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*J lilt I K 1 Ji U NE Zbc {tribune Saturday. September 20, 1913 President Wilson appears to liave carried an overwhelming majority of tlie people of the United States with him in his action concerning the state of affairs in Mexico. The President's offer of mediation included the condition! that there should be anlimme* diate armistic throughout Mexico, a free election, 8 pi from Huerta that he would not be a candidate, and an agl mentof all parties to abide by the result. Huerta rejec led these terms. Having failed to bring these desirable conditions to a head, President Wilson announced in person to Congress thai the polic) <>f the Government nl the United States would be: Nn armed intervention in Mexico, strict neutrality, a denial of arms to both factions, the recall of all Americans from Mexico, and patient forbearance with the Mexican Republic. The recalling of Americans is acting piejudicially on Mexican trade, and is alarming the Mexican authorities. Perhaps this is a bigger stick to beat Me: with than would have been the dispatch of a large army. I he embargo on shipping arms to Mexico from [the I Inited States went into force on 28th August. What a mesj the I'. S. government would have tumbled into if they had got embr in Mexico III holding aloof .is he has done, President Wilson has proved himself to be .1 strong as well a a wise in. HI : "Greater 1* he that ruleth his •pint th,1 1 he that taketh a city" The following are exl from private coi li n eexpressing opinious on B 1I1 mi.is Exhibits at Toronto : "One of the directors of the Exhibition told me personally that he had been a yeark visitor for eigliti rii years and he would not hesitate to any %  that the Bahamas people bad the most attractive display of the most useful artich s he had 1 -I 'ii. '1 lung-, that people US6 111 ;\ day life."' Another opinion from a leading business man in Toronto. "Ill my judgment, the exhibit did the Colony great credit. The only trouble was that the space allotted was t< 0 small to show everything to advanti The Sponge exhibit and the show of turtles were especially line and evidently much admired. By comparison with the other West Indian exhibits I think the Bahamas was the best. You ask me to make suggestions, ami it occurs to me th it if you send a few expert work 1 rs. iii sis tLand other native products, who would be enga in making mats, hats and other articles in view of the public,for sale --/laving of course a I k of similar articles display ed it would add to the attraction ot the exhibit very much, and probably also to the financial success of tin.' undertaking." *AGRICULTURAL NOTES We had the pleasure of ing Mr. W. K. Moote 1 Pineap pie Cultivation f\i Thins/ \ e must confess thai it is the finest one we ha\ e e\ n m tins Colony. The new p ants, Bet OUt last month, li ive all in root, and are putting out new leaves. We bespeak SU< for this cultivation w Inch is he ing carried out, on lines q different from the "old way" The li iard of ARI ii ulture, we told, has enquiries from abroad for Limes in lots of 10 Barrels. We do not think, that all ovei the coloiiv 10 barrels could be gathered in sether. Why? Surely Ihey gr w ilmost wild and uncultivated throughout these Islands. In coir, ersation tinmorning : with Mr. 'Thomas ! lilnlcll ol Upper Bogue, w ed b %  him that li •, during the past twelve months, had received for bunches of|ba innas alone, sold at Harbour Island, nearly £35, Thirty live p acids. Mr. Adorns W. Notlage, tliis morning, in *>ur local market, sold three Pumpkina, grown in the Wulff Uo..d. for five shillings sterling. The following were pa-senfrom Mi inn per "r ran E"' vi si irdav.— M ss Jennie Alburv ; Mrs E. H. C I'lli '. Messrs John Storr, S 1 n 1 1 .\n c.vles, Albert Glinton and Krnest MaCksy, '•) 'The Mad Steamer "Vij l.ui cia" sailed from New York for Nassau at 4 p. m. with 33 pas sengers, and ijnoo barrels of cargo. Will proceed to Progreso and Puerto Mexico. Kndav. J Editor Tribune, Sir: Oh the power of suggestion. Hard Drinker tastes carrion in iced water.l don't wonder at it. I |e doesn't Know the taste of water, iced or not. But I do wonder at the Editor falling in to the trap, k>t every one whq knows him, knows that he can't teil "Scotch" from "Irish" 1 doubt il he knows Brandy from ( iiu, except by the colour. I know spirits, and I know the 1 I the different kinds ; and I diank Ice Wall r vesti 1 lay but no spirits and I'll be jiggere il then was an\ taste of carrion, butsir, I must tell you th it as I don'l eat it, I don't know the e of it I'm sorry for you both. Tell Hard 1 Irinker to quit chewing Carrion and try Pears for a 1 han SOFT DRINKS. j PORTABLE LAWNS OF GRASS CARPET. Living-Grass, carpets that 1 m be used as table i overs, :oats, or lor making temporary MI permanent lawns are now manufactured in England, Thej |y living carpets for the with which they Cov 1 continues to grow in whatever place of use the car pel is put, as sh,, W n by illustrations appearing in the ()ctobei Popular Mechanics Magazine. To make them, millions of gi IS! Is are thrown on a strip ol Carpel in a green house and al lowed to sprout and grow. Win 11 the grass has taken root, the caipet can be handled like a rug. If a temporary lawn is desired, the ground is rolled and the carpet isjaid down in sti ips; i alterw.inls it can be taken up ; and used elsewhere. When it is allowed to remain in one pie e| I it takes root and forms a beau > tiful lawn. All entire 1 uvil can be laid in a <\^^ and two lengths of carpet will make a Cl H ki t, pitch. SECOND-STOWY BUNGA LOW APARTMENTS. A Colony of one story bunga lows built about a court on the roof of a block of stores is a new idea in apartm int houses : %  '! is il.-j .iliutL-t nU i it ki sI trations, in the Octolr Popular* Mechanics Mag izuHr From the 1 et the bungalow apartm (nl building looks like .in ordio irv buck business block with sho 1 below and flats on the second floor. But the stairway from the streets, instead of leading to a second story, takes one to a broad, sunny court on the roof of the eh ips. 1> >wn the center of the court is a pergola with tl iwer b xes beneath it, and around the four sides are the %  \ gables ol 17 one story S chalet bungalows. In all there ; AO a-r'Oin, four 3room, and eleven | room bungal apartments about the court. Each pair ol bungalows has a 1 ommon sheltered porch reci ed so that the entrance d K)r8 ntothe living rooms. Their kitchens ami dining rooms face the court and their living and ing rooms overlook the street. Each has itown hath r n and plentj of 1 loset room 'The coiniiioii laundry is not in the basement, but on the roof of one of the bungalows, and clothes anhung out oa the roofs of the kitchens tmseen from the street below. The flooi ol the court is covered with heavy deck roofing, drained bj a gutter in the cent* r, and gai |l are Ol in DOS with ventilating pij.es lead. through the roof. r A FLOATING FLAT Tu BEAT 1 HE LANDLOUP "My flouting fl-'t is a 18 ft. cal in motoib >?t fitted up foi a iiome," says Harry D Barli in the October Popular Mechanics Magazine. "We built it a ai ago to live in during the Summer, but when the season c Insed we could not bear to leave it. It cost us lessthan $1,000, two years rent, and we have travelled 4,000 miles in it. "When we ihl our float in,' flat, 1 took my plans to VHI 1 MIS boat yards and sei ure I pi K 1 s. 1 wanted a boat with sleeping accommodations for six persons, electric lights, power, bath, toilet, and couking equipment. I finally found a contractor who would build the the hull with gasoline tank, rilddtf and steering wheel, painted and finished, foi I275 I lien I bought a 30 lip. engine with magneto, clutch, propeller, etc., for 1375. For lights I purchased a storage battery f<>r#75 a ml we recharge it on the way. The equipment of bell, lights,



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I! T Hi£ T R I BU N E whistle, fire extinguisher and life preservers, which the government requires, cost $30. "While we lived on the boat we visited neighbouring cities and I commuted to Chicago to my work aa foreman in a I job-printing office. When cool w< at her approached, we decided to go t'> I > ouisiana with some friends. We were at Hammond, Ind.. then, and made tliugli rough water. Our route took us down through the Illinois And Michigan Canal|the Illinois River,then down the Mis sissippi. At St. Louis, Memphis, Baton Rouge, and New Orleans I worked t my trade and at in, Vicksburg, Natchez, and other cities, we visited friends or looked a round. We reached New Orleans on Dec. I) just ahead of the cold weather all the way down. I found a harbor for our home, a position for myself, and a school for the I and we tied up there for the winter." DEPAR1 METAL NOTICE I >. 111 /i 111 .ii l ospil 'I \.'-in Mh ^ept. i'H3 A ITI.k \ IK >\farthrprannf I 'ml) %  11 <. 11 %  r XIIIS" m 1 lie Ho*. pit ii will Inri ceiv* I bv tinSupt, i"|) 1 inn of Saturday ^7:11 i 1 I'.y ordei 1 'I iiif 1 'omm *i< 11 t R J.ANDERSONPlRRINGTi >N Sup 1 int<*ndent, A Auction Sale M >\'I>\Y 11.30 THE mi 1 DRY 1, ) in-; la Cottons, la 1 W'.l | Lorseis, Luce, 1 n rui Iw ies Drfu 11 iiiimiiigt, I I '-HI \, IViluun-i v, Etc '. ULRC;RAMS| Sept. 20th 1913. London.—A suffragette 'Arson squad" eai h to-d ly tried to bui n down Penshurst Place, the his toric fourteenth century seat of Lord l)i-shsl.and Dudley at Tunbridge, Knit. A working part of household employees succeeded i" extin guishiiigthe Bams*. London, 18.— Great llritain will know to -morrow whether she will have to endure another national transport strike. Acting wmm Mental and Physical Fatigue mmm j When brain or body ia weary the digmtivn powrre nr wonkened and diptnptp fur ordinary food is ofton experienced. Under auch circumstances tlio Allenburya' I Diet ia upecially valuable. It is pleasant to take, eanily digested and Matmilatad and speedily restorative. Thus it helps the system to recover tone and vigour. Thr 'Allcnburyi' DIET is prepared from pure rich milk and whole wheat—Ihc two vital food elements combined in partially pre—digested form. Made in a minute—/Jdd boiling mater only. I TO BE OBTAINKD MOM AI.L CHF.UI8TS A NP STORES. ALLEN & HANBURYS LTD. LONDON. ENGLAND. w&M&MwmMmmmmm a. A food for Adults and quite dis'inct from the well-known; : 'Allenburyi* Foods for Infants. iM -f-i on a de nand from Birmingham, where the strike situation is serious, the executive hoard of the national union of railway men will meet in London m the morning to discuss the adi isability of calling a national strike. Birmingham has token Liverpools place as the strike center, ["he stoppa :<• of freight shipments is complete. I rade in Dublin is almost completely paralyzed. The strike 'ever is spreading to Wales and Ulster. Belfast, 18. --Sir Ed war I Carv, H I lande I in Ireland to day with the object of inspei ting the volunteer army which is bein ; I in Ulster t > supp ri provisional government which it is said, is tn be brougui intoe: istence if the home 1 ul lull be1 law. The Ulster army is said to be thoroughly organized and alleady to have attained a it length .,! about 100,000 men, which number, it is expected by the leaders, will nearly double alien rest railing has beencompletep. There seems to be little hope of a |] ineral i onfereuce b :l w 1 the various parties on the question of home rule, although the possibility of the holding of an open conference on the subject of Irish government as a whole is still canvass d. New Vork, 18.