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IHt rRlBUNE Zbc tribune Thursday, September 4. 1913 The Imperial Parliament terminated its labours for the year on August t5'.h, after having sat almost continuously since the beginning of last year. Of the three contentious measures sent to the Peers for the second time, one. the Scottish Temperance Bill has beei. pass ed by means of a compromise not affecting its main principles. But for the Parliament Act. the Lords would no doubt have rejected this measure a second time. As it is, thev have flung back the Home Rule and Welsh Disestablishment Bills. If the Government pass these two bills in the spring of next year, thev I will pass into Law automatically. The Peers may throw them out or not, but their action .me way or the other would not for an hour keep these bills from finding a location in the Statute Book. The Plural Voting Bill has been rejected for the first time. The Peers are afraid to state their real reason for rejecting it. They are content with arguing that it should be part of a larger measure : "Will you walk into my parlour ? Said the Spider to the fly". The Liberal fly did not take the walk, and is all the safer for not going into the professed compromise. If the government should be in office in 1915, that measure also will pass over thecoroneted heads of the legislators of the Gilded Chamber. The Insurance Act has been usefully amended, as was inevitable in the case of a law so complicated and experimental. Experience will reveal other minor defects, and these too will be remedied. But neither the Tories nor the Liberals are likeand if things were handled bet1> to either repeal it or to in j ter, many who are now prejudicany way alter its general out-| ed about coing there, would do lines. Mark Antonys words will s<>. and thus enjov and pay' for from the beach north of the Eastern parade. The magistrate very wisely inflicted no punishment. These boys were nearly all of them under fifteen years of age, and t" them at this time of the year the water is simply irresistible ; and swimming is a most healthy exercise and really a life safe-guard, which the law would do well to encourage, and wisely to en force ; but instead the law forbids bathing here and bathing there, and provides no place where bathing max be enjoved We are of opinion th it the time has come for the establishment of properly regulated public bathing places for the good of all the people. Not every magistrate will lie as wise as the one who dealt with the cases referred t->, and until provision is made for, or the restrictions removed from public bathing, our youths will be deprived of a healthy form of recreation and lack a most desirable acquirement. • Yesterday afternoon a burial not a pauper's, took place from the Hospital. The Undertaker as usual, ordered Hearse and carriages, to go to the front en trance, but the Superintendent refused to allow the funeral to pass out that way, and ordered the Hearse and Carriages to go around to the back gate from whence the Pauper burials proceed. This should not be so, and we therefore ask why ? If a man, woman, or child, or any of their relatives or friends have means, and upon requiring Medical Treatment, decide to take the advantages of the Hospital, and die there, why should they be treated as if paupers? Why should it not be, as in all other civilized places ? There is nothing disgraceful or humiliating in dying in the Hospital, die at the Hospital their friends to who have not apply in this jase : I come to bury Caesar, not to piaise him. "Unionists in future days will say over this very lively law" I come to praiie Caesar nut to bury him In the Police News published yesterday we find the names of no less than eight boys who were hauled before the magisrate, for what ? For bathing at the privileges which the Taxpayer's money provides. If the Board of Works would purchase Cracked Stone for Road Making, and Repairing, at a price per Barrel, and store the same in the open space to the East of the Prison Walls, it would employ a number of persons, would be an incentive to lot owners-to gather the loose come forward and bury them to proceed through the Central gate on Shirley Street. We did not know of this Rule I and it caused great annoyance to the friends of the deceased Mr Clifford Goern, a stranger here, but I have been told a very J respectable man. We hope this Rule made by the Commissioners of the B. G. H. will in future be carried out without discrimination. It is a pity that they did not publish a notice to that effect, as this un pleasantness would not have happened. Yours Trulv T. G. JOHNSON, Undertaker. CABLEGRAMS, trie toot of Dorchester St, and and disorderly looking store, many years to take persons who and get something for their trouble, and at the same time, it would obviate the unpleasantness and discomfort of having our streets* blocked, when being remade or repaired. Why does not the Street Contractor used the Sweeper ? It certainly would look more business like and be more in keeping with the pteeeiit day civiliI zation. The new Schooner "Winifred" recently built at Biminis by, the two Francis Brothers, An-1 drew and Ernest, sailed into our Harbour on Monday morning, for her owner Walter K Moore, Esq. to see her for the first time and to have the finishing fittings attached. She is 71 ft." keel, 25 ft beam, and registers 95 tons. She is ready for any business which may come her way, but w.ll Panama, 2nd.-The last star, out possibly in the Miami; ma ining barrier at the Pacific passenger trade, under the able e „d () f the Panama Canal was and p 'polar Captaincy of Anblown up by Dvnamite this drew M. Francis, of Biminis. lmorning.lt was witnessed bv the As the vessel now lies at the officers of the British cruiser dock of Messrs J. P Sands Co. New Zealand" and fifteen she presents the appearance of hundred others, having been well and substantially built, ami we congratulate London, and 1.—Secretary Mcour fellow citizen Mr. Moore,on kenna replying to petition' sent his new enