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II I I I I .. , %  .'7 Zhc {tribune Sa.tvjrdnv. September 27. J1913 '1 HE RAILWAY D1S ST u AT AISGILL MOOu This heart rending accideal took place in the early morning, just before dawn, of the 2nd September. The'tmasfa occurred at Aisgill Moor, at tiie highest railway altitude in England, al a very short distance to the North of Hawes Junction on the tame line, where a dreadful collision, entailing terrible loss ol lifi i i" m d al Chi istmas rgio. ; u> know well this p lantern by the guard of the front a s that which came to me on train, and every effort was made these peaceful Westmoreland to ^op the second train. But it %  hails this morning as heard the was too late. The engine crash-(shrieks ol unseen men and wonto the rear of the stationary men and children in torture, train and telescoped the two entombed beneath a Baring last carriages. The experience wreckage of broken nearly 3 years before at Hawes into a shapeless confusion," Junction had caused these trains to carry plenty of axes and tools of a like description and very soon efforts were being made to free theshrieking and groaning THECARNAUBAWAX PALM There is an axii >m which says passengers from the wreckage "He who makes two blades to into which they were jammed, grow where only one grew beBut before the rescue wbrkcould for..-is a benefactor," and we far, the smashed carriages think that who ess fully caught fire, and for sonn time introduces this highly profitable the rescuers were driven bad; by palm into the list of our econofehe frightful beat, and compel! • mic products will be a benefaci rl to list, MI impotently t<> the tor ind< of railway, with itsd wailing of the sufferers os thev We are hoi pet mall} ac foundings, its neavj climb up were burned to death. Before the quainted with the palm mirsel%  "" l l! Bwlf < run flames absolutely stopped the ves, but if all that is said of it by wards at terrific speed. workofdeli t, some were dealers in its product WaxHie prime cause of the d .. got out alive, but much scorchbe true and there is no re terseems to have been bad coal ed. One man wat saved with why what th should be load too heav' for i • at di ilty, and then the true, whyl I iscountrv tapressengine to haul up a steep arm of am eragn ised victim b % % %  um< vith it the bitoftracK. rhe two Midland i to wave in (he space betti thus 11 'it. vacant until the II ours Some of the advantages claimwithered it, |while would-b" ed for this p.tlm are, "It lives deliverers looked h Iplesslv on. inawidelvdi dat i "It Edinburgh started from Car J Notoneofthe bodies when is import* u Mielter for lisle within 12 minuti s of each releas. d from the debris was reother crops "It i; a very profi Other, rhe Glasgow train driver cognizable. One little girl was table shadi tr. asked for a second engii itified by a partly broken Itsl 1 load was too heavy according chain on her neck. In the other com I'he quantity t illations for one engine, 1 urnt trinkets and bud K a tre. kill yield annual' lad the coal was of very poor and such like were found and lyissaid : I b and the quality. He was told that no claimed by relatives, but it was value of it > 19 per ton. ij engine was available, and impossible to say from which. "7 he la". ,,.', % %  without one. When of the charred remains they had fulfiri" which serves for hat Scotch Expresses for London the lir^ from < ilasgow and the second from \ n and crav ling up the hill he had to I Stop for want, of sufficii nl steam Hehadjustpa I tin Mallerstang signal box and as he had not reached the 11 awes Junction I box, the Malleistang sig nalman was keeping the signals come. Thirteen were killed on making, h the spot and at least one (Sir strings, rotw mats nets, Douglass) died after ''The J\>. nod ci aged tre 1 •. ei \ h rd" 1 f vellowish colour Arthur wards. A survivor, Mr. IT. H. Brander, with black v< I takes a in his thrilling narrative states polish, is not ntta ked by insects that an impulse to rhange his and withstandeven sal't wat-r. The Cam i /> Wax Palm — death. II" had booked a reser* Copemicia CeriRera) is a beautied seat and discovered on going ful tall fan palm, p. to 80 feet to fmd it that by mistake no (high. seat had been set apart for him Seed appears to be easily obAs the train was full he at the tamed. We think thai this Glnsgow express jumped down last moment hurriedly found a palm is worthv of the attention to find out from the driver why seat at the extreme rear. When of the Board ol Agriculture, to "le had stopped. When he hnd the train had started, the idea which we commen learned the cause he ran bad; struck him to try for a better d tie line to signal the seat, he found one in tl t re Edinburgh express to stop if by of the tram and transferred np so as to prevent the expri .eat saved him from certain Iro 1 tdtndurgh Irom pas >ing Mallerstang until the Glasgow express could get clear 1 f la Junction. I a n ar end guard of the lam rhantfe it should have pass" cd Mallerstang. Meanwhile, the i\ ft of the se %  ind train went limself and his baggage to it. I irriage that he first took IE WAUEHOU COMMN III.. Some month i'o, even before was reduced to ashes, and he i the prorogation of the House ol d his engine whil* dn %  1 ung the most vigorous I Assembly. His Excellency the bfr>g at the rate of jo mill a ol the rescuers, lie says 'I have Govi rnoi appointed a Commitf, to ( i • 1 on the battlefields of South tee to discuss, decide, and re he nir his nan noticVfrica wounded men brought to I commend the necessary chances the signals w %  Fas the) ran past Mailerlj. Suddenlv the fireman saw the hospital in scores -wounded in indescribable fashion. But I have never ex rant ic waving of the red perienced quite Hie same horror in the W irehouse pso|iei ty, for the Customs, purposes. His Exeel fancy met this Committee, at an appointed time, in the building and after outlining his ideas a ked them t > select .1 Chairman and gel to work. The I Ion. J. P. Sands cording' lv eli cted as< but although so lour; tune IS elapsed, we have beard nothing of their work, not even of their having since 1 This matter is bl 1 oming a town talk, so we di em it ad\ is ibli to refer to it. It is now about tune for tins Committee to get to work, and show themselves worthy of the 1 onfidem • %  reposed in them by the Governor in selecting and appointing them t" this important work. BUILDING Nolls. "Centreville," the com modi • I Ion. D. A. Bri 1 Stn built I y.Mr.Ma d mald.architi of the Hotel "Colonial" is having the tront remo lei led, and a wide covered verandah built around tl %  %  1 • 1 floor, which will ommand a splendid \ ie\ of the harbour. 1 he plans ,1 is wm %  e by G E. Mayer the lo< il an il Mr, M ivei is also the archi teet of the "Lightbouru I louse Annex," which pi to be an attractive huildi I %  f The Amei tern si hooner "I larrison T. Beai ham," 17 days out from Baltimore, with coal for the Fl ida East Co I lotel Co., arri> ed on Thuisday morning. The Motor "Kranci I arrived this afti 1 no in froi Miami with I 'e, ( i asoline, ai d ihingli 1 mails and the follow ing pnssen '.Vis. Mesdames Louise I urnque \ Cur ida d Johnsonland (Catherine Williams; Messrs Norman Johnton, Joseph Millei George Knowles, Sam Al bury, Alonzn 1'iait, samuel tinnnt, Ji miall Moss, Janus Si i 1 b-. Cli.e. Bonaby and Josi 1I1 V\ ilson (13 1 FOREIGN Mads also Mails for I lagua and Lon Cay will close on Tues lay 30th September at 8 o'cl' 1 I. a. m. •r Nassau. N I'., Sepl I -i, I9I j. To the Editorof the rribuue. Deai Sir. Several times you hare called attention to the good work be in>,' done by the Daughters of the Empire around the grounds ne?ring the Omen's Stair Case. L JL



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TT T H£ TRIBU N I. Rut wliat about the approach to it, ii is well to kno •. thai our Canadian Visitars have pre ty places to visit, but tnu-tii! ail for them. ? Surely the iovernmenl should do their part now and improve the side-walks of Union Street. It is simply .1 disgrace to Nassau to have to roll about on them and those who live that way have to use the middle of the Street to pet ilong comfortably. If tin Boar I of Works do not intend to pa" e ih Be %  alks why not make a law that e onf do their own fro I kntow a fi iend of mine w Ii i want i I to improve the fro t of his i and the Civil Kngi neei Bt< | ped him, saj ing you will want t" own. What about Palms for I Inion l! IS just ;. as Vi( toria Av< nue just as h Ii toned as any other Street. It is time for us to show th it we badly treated and w< have this wi ti ( of | this year. Yours Ti uly UNI IN STREET. (Communicated] IRREGULARITIES AT Till llo I'll \L. I Ri sident Surgeon, no Ion I ins in the Institu tion, as tin title of hi pro\ idi s, but instead, is spending the summi r out <>f to 80 Physician 1resident thi in case df accidents or serious illness at night. I he Traini N use. or one of them, being employed on a 1 in town, no Trained Nurse, 1 • onriiiglit duly. A Probationei <>f less than >f prescriptions and the hand-J London, 35. \ record con trui I ense of tlie term may not o d 'pendent on profi >sii >nal atbli 1 1 .11 % %  : m to thinl ling of poison 'iis dru I g( Cre< k San Salvador 18th Septr. 1913 Editor Tribune:— Dear Sir. Please allow me space in your valuable column I ti i -peal: about no event that took plao at ek. (n September the 16th inst. one of the members of > : A n Church died, her name was Anna Ingraham. She was stridden with pai.iK ;is and sudd< nlj d Shs was to inimi ied on Wedlay 18th inst., as there was n 1 public but %  i neai bj they inti 1 Inns' her in thl church yard as it isa rule to bury all the memb rs in the yard, the • to the Cater hist and m to permit th n I 1 l p roughly pp iken 'did not allow them the privih ge to bun her. At last the family had to bury her in her own y ud. Mr Editoi, do you think I • all voii es an •p \ ill look into tins matter thanking you for ice, I remain vours, rtN EYE WITNESS. 113 The ( > vei m ttentinn is Hall) in\ ed to a bit of road in Th Lot's Settlement which is one of the districts of Atthur's Town. north side of the nises of toi S imuel Stubbs to the north astern side thenis a pit ce of road that 111 eds work ing|on. There are trees growing in the road and if these tri 1 are cut si;iinic|!l I gold IMI valued al I %  1 1 I I 11 I ill to daj from the 1 ran ;vaal. V ; ',' down and the roads fixed in Mining .isle in charge of the order be lieve U will be a boon wards ;,t niKhnotwnl.tand,,,, in ,, abital ts „f „„ Lot. the absence or the Doctor, and there being another Trained Lottbyfirr. V lintrse on Bay Nurse, and the Matron on the Street Arthurs Town. The pro staff pertyof Mrs. Margaret Dean. The Superintendent not easily Sepl 9th 1913 found when wanted on business, Wanted an cy. to serve in Paris, 35.---The aviator iai 10s • rossi d the Mediterranean from Ircjus, near Cannes, to Bizerta, near Tunis, ;*<]<] ing anol ird to the li-t of I'rench aerial achievements. I iarros's flight ranks as one of the most notable feats in aviation. I le did not actually fly miles without passing land, but two Stages, one of 113 miles and the other of 125 miles were over the sea, His actual flying time was 7 hours 15 miniit Washington, I35. —A total lass 1 if &161.000.000 was is d In the I hio floods last March. The weather bureau estimates that sum, which in 1 des 1< iss to railroads, tele, graphs and to fai m property. Paris, 2 V -Mis l'ankhurst the English sulfragette leader, in formed the Assi ciated Press to da> llint sle did not antici| 1 le the shgl test difficulty in entei ing the I 1 states on hei pro 1 isit to that country. "The object of my voyages to Am lie said, i> to answer the queston in th i minds of the Am can pe why do militants do of thinu the> Ten many minute and othei papers to take him away from Ins office (?l as when seen has on I is the streets he always hands full (?) '1 he I lispenser too, seemi to have too much business in town, as he ton is frequently t< 1 be met on the stn eis. dm ing I hspenBand of I lope < Grange Creek apply to K C. Dean. Also Presi HI and Chairman, C Mil 1. <:i V\H Septemh >r 27th 1913. Liverpool, 35, — Militant sufsarj Hours, and his hands empty fragettes last night set fire to that is without au\ papers Seafield House at Seaforth, four therein. I miles to the northwest of Liver Small young irresponsible pool, and caused damage cstiboj entrusted with the filling mated at $400,000. £ do in l' Mexico, 25. Fred i Jamboa Minist 'i 1 il Foreign Affairs, was nomir itetl for the presidency le. the ( a'; i!ic party convention The efforts of the party, it is said, h ive been din 1 I 11 the Selection of men who {would • it pta : the I'm States London, I D lily Telegraph in a long editor, al tins morning miswers American criticism of (Ire it Britains rep uleil in enti HI to withd a v from lie Olympic Games, it ad nits tint the English public looks upon the proposed Olympic Fund with coldness, because it means the breaking down of the spirit of amateurism. Ih %  question is "Whether athleti proness as such, when mad" a mattei ol business, is or is n >t hi Ipful to the nation, d welfare Apparently the mental attitude of an amateur is not yet understood in America, Germany or Sweden. At all events, it is conceivable that the national welfare in the higlnst and HARM R'S \( >l ICE T HE undersigned desires 10 in foi in liii I irmei patrons, as well as the public, tli ii he is I p, pn 111 (I to wait upon them at ilieir homes, offices,and stores; and do their bafberrng. Patronace ctfully solicited. Phone 1. I'.. II ROBERTS, Sep.. ; 1 NOTICE I'O CUSTOMERS C Ol IKES ii, p will be %  1 D.V. on M 39th. o. v. a >OKE Bar I ;THF. WORLDS JUDGMENT makes powerful the name STANDARD ENGINE. Lloyd's Register shows this the powei 1 >f the majority. Back of the Standard guarantee is t lie Standard Motor ConsU tion Co., 171 Pine St., .1 1 sey City, N. J. CHAS. E. ALBURY, Nassau, X. P. nt for the Bahamas. Shingles Best No. 1 Heart 5m. Cypress Shingh s al $9.6 • per thous in. 1 id' JO bundles Discounts "ii lots 1 if ov 1 yii 1 shinglfs. Special Price also on c 1 1 grades -also 31 ii. Cypres • I I6.72 p< 1 thogs ind of 30 undies. This price made |> issible by a \ ery large purrhas % %  Fresh stock arriving every w eek. C. C. SAUNDERS. Na sau, N. P.. Sept. 16, 1913



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T l) NE independent so hr a* their own affairs are concerned State conven tions which meet annually and .1 general convention which is held biennially. The Univetsalists have a foreign mission in Jap in and home missions, are strong in educational work and have a flourishing Young People's Society, called the National Young People's Christian Union. There are 709 Universalist minis ters, 886 parishes and 53,048 communicants. UNITARIANS I nitarians give annually in their Year Hook the number of ministers and churches, but make no returns foi members, The census of 1890 found 61,749 members; that ol |j. I heir an-, according to the Unitarian Y>\n Book for 1911. ministers and 493 churches. More hnlf the mi mbers are in M is sai hussetfs, New I Ian pshire h 1 i the next largest number, and 1 ali fnrnia stands thud. The American Unitarian Association, with its headquarters in Boston, c irries on Unitarian Missionary work in this country, 'I he Unitarians aid the I'.1 ihmoSomnj, of India, the Liberal Christains <>f Hungary and of oilier European countries, and do some work in Japan. They als 1 m notain "undenominational" I hools of rational theology at harvard, Meadeville and Berkeley, California. INDEPENDENT CONGREGATIONS These are local societies which have no denominational connection and no organization among themselves. Lutheran independ. ant and Methodist independent congregations are not included among hem. There are 267 milt. i-t-'is, 879 churches and 48,673 nbers retm ned under the I of Indep n li ni Congregations. NOfk'K. r ill"' is id inform my Patrons and the Public in < ieneral that 1 have opened mv Public Black S mill Shop; and inn w 1 v ready to tlo anything in the line ol 1 or new work I lorse Shoeing Suecially, All work d Mechauii illv. P. A. Huyler, 1 Baj St % % % %  t. East 1 Whai : A WANTED, FRESH FLYING FISH Will pay 6s. for same. SANDS, Photographer, Bay street. City, li I ORJ RENT. Oi.'SK on last Bay Street, at present < %  %  :upied by P, P. Sturrup Esq. possession given ist. August. Apply to, WALTER K. MOORE. STANDARD OIL COS GaSOline Japencoj I )rums 1 to Gallons. Delivere 1 Wharf J. I'. Sands on arrival "'Frances E." Only Five Drums each week. 22cts. <' %  % % %  Ci h < HI I lelivery. C. C. SAUNDERS. Septemrx ,191 For Sale Cheap SI ONI) IIAN'D M \\l!.l.\ WRAPPING PAPER, in good condition. |. S. li HIMSt IN CI >. SANITARY WASHABLE PAINT TO BE MIXED WITH WATER. In White, ( irev, Pink an I Gr< 7 Hi. Tins at 3s. 6 I. Perfex Enamels AS % %  RTED COL( >URS in Tinat is., 1-. od., 2s. 6d. Star Vacuum Flasks IN IVVO SIZES PINTS AND QUARTS. For S 1 If by CHAS I ALBURY. BARGA At Williams Wholesale and Retail SHOE ESTABLISHMENT W ILLIAMS THE SHOEMAN':} plnceof business is not a store which conforms strictly to M gular merchandising," but one which is made up <>i two departments, No. 1 and No. 2. is where regular stock 1-kept and orders for the various lines ; .. duplicated from time to tune and sold under the one prio J^Q s Oenapttripnt '? vhere regular stock is tept and^rders for the various lines are and in accordam e with quality. N f\ O DprAnnf-moni is where prices in some cases areas low as 30 per cenl to 40 per u *#0|#I LilicJIlt cent less than the regular prices or what they really are worth. In this latter department purchases are rightly termed BARGAINS Thisquestion may arise with some. In what way is tins No. _• Department maintained? The answer is simply this. The Proprietor buys through an Agent who knows how, uf Merchants who have failed in business, at su< h low prices as to warrant tins great U\ at 48. WILLIAMS' WHOLESALE & RETAIL SHOE ESTABLISHMENT -77 79 1 ' IV St. Nassau, N. P., I 1



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Nvillius B.ddicttis (urare in verbs m&nltri. Bcini! bound lo swcivr lo the Do|m&! f no Master VOL. X. N'ASSIWI. N. P.. Bnham&s, Saturday. September 27. 1913 No. 25T ; IN H. DL'PI'CH, 11 IfAKKRT STI.KI: ; ' I BUSHEL) \>\\\.\ 0) K o (D 0) Id. %  I %  r ,• -.'.i i i] %  njn ... lil A ilely H Mont 1.1 > %  (*• RalfYearW V-'.IC IV '' PAYARLI IN allVAKCK. Ad vert itii [Rat (,,, | line f..i lecondin*ertion; %  i lepennyper hue lot nub* quenl insertions. A'l\ Brl Btl undtl eight lines ^s. REI IGIOUS UOUHS IN mi: UNI I I I) STA IKS \VII\ I THEY ARE, WH\ I THEY l'i. AND WHA r I'lll-V NUMBER P.v ii. K. Carroll, LL.D. ii (l,i led) s.\IA-\ I [ON \R\IIKS 01 these there are two, the Sal* v.iiiiin Arrr-j and the Ainsrican Salvation Army, (i) I lie former, w nli its headquarterin Fourl Strert, New York Otv, reports ., corresponding to ministers, 85a loctettei or corf* organizations, and 16,38 mem i 1 %  :-. all usually in tne class of workers. There arc Sunda) schools aod young people'* socielies, (2 'I he \inerir in' Salvation Army Ins. accoi ling t*> the census n| 1^ 6, v offi era, 10 societies • posts, and 436 member* The work of lot li these bod ret is mostly in ritirs and the l.ogei towns. SOHWBNCKFELDERS A small body of follow era of par von S*h\venckf"ld o| Ger. mai y, who lived in llifl sixteenth 1 I -ntiii y. A smdl band nf 111 r-111 came lo Pennsylvania in 1731 ''"'' in Pennsylvania the Church still exists, in numbers it is increasing rjithrr than diminishing, Its General Conference, which is annual, was held in May last. There were reported six ministers, eight churches and 941 communicants. This small body has a mission in China, for which it raises about 00 1 year. ' [AL BRETHREN This body w is organized in Hindis after the Civil War, largely in protest sg linsl p il tics in the pulpit. It has t-v I n ill associa, both in Illinois, with 15 ministers, 17 churches and 1. ne mbers, aw l 1 the census %  if 1006. SO* II IV TOR ETHICAL I UL1 URE Tins body holds to r.o formal 1, but sti ives to educate in light liviug. There are six of the Kocietus, one each in New York, Phil idi I phi 1, St. Louis mid other cities. There are seven ministers turers and -',(.50 membei The societies do considerable charitable work. SPIRITUALISTS Those who believe that communications with the c|e.id can an 1 di' lake pla t and thai all | nomeua, physical and spiritual, aie the expression ,,f ;iI1 infinite Intelligence aic organized in conI itions which affiliate in State Association*, Th>*re is also a Nation. il Ass.,('i itioil with headquarter* in Washington, D, C. They have ordained ministers, lay mimsteis, or lne.itHtea, and associate mimsi, -. ; IK Ian, r |are known as "medium 1 Theic is a ritual f> T public 1 %  tings, I ip. tisnis, funtrals, etc, There 185 ministers b si lea %  In en 11 ites, 1,500 congregations and 300,000 members THEOSOPHICAL SOCIETY I Ins organization, professing the principle nf universal brotherhood, and holding to the teaching ol Madame Blavatsky, is v 1 v much divided and was leported by the census of 1906 in four divisions. There are no minister*. I he number of local societies is reported fnr ran at 123, with 1,09a n I CIS. UNITED BRETHREN There are two b tdies of United Brethren in Christ, the resull 1 a division in 18K0 on the adoption of a new constitution which changcd the rule forbidding membns to belong to secret societies. The L'mted lirctluen in Christ out of a revival movement, led ' ministers of the Reformed German Church and of the Mennonites. Ii is Methodistic in doctrine, p ility and usage, emphasizing the doctrine of sanctificatioo, having itinerant ministers, bishops,annual conferences, presiding el '•11, 111's, ,1 isses and class leaders, quanei ly < infeien 1 I he United Brethren in Christ, the larger body, which adopted the new constitution, ha> flourishing home and foreign missions, with much oilier denominational work. Its foreign missions are in China, Japan, the Philippines 1 West Africa, There are live bishops, one of whom is retired, 40 annual conferences, besides five in foreign fields 1,887 itinerant ministers 548 local preachers, 3,725 churches 391,461 communicants, besides 1,779 in China, Japan and Africa,, 1,556 young people's societies, with 62,850 members besides 550 junior societies, with 21,424 members, 3,495 Sunday schools, including foreign missions, with 395,387 enrolment. The amount raised for pastors' salaries last year was 81,067,590 for church expenses, $995.^i"; for missions, 8 190,457, and for all purposes, fj3,593,370. 'The value of church property is $10,505,447, and of parsonages, 82,032,989. 'The limitation is strongest in Pennsylvania, Ohiocoming second, and Indiana third. 2. The United Brethren in Christ (Old Constitution), those who adhere to the 1 (institution as it was before tin-majority changed it have 24 annual conferences, including one in Canada, 4 bishops, 320 itin • eranl ministers, ill local preaches. 5?7 societies or churches, and 1 communicants. Together the two bodies of United Bret hern h ive 2,207 itinerant ministers, ind 311,8)4 communicants. The churches of the l'mted Brethren observe Christmas and Easter as 1 hutch fesl ivals. UNIVERSALISTS The Uni versa list ecclesiastical organization embraces the local parishes or societies, which are (Continued on fourth pa 1


The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02096
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Saturday, September 27, 1913
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
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General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
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Nvillius B.ddicttis (urare in verbs m&nltri.
Bcini! bound lo swcivr lo the Do|m&! f no Master
VOL. X.
N'assiwi. N. P.. Bnham&s, Saturday. September 27. 1913
No. 25T
; IN H. DL'PI'CH,
11 IfAKKRT sti.ki: ;
' I
BUSHEL) \>\\\.\

*
0)
K
o
(D
0)
Id.
'I

r , -.'.i i i]
njn ... lil
A ilely .......*H
Mont 1.1 >
' ...... (*
RalfYearW .....
V-'.IC IV ''
PAYARLI IN allVAKCK.
Ad vert itii [Rat
(,,, | line
f..i lecondin*ertion; i lepennyper
hue lot nub* quenl insertions.
A'l\ Brl Btl undtl eight lines ^s.
REI IGIOUS UOUHS IN mi:
UNI I I I) STA IKS
\VII\ I THEY ARE,
WH\ I THEY l'i.
AND WHA r I'lll-V
NUMBER
P.v ii. K. Carroll, LL.D.
ii (l,i led)
s.\IA-\ I [ON \R\IIKS
01 these there are two, the Sal*
v.iiiiin Arrr-j and the Ainsrican
Salvation Army, (i) I lie former,
w nli its headquarter- in Fourl
Strert, New York Otv, reports
., corresponding to
ministers, 85a loctettei or corf*
organizations, and 16,38 mem
i 1 :-. all usually in tne class of
workers. There arc Sunda)
schools aod young people'* socie-
lies,
(2 'I he \inerir in' Salvation
Army Ins. accoi ling t*> the census
n| 1^ 6, v, offi era, 10 societies
posts, and 436 member*
The work of lot li these bod ret is
mostly in ritirs and the l.ogei
towns.
SOHWBNCKFELDERS
A small body of follow era of
par von S*h\venckf"ld o| Ger.
mai y, who lived in llifl sixteenth
1 I-ntiii y. A smdl band nf 111 r-111
came lo Pennsylvania in 1731 ''"''
in Pennsylvania the Church still
exists, in numbers it is increas-
ing rjithrr than diminishing, Its
General Conference, which is an-
nual, was held in May last. There
were reported six ministers, eight
churches and 941 communicants.
This small body has a mission in
China, for which it raises about
00 1 year.
' [AL BRETHREN
This body w is organized in
Hindis after the Civil War, large-
ly in protest sg linsl p il tics in the
pulpit. It has t-v I n ill associa-
, both in Illinois, with 15
ministers, 17 churches and 1.
ne mbers, aw l 1 the census
if 1006.
SO* II IV TOR ETHICAL
I UL1 URE
Tins body holds to r.o formal
1, but sti ives to educate in
light liviug. There are six of the
Kocietus, one each in New York,
Phil idi I phi 1, St. Louis mid other
cities. There are seven ministers
turers and -',(.50 membei .
The societies do considerable
charitable work.
SPIRITUALISTS
Those who believe that com-
munications with the c|e.id can
an 1 di' lake pla t and thai all |
nomeua, physical and spiritual,
aie the expression ,,f ;iI1 infinite
Intelligence aic organized in con-
I itions which affiliate in State
Association*, Th>*re is also a
Nation.il Ass.,('i itioil with head-
quarter* in Washington, D, C.
They have ordained ministers, lay
mimsteis, or lne.itHtea, and as-
sociate mimsi, -. ; Ik Ian, r |are
known as "medium 1 Theic is a
ritual f>t public 1 tings, I ip.
tisnis, funtrals, etc, There
185 ministers b si lea ' In en 11 ites,
1,500 congregations and 300,000
members
THEOSOPHICAL SOCIETY
I Ins organization, professing
the principle nf universal brother-
hood, and holding to the teaching
ol Madame Blavatsky, is v 1 v much
divided and was leported by the
census of 1906 in four divisions.
There are no minister*. I he num-
ber of local societies is reported
fnr ran at 123, with 1,09a n
I CIS.
UNITED BRETHREN
There are two b tdies of United
Brethren in Christ, the resull 1
a division in 18K0 on the adoption
of a new constitution which chang-
cd the rule forbidding membns to
belong to secret societies. The
L'mted lirctluen in Christ
out of a revival movement, led '
ministers of the Reformed Ger-
man Church and of the Mennon-
ites. Ii is Methodistic in doctrine,
p ility and usage, emphasizing the
doctrine of sanctificatioo, having
itinerant ministers, bishops,annual
conferences, presiding el
'11, 111's, ,1 isses and class leaders,
quanei ly < infeien
1 I he United Brethren in Christ,
the larger body, which adopted
the new constitution, ha> flourish-
ing home and foreign missions,
with much oilier denominational
work. Its foreign missions are
in China, Japan, the Philippines
1 West Africa, There are live
bishops, one of whom is retired,
40 annual conferences, besides five
in foreign fields 1,887 itinerant
ministers 548 local preachers, 3,-
725 churches 391,461 communi-
cants, besides 1,779 in China, Ja-
pan and Africa,, 1,556 young
people's societies, with 62,850
members besides 550 junior socie-
ties, with 21,424 members, 3,495
Sunday schools, including foreign
missions, with 395,387 enrolment.
The amount raised for pastors'
salaries last year was 81,067,590
for church expenses, $995.^i";
for missions, 8 190,457, and for all
purposes, fj3,593,370. 'The value
of church property is $10,505,447,
and of parsonages, 82,032,989. 'The
limitation is strongest in
Pennsylvania, Ohiocoming second,
and Indiana third.
2. The United Brethren in Christ
(Old Constitution), those who ad-
here to the 1 (institution as it was
before tin-majority changed it have
24 annual conferences, including
one in Canada, 4 bishops, 320 itin
eranl ministers, ill local preach-
es. 5?7 societies or churches, and
, 1 communicants.
Together the two bodies of United
Bret hern h ive 2,207 itinerant min-
isters, ind 311,8)4 communicants.
The churches of the l'mted Bre-
thren observe Christmas and
Easter as 1 hutch fesl ivals.
UNIVERSALISTS
The Uni versa list ecclesiastical
organization embraces the local
parishes or societies, which are
(Continued on fourth pa

1



II I I I I
.. ,
.'-
7
Zhc {tribune
Sa.tvjrdnv. September 27. J1913
'1 HE RAILWAY D1S ST u
AT AISGILL MOOu
This heart rending accideal
took place in the early morning,
just before dawn, of the 2nd
September. The'tmasfa occurred
at Aisgill Moor, at tiie highest
railway altitude in England, al
a very short distance to the
North of Hawes Junction on the
tame line, where a dreadful col-
lision, entailing terrible loss ol
lifi i i" m d al Chi istmas rgio.
; u> know well this p
lantern by the guard of the front as that which came to me on
train, and every effort was made these peaceful Westmoreland
to ^op the second train. But it hails this morning as heard the
was too late. The engine crash-(shrieks ol unseen men and wo-
nto the rear of the stationary men and children in torture,
train and telescoped the two entombed beneath a Baring
last carriages. The experience wreckage of broken
nearly 3 years before at Hawes into a shapeless confusion,"
Junction had caused these trains
to carry plenty of axes and tools
of a like description and very
soon efforts were being made to
free theshrieking and groaning
THECARNAUBAWAX
PALM
There is an axii >m which says
passengers from the wreckage "He who makes two blades to
into which they were jammed, grow where only one grew be-
But before the rescue wbrkcould for..-is a benefactor," and we
far, the smashed carriages think that who ess fully
caught fire, and for sonn time introduces this highly profitable
the rescuers were driven bad; by palm into the list of our econo-
fehe frightful beat, and compel! mic products will be a benefac-
i rl to list,mi impotently t<> the tor ind<
of railway, with itsd wailing of the sufferers os thev We are hoi pet mall} ac
foundings, its neavj climb up were burned to death. Before the quainted with the palm mirsel-
""l l! Bwlf< run flames absolutely stopped the ves, but if all that is said of it by
wards at terrific speed. workofdeli t, some were dealers in its product Wax-
Hie prime cause of the d .. got out alive, but much scorch- be true and there is no re
terseems to have been bad coal ed. One man wat saved with why what th should be
load too heav' for i at di ilty, and then the true, whyl I iscountrv
tapressengine to haul up a steep arm of am eragn ised victim b um< vith it the
bitoftracK. rhe two Midland i to wave in (he space betti
thus 11'it. vacant until the II ours Some of the advantages claim-
withered it, |while would-b" ed for this p.tlm are, "It lives
deliverers looked h Iplesslv on. inawidelvdi dat i "It
Edinburgh started from Car J Notoneofthe bodies when is import* u Mielter for
lisle within 12 minuti s of each releas. d from the debris was re- other crops "It i; a very profi
Other, rhe Glasgow train driver cognizable. One little girl was table shadi tr.
asked for a second engii itified by a partly broken Itsl 1
load was too heavy according chain on her neck. In the other com I'he quantity
t illations for one engine, 1 urnt trinkets and bud k a tre. kill yield annual'
lad the coal was of very poor and such like were found and lyissaid : I b and the
quality. He was told that no claimed by relatives, but it was value of it > 19 per ton.
ij engine was available, and impossible to say from which. "7he la". ,,.',
without one. When of the charred remains they had fulfiri" which serves for hat
Scotch Expresses for London the
lir^ from < ilasgow and the
second from \ n and
crav ling up the hill he had to
I Stop for want, of sufficii nl steam
Hehadjustpa.....I tin Maller-
stang signal box and as he had
not reached the 11 awes Junction
I box, the Malleistang sig
nalman was keeping the signals
come. Thirteen were killed on making, h
the spot and at least one (Sir strings, rotw
mats nets,
Douglass) died after
''The J\>. nod ci aged tre 1
. ei \ h rd" 1 f vellowish colour
Arthur
wards.
A survivor, Mr. IT. H. Brander, with black v< I takes a
in his thrilling narrative states polish, is not ntta ked by insects
that an impulse to rhange his and withstand- even sal't wat-r.
The Cam i /> Wax Palm
death. II" had booked a reser* Copemicia CeriRera) is a beauti-
ed seat and discovered on going ful tall fan palm, p. to 80 feet
to fmd it that by mistake no (high.
seat had been set apart for him Seed appears to be easily ob-
As the train was full he at the tamed. We think thai this
Glnsgow express jumped down last moment hurriedly found a palm is worthv of the attention
to find out from the driver why seat at the extreme rear. When of the Board ol Agriculture, to
"le had stopped. When he hnd the train had started, the idea which we commen
learned the cause he ran bad; struck him to try for a better
d tie line to signal the seat, he found one in tl.......tre
Edinburgh express to stop if by of the tram and transferred
np so as to prevent the expri .eat saved him from certain
Iro 1 tdtndurgh Irom pas >ing
Mallerstang until the Glasgow
express could get clear 1 f la
Junction.
I a n ar end guard of the
lam rhantfe it should have pass-
" cd Mallerstang. Meanwhile, the
i\ ft of the se ind train went
limself and his baggage to it.
I irriage that he first took
IE WAUEHOU
COMMN III..
Some month i'o, even before
was reduced to ashes, and he i the prorogation of the House ol
d his engine whil* dn 1 ung the most vigorous I Assembly. His Excellency the
bfr>g at the rate of jo mill a ol the rescuers, lie says 'I have Govi rnoi appointed a Commit-
f, to(i 1 on the battlefields of South tee to discuss, decide, and re
he nir his nan notic- Vfrica wounded men brought to I commend the necessary chances
the signals w
Fas the) ran past Mailer-
lj. Suddenlv the fireman saw
the hospital in scores -wound-
ed in indescribable fashion.
But I have never ex
rant ic waving of the red perienced quite Hie same horror
in the W irehouse pso|iei ty, for
the Customs, purposes. His Ex-
eel fancy met this Committee,
at an appointed time, in the
building and after outlining his
ideas a ked them t > select .1
Chairman and gel to work. The
I Ion. J. P. Sands cording'
lv eli cted as< but al-
though so lour; tune IS elaps-
ed, we have beard nothing of
their work, not even of their
having since 1
This matter is bl 1 oming a
town talk, so we di em it ad-
\ is ibli to refer to it. It is now
about tune for tins Committee
to get to work, and show them-
selves worthy of the 1 onfidem
reposed in them by the Governor
in selecting and appointing
them t" this important work.
BUILDING Nolls.
"Centreville," the com modi
I Ion.
D. A. Bri 1 Stn
built I y.Mr.Ma d mald.architi
of the Hotel "Colonial" is
having the tront remo lei led,
and a wide covered verandah
built around tl 1 1 floor,
which will ommand a splendid
\ ie\ of the harbour. 1 he plans
,1 is wm e by G
E. Mayer the lo< il an il
Mr, M ivei is also the archi
teet of the "Lightbouru I louse
Annex," which pi to be
an attractive huildi I
f
The Amei tern si hooner
"I larrison T. Beai ham," 17
days out from Baltimore, with
coal for the Fl ida East Co
I lotel Co., arri> ed on Thuisday
morning.
The Motor "Kranci I arriv-
ed this afti 1 no in froi Miami
with I 'e, (iasoline, ai d ihingli 1
mails and the follow ing pnssen
'.Vis.
Mesdames Louise I urnque \
Cur ida d Johnsonland (Catherine
Williams; Messrs Norman John-
ton, Joseph Millei George
Knowles, Sam Al bury, Alonzn
1'iait, samuel tinnnt, Ji
miall Moss, Janus Si i1 b-. Cli.e.
Bonaby and Josi 1I1 V\ ilson (13 1
FOREIGN Mads also Mails
for I lagua and Lon Cay will
close on Tues lay 30th Septem-
ber at 8 o'cl' 1 I. a. m.
r
Nassau. N I'.,
Sepl I -i, I9I j.
To the Editorof the rribuue.