—The Hamburg American liner Imperator will arrive this afternoon with $649 passengers on board) the largest number ever carried Ml any single steamship in any part of the world., London, 18.— In circumstances even more remarkable than s, the famous pearl neckovi re I today. The pearls were lying in the gutter in a road in Highbury, Ii London, by a workingman named Augustus Home. II pit ked them up on his way to work this morning. \ reward of $50,000 was offered for the recovery of the pearls last July. Birmingham, 18.—The rrenof the British Association to-day pursued the question, 1I1ussed bv Sir Edward] Schafer in Ins presidential address last of the origin of life, Many differences of opinion wen. ale I in the debate, but on : oiut there was complete ul—that we are no nearer a solution of the problem than we were a thousand years ago. Paris, 18.—Thunderstorms of exceptional visolrnce have swept over Francedoing meat damage. For Sale Cheap •>K' OM> II \\'I> MANILLA WRAPPING PAPER, in good condition J. S. JOHNSON I I ). Nassan.N. P., Sept. 19, i't'3 Schooner~WINIFRED M. S AILS fur MIAMI, !•!..., F RIDAY, September 4 th. I 111 pa .-.>^ wis late of Mm no accompwisti Prio I I is ;iiii| is \ A WANTED. — I'OK SALE JFRESH PLYING FISH — Will p.i\ Cs, foi same, 1 fOUSEand Lotos S \Nlis. J 1 for particulars if Photographer, L. Dean or Michael Rf Hay street, City. 132 St. New York City JL



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inr i R i D u NE !l BARGAINS AGAIN! At Williams Wholesale and Retail SHOE ESTABLISHMENT \A/ ILLIAMS THE SHOEMAN'S plnce of business is not a store which conforms strictl} to "rev v gular merchandising," but one\\vitfc$i is miido up of two departments, No. i and No, 2. XTQ 1 T^pkf-kji Y>+ YYi C*Y\ t is where regular stock is kept and orders for tie various lines are ~ XJ 1 U"fJ<*>L tlilvlll duplicated from time to time and sold under the one pi tem %  Hid in accordant e with quality. pt In this I itter d< pai In rightly tenm <1 MQ O T}^f-|- Y>+ *vi ami '" e prices in so : as low As 30 per cent to | 1 pei v # ^ d U&fJcll LIXIwlTL cent less than the regular prices or what they really are worth. BARGAINS rhis question maj arise with some. In what wa; this No. 2 Department maintained? The answei issimph tins. I In' Proprietor buys through an Agent who knows how, of Merchants who have failed i:i business,at such low pi to warrant this (fpeat discount on regular prices. Hi also buys portions of the salvage of sta "l Boots and Shoes that have been in a fin (as w; s done on .1 recenl occasion) and these are sold al | beyond competition. In order that these methods of business m ty demonstrated Williams the Shopman yites hi patrons and the public generally to< 1 long others the following? Bargains : he is just in receipt of per last steamer i< ehite Canvas li ps. Regular pn< 8s. now a 4 s '35 pairs wo's. Grey Su^de Button Ox. I'ies 10s. now sold at 6s. 75 pairs wo's. Pat. colt 2 strap slippers Regular Price ifls. now being sold at 8s 125 pairs Men Ian Calf Button Ox Hi t6s.nov at 10s. 230 pairs Colored Canvas Lea. sole Ox. Ties 6s. now bi ing sold al WILLIAMS' WHOLESALE & RETAIL SHOE ESTABLISHMENT .:, 1 Baj St. Nassau, N. I'., N'i> Inter statistics Hi in I how obtained by the censix of igo6 have been given. 'I he body then had 24 ministeis, 24 churches, and is,171 Communicants. ( to lie continued ) Grand Opening! THE BUSY BEE SHOE STOr?E THF. BUSY BEE, A NEW SHOE .STOKE WILL Bf. OPENED ON iturday 13th inst. IDER THF. BIG TREE i Stock will com,-)ii,o nil tho pny Stylus nd Gr.xl'-s of BOOTS AND SHOIS BI fron\ tho .t>.\ nuinc orl<.. patronage of my kind iand the public g 3|iectfully Solicited U. S. KNOWLES Manager. >. AGNES S IIIII •!. k( >o.\I. 'I UESDAY, -\ PI |, 1913. SOIREE Mrs. ./. %  ,' arks. Admission 1 ( ) pen s /> m. GEO. L. DAYIS MUSIC LESSi >\GIVEN ON PIANO, VTOMN, \l VNDOLIN end GUI I VR. Pianos tuned and Repaired. Order* taken (or Private Enttrtninnuntt. 67 West street, FOR RENT. i j lUSl "ii I .ivt Day Street, .-it 1 present occupied by B. P. Sruirup I ; ion given ist. ust. Apply to, WALTER K. MOORE. Nl HI I "M IN is t< inform my Pati >n I and the pub ic in Reuei 11 thai I li.c\ c retuine I i mn my round trip and .in w re. idv ti do H n tiling in the line of g net il repanIng of boots ;nnl sh All work don innically D. S. PI I \ h.l.i.. r. Bay -I Japeneo \\l I \KY W \-ll WILE I • \ I \" l 11 BE MIXED 'Mil VV \ I ER. In While, Pink und 7 Hi. I ins ,u (.. i, \. Prefix Enamels AS •' >H IKD t OLOURS in Tins i| fjd, IS., is. (Jl |., J8, I, I. Star Vacuum Flasks IN TWO SIZES PINTS AND QUARTS. Fur Sale by • CHAS. K. ALBURY. W. A. M \ llll :\i UNDERTAKER D ESIRES i inform hi< friend and the Public that !>•• Im* reci w ed a complete nut in i f for ihc husim • nl an m> H ii iker, which place* him in a i...-.; •..>. to curry i ut Runetaht ihni be entrusted to Ins care with tem and despah h ; nnd n spi i i solicits their patronng < Jet Prices fust ami prove that tbt y are the rery lowest for first | H s v. ,\ k. Fresh Just Arrived O NION SEEDS fn.m Teneriffe and all other Vegetable Seeds AT Ti M ) I l.'S. I 11 Bay Street. o



