<%BANNER%>

PAGE 1

T FI £ T R I B U N fi Zhe tribune Saturday. December 27. 1913 In conversation, while at Eleutlicra, with a planter of prominence we gathered the following : "We are having fine rains and the pines are shooting very ear!) this season in consequence. If the rains continue we expect lo get a good crop of pine-apples, as regards quality. Early pint make early slips and a large per centage of i4inch. pines upon which the grower depends so much. If your Readers will refer to your issue of Saturday, No* ember 22, they will find tint the quantity of 14 inch size have in creased, while those of a sin.ilh have decreased during the pasl three or four years. It is the di sire and ambition of every plan tor or cultivator lo produce the largest size, as it is more to his benefit to do so. Plants that shoot .early give the best results in the following season, for the reason that tin pines and slips are taken nfl earlier, which gives the suckers more time to grow. Could a targe per centage of the larger pines be obtained in May, Ihi industry would soon revive, but owing to droughts, and improi ei (or poisonous] fertilizers, w % %  have been prevented trom obtaining these results tip to the I iit. Last season 45,060. dozen slips were imported from Cuba b\ priv ite enterprise : these slips we e planted in a new fertilizer from Jacksonville, and the fields v look,-,s healthy and as promising as an) ever grown in the Colon). W hat a wise thing our Go\ eminent did when, live or years ago, they importod quantity of slips from Co While man) of these wire n >t planted to advantage, the lessons leai ned from their use have been mosl valuable, and the < invent* men! s provisii HI J1.1 \ e been h ke "bread cast open the waters Tliero would not have he< n 1 >,•00dozen pines in the Colony to day were it not for this fact. \\ e ham from this that the industi \ can be revived, and that £nc Cuban slips will grow and pi (luce pine when tlie native will not e\ en i' 'oi Noting the success of the im pot ted slips sevi ral pri> ate in • dividual) imported numbers of them, and these are the plants j their derm is with a eat-o ninethat will give the pines for 1914 tails and a lengthened curtailand following years. This is one 1 ment of the liberty which they instance where the Government Saved this valuable industry at ,1 comparatively trilling cost, and we are hoping, mosl sincere lv, that they will see !" np way of helping us to place the indus %  trv on a firm basis, and of help, ing to induce small growers to l,,, l! ""'' al "" v **<* %  r-ngage in the work, by formula-' ting some scheme that will encourage them to start in, with a put to such ill US THE STROMBUS is prepared to take new Names and addresses and renewals for its Cit) and Business I hrectoi \ guarantee that they will not do SO at actual loSS. It is ea.v tOS> e that any monev spent to revive an ii dustry such as this is, and such as it has been to tins Col ments should now be sent in. The Strombus offers .1 most desirable Medium for advertis ing not only within the Colon) but abroad as well. Hoarding and Lodging I louses cannot afford to be without an MM II .IS II IIIS llt;i_-II II. llll.s V..OI • .1 .. 1 onyoneofits most valuable advertisement m the btrombus 1 ounsts read the Strombus, Residents read the Strombus, Ev< 1 vbodv who wants inforIII Is—would be a paying vestment. We are ir. a position to m\ mal ""> read the Strombus, so that the proposed Bill, relatiim to I-1 iendh Societies, ill that they want evei) I) "I •' to ivnow about should advertise ii in THE STROMBUS. not I with this coming session "l the I .egislaiure ; the ultii le of the Mill will 1 : nn the views of the dif ns of the community on the subj %  /• Complaints have been made to us that the senseless and vicious practice of pulling tl r %  ving fcates, t iking up brid,' 1 "over drains an'l in boats, carts and So on m obstruction of the streets in the suburbs principally was in dulged in on Christmas moimug by hoodlums from the city and suburbs. This practice is 1 souice of grt >t annoyance to the victims, and may lead to serious inju rus to inoffensive persons; and a a\ further lead to severe chas in nt or moie yf the offend ing villains. Failing the protection which e\ery cili/en has the right to expect, a respectable citizen of Eastern District informs us that for the last live Christmases he has been compelled to watch Ins premise* ; and on Christmas 1 interest of the A. M. K. Church rmorring succei did in captui ing in that district. After leaving We would direct the attention of our Ri adei • to the A Ivertisenini' of "Christmas Music" to be given in Trinity Cnurch on Vloiida) evening. The Imperial is giving a good show ,as usual, this evening. The Revd. CharlesA. Dann, ani\e, 1 on Fiida) morning, A lue occurred in Granl I'nwn between nine and ten n'cli cfc I isl night, w hen a house the propert) rl Mi VIfred Bode, on Mai kel Stre ft, South ; w ilh all its contents, were entirely destroj ed. There is a strong suspicion of arson. We ha\e been requested to state that the Right Rev. John I lurst 1) \)., bishop of the A. M. I'.. Church intends visiting Savannah Sound. Kleutluia, some ti ne in March next, in the two of the blackguards and handing them over to the police, we trust that the) may be made I wholesome examples of, and get • e punishment they richly de serve. Surely the public should be protected bom these depreda lions, and the perpetral rs whenever caught being too ig. j noiar.t to recognise and respect the rights of others, should have the knowledge injected in) 1 them through the medium of the Bahamas, Mr. Hurst will proceed to St. Thomas or Barbados*. There was a public prize giving at the "Bishop's Eastern S hool on Thuitday afternoon. 18th Deer., which was fairly well attended. Among those present w< re: Revs 11. W. Weigall, M A, Fr. I tavison, IT. Lovell and Mrs. Lovell. The parents and friends of thechildien weie well represented. The following programme was very nicely rendered : Song—The School. Recitations—Misses Alice Hill, Kathleen Smith, Maud Know If s. %  swcdish Drill 16 girls.Song— j tirls. Scenes fr R obin I lood I 'he different parts of King, Nobles, Robin I lood, PriarTui k Little John, Allana Dale. Michael, For< Sters, Maid Marian and Lady Christahel were well performed by Misses II. Smith, II. Eorbes, E. Thompson, A. Demeritte, (i. Eldon, V. Knowles, ll.lldl.N. R .ker.M.Young, II Young, < i. I 1 imps >n, D. Stuart, L. Eldon, I). Fountain, R. 11 ill, Man one I lax ton, Edith llaxton, and Masters Allan Stuart, P. I lanna, A. hidon and R, I laxton. After the presentation of the prizes by His Lordship the Bishop, Ite congratulated the teachers on the success of the after noon's proceedin Articles suitable for prizes were given bv 'The Lord Bishop, Rev W. S. Lovell, Miss Phyllis Frith, Mr. II. Butler, Miss M, Albury, Miss (i. ButW, and prizes were awarded to Majorie Uaxton, Naomi Roker, Alice Smith, Robert I laxt< n, Doris Fountain, Ellen Thompson, l laid Forbes, Madge Fountain, Nellie Hill, Maria Voung, lidda Smith. Gladys T Idoil and Hilda Smith We congratulate Miss M. Albury, Ihe Mistress of this tchooi, upon the excellent showing of her pupils. Editor of the Tribune Dear Sir,— 11 is appalling to my min I hoW the gospel of Jesus Christ is mutilated, and n mowed dow n m our time by leading men iii responsible posi ions. At a recent lecture oil "'The State of the Dead" delivered in the Eastern District, a prominent cil izen, and membei of one of our leading denominations, 1 riticised the speakei for not having 1 reachi d the gospel BI (oidmg to his definition oi the gospel.) "We ma\ well inquire then, what is the gospel ? "We preach Christ and I lim ne iind," the ap title Paul declared. The complete gospel, without omission or intermission, which is the po %  %  1 of ( i )d unto salvation. And Jesus said, N • man cometh unto the lather but by me. I am the l ..ay the truth, and the lift. ,i,miiiiwiniiniw