Deai Sir.
Several times you hare called
attention to the good work be
in>,' done by the Daughters of
the Empire around the grounds
ne?ring the Omen's Stair Case.
L
JL


TT
T H TRIBU N I.
Rut wliat about the approach
to it, ii is well to kno . thai our
Canadian Visi-
tars have pre ty places to visit,
but tnu-tii! ail for them. ?
Surely the iovernmenl should
do their part now and improve
the side-walks of Union Street.
It is simply .1 disgrace to Nassau
to have to roll about on them
and those who live that way
have to use the middle of the
Street to pet ilong comfortably.
If tin Boar I of Works do not
intend to pa" e ih Be alks
why not make a law that e
onf do their own fro I
kntow a fi iend of mine w Ii i want
i I to improve the fro t of his
i and the Civil Kngi
neei Bt< | ped him, saj ing you
will want t" own.
What about Palms for I Inion
l! IS just ;. as
Vi( toria Av< nue just as h Ii
toned as any other Street. It
is time for us to show th it we
badly treated and w<
have this wi ti ( of |
this year.
Yours Ti uly
UNI IN STREET.
(Communicated]
IRREGULARITIES AT Till
llo I'll \L.
I Ri sident Surgeon, no
Ion I ins in the Institu
tion, as tin title of hi
pro\ idi s, but instead, is spend-
ing the summi r out <>f to
80 Physician 1- resident thi
in case df accidents or serious
illness at night.
I he Traini N use. or one of
them, being employed on a 1
in town, no Trained Nurse, 1
onriiiglit duly. A Probationei
, <>f less than
>f prescriptions and the hand-J London, 35. \ record con trui I ense of tlie term may not
o d 'pendent on profi >sii >nal
atbli
1 1 .11 : m to thinl
ling of poison 'iis dru
' I g( Cre< k San Salvador
18th Septr. 1913
Editor Tribune:
Dear Sir.
Please allow me space in your
valuable column I ti i -peal: about
no event that took plao at
ek.
(n September the 16th inst.
one of the members of >: A n
Church died, her name was Anna
Ingraham. She was stridden with
pai.iK ;is and sudd< nlj d
Shs was to in- imi ied on Wed-
lay 18th inst., as there was n 1
public but i neai bj
they inti 1 Inns' her in thl
church yard as it isa rule to bury
all the memb rs in the yard, the
to the Cater hist and
m to permit th n I 1
l p roughly
pp iken '- did not allow
them the privih ge to bun
her. At last the family had to
bury her in her own y ud.
, Mr Editoi, do you think
I all voii es an
p \ ill look
into tins matter thanking you for
ice,
I remain vours,
rtN EYE WITNESS.
113
The(> vei m ttentinn is
Hall) in\ ed to a bit of road
in Th Lot's Settlement which is
one of the districts of Atthur's
Town.
north side of the
nises of toi S imuel Stubbs
to the north astern side then- is
a pit ce of road that 111 eds work
ing|on.
There are trees growing in the
road and if these tri 1 are cut
si;iinic|!l
I gold Imi valued al
I ' 1 1..... I I 11 I ill to
daj from the 1 ran ;vaal.
* V; ',' down and the roads fixed in
Mining .isle in charge of the order, believe U will be a boon
wards ;,t niKhnotwnl.tand,,,, in,,abital,ts f Lot.
the absence or the Doctor, and
there being another Trained Lottbyfirr. V lintrse on Bay
Nurse, and the Matron on the Street Arthurs Town. The pro
staff pertyof Mrs. Margaret Dean.
The Superintendent not easily Sepl 9th 1913
found when wanted on business, Wanted an cy. to serve in
Paris, 35.---The aviator iai
10s rossi d the Mediter-
ranean from Ircjus, near Can-
nes, to Bizerta, near- Tunis, ;*<]<]
ing anol ird to the li-t of
I'rench aerial achievements.
I iarros's flight ranks as one
of the most notable feats in avi-
ation. I le did not actually fly
miles without passing land,
but two Stages, one of 113 miles
and the other of 125 miles were
over the sea, His actual flying
time was 7 hours 15 miniit
Washington, I35.A total
lass 1 if &161.000.000 was
is d In the I hio floods last
March. The weather bureau es-
timates that sum, which in
1 des 1< iss to railroads, tele,
graphs and to fai m property.
Paris, 2V -Mis l'ankhurst the
English sulfragette leader, in
formed the Assi ciated Press to
da> llint sle did not antici| 1 le
the shgl test difficulty in entei
ing the I 1 states on hei pro
1 isit to that country.
"The object of my voyages to
Am lie said, i> to answer
the queston in th i minds of the
Am can pe why do mili-
tants do of thinu the>
Ten many minute and othei
papers to take him away from
Ins office (?l as when
seen
has
on
I is
the streets he always
hands full (?)
'1 he I lispenser too, seemi to
have too much business in town,
as he ton is frequently t< 1 be met
on the stn eis. dm ing I hspen-
Band of I lope < Grange Creek
apply to K C. Dean.
Also Presi hi and Chairman,
C Mil 1. <:i V\H
Septemh >r 27th 1913.
Liverpool, 35, Militant suf-
sarj Hours, and his hands empty fragettes last night set fire to
that is without au\ papers Seafield House at Seaforth, four
therein. I miles to the northwest of Liver
Small young irresponsible pool, and caused damage csti-
boj entrusted with the filling mated at $400,000.

do in l'
Mexico, 25. Fred i Jam-
boa Minist 'i 1 il Foreign Affairs,
was nomir itetl for the presiden-
cy le. the ( a'; i!ic party con-
vention The efforts of the party,
it is said, h ive been din 1 I 11
the Selection of men who {would
it pta : the I'm
States
London, I D lily
Telegraph in a long editor,al
tins morning miswers American
criticism of (Ire it Britains re-
p uleil in enti hi to withd a v
from lie Olympic Games, it ad
nits tint the English public
looks upon the proposed Olym-
pic Fund with coldness, because
it means the breaking down of
the spirit of amateurism. Ih
question is "Whether athleti
proness as such, when mad" a
mattei ol business, is or is n >t
hi Ipful to the nation,d welfare '
Apparently the mental at-
titude of an amateur is not yet
understood in America, Ger-
many or Sweden. At all events,
it is conceivable that the nat-
ional welfare in the higlnst and

HARM R'S \( >l ICE
THE undersigned desires 10 in
foi in liii I irmei patrons,
as well as the public, tli ii he is
I p, pn 111 (I to wait upon them at
ilieir homes, offices,and stores; and
do their bafberrng. Patronace
ctfully solicited. Phone 1.