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Nullius jvililiilns jurare in verba n-mgistri. Beinji bound tr. H we;\r lo the D'unms <>t no Master VOL. A. IU, N. I\. HivlianiBs, Saturday. Seplrmhcr 20. 1') I"* No. 231 I. >':" ( I I %  %  • tiiil I i hinlm i Ihlt i i )n r|H ': B irh Yr.n.y IJ >. v KM.* iv v iv I %  • %  %  '. %  .^.M1 our I.I I I. ,1 I I'\IIH) I ATI v\n vvn \i ri11 v SCMI EH .'•.'• I %  RI >\l VX ( v l lloi IC ill'l: I In-. ni'i I • I Id, (IM ii fa Pop Pin* X.. I 1111 I'M-:.' I|) I 'I I.'" ii-' .-ir. I \ %  i uf %  i '. i %  %  • • .f ~-t. I' i %  %  %  \ : I ... Su %  ' i'h' L'nivf i I'aiiiucli I i Iif VVrst, P. i mate ol Illllv, '-II I' Hlnl Met "p in..ii of the Ri HI in PHI. \ %  11 c-'-. '..II "I the I emporal i b e I i'lK K'", i i I (or 11:" I 'mi. it Sim n as 1 hn ir roll in 179". He i' %  i • c im* '"• 111808, I In Church now Ima in I lie I' Mate*, reclusive %  f P< no Rico, I lawaii, 1 in' i HI ii Z n In' Km ill in !\. mi.'. |i is now I fn Iv r>| ugh |e P p.il S< I I I" I" I Ifl Mi •' \< v. Joint !. %  / ... h. I'., i | in Washington, —' *" %  I 1 -%  : i In i.iI ,.. %  l.-'io-., 1 In"Hi. rs, I ii -,, u tni 1 lie H'j : 11 rl to %  I both i-l.i-.i .it tin' was '7. I 'M nli w hi< h 1 .in.l llf DIM It • .1" 1 I be 1l1.1t 1 in) I in Cail'i >lic cliun lie* "'. Sunday, md h in ll llioil-. |||'l s,.(||s ire rep 1 a ngle ]•> 11 ish. I In' "f men I .is 10 ;i 1 '.ii ' i. rv much '1 than ibt in* in any Pro 1 at 1 ion, I Ini ;ith 'ii ichy ol ji its t.. the pub. 1 •' bin 1I1 ••• eithet ectatiiin 1 the 1'roii-t. nt I'.'lili 11 .,., id'i ml tl 1 f. ire. In a I seh "-Is t IUI In in 1 he faith by 1 Hiiolic ti HI hi iare |)r> 11< '• I, 11"' b t il ol these school* is 1 1 1 9, utni ihe numbei ol •'. Be-ides lhe*e oala ihen .in%  ., rolleg ys and ;< 1 .-,. nden I.'jot gins. There are 289 orp asylums with 47,111 orphans ini'l 1114 homes for tinaged I I <• vi md totnl ol rhildien in Roman v. ;itlio ic 11 is' I tut 1.. 1 is IS 1,540,1. |.,. I he Roman vathojic. \ liiiri h .'OPS 111 >t n']"ii t tl umber ,f 1 •, "Mi'iiiun. ants as Pn testa nt ("Ini" Ii do. It "i\es v\ hat is %  ailed "I nthatic populntii Phis term emhi ices ill p 1-0,1xho h iv. not iiniiiK'.itcil, among w bom am ;ii| inf.in hildren wl n have 1 <>t heeu confirn ed. 'Childn n are 1a rule admittted to their first communion u nine >r ton years of age. The larger dine lakeacenms of their population only once in three to five vear*. fhe population reporter! at 'he of 1911 was 15,015,569. This number, a* alre idj %  it.-<|, j* not %  mmunii ml*, but of *nul*. I he pi l.itis ..I the Church dedm t 15 per rent, .is representing re 1 who are n riuni1 %  "••. md call tinremaindercommunic mt*. Aco rding to tin 1 above number represents 11,763,. %  'iKiw m ina nl aiiii n iilJ.?S^.'*, tl %  1 t-, or non-eom.nunicant*. The foreign missionary wotk .f uri li of Ri me 1done rhieflv 1 h the Society f< .r the Prop 1. %  ition ol thFaith, Inch w % founded .it Lynn*, Fi mce, 1822, It his raised and • icpen led in all about ?77,orx>,oo of which • <5 7.occ, 1 fiom tl e United Stati '. The Catholic Mis ii marv I 111 I r h %  'M-11111:11 \'i,,, |j 1 : .-i ch I stei i"ii ciety Ifor the In. %  chu %  ches HI p..or an l needy plai e* I ii""'• ilsoa <' ithol %  • Colon ii 1. tinnS iety whose bjecl i* to coin. 1 nmigrants according to race and lai >u There are Catholic Boards for missionary l Indian cornmnnrcants s ret timed, among \\h"m n iests inI ih airin •, an I for ire 2 11 C l I i." P I ish Nation il Church is the result of il ^satisfaction ofP >li*h Catholic laymen with "absolute ligiou*, pol tir.il ml social power oei the parjshioneri*' exercised by thIn rarchy of the Roman Cath olic Church There were at one time two bishops. One has lince removed by death, (Continui

The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02092
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Saturday, September 20, 1913
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02092

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Full Text
Nullius jvililiilns jurare in verba n-mgistri.
Beinji bound tr. Hwe;\r lo the D'unms <>t no Master
VOL. A.
IU, N. I\. HivlianiBs, Saturday. Seplrmhcr 20. 1') I"*
No. 231
I. >':" ( I I
.
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i '. i ' .f ~-t. I'
i ' .!". \:, I ... Su '
' i'h' L'nivf i
I'aiiiucli I i Iif VVrst, P. i mate
ol Illllv, '-Ii I' Hlnl
Met'"p in..ii of the Ri hi in Phi.
\ 11c-'-. '..ii "I the I emporal
ibe I i'lK K'",
i i I (or
11:" I 'mi. it Sim n as 1 hn ir
roll in 179". He i' " i c im* ''"
111808, I In
Church now Ima in I lie I'
Mate*, reclusive f P< no Rico,
I lawaii, 1 in' i hi ii Z n<- and ill'*
Philippines, fourteen ,1 rrlibitln p-,
of whom three mi' (.'! 1111.1I-, .11111
ninety-seven bishop*, I'here ate
:i great w mbei tl religious orders.