PAGE 1

in E i i< i i' N Tl.rn the gospel includes Hie %  •e^ to life lli-' t>uth along the 'vox, and lastly life, the result ofJnllowing the way and the truth. Well tlion, if I am in error as totlf rial me of man or the coaili'Kin and slate of the dead, • im i in ihtuitli ? Nil If I then preach the truth as it is in Christ Jesus, as to the nature of nia^ani I not preaching the Hie;;.. %  I : V :iiv. venlv I am the lecturer at the meeting alluded to, \'i explicitly prov d from the S i iptures, that man doflt not poss ss immortality, but is a d\ iug reature. The Scriptui s also speak in no Uncertain tones,-— "S m I ./ man lie more just than God ? Job4 : 17. And a^aki %  ( lod onlv hath immortality" 1 'I im, fi : ](, And again, "Our Saviour, Jesus Christ hath abotshed leath, and brought life and i minor tali f) to light through i|w gospel. 2 Tim, 1 : 10 And then the) ad in >nish us to seek for immortality. Rom., 2 : 7 Yet in Hie fa e of the wisdom of God, our w uld be sin pherd of fi'H k said, "I have an immortal *>ul to s;i Now Nr, froffl whcncr this dec#|i'i 1 .W'liv, il is i'i! [Adam's sin. Rom., 5 : 12. 'Hie innate tendency, \es of nature. id not Satan say to our fore its, "Ye shall not surcU t> And did they not Fall this di 1 ption, and BIN fcd upon all in that they had Wherefore we are bom with this de< rpl ion in our natures, that we are immortal never dying souls, —and the work of the gospel i> to clear up all ifch de eptions. Now I \ inline tos.iy, a child Ii 'i 11 in out a •'•, and brought up away from all forms of reltgions inllin in e, when Ii" becomes a man if guestioned upon this point, would say he had ;\\\ im mortal soul. Therefore he would be In need of that form of the itospel to which we listened the other evening to correct this inherent error. No doubt the ohjector was placed in an undesirable post. tion,left in a state of sus| sion, — to come down lower, perhaps, than he was willing. search the Scriptures "For in them vc think ve have eternal life." Thanking you foi your valuable space Mr. Editor. I am yours, CALIGULA. BIRTH sMi r11 — Friday night, Dec a6th nu 5, to Mr. and Mr>. Charles C. ."smith, a daughter. A CARD. Mrs. Sophia Minns and family d'sir. s to thank friends for sympathy extended in recent b •• reavement and for flowers kindly sent. Pol ire Orderly Room Nassau, *jrd December, 1913 N< >i ICE. R EFERRING to Govern. in.mi Notice No. 353 i8th 1).-.. 11.1,. r suspending All Rules and Regulations made under the Street Nuisance Prohibition Act 18994 Dec 24th, J5II1, and 51st. 1913, and on 1st January 191 4. the public are hereby notified that the firing of Crackers will not be allow 1 d in the vicimix of Churches during 1 >i\ in-,-1 > 11 e, inside the Public Market and on the Wharves to the North of Bay Street. Masqueraders will not be al lowed mside the Market or on the Wharves By Order, R. II. C. CRAWFORD Commandant of Police. TRINITY CHURCH Monday, Dec. 29th, at 8 p.m. Christmas Music. Mrs. Paine. Mrs. Brace Mr. Asa II. Pritchard. Rev. P. J. Paine. Organist: — Ret. 1Simpson, B. V Silver C< II Ii %  "> aid "/ Epworth Fund, lerhabs, than b lowwer However we are glad to offer him consolation, "knowing that tribuktton worketh patience," bv .TTvisiii'-.' him t" build anew upon the Solid Foundation, and December 27th iqn BY RADIO TELEGRAPH Vienna, 26. —A dispatch from Sofia says the Bulgarian Foreign Minister will resign iii order to prevent a fall of the entire cabinet. Washington, 26.—Male and hearty, Admiral I ie >rga I >ewej celebrated ins 76111 birthday to day. rite Hero of Manila hopes there will be no more wars, bu t recommends a strong navy for 1 this government. London, 2b.—The British cruise 1 Roxburgh and Spanish cruis 1 Pelayo are hastening to the assistance of the British steamship Ludgate stranded on the African coast off Tarifa. The cruisers will rescue thecie.v and save the ship from pillage at the hands of bands of Moors who have been attempting to overpower the crew and loot the Ludgate. New York, 26.—Great damage to property and loss of seven live* was the toll, up to late this afternoon, of a heavy northi east gale which lias been sweep ing the coast for 21 hours. The chief loss ni hfe followed the stranding of two barges off Forked River, New Jersey, when live men were drowned. Probably a million dollars damage has been done to palatial suram 1 homes of New Yorkers at Sea bright and nearby 1 oast o don Calumet, Michigan, 26.—The number of persons who lost their lives in a panic following a false alai 111 of lire at Red Jacket was placi I at 75 this afternoon. Tokio, 2b. The Diet O) n I today by the emperor who deli vend a spe< eh from the throne. I le laid sin ss tm the friendly relations existing among the powers. Paris, 36. Dr. Alexis Carrell, "I Rockefeller Institute, New York, was married this after noon to Madame lie la Maine. 1 Jr. Carrell won the Nobel prize for nu 2 for his medical discov cries, New York, 26.—The police are hunting for a big limousine automobile which struck Rich aid B. Lee, Jr. and bis wife ( i 1 trude at 6fi "-tie t and Broad way earls this morning and hurled them iii front of a taxi cab, TheTaxicab ran overboth. Mrs Lee. who was the daughter of Col. Phillip Harvey of Wash lington, died before reaching the hospital. I.ee's condition isc.ri11 al. He is General Manager of the transportation department [of the American Sugar Refining Company. New York, 26. It is -aid that Mayor elect Mitchell will up point Dr. {Catherine B. Davis. Commissioner of Correction. if appointed she will have charge 1 of all of the cit\s penal institu Horn and her ary will be I7, 500 yearly. Rome, 26.I ingUp Of the late Cardinal Ramoolla s apartmentshas given rise to controversy. H '* ' %  %  ''' tha J u was illegal as it was carried out without the authorisation MI intervention of judicial ofli Hals. New York; 361I1 Closing quotations on Stock r.xchangr. Am 11 Copper 7i I B. 9 Reading >7<> i >nu. PaC. Union I'ac. i', S. Steel • AN ENTERTAINMEN1 W ILL be given on Tuesday evening, join instant, in the "Cotu Hall,' 1 Mackey Street— entitled A Drill of 26 letters of the Alphabet, also ; ; it rt •" ld Dialogues. Refreshment* will he sold. Admission :—AdalH I '. i, InMi'ii 3d. Rev. II. A. P0IT1ER, 1 NOTICE (Special) AT THE ROYAL STORE. B b.s \ N >. (i Flour it l 1 '-• 1! 'A m laurel Brand %  > |b. foi cts. 1 nnd Storm Kii g B nnd Bt8cts, lb. While Granulated Sugar I I us, •_'l cis. Brown Crystallised Sugai at ."1 is. Ih. Above Stock just Iv*'' eiyed per s s. "Vigilant ia" Good Quality and I resh. And list but noi least ITgT Pure Jain.oe.1 Rum At 10s. Per Gallon "Call early" J I. SAUNDI'RS & Co Shingles Beat No. 1 Heart 3111. Cypress Shingles al $9.60 per thousand of 20 bundles Discounts on lots of over 5000 sliiiifjlps. Special Price also on cheapi 1 gradi al o 5111. Cypress a1 ^6.72 pei thousand of 20 bundles, I his price made possible bya verj large purchase. Fresh stock arriving every Week. C. C SAUNDERS. 4 %  L



PAGE 1

OUR CHRISTMAS COLORS For hundreds of years I o'lv hns been used^for Christmas oVcnra li>n. it trows in ntmnsl pvery rountiy. I lie choict of our Christmas color*, red and gr*en, li is no doubt come about from these colois which Nature prr>vides at the Christmas season in the holly and poinsettia. WHY DO WE Kiss UNDER THE MISTLETOF Romantic Scandinavians, in pivinp honor to their gieat K'd,! Thor, built creat fires calif d "Julc," j or "Yule*' fires. The high-r the 1 Mm Mental and Physii %  7////'///,. atigue m MB flames towered through the forests the greater pleased was Thor. I he men soon learned tint the trees upon which mistletoe clung would give the Inightest fires. They believed this was due to HIP tfre.it Thor himself, who caused tlir mis When brain or body i weary the digestive powers are weakened and dUtte for ordinary food ie often experienced. Under such clreumtDC the 'Allinburyt' Diet is specially valuable. It is pleasant to take, easily digested and assimilated and speedily restorative. Thus it helps the system to recover tone and vigour. TVs 'Alke****** DIET is prepared fro pars rick silk sad whole whst-th two vital food CUOMBIS— comkiaed ia partially pre-difcstcd form. Madi in a minult—Mdd boiling maltr onln. TO BE OBTArKKD MOM ALL CHEMISTS AND STORES. ALLEN & HANBURYS LTD. LONDON. r.NGI AND, A food for Adults aad quit* dis'laet from tke wH-kaowa| 'Alleaksrya' Foods for Infants. k the birth ol Jesus thousands of tleloe to grow on those trees to let 'candles were brightly burning liis people know which were best ; throughout Palestine—a fitnng, fi4" burning in his honor. i though unintentional proclamation The trees upon which quantities n f \\ w l.igln that had come into of the mistletoe grew were sapped j t |, e world. A lact that bears out of their vitality, an', being drier this supposition it that theCaihoburned with a blighter none than | |j C | 0 f the Creek Chmch call other trees that were full of sap. So when any one met under tlie iristletoe in the great forests, no matter how great enemies 'hey were, they dropped theii weapons and greeted each other kindly ; nor would they take up arms against each nthei \ until the-sunrise of another d iv. This was their tribute in honor of Thor. They began to lake bits of the mis'letoe into their homes an I hang it over the doorways, and if any enemies came they could not enter the houses beneath th" mistletoe without becoming friend* of the people inside so long as they reniained theie. From Ihiscanie the habit of greeting people who stepped tinder the mlilletoe with an embrace or a kiss, and at indoor feasts the mistletoe was hung up in the room and the people greeted each other with kisses And, so in these days the couple kissing beneath iheCnriMnia*mistletoe in a spirit of fun or romance cairies on a custom the Scan* dioavianf had a thousand years before Chtist. WHAT THE CIIRKIM \S CANDLE SIGNIFIES Pinning candles at Christmas! ide is a custom derived from the Ro. man Saturnalia 1 Not only were candle* used for the purpose of illu inn ill MI during that festival) but they wee also exchanged as gifts in token of cheerfolneei and good n ill It is probable ill it the employment of c. nidles was derived from the Jewish Feast of Chrietmas the "Feast ol Light."— Ladies Home Journal." NOTICE Gasoline TANDARD Oil Cos Motor broidered S TAND.' Spirits sold in quantni of ^ gallons and upward for one shilling per gallon at Garage, Pring a Vessel lor small quantities. Drums may be had with "drum lots,' subject t< return when empty Keo the Fifth Cars sold at $i'75. p ss to per cent discount f. o. b. factory. Reo Cars also for Hire. Bicycles rented for ics. a week. Automobile kept in stock. ANNA E.RAE Proprietress Of The Fogue, *'i4u Bon Marche Stores" and Bijou A LARGE ASSORTMENT TO SELECT FROM L ADIES Drew Goods, in Lustres, Serges, Ratines white and Coloured Cordings, Crepes, Crepons, Marquisettes, Bengalines, Landsdowries, Spot-Muslins, EmMuslins, Velvets, Embroidered Batistes, Tussore Suitings, Embroidery Flouncing?, Overall Embroidersand Overall Lace. J. C. COAKLEY'S PennyCigar "Ladysmith Brand" It is better than a 2d. Cigar elsewhere. Try one and be convince of its excellent quality. Furniture FORXMAS PRESENTS RECEIVING AT THE NASSAU BARGAIN HOUSE Bv Stmr. arriving to day WICKER FURNITURE tid bicycle supplies Silk Stockings Cylinder oil and Men's White, Black, Grey keep gasoline. Come and see Sil them. Apply to J. P. SIMMS, 47 Market Street Nov. 18, 10.13. N O T I C E Gasoline S TANDARD OIL CO'S GAS. OI.INK. Sold in quantities of One Gallon and upwards for the lone shilling a gallon. rt T> OCKING Chain, bibles. Laces and Insertions, RioJ^ sitting ., Couches bpns plain and fancy Latest ^of Ha ChilcTs Rockers, Stands, Style Belts Late Collars, Cane Seat, Enihroiderv Collars. Rockers, Dining Chairs, Blue, Heliotrope, and drey A)s „ Hi.renux, WasllStands otc. Rnaml'd. Bedstead*, M.ttress^s &c ina T.'ware, s her Silk Ti


PAGE 1

P > 3 cr CO rf CD OflT V o CD CO tttttte Nvilliua Rddlctus |\irare in verba ma-Siatrl. Balng bound to twiar to the Do|mai >l no Miiir. VOL. XI. NaiHU, N. P.. Baham&t, Saturday, December 27. 191) No. 22 LEON E. H DL'FI CH. El>ITOR till POPIIT0 OK KICK 3 K 44 MAItKK.T STHKET Nassau N. P., F.AIIAMAS. f. U. Bn lb 3 PUBLISHED DAILY. Monday, Wednesday and Friday— single ropy ... J I Tuesday Thin sdav anil Saturday — single copv ... id Weekly 4 t<< Monthly is.^d ^uartei Iv ... ... .. 4. HalfVearlv 8 . Veaiiv ... ... Ifll PAYABLE IV ADVAVCE. Advertising Hates: -Six |>erire per line for firt insertion ; three pence per lii e 'or second laSMtion; and one |ienny per line for subsequent insertions. Advertisements undei eight lines 4c now CHRISTMAS CUSTOMS CAME ABOUT. r WHY THE ENGLISH CHRISTMAS MEAT is BEEF When the Druids gathered the mistletoe (roiii |he Sacred oak each winter two hulls were sacrificed, and the ancient Biitons ate beef as a remiudei r.f this sacrifice. I his significance has, of course, long tine* died out, but beef has always been the Christmas meat of the English. 'I lie? loin of beef was knighted by Charles II nt a Cluistmas feast because on re turning from the hunt the dish was so gratifying 10 his palate : Quoth Charles, "Odd's fish! a noble dish Ay, noble made by me By kindly right I dub thee knight — Sir l.oin hencrforwnid be." WHY WF. RAT PLUM PUDDING AND MINCE PIE The Christmas pudding In its contents is thought 10 symbolize, as does mince pie also, the rich offerings made by the Wise Men to the lif int linist, anil dates back to Hie early C"lni*ti lilt. "Once upon a time" plum pudding was called "hackin," signifying the "hackin" or chopping of the ingredients —meats, suet, fruits and spices After the revolution that enthroned the "Merry mon%  rch," Charles II, the "hackin" of 1 our nncestois was baptized "plum pudding." It seems to havj survived in its oiiginal foim only in England, where |1 is a National dish. It was brought to America by the Englith colonists. It is said thai a Frenchman will not taste thereof. There is a funny story that a French nobleman, wishing to please an Fnglish ambassador on t hnstinas Day by serving a plum pudding, procured a recipe and gave Ins chief minutest instiuctions as lo mgicdients, the quantity of water in ihe kettle, etc., forgetting only one thing, the pudding cloth, and the dish was served up like so much soup in a large tureen, to the sin prise of the honoured guest, WHERE WE GET THE CHRISTMAS CARD Christinas cards were first printed in London nearly seventy years ago, but did not become popular until fifty years ago. The firs! Christmas card was only a visiting card on which was written the greeting, "A Merry Christmas," of "A Happy New Year." Snow scenes, holly branches and robins appeared lalei on embotsed cards, probably pictuiing Fnglish Christmas scenery, r.s the robin is known in England as the Christmas bird, and also as "The Savior's bird," because of the legend of its red breist. This bird is still seen on christmascuds, but not so olten as former'y. WHAT is TWELFTH NIGHT ? January 6, the Hvellth night after Christ mas, is the celebration of the visit of the Magi to the Infant King in the Bethlehem manger, known in the church calendar as Epiphany, Its tradition and obseivances have become corrupted, but n Chlistmai customs trace to the Roman Saturnalia so do those of the 1 welfth Night frolics. The King of Saturnalia was elected by beans, and the one who gets the bean in the "Twelfth Cake," which is divided by lot, is tie King or "Lord of Misrule." He holds a mock court and receives the homage of the other guests, for whom later in the evening he suggesis amusing diversions. The street revelries are much on the order of the American April first and Hallowe'en frolics. The religious rites are still observed in some form. In memory of the Magi's offerings the British Sovereign each year places by proxy three purses on the alms dish lor presentation on the altar. WHY DO WE PRESENT GIFTS? It was the custom among the Romans to make gifts to each other at their winter festival and this custom also may have descended to us from antiquity. But Christians like to feel that it is because the Wise Men brought gifts to the Infant Jesus, and because of the gift of God to the world. Gifts lothe poor seem from the earliest Bible times to have been an expression of a thankful heait. We bring Him gifts when we give to those who are in need. WHY DO WE DECORATE THE CHRISTMAS TREE? The ancient Teutons, who were sun worshippers thought that the spreading of a great tree was symbolical of the sun rising higher and higher in the heavens, and the decoration of our Christmas trees is supposed to be symbolic of the sun tree. The lights represent the flashes of lightning overhead, the apples nuts and calls symbob/e the sun, moon and stars, while the little animals represent the sacrifices made to the sun god. In another endeavor to give a new meaning to heathenish customs the early Christians pul a new interpretation upon the tree itself and attached new meanings to its decorations. The fir itself, with its lights, respresented the Christ who was the beginning of a new life in the midst of the wintry darkneas of heathendom, the tree of life, the light of the world. "Purely Christam symbols were introduced, the angels, the anchor, cross and heart, the star of the east and the golden threads, railed Lametta, which represent the hair of the Christ Child. Under the branches of the tree lies the B-be in a manger, watched over by His parents and surrounded by sheep and oxen. (continued on 4th page )


The Tribune.
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS DOWNLOADS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02166
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Saturday, December 27, 1913
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02166

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

( PDF )

( PDF )

( PDF )

( PDF )


Full Text
P
>
3
cr
CO
rf
CD
OflT
V
o
CD
CO
tttttte
Nvilliua Rddlctus |\irare in verba ma-Siatrl.
Balng bound to twiar to the Do|mai >l no Miiir.
VOL. XI.
NaiHU, N. P.. Baham&t, Saturday, December 27. 191)
No. 22
LEON E. H DL'FI CH.
El>ITOR till POPIIT0
OK KICK 3K 44 MAItKK.T STHKET
Nassau N. P., F.aiiamas.
f. U. Bn lb 3
PUBLISHED DAILY.
Monday, Wednesday and Friday
single ropy ..... ... J I
Tuesday Thin sdav anil Saturday
single copv ... ..... id
Weekly .........4t<<
Monthly ......is.^d
^uartei Iv ... ... .. 4.
HalfVearlv .......8.
Veaiiv ... ... Ifll
PAYABLE IV ADVAVCE.
Advertising Hates: -Six |>erire per line
for firt insertion ; three pence per lii e
'or second laSMtion; and one |ienny per
line for subsequent insertions.
Advertisements undei eight lines 4c
now CHRISTMAS CUSTOMS
CAME ABOUT.
r WHY THE ENGLISH
CHRISTMAS MEAT is BEEF
When the Druids gathered the
mistletoe (roiii |he Sacred oak each
winter two hulls were sacrificed,
and the ancient Biitons ate beef
as a remiudei r.f this sacrifice. I his
significance has, of course, long
tine* died out, but beef has always
been the Christmas meat of the
English. 'I lie? loin of beef was
knighted by Charles II nt a
Cluistmas feast because on re turn-
ing from the hunt the dish was so
gratifying 10 his palate :
Quoth Charles, "Odd's fish! a
noble dish !
Ay, noble made by me !
By kindly right I dub thee
knight
Sir l.oin hencrforwnid be."
WHY WF. RAT PLUM
PUDDING AND MINCE PIE
The Christmas pudding In its
. contents is thought 10 symbolize,
as does mince pie also, the rich
offerings made by the Wise Men
to the lif int linist, anil dates
back to Hie early C"lni*ti lilt.
"Once upon a time" plum pud-
ding was called "hackin," signify-
ing the "hackin" or chopping of
the ingredients meats, suet, fruits
and spices After the revolution
that enthroned the "Merry mon-
rch," Charles II, the "hackin" of
1
our nncestois was baptized "plum
pudding."
It seems to havj survived in its
oiiginal foim only in England,
where |1 is a National dish.
It was brought to America by
the Englith colonists.
It is said thai a Frenchman will
not taste thereof. There is a fun-
ny story that a French nobleman,
wishing to please an Fnglish am-
bassador on t hnstinas Day by
serving a plum pudding, procured
a recipe and gave Ins chief minu-
test instiuctions as lo mgicdients,
the quantity of water in ihe kettle,
etc., forgetting only one thing, the
pudding cloth, and the dish was
served up like so much soup in a
large tureen, to the sin prise of the
honoured guest,
WHERE WE GET THE
CHRISTMAS CARD
Christinas cards were first print-
ed in London nearly seventy years
ago, but did not become popular
until fifty years ago.
The firs! Christmas card was
only a visiting card on which was
written the greeting, "A Merry
Christmas," of "A Happy New
Year." Snow scenes, holly branches
and robins appeared lalei on em-
botsed cards, probably pictuiing
Fnglish Christmas scenery, r.s the
robin is known in England as the
Christmas bird, and also as "The
Savior's bird," because of the le-
gend of its red breist. This bird
is still seen on christmascuds, but
not so olten as former'y.
WHAT is TWELFTH NIGHT ?
January 6, the Hvellth night af-
ter Christ mas, is the celebration of
the visit of the Magi to the Infant
King in the Bethlehem manger,
known in the church calendar as
Epiphany, Its tradition and ob-
seivances have become corrupted,
but n Chlistmai customs trace to
the Roman Saturnalia so do those
of the 1 welfth Night frolics. The
King of Saturnalia was elected by
beans, and the one who gets the
bean in the "Twelfth Cake,"
which is divided by lot, is tie
King or "Lord of Misrule." He
holds a mock court and receives
the homage of the other guests,
for whom later in the evening he
suggesis amusing diversions. The
street revelries are much on the
order of the American April first
and Hallowe'en frolics.
The religious rites are still ob-
served in some form. In memory
of the Magi's offerings the British
Sovereign each year places by
proxy three purses on the alms dish
lor presentation on the altar.
WHY DO WE PRESENT
GIFTS?
It was the custom among the
Romans to make gifts to each oth-
er at their winter festival and this
custom also may have descended to
us from antiquity. But Christians
like to feel that it is because the
Wise Men brought gifts to the In-
fant Jesus, and because of the gift
of God to the world. Gifts lothe
poor seem from the earliest Bible
times to have been an expression
of a thankful heait. We bring
Him gifts when we give to those
who are in need.
WHY DO WE DECORATE
THE CHRISTMAS TREE?
The ancient Teutons, who were
sun worshippers thought that the
spreading of a great tree was
symbolical of the sun rising higher
and higher in the heavens, and the
decoration of our Christmas trees
is supposed to be symbolic of the
sun tree. The lights represent the
flashes of lightning overhead, the
apples nuts and calls symbob/e the
sun, moon and stars, while the
little animals represent the sacri-
fices made to the sun god.
In another endeavor to give a
new meaning to heathenish cus-
toms the early Christians pul a
new interpretation upon the tree
itself and attached new meanings
to its decorations. The fir itself,
with its lights, respresented the
Christ who was the beginning of
a new life in the midst of the win-
try darkneas of heathendom, the
tree of life, the light of the world.
"Purely Christam symbols were
introduced, the angels, the anchor,
cross and heart, the star of the east
and the golden threads, railed
Lametta, which represent the hair
of the Christ Child. Under the
branches of the tree lies the B-be
in a manger, watched over by His
parents and surrounded by sheep
and oxen.
(continued on 4th page )