' I'.. II ROBERTS,
Sep.. ; 1 .

' NOTICE I'O CUSTOMERS
COl IKES ii, p will be
1 D.V. on M
39th.
o. v. a >OKE
Bar I
;thf. worlds judgment
makes powerful the name
STANDARD ENGINE.
Lloyd's Register shows this
the powei 1 >f the majority.
Back of the Standard
guarantee is t lie Stan-
dard Motor ConsU
tion Co., 171 Pine St.,
.1 1 sey City, N. J.
CHAS. E. ALBURY,
Nassau, X. P.
nt for the Bahamas.
Shingles
Best No. 1 Heart 5m. Cypress
Shingh s al $9.6 per thou-
s in. 1 id' jo bundles
Discounts "ii lots 1 if ov 1
yii 1 shinglfs.
Special Price
also on c 1 1 grades -also
31 ii. Cypres I I6.72 p< 1
thogs ind of 30 undies. This
price made |> issible by a \ ery
large purrhas
Fresh stock arriving every
w eek.
C. C. SAUNDERS.
Na sau, N. P..
Sept. 16, 1913


T
l) NE
independent so hr a* their own
affairs are concerned State conven
tions which meet annually and .1
general convention which is held
biennially.
The Univetsalists have a foreign
mission in Jap in and home missi-
ons, are strong in educational work
and have a flourishing Young Peo-
ple's Society, called the National
Young People's Christian Union.
There are 709 Universalist minis
ters, 886 parishes and 53,048 com-
municants.
UNITARIANS
I nitarians give annually in their
Year Hook the number of ministers
and churches, but make no returns
foi members, The census of 1890
found 61,749 members; that ol
|j. I heir an-, according to the
Unitarian Y>\n Book for 1911.
ministers and 493 churches. More
hnlf the mi mbers are in M is
sai hussetfs, New I Ian pshire h 1 i
the next largest number, and 1 ali
fnrnia stands thud. The American
Unitarian Association, with its
headquarters in Boston, c irries on
Unitarian Missionary work in this
country, 'I he Unitarians aid the
I'.1 ihmoSomnj, of India, the Liber-
al Christains <>f Hungary and
of oilier European countries,
and do some work in Japan. They
als 1 m notain "undenominational"
I hools of rational theology at
harvard, Meadeville and Berkeley,
California.
INDEPENDENT CONGREGA-
TIONS
These are local societies which
have no denominational connec-
tion and no organization among
themselves. Lutheran independ.
ant and Methodist independent
congregations are not included
among hem. There are 267 milt.
i-t-'is, 879 churches and 48,673
nbers retm ned under the I
of Indep n li ni Congregations.
NOfk'K.
rill"' is id inform my Patrons
and the Public in < ieneral
that 1 have opened mv Public
Black S mill Shop; and inn w 1 v
ready to tlo anything in the line ol
1 or new work I lorse
Shoeing Suecially, All work d
Mechauii illv.
P. A. Huyler,
1 Baj St t. East 1 Whai:
A
WANTED,
FRESH FLYING FISH
Will pay 6s. for same.
SANDS,
Photographer,
Bay street. City,
li
I ORJ RENT.
Oi.'SK on last Bay Street, at
present < :upied by P, P.
Sturrup Esq. possession given ist.
August.
Apply to,
WALTER K. MOORE.
STANDARD OIL COS
GaSOline Japencoj
I )rums 1 to Gallons.
Delivere 1 Wharf J. I'. Sands
on arrival "'Frances E."
Only Five Drums each week.
22cts. <'
Ci h < hi I lelivery.
C. C. SAUNDERS.
Septemrx ,191 .
For Sale Cheap
SI ONI) IIAN'D M \\l!.l.\
WRAPPING PAPER, in good
condition.
|. S. li HIMSt IN CI >.
SANITARY WASHABLE
PAINT
TO BE MIXED WITH WATER.
In White, ( irev,
Pink an I Gr<
7 Hi. Tins at 3s. 6 I.
Perfex Enamels
AS RTED COL( >URS
in Tin- at
is., 1-. od., 2s. 6d.
Star Vacuum Flasks
IN IVVO SIZES
PINTS AND QUARTS.
For S 1 If by
CHAS I ALBURY.
BARGA
At Williams Wholesale and Retail
SHOE ESTABLISHMENT
WILLIAMS THE SHOEMAN':} plnceof business is not a store which conforms strictly to M
gular merchandising," but one which is made up <>i two departments, No. 1 and No. 2.
is where regular stock 1-- kept and orders for the various lines;..
duplicated from time to tune and sold under the one prio
J^q s Oenapttripnt '? vhere regular stock is tept and^rders for the various lines are
and in accordam e with quality.
Nf\ O DprAnnf-moni is where prices in some cases areas low as 30 per cenl to 40 per
u* *#0|#I LilicJIlt cent less than the regular prices or what they really are worth.
In this latter department purchases are rightly termed
BARGAINS
Thisquestion may arise with some. In what way is tins No. _ Department maintained? The answer is simply
. this. The Proprietor buys through an Agent who knows how, uf Merchants who have failed in business, at su< h low prices
as to warrant tins great ..I Bool and Shoi a that havi been in a fire (as was done on a re, enl 01 casionl and these are sold at pria 8 be
yond competition.
In order th il these methods of business may be clearly demonstrated Williams the Shoeman specially in-
vites In- patron. ,111,1 the public generally to call and see among others the following* Bargains : he is
just in receipt of per last Rteamer 160 pairs wo's. white Canvas Bow Pumps. Regular price 8s. now being sold
ai 1.. 135 pairs wo's. Grey Su^de Button Ox. Ties 10s. now being sold at 6s. 75 pairs wo's. Pat. colt 2 strap
slippers RegularPrice 12 being sold at 8s. 125 pairs Men I an Calf Button Ox Ties 16s. now being sold
iai ios. 250 pairs Colored Canvas Lea, sole ( k. Ties 6s. now being n >U\ at 48.
WILLIAMS' WHOLESALE & RETAIL SHOE ESTABLISHMENT
-77 79 1','IV St.
Nassau, N. P.,
I
1


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