M In' Ii dlffi 1 i'1'ly in orl< find
;iu' in si in'- 1.ims rival*, including
the Augustinian, Basilian, Bene*
die tine, Capuchin, Carmelite,
Trappist, Dominican, Franciscan,
l.'uii, Marist, Pattiooift, Paulilt,
Tlir.iliic
pun 1 ml many iilil ition.
.11 ordei* f 1 mi- I 1 1.
1 1 irovi .1 lie '
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rs hi noimal
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ugh |e P p.il S<
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Mi ' \< v. Joint !./.... h. I'.,
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in Washington,
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1 lie H'j : 11 rl to
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nli w hi< h 1 .
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It .1" 1 I be 1l1.1t
1 in) I in Cail'i >lic
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" ll llioil-. |||'l s,.(||s
ire rep 1 a ngle ]> 11 ish.
I In' "f men I .is 10 ;i
1 '.ii ' i. rv much
'1 than ibt in* in any Pro
' 1 at 1 ion, I In- i ;i-
th 'ii ichy ol ji its t.. the pub.
1 ' bin 1I1 eithet ectatiiin 1 the
1'roii-t. nt I'.'lili 1- 1 .,.,
id'i ml tl 1 f. ire.
In a I seh "-Is t iui In in 1 he
faith by 1 Hiiolic ti hi hi i- are |)r>
11< ' I, 11"' b t il ol these school*
is 1 119, utni ihe numbei ol
'. Be-ides lhe*e
oala ihen .in- .,
rolleg ys and ;< 1 .-,. nde-
n I.'- jot gins. There are 289 or-
p asylums with 47,111 orphans
ini'l 1114 homes for tin- aged I I <
vi md totnl ol rhildien in Roman
v. ;itlio ic 11 is'I tut 1..1 is IS 1,540,1. |.,.
I he Roman vathojic. \ liiiri h
.'ops 111 >t n']"ii t tl umber ,f 1 ,
' "Mi'iiiun. ants as Pn testa nt
("Ini" Ii do. It "i\es v\ hat is
ailed "I nthatic populntii
Phis term emhi ices ill
p 1-0,1- x- ho h iv. not
iiniiiK'.itcil, among w bom am ;ii|
inf.in hildren wl n have 1 <>t
heeu confirn ed. 'Childn n are
1- a rule admittted to their
first communion --u nine >r ton
years of age. The larger dine
lakeacenms of their population
only once in three to five vear*.
fhe population reporter! at 'he
of 1911 was 15,015,569. This
number, a* alre idj - it.-<|, j* not
mmunii ml*, but of *nul*.
I he pi l.itis ..I the Church dedm t
15 per rent, .is representing
re 1 who are n riuni-
1 '". md call tin- remaindercom-
munic mt*. Aco rding to tin 1
above number represents 11,763,.
' 'iKiwminanlaiiiiniil- j.?s^.'*, tl
1 t-, or non-eom.nunicant*.
The foreign missionary wotk .f
uri li of Ri me 1- done rhieflv
1 h the Society f< .r the Prop 1.
ition ol th- Faith, Inch w %
founded .it Lynn*, Fi mce, 1822, It
his raised and icpen led in all
about ?77,orx>,oo of which <57.-
occ, 1 fiom tl e United
Stati '. The Catholic Mis ii marv
I 111 I r h 'M--11111:11 \- 'i,,, |j
1 :.-i ch I stei i"ii
ciety I- for the In. chu
ches hi p..or an l needy plai e*
I ii""- ' ilsoa <' ithol Colon ii 1.
tinnS iety whose bjecl i* to coin.
1 nmigrants according to race
and lai >u..... There are Catholic
Boards for missionary the [n 1 in- and the negroes. For
the latter 7.' churches are reported
its mil 11,270 pupil*.
1r, t Driest* engaged in
this work. The number of Catholic
communicants is not large, p'oh.
ably mi let 50,000, \ consider ihlv
I n';er nuinhei <>l Indian cornmnnr-
cants s ret timed, among \\h"m
n iests in- I ih airin , an I for
ire 2 11 C
l I i." P I ish Nation il Church is
the result of il ^satisfaction ofP >li*h
Catholic laymen with "absolute
ligiou*, pol tir.il ml social power
oei the parjshioneri*' exercised by
th- In rarchy of the Roman Cath
olic Church There were at one
time two bishops. One has lince
, removed by death,
(Continui


*J
lilt I K 1 Ji U NE
Zbc {tribune
Saturday. September 20, 1913
President Wilson appears to
liave carried an overwhelming
majority of tlie people of the
United States with him in his
action concerning the state of
affairs in Mexico.
The President's offer of media-
tion included the condition!
that there should be anlimme*
diate armistic throughout Mexi-
co, a free election, 8 pi
from Huerta that he would not
be a candidate, and an agl
mentof all parties to abide by
the result. Huerta rejec led these
terms.
Having failed to bring these
desirable conditions to a head,
President Wilson announced in
person to Congress thai the
polic) <>f the Government nl the
United States would be: Nn
armed intervention in Mexico,
strict neutrality, a denial of
arms to both factions, the recall
of all Americans from Mexico,
and patient forbearance with
the Mexican Republic.
The recalling of Americans is
acting piejudicially on Mexican
trade, and is alarming the Mexi-
can authorities. Perhaps this is
a bigger stick to beat Me:
with than would have been the
dispatch of a large army.
I he embargo on shipping arms
to Mexico from [the I Inited
States went into force on 28th
August.
What a mesj the I'. S. gov-
ernment would have tumbled
into if they had got embr
in Mexico Iii holding aloof .is
he has done, President Wilson
has proved himself to be .1
strong as well a a wise in.hi :
"Greater 1* he that ruleth his
pint th,1 1 he that taketh a city"
The following are exl
from private coi li n eex-
pressing opinious on B 1I1 mi.is
Exhibits at Toronto :
"One of the directors of the
Exhibition told me personally
that he had been a yeark visit-
or for eigliti rii years and he
would not hesitate to any that
the Bahamas people bad the
most attractive display of the
most useful artich s he had 1 .