T FI T R I B U N fi
Zhe tribune
Saturday. December 27. 1913
In conversation, while at Eleu-
tlicra, with a planter of promi-
nence we gathered the follow-
ing :
"We are having fine rains and
the pines are shooting very ear!)
this season in consequence. If the
rains continue we expect lo get
a good crop of pine-apples, as
regards quality. Early pint -
make early slips and a large per
centage of i4inch. pines upon
which the grower depends so
much. If your Readers will refer
to your issue of Saturday, No*
ember 22, they will find tint the
quantity of 14 inch size have in
creased, while those of a sin.ilh
have decreased during the pasl
three or four years. It is the di
sire and ambition of every plan
tor or cultivator lo produce the
largest size, as it is more to his
benefit to do so.
Plants that shoot .early give
the best results in the following
season, for the reason that tin
pines and slips are taken nfl
earlier, which gives the suckers
more time to grow. Could a
targe per centage of the larger
pines be obtained in May, Ihi
industry would soon revive, but
owing to droughts, and improi
ei (or poisonous] fertilizers, w
have been prevented trom ob-
taining these results tip to the
I iit.
Last season 45,060. dozen slips
were imported from Cuba b\
priv ite enterprise : these slips
we e planted in a new fertilizer
from Jacksonville, and the fields
" v look- ,-,s healthy and as
promising as an) ever grown in
the Colon).
W hat a wise thing our Go\
eminent did when, live or
years ago, they importod
quantity of slips from Co
While man) of these wire n >t
planted to advantage, the lessons
leai ned from their use have been
mosl valuable, and the < invent*
men! s provisii hi J1.1 \ e been h ke
"bread cast open the waters "
Tliero would not have he< n 1 >,-
00dozen pines in the Colony
to day were it not for this fact.
\\ e ham from this that the in-
dusti \ can be revived, and that
nc Cuban slips will grow and
pi (luce pine when tlie native
- will not e\ en i' 'oi
Noting the success of the im
pot ted slips sevi ral pri> ate in
dividual) imported numbers of
them, and these are the plants j their derm is with a eat-o nine-
that will give the pines for 1914 tails and a lengthened curtail-
and following years. This is one 1 ment of the liberty which they
instance where the Government
Saved this valuable industry at
,1 comparatively trilling cost,
and we are hoping, mosl sincere
lv, that they will see np way
of helping us to place the indus
trv on a firm basis, and of help- ,
ing to induce small growers to l,,,l!""'' al "" v **<*
r-ngage in the work, by formula-'
ting some scheme that will en-
courage them to start in, with a
put to such ill US
THE STROMBUS
is prepared to take new Names
and addresses and renewals for
its Cit) and Business I hrectoi \
guarantee that they will not do
SO at actual loSS. It is ea.v tOS> e
that any monev spent to revive
an ii dustry such as this is, and
such as it has been to tins Col
ments should now be sent in.
The Strombus offers .1 most
desirable Medium for advertis
ing not only within the Colon)
but abroad as well.
Hoarding and Lodging I louses
cannot afford to be without an
MM II .IS II II- IS llt;i_-II II. llll.s V..OI .1 .. 1
ony- oneofits most valuable advertisement m the btrombus
1 ounsts read the Strombus,
Residents read the Strombus,
Ev< 1 vbodv who wants infor-
III
Iswould be a paying
vestment.
We are ir. a position to m\ mal""> read the Strombus, so
that the proposed Bill, relatiim
to I-1 iendh Societies, ill
that they want evei) I) "I ' to
ivnow about should advertise ii
in
THE STROMBUS.
not
I with this coming
session "l the I .egislaiure ; the
ultii le of the Mill will
1 : nn the views of the dif
ns of the communi-
ty on the subj
/
Complaints have been made
to us that the senseless and
vicious practice of pulling tl
r ving fcates, t iking
up brid,'1"- over drains an'l
in boats, carts and So on
m obstruction of the streets in
the suburbs principally was in
dulged in on Christmas moimug
by hoodlums from the city and
suburbs.
This practice is 1 souice of
grt >t annoyance to the victims,
and may lead to serious inju -
rus to inoffensive persons; and
a a\ further lead to severe chas
in nt or moie yf the offend
ing villains.
Failing the protection which
e\ery cili/en has the right to
expect, a respectable citizen of
Eastern District informs us
' that for the last live Christmases
he has been compelled to watch
Ins premise* ; and on Christmas 1 interest of the A. M. K. Church
rmorring succei did in captui ing in that district. After leaving
We would direct the attention
of our Ri adei to the A Ivertise-
nini' of "Christmas Music" to
be given in Trinity Cnurch on
Vloiida) evening.
The Imperial is giving a good
show ,as usual, this evening.
The Revd. CharlesA. Dann,
ani\e,1 on Fiida) morning,
A lue occurred in Granl
I'nwn between nine and ten
n'cli cfc I isl night, w hen a house
the propert) rl Mi VIfred Bode,
on Mai kel Stre ft, South ; w ilh
all its contents, were entirely
destroj ed. There is a strong
suspicion of arson.
We ha\e been requested to
state that the Right Rev. John
I lurst 1) \)., bishop of the A.
M. I'.. Church intends visiting
Savannah Sound. Kleutluia,
some ti ne in March next, in the
two of the blackguards and
handing them over to the police,
we trust that the) may be made
I wholesome examples of, and get
e punishment they richly de
serve.
Surely the public should be
protected bom these depreda
lions, and the perpetral rs
whenever caught being too ig.
j noiar.t to recognise and respect
the rights of others, should have
the knowledge injected in) 1
them through the medium of
the Bahamas, Mr. Hurst will
proceed to St. Thomas or Bar-
bados*.
There was a public prize giv-
ing at the "Bishop's Eastern
S hool on Thuitday afternoon.
18th Deer., which was fairly
well attended. Among those
present w< re: Revs 11. W.
Weigall, M A, Fr. I tavison, IT.
Lovell and Mrs. Lovell. The
parents and friends of thechild-
ien weie well represented.
The following programme
was very nicely rendered :
SongThe School. Recita-
tionsMisses Alice Hill, Kath-
leen Smith, Maud Know If s.
swcdish Drill 16 girls.Song
j tirls. Scenes fr.....Robin I lood
I 'he different parts of King,
Nobles, Robin I lood, PriarTui k
Little John, Allana Dale. Mi-
chael, For< Sters, Maid Marian
and Lady Christahel were well
performed by Misses II. Smith,
II. Eorbes, E. Thompson, A.
Demeritte, (i. Eldon, V. Know-
les, ll.lldl.N. R .ker.M.Young,
II Young, < i. I 1 imps >n, D.
Stuart, L. Eldon, I). Fountain,
R. 11 ill, Man one I lax ton, Edith
llaxton, and Masters Allan
Stuart, P. I lanna, A. hidon and
R, I laxton.
After the presentation of the
prizes by His Lordship the Bish-
op, Ite congratulated the teach-
ers on the success of the after
noon's proceedin
Articles suitable for prizes
were given bv 'The Lord Bishop,
Rev W. S. Lovell, Miss Phyllis
Frith, Mr. II. Butler, Miss M,
Albury, Miss (i. ButW, and
prizes were awarded to Majorie
Uaxton, Naomi Roker, Alice
Smith, Robert I laxt< n, Doris
Fountain, Ellen Thompson,
l laid Forbes, Madge Fountain,
Nellie Hill, Maria Voung, lid-
da Smith. Gladys T Idoil and
Hilda Smith
We congratulate Miss M.
Albury, Ihe Mistress of this
tchooi, upon the excellent
showing of her pupils.
Editor of the Tribune
Dear Sir,
11 is appalling to my min I
hoW the gospel of Jesus Christ
is mutilated, and n mowed
dow n m our time by leading
men iii responsible posi ions.
At a recent lecture oil "'The
State of the Dead" delivered in
the Eastern District, a promi-
nent cil izen, and membei of one
of our leading denominations,
1 riticised the speakei for not
having 1 reachi d the gospel
bi (oidmg to his definition oi
the gospel.)
"We ma\ well inquire then,
what is the gospel ?
"We preach Christ and I lim
- ne iind," the ap title Paul de-
clared. The complete gospel,
without omission or intermis-
sion, which is the po 1 of ( i )d
unto salvation. And Jesus said,
' N man cometh unto the
lather but by me. I am the
l ..ay the truth, and the lift.
,i,miiiiwiniiniw


in E i i< i i'
N
Tl.rn the gospel includes Hie
e^ to life lli-' t>uth along the
'vox, and lastly life, the result
ofJnllowing the way and the
truth.
Well tlion, if I am in error as
totlf rial me of man or the
coaili'Kin and slate of the dead,
im i in ih- tuitli ? Nil If I
then preach the truth as it is in
Christ Jesus, as to the nature of
nia^ani I not preaching the
Hie;;.. ! I : V :iiv. venlv I am
the lecturer at the meeting
alluded to, \'i explicitly prov
' d from the S i iptures, that man
doflt not poss ss immortality,
but is a d\ iug reature.
The Scriptui s also speak in
no Uncertain tones,-
"S m I ./ man lie more
just than God ? Job4 : 17. And
a^aki '( lod onlv hath immor-
tality"
1 'I im, fi : ](, And again,
"Our Saviour, Jesus Christ hath
abotshed leath, and brought
life and i minor tali f) to light
through i|w gospel. 2 Tim, 1 : 10
And then the) ad in >nish us to
seek for immortality. Rom., 2 :
7 Yet in Hie fa e of the wisdom
of God, our w uld be sin pherd
of fi'H k said, "I have an immor-
tal *>ul to s;i
Now Nr, froffl whcncr this
dec#|i'i 1 .- W'liv, il is i'i!
[Adam's sin. Rom., 5 : 12.
'Hie innate tendency, \es
of nature.
id not Satan say to our fore
its, "Ye shall not surcU
t> And did they not Fall
this di 1 ption, and BIN
fcd upon all in that they had
. Wherefore we are bom
with this de< rpl ion in our
natures, that we are immortal
never dying souls, and the
work of the gospel i> to clear up
all ifch de eptions.
Now I \ inline tos.iy, a child
Ii 'i 11 in out a ', and brought up
away from all forms of reltgi-
ons inllin in e, when Ii" becomes
a man if guestioned upon this
point, would say he had ;\\\ im
mortal soul.
Therefore he would be In
need of that form of the itospel
to which we listened the other
evening to correct this inherent
error.
No doubt the ohjector was
placed in an undesirable post.
tion,- left in a state of sus|
sion, to come down lower,
perhaps, than he was willing.
search the Scriptures "For in
them vc think ve have eternal
life." '
Thanking you foi your valu-
able space Mr. Editor.
I am yours,
' CALIGULA.
BIRTH
sMi r11 Friday night, Dec a6th
nu 5, to Mr. and Mr>. Charles
C. ."smith, a daughter.
A CARD.
Mrs. Sophia Minns and family
d'sir. s to thank friends for sym-
pathy extended in recent b
reavement and for flowers kind-
ly sent.
Pol ire Orderly Room
Nassau, *jrd December, 1913
N< >i ICE.
REFERRING to Govern.
in.mi Notice No. 353 i8th
1).-.. 11.1,. r suspending All Rules
and Regulations made under
the Street Nuisance Prohibition
Act 18994 Dec 24th, J5II1, and
51st. 1913, and on 1st January
191 4. the public are hereby no-
tified that the firing of Crackers
will not be allow 1 d in the vici-
mix of Churches during 1 >i\ in-
-,-1 > 11 e, inside the Public Mar-
ket and on the Wharves to the
North of Bay Street.
Masqueraders will not be al
lowed mside the Market or on
the Wharves
By Order,
R. II. C. CRAWFORD
Commandant of Police.
Trinity Church
Monday, Dec. 29th, at 8 p.m.
Christmas Music.
Mrs. Paine. Mrs. Brace
Mr. Asa II. Pritchard.
Rev. P. J. Paine.
Organist:
Ret. 1- Simpson, B. V
Silver C< II Ii " "> aid "/
Epworth Fund,
lerhabs, than b
lowwer '
However we are glad to offer
him consolation, "knowing that
tribuktton worketh patience,"
bv .TTvisiii'-.' him t" build anew
upon the Solid Foundation, and
December 27th iqn
BY RADIO TELEGRAPH
Vienna, 26. A dispatch from
Sofia says the Bulgarian Foreign
Minister will resign iii order to
prevent a fall of the entire cabi-
net.
Washington, 26.Male and
hearty, Admiral I ie >rga I >ewej
celebrated ins 76111 birthday to
day. rite Hero of Manila hopes
there will be no more wars, bu t
recommends a strong navy for
1 this government.
London, 2b.The British
cruise 1 Roxburgh and Spanish
cruis 1 Pelayo are hastening to
the assistance of the British
steamship Ludgate stranded on
the African coast off Tarifa. The
cruisers will rescue thecie.v and
save the ship from pillage at the
hands of bands of Moors
who have been attempting to
overpower the crew and loot
the Ludgate.
New York, 26.Great dam-
age to property and loss of seven
live* was the toll, up to late
this afternoon, of a heavy north- i
east gale which lias been sweep
ing the coast for 21 hours. The
chief loss ni hfe followed the
stranding of two barges off
Forked River, New Jersey, when
live men were drowned. Proba-
bly a million dollars damage
has been done to palatial sura-
m 1 homes of New Yorkers at
Sea bright and nearby 1 oast o do-
n
Calumet, Michigan, 26.The
number of persons who lost their
lives in a panic following a
false alai 111 of lire at Red Jacket
was placi I at 75 this afternoon.
Tokio, 2b. The Diet O) n I
today by the emperor who deli
vend a spe< eh from the throne.
I le laid sin ss tm the friendly re-
lations existing among the
powers.
Paris, 36. Dr. Alexis Carrell,
"I Rockefeller Institute, New
York, was married this after
noon to Madame lie la Maine.
1 Jr. Carrell won the Nobel prize
for nu 2 for his medical discov
cries,
New York, 26.The police
are hunting for a big limousine
automobile which struck Rich
aid B. Lee, Jr. and bis wife
( i 1 trude at 6fi "-tie t and Broad
way earls this morning and
hurled them iii front of a taxi
cab, TheTaxicab ran overboth.
Mrs Lee. who was the daughter
of Col. Phillip Harvey of Wash
lington, died before reaching the
hospital. I.ee's condition isc.ri-
11 al. He is General Manager of
the transportation department
[of the American Sugar Refining
Company.
New York, 26. It is -aid that
, Mayor elect Mitchell will up
point Dr. {Catherine B. Davis.
Commissioner of Correction. if
appointed she will have charge
1 of all of the cit\s penal institu
Horn and her ary will be I7,
500 yearly.
Rome, 26.- I ingUp Of
the late Cardinal Ramoolla s
apartments- has given rise to
controversy. H '* ''' '''! thaJ
u was illegal as it was carried
out without the authorisation
mi intervention of judicial ofli
Hals.
New York; 361I1
Closing quotations on Stock r.x-
changr. .
Am 11 Copper 7i I
B. Can. I'..c. an
St. Paul I0
New York Central 9
!'. mw. >9 *
Reading >7<> i
>nu. PaC.
Union I'ac.
i', S. Steel

AN ENTERTAINMEN1
WILL be given on Tuesday
evening, join instant, in the
"Cotu..... Hall,'1 Mackey Street
entitled A Drill of 26 letters of the
Alphabet, also ;; it rt "ld
Dialogues. Refreshment* will he
sold.
Admission :AdalH I '.
i, InMi'ii 3d.
Rev. II. A. P0IT1ER, 1
NOTICE (Special)
AT THE ROYAL STORE.
Bb.s \ n >. (i Flour it l 1 '- 1!'-
A m laurel Brand
> |b. foi cts.
1 nnd Storm Kii g
B nnd Bt8cts, lb.
While Granulated Sugar I I us,
_'l cis. Brown Crystallised
Sugai at ."1 is. Ih.
Above Stock just Iv*'' eiyed
per s s. "Vigilant ia"
Good Quality and I resh.
And list but noi least
ITgT Pure Jain.oe.1 Rum
At 10s. Per Gallon
"Call early"
J I. SAUNDI'RS & Co
Shingles
Beat No. 1 Heart 3111. Cypress
Shingles al $9.60 per thou-
sand of 20 bundles
Discounts on lots of over
5000 sliiiifjlps.
Special Price
also on cheapi 1 gradi al o
5111. Cypress a1 ^6.72 pei
thousand of 20 bundles, I his
price made possible bya verj
large purchase.
Fresh stock arriving every
Week.
C. C SAUNDERS.
4

L


OUR CHRISTMAS
COLORS
For hundreds of years I o'lv hns
been used^for Christmas oVcnra
li>n. it trows in ntmnsl pvery
rountiy. I lie choict of our Christ-
mas color*, red and gr*en, li is no
doubt come about from these colois
which Nature prr>vides at the
Christmas season in the holly and
poinsettia.
WHY DO WE Kiss
UNDER THE MISTLETOF
Romantic Scandinavians, in
pivinp honor to their gieat K'd,!
Thor, built creat fires calif d "Julc," j
or "Yule*' fires. The high-r the1
Mm
Mental and Physii
7////'///,.
atigue
m
MB
flames towered through the forests
the greater pleased was Thor. I he
men soon learned tint the trees
upon which mistletoe clung would
give the Inightest fires. They be-
lieved this was due to Hip tfre.it
Thor himself, who caused tlir mis
When brain or body i weary the digestive powers are weakened and dUtte for
ordinary food ie often experienced. Under such clreumtDC the 'Allinburyt'
Diet is specially valuable. It is pleasant to take, easily digested and assimilated
and speedily restorative. Thus it helps the system to recover tone and vigour.
TVs 'Alke****** DIET is prepared fro pars rick silk sad whole whst-th two vital
food cUombIscomkiaed ia partially pre-difcstcd form.
Madi in a minultMdd boiling maltr onln.

TO BE OBTArKKD MOM ALL CHEMISTS AND STORES.
ALLEN & HANBURYS LTD.
--------------- LONDON. r.NGI AND, ---------------
A food for Adults aad quit* dis'laet from tke wH-kaowa|
'Alleaksrya' Foods for Infants.
kthe birth ol Jesus thousands of
tleloe to grow on those trees to let 'candles were brightly burning
liis people know which were best ; throughout Palestinea fitnng,
fi4" burning in his honor. i though unintentional proclamation
The trees upon which quantities nf \\w l.igln that had come into
of the mistletoe grew were sapped j t|,e world. A lact that bears out
of their vitality, an', being drier this supposition it that theCaiho-
burned with a blighter none than | |jC| 0f the Creek Chmch call
other trees that were full of sap. So
when any one met under tlie iris-
tletoe in the great forests, no matter
how great enemies 'hey were, they
dropped theii weapons and greeted
each other kindly ; nor would they
take up arms against each nthei \
until the-sunrise of another d iv. !
This was their tribute in honor of
Thor.
They began to lake bits of the
mis'letoe into their homes an I hang
it over the doorways, and if any
enemies came they could not enter
the houses beneath th" mistletoe
without becoming friend* of the
people inside so long as they re-
niained theie. From Ihiscanie the
habit of greeting people who
stepped tinder the mlilletoe with
an embrace or a kiss, and at indoor
feasts the mistletoe was hung up
in the room and the people greeted
each other with kisses
And, so in these days the couple
kissing beneath iheCnriMnia*mis-
tletoe in a spirit of fun or romance
cairies on a custom the Scan*
dioavianf had a thousand years
before Chtist.
WHAT THE CIIRKIM \S
CANDLE SIGNIFIES
Pinning candles at Christmas! ide
is a custom derived from the Ro. '
man Saturnalia1. Not only were
candle* used for the purpose of
illu inn ill mi during that festival)
but they wee also exchanged as
gifts in token of cheerfolneei and
good n ill It is probable ill it the
employment of c.nidles was deriv-
ed from the Jewish Feast of
Chrietmas the "Feast ol Light."
Ladies Home Journal."
NOTICE !
Gasoline
TANDARD Oil Cos Motor broidered
STAND.'
Spirits sold in quantni of ^
gallons and upward for one shilling
per gallon at Garage,
Pring a Vessel lor small quanti-
ties.
Drums may be had with "drum
lots,' subject t< return when empty
Keo the Fifth Cars sold at
$i'75. 'pss to per cent dis-
count f. o. b. factory.
Reo Cars also for Hire.
Bicycles rented for ics. a week.
Automobile
kept in stock.
ANNA E.RAE
Proprietress Of
The Fogue,
*'i4u Bon Marche Stores"
and Bijou
A LARGE ASSORTMENT TO
SELECT FROM
LADIES Drew Goods, in
Lustres, Serges, Ratines
white and Coloured Cor-
dings, Crepes, Crepons, Mar-
quisettes, Bengalines, Lands-
dowries, Spot-Muslins, Em-
Muslins, Velvets,
Embroidered Batistes, Tus-
sore Suitings, Embroidery
Flouncing?, Overall Embroi-
ders- and Overall Lace.
J. C. COAKLEY'S
PennyCigar
"Ladysmith Brand"
It is better than a 2d. Cigar
elsewhere.
Try one and be convince of
its excellent quality.
Furniture
FORXMAS PRESENTS
RECEIVING AT
THE NASSAU BARGAIN
HOUSE
Bv Stmr. arriving to day
WICKER FURNITURE
tid bicycle supplies Silk Stockings
Cylinder oil and Men's White, Black, Grey
keep gasoline. Come and see Sil
them.
Apply to
J. P. SIMMS,
47 Market Street
Nov. 18, 10.13.
N O T I C E
Gasoline
STANDARD OIL CO'S GAS.
OI.INK. Sold in quantities
of One Gallon and upwards for
the lone shilling a gallon.
rt T> OCKING Chain, bibles.
Laces and Insertions, Rio- J^ sitting ., Couches
bpns plain and fancy Latest ^ofHa, ChilcTs Rockers, Stands,
Style Belts Late Collars, Cane Seat,
Enihroiderv Collars. Rockers, Dining Chairs,
Blue, Heliotrope, and drey A)s
Hi.renux, WasllStands otc.
Rnaml'd. Bedstead*, M.ttress^s &c
ina T.'ware,
s
her
Silk Ti Silk Shirts. Pyjamas
Ladies Superfine Silk Para-
noia, Silk Evening Scarves,
Beautiful Handbags
Handsome Japanese Goods
Genuine Irish Linens of all
kinds.
Auto Crease a specialty. vT j^ p \\UT ]\\m, Helio, A quantity China F. ware,
Can even sell vou a verv num. ,-\' 1 c;n. sn,l< will) Vaset, Toy 1 ea and Dinner Set
nieat storage drum with fauril In and Green S.Ik Sot ks with Vtl()(..ip,Si nd ,ts , ,
goods (or Xinas presents.
\:i-. MOORE,
Live
Georgia
Turkeys

NO I ICE.
'"TM1IS is to inform my Patron'.
1 and the Public in General
that I have opened my Public
IMack Smith Shop;
employment ol end es was .eriv- ... w '=" " -I...... ,. k g ;,,, s and am
am now
line of
orse
me
burning ol candles was one of the
incidents of that lenst, mid it is
uliUely that at the time of
"Just here Per Frances ."
from Miami Fla
Price Is. 6d. lb
Live weight
These special Drums do away
with the necessity of buying a
Stornge Tank,
Mechanically.
j'. A. I'luyler,
Bay Street. But (WhaiP
Call up Phone 136


University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2011 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Powered by SobekCM