousand of 20 bundles. This
price made possible by a very
large purchase.
Fresh stock arriving every
week.
C. C. SAUNDERS.
REMEMBER!
No home was, or cn be com]
plel without "M\ilc",
WE are offering a line of High
Grade Pianos, Player Pi.
aflOS, Piano O.gans, and Reed
Organs suitable for" every home.
Come! and see our la leal catalogue
and let us send one of these insiiu-
ineuts diiact from factory to your
Uomn for 30 days trial. Absolutely
FRF.F. for Ritkttig.Ch.iOM for your
elf.Our instrumei.U and terms i.re
the I'.est in the World.
THE RISING STAR
Dillet Street
\Y. F. W. & Co
WT. would iform all who appreciate a Good Smoke that we now
have on h ind an extensive Stock of HAVANA CIGARS. We
guarantee our brand to be made of the finest Havana and Sumatr?
Wrappers, and Havana Fillers throughout.
These Cigars are manufactured on our premises by skilled workmen
and great pains are taken to produce an article of superior quality.
The success we have met with in the past leads us confidently to expect
the patronage of connoiseurs.
J. L. SAUNDERS & Co.
Bav Street.
Live
Georgia
Turkeys
"Just here Per Frances E."
from Miami \Fla
Price Is. 6d. lb
Live weight
Call up Phone 136
THE WORLD'S JUDGMENT
makes powerful the name
STANDARD ENGINE.
Lloyd's Register shows this
the power of the majority.
Back of the Standard
guarantee is the Stan-
dard Motor Construc-
tion Co., 171 Pine st.,
Jersey City, N. J.
CHAS. E. ALBURY,
Nassau, N. P.
Agent for the Bahamas.
Calendars
AND GREETING^FOLP&R*
with
VIEWS OF NASSAU
at
SANDS' STUDIO
and
DIOCESAN HOOK STORE.
REAL
Bargains
AGAIN
IN BOOTS AND SHOES.
WILLIAMS
THE SHOEMAN
Mas just received a
large consignment oi
Hoots and Siioes most
of which ar
SAMPLE LOIS
of 1, 2 and 3 pairs of a
brand and style in all sizes
which are being sold
SURPRISINGLY CHEAP:
In many instances the discount is
not ie-s than
20 per cent on the
REGULAR PRICKS
Call to d.ty and convince \our
self that this is another lot of
tlrnse Exceptional Bargains
which is eveiy now and then
offered at
WILLIAMS*
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
SHOE ESTABLISHMENT.
277 279, IViy-^tieet,
Furniture
FOR XMAS PRESENTS
RECEIVING AT
THE NASSAU BARGAIN
HOUSE
By Stmr. arriving to day
WICKER FURNITURE
ROCKING Chairs. Tablet,
Sitting ,, ("ouches
Sofas, Child's Rockers, Stands,
Cane Seat,
Rockers, Dining Chairs,
Large Wooden Rockers and
Dining Chairs
Also
Bureaux, Waslistandt &c.
F.namlM Hedtteads. Mattresses Sec
A quantity China I-'.'ware,
Vates, Toy Tea and Dinner Sets
Velocipedes, and lots of other
poods for Xmas presents.
A F.MOOPE.
ii


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