-I 'ii. '1 lung-, that people US6 111
;\ day life."'
Another opinion from a lead-
ing business man in Toronto.
"Ill my judgment, the exhibit
did the Colony great credit.
The only trouble was that the
space allotted was t< 0 small to
show everything to advanti
The Sponge exhibit and the
show of turtles were especially
line and evidently much admir-
ed.
By comparison with the other
West Indian exhibits I think the
Bahamas was the best.
You ask me to make sugges-
tions, ami it occurs to me th it
if you send a few expert work
1 rs. iii sis tLand other native pro-
ducts, who would be enga
in making mats, hats and other
articles in view of the public,for
sale --/laving of course a I
k of similar articles display
ed it would add to the attrac-
tion ot the exhibit very much,
and probably also to the finan-
cial success of tin.' undertaking."
*-
AGRICULTURAL NOTES
We had the pleasure of
ing Mr. W. K. Moote 1 Pineap
pie Cultivation f\i Thins/
\ e must confess thai it is the
finest one we ha\ e e\ n m
tins Colony. The new p ants,
Bet OUt last month, li ive all
in root, and are putting out
new leaves. We bespeak SU<
for this cultivation w Inch is he
ing carried out, on lines q
different from the "old way"
The li iard of Ari ii ulture, we
told, has enquiries from
abroad for Limes in lots of 10
Barrels. We do not think, that
all ovei the coloiiv 10 barrels
could be gathered in sether.
Why? Surely Ihey gr w ilmost
wild and uncultivated through-
out these Islands.
In coir, ersation tin- morning
: with Mr. 'Thomas ! lilnlcll ol
Upper Bogue, w
ed b him that li , during the
past twelve months, had receiv-
ed for bunches of|ba innas alone,
sold at Harbour Island, nearly
35, Thirty live p acids.
Mr. Adorns W. Notlage, tliis
morning, in *>ur local market,
sold three Pumpkina, grown in
the Wulff Uo..d. for five shillings
sterling.
The following were pa-sen-
from Mi inn per "r ran
E"' vi si irdav.
M ss Jennie Alburv ; Mrs E.
H. C I'lli '. Messrs John Storr,
S 1 n 1 1 .\n c.vles, Albert Glin-
ton and Krnest MaCksy, ')
'The Mad Steamer "Vij l.ui
cia" sailed from New York for
Nassau at 4 p. m. with 33 pas
sengers, and ijnoo barrels of car-
go. Will proceed to Progreso
and Puerto Mexico. - Kndav.
J
Editor Tribune,
Sir:
Oh the power of suggestion.
Hard Drinker tastes carrion in
iced water.l don't wonder at it.
I |e doesn't Know the taste of
water, iced or not. But I do
wonder at the Editor falling in
to the trap, k>t every one whq
knows him, knows that he can't
teil "Scotch" from "Irish" 1
doubt il he knows Brandy from
( iiu, except by the colour.
I know spirits, and I know the
1 I the different kinds ; and
I diank Ice Wall r vesti 1 lay but
no spirits and I'll be jiggere il
then was an\ taste of carrion,
butsir, I must tell you th it as I
don'l eat it, I don't know the
e of it I'm sorry for you
both.
Tell Hard 1 Irinker to quit
chewing Carrion and try Pears
for a 1 han
SOFT DRINKS.
j
PORTABLE LAWNS OF
GRASS CARPET.
Living-Grass, carpets that
1 m be used as table i overs,
:oats, or lor making temporary
mi permanent lawns are now
manufactured in England, Thej
|y living carpets for the
- with which they
Cov.....1 continues to grow in
whatever place of use the car
pel is put, as sh,,Wn by illustra-
tions appearing in the ()ctobei
Popular Mechanics Magazine.
To make them, millions of gi IS!
Is are thrown on a strip ol
Carpel in a green house and al
lowed to sprout and grow.
Win 11 the grass has taken root,
the caipet can be handled like
a rug. If a temporary lawn is
desired, the ground is rolled and
the carpet isjaid down in sti ips;
i alterw.inls it can be taken up
; and used elsewhere. When it is
allowed to remain in one pie e|
I it takes root and forms a beau
> tiful lawn. All entire 1 uvil can
be laid in a <\^^ and two lengths
of carpet will make a Cl h ki t,
pitch.
SECOND-STOWY BUNGA
LOW APARTMENTS.
A Colony of one story bunga
lows built about a court on the
roof of a block of stores is a
new idea in apartm int houses
:'! is il.-j .iliutL-tnUi itkis-
I
trations, in the Octolr Popular*
Mechanics Mag izuHr From the 1
. et the bungalow apartm (nl
building looks like .in ordio irv
buck business block with sho 1
below and flats on the second
floor. But the stairway from the
streets, instead of leading to a
second story, takes one to a
broad, sunny court on the roof
of the eh ips. 1> >wn the center
of the court is a pergola with
tl iwer b xes beneath it, and
around the four sides are the
\ gables ol 17 one story S
chalet bungalows. In all there
; ao a-r'Oin, four 3room,
and eleven | room bungal .
apartments about the court.
Each pair ol bungalows has a
1 ommon sheltered porch reci
ed so that the entrance d K)r8
ntothe living rooms. Their
kitchens ami dining rooms face
the court and their living and
ing rooms overlook the
street. Each has it- own hath
r.....n and plentj of 1 loset room
'The coiniiioii laundry is not in
the basement, but on the roof
of one of the bungalows, and
clothes an- hung out oa the
roofs of the kitchens tmseen
from the street below. The flooi
ol the court is covered with
heavy deck roofing, drained bj
a gutter in the cent* r, and gai
|l are Ol in DOS
with ventilating pij.es lead.
through the roof.
r
A FLOATING FLAT Tu
BEAT 1 HE LANDLOUP
"My flouting fl-'t is a 18 ft.
cal in motoib >?t fitted up foi a
iiome," says Harry D Barli
in the October Popular Me-
chanics Magazine. "We built it
a ai ago to live in during the
Summer, but when the season
c Insed we could not bear to
leave it. It cost us lessthan $1,-
000, two years rent, and we
have travelled 4,000 miles in it.
"When we ihl
our float in,' flat, 1 took my
plans to VHI 1 mis boat yards and
sei ure I pi K 1 s. 1 wanted a boat
with sleeping accommodations
for six persons, electric lights,
power, bath, toilet, and couking
equipment. I finally found a
contractor who would build the
the hull with gasoline tank,
rilddtf and steering wheel,
painted and finished, foi I275
I lien I bought a 30 lip. engine
with magneto, clutch, propeller,
etc., for 1375. For lights I pur-
chased a storage battery f<>r#75
a ml we recharge it on the way.
The equipment of bell, lights,


I!
T Hi T R I BU N E
whistle, fire extinguisher and
life preservers, which the gov-
ernment requires, cost $30.
"While we lived on the boat
we visited neighbouring cities
and I commuted to Chicago to
my work aa foreman in a I
job-printing office. When cool
w< at her approached, we decid-
ed to go t'> I>ouisiana with some
friends. We were at Ham-
mond, Ind.. then, and made
tli<- ii ip to Chicago, 12 miles,
safelv thr >ugli rough water. Our
route took us down through the
Illinois And Michigan Canal|the
Illinois River,then down the Mis
sissippi. At St. Louis, Memphis,
Baton Rouge, and New Orleans
I worked t my trade and at
in, Vicksburg, Natchez, and
other cities, we visited friends
or looked a round. We reached
New Orleans on Dec. I) just
ahead of the cold weather all
the way down. I found a harbor
for our home, a position for my-
self, and a school for the I
and we tied up there for the
winter."
DEPAR1 METAL NOTICE
-
I>. 111 /i 111 .iilospil 'I
\.'-- in Mh ^ept. i'H3
AITI.k \ IK >\- farthrprannf
I 'ml) 11 <. 11 - r Xiiis" m 1 lie Ho*.
pit ii will In- ri ceiv* I bv tin- Supt,
i"|) 1.....inn of Saturday ^7:11 i 1
I'.y ordei 1 'I iiif 1 'omm *i< 11 t
R J.ANDERSONPlRRINGTi >N
Sup 1 int<*ndent,
A
Auction Sale
M >\'I>\Y 11.30
THE mi 1
DRY 1, ) in-;
la Cottons, la1'
W'.l |
Lorseis,
Luce, 1 n rui Iw ies
Drfu 11 iiiimiiigt,
I I '-hi \, IViluun-i v,
Etc
'. ulrc;rams|
Sept. 20th 1913.
London.A suffragette 'Arson
squad" eai h to-d ly tried to bui n
down Penshurst Place, the his
toric fourteenth century seat of
Lordl)i-shsl.- and Dudley at Tun-
bridge, Knit.
A working part of household
employees succeeded i" extin
guishiiigthe Bams*.
London, 18.Great llritain
will know to -morrow whether
she will have to endure another
national transport strike. Acting
wmm Mental and Physical Fatigue mmm
j When brain or body ia weary the digmtivn powrre nr wonkened and diptnptp fur
ordinary food is ofton experienced. Under auch circumstances tlio Allenburya'
IDiet ia upecially valuable. It is pleasant to take, eanily digested and Matmilatad
and speedily restorative. Thus it helps the system to recover tone and vigour.
Thr 'Allcnburyi' DIET is prepared from pure rich milk and whole wheatIhc two vital
food elements combined in partially predigested form.
Made in a minute/Jdd boiling mater only.
I
TO BE OBTAINKD MOM AI.L CHF.UI8TS A NP STORES.
ALLEN & HANBURYS LTD.
LONDON. ENGLAND.
w&M&MwmMmmmmm
a.........
A food for Adults and quite dis'inct from the well-known; :
'Allenburyi* Foods for Infants.
-------------iM_________ -f-i
on a de nand from Birmingham,
where the strike situation is seri-
ous, the executive hoard of the
national union of railway men
will meet in London m the morn-
ing to discuss the adi isability of
calling a national strike.
Birmingham has token Liver-
pools place as the strike center,
["he stoppa :< of freight ship-
ments is complete.
I rade in Dublin is almost
completely paralyzed. The strike
'ever is spreading to Wales and
Ulster.
Belfast, 18. --Sir Ed war I Car-
v,hi lande I in Ireland to day
with the object of inspei ting the
volunteer army which is bein ;
I in Ulster t > supp ri
provisional government which it
is said, is tn be brougui intoe:
istence if the home 1 ul lull be-
1 law.
The Ulster army is said to be
thoroughly organized and al-
leady to have attained a it length
.,! about 100,000 men, which
number, it is expected by the
leaders, will nearly double alien
rest railing has beencompletep.
There seems to be little hope
of a |] ineral i onfereuce b :l w 1
the various parties on the ques-
tion of home rule, although the
possibility of the holding of an
open conference on the subject of
Irish government as a whole is
still canvass d.
New Vork, 18.The Hamburg
American liner Imperator will
arrive this afternoon with $649
passengers on board) the largest
number ever carried Ml any sin-
gle steamship in any part of the
world.,
London, 18.In circumstan-
ces even more remarkable than
s, the famous pearl neck-
ovi re I today.
The pearls were lying in the
gutter in a road in Highbury,
Ii London, by a working-
man named Augustus Home.
II pit ked them up on his way
to work this morning.
\ reward of $50,000 was
offered for the recovery of the
pearls last July.
Birmingham, 18.The rren-
of the British Association
to-day pursued the question,
1I1- ussed bv Sir Edward] Schafer
in Ins presidential address last
of the origin of life, Many
differences of opinion wen.
ale I in the debate, but on
: oiut there was complete
ulthat we are no
nearer a solution of the problem
than we were a thousand years
ago.
Paris, 18.Thunderstorms of
exceptional visolrnce have swept
over Francedoing meat damage.
For Sale Cheap
>K' OM> II \\'I> MANILLA
WRAPPING PAPER, in good
condition
J. S. JOHNSON I I ).
Nassan.N. P.,
Sept. 19, i't'3
Schooner~WINIFRED M.
SAILS fur MIAMI, !!...,
F RIDAY, September 4 th.
I 111 pa .-.>^<- snd i' reighl
\pply to
W.M.I Lk'K. MOOR I ,
10-22 l'.H I lament xtieet.
Commencing'
Last night]
By Special Arrangement.
m
300 lb. Dancing
Actress
Will be at the
IMPERIAL
For one we
We have also I 1JA
I > wis late of Mm
no accompwisti
Prio I I is ;iiii| is \ '
A
WANTED.
I'OK SALE
JFRESH PLYING FISH
Will p.i\ Cs, foi same, 1 fOUSEand Lotos
S \Nlis. J-1 for particulars if
Photographer, L. Dean or Michael Rf
Hay street, City. 132 St. New York City
JL


inr i r i d u nE
!l
BARGAINS AGAIN!
At Williams Wholesale and Retail
SHOE ESTABLISHMENT
\A/ ILLIAMS THE SHOEMAN'S plnce of business is not a store which conforms strictl} to "re-
v v gular merchandising," but one\\vitfc$i is miido up of two departments, No. i and No, 2.
XTq 1 T^pkf-kji y>+ YYi C*Y\ t is where regular stock is kept and orders for tie various lines are
~ XJ* -1 U"fJ<*>L tlilvlll duplicated from time to time and sold under the one pi tem
Hid in accordant e with quality.
pt
In this I itter d< pai In rightly tenm <1
Mq O T}^f-|- y>+ *vi ami '" e prices in so : as low As 30 per cent to | 1 pei
v'# ^d U&fJcll LIXIwlTL cent less than the regular prices or what they really are worth.
BARGAINS
rhis question maj arise with some. In what wa; this No. 2 Department maintained? The answei issimph
tins. I In' Proprietor buys through an Agent who knows how, of Merchants who have failed i:i business,at such low pi
to warrant this (fpeat discount on regular prices. Hi also buys portions of the salvage of sta
"l Boots and Shoes that have been in a fin (as w; s done on .1 recenl occasion) and these are sold al | be-
yond competition.
In order that these methods of business m ty demonstrated Williams the Shopman
yites hi patrons and the public generally to< 1 long others the following? Bargains : he is
just in receipt of per last steamer i< ehite Canvas li ps. Regular pn< 8s. now
a* 4s' '35 pairs wo's. Grey Su^de Button Ox. I'ies 10s. now sold at 6s. 75 pairs wo's. Pat. colt 2 strap
slippers Regular Price ifls. now being sold at 8s 125 pairs Men Ian Calf Button Ox Hi t6s.nov
at 10s. 230 pairs Colored Canvas Lea. sole Ox. Ties 6s. now bi ing sold al
WILLIAMS' WHOLESALE & RETAIL SHOE ESTABLISHMENT
.:, 1 Baj St.
Nassau, N. I'.,
N'i> Inter statistics Hi in I how
obtained by the censix of igo6 have
been given. 'I he body then had 24
ministeis, 24 churches, and is,171
Communicants.
( to lie continued )
Grand Opening!
THE BUSY BEE
SHOE STOr?E
THF. BUSY BEE, A NEW SHOE
.STOKE WILL Bf. OPENED ON
iturday 13th inst.
IDER THF. BIG TREE
i Stock will com,-)ii,o nil tho
pny Stylus nd Gr.xl'-s of
BOOTS AND SHOIS
BI fron\ tho .t>.\ nuinc orl<- ..
patronage of my kind
iand the public g
3|iectfully Solicited
U. S. KNOWLES
Manager.
>. AGNES S IIIII !. k( >o.\I.
'I UESDAY, -\ PI |, 1913.
SOIREE
Mrs. ./. ,' arks.
Admission 1 ()pen s /> m.
GEO. L. DAYIS
MUSIC LESSi >\- GIVEN ON
PIANO, VTOMN,
\l VNDOLIN end GUI I VR.
Pianos tuned and Repaired.
Order* taken (or Private
Enttrtninnuntt.
67 West street,
FOR RENT.
ij lUSl "ii I .ivt Day Street, .-it
1 present occupied by B. P.
Sruirup I ; ion given ist.
ust.
Apply to,
WALTER K. MOORE.
Nl HI
' I "M IN is t< inform my Pati >n
I and the pub ic in Reuei 11
thai I li.c\c retuine I i mn my round
trip and .in.....w re. idv ti do hn -
tiling in the line of g net il repan-
Ing of boots ;nnl sh
All work don innically
D. S. PI I \ h.l.i..
r. Bay -I
Japeneo
- \\l I \KY W \-ll WILE
I \ I \" l
11 BE MIXED 'Mil VV \ I ER.
In While, ,
Pink und
7 Hi. I ins ,u (.. i, \.
Prefix Enamels
AS ' >H IKD t OLOURS
in Tins i| fjd,
IS., is. (Jl|., J8, I, I.
Star Vacuum Flasks
IN TWO SIZES
PINTS AND QUARTS.
Fur Sale by
CHAS. K. ALBURY.
W. A. M \ llll :\i
UNDERTAKER
DESIRES i inform hi< friend
and the Public that !> Im*
reci w ed a complete nut in i f
for ihc husim nl an m>
h ii iker, which place* him in a
i...-.; ..>. to curry i ut Runetaht ihni
be entrusted to Ins care with
tem and despah h ; nnd n spi i i
solicits their patronng < Jet
Prices fust ami prove that tbt y
are the rery lowest for first |Hs
v.' ,\ k.
Fresh Just Arrived
O
NION SEEDS fn.m Teneriffe
and all other Vegetable Seeds
AT Ti M ) I l.'S.
I 11 Bay Street.
o


5S/AK5-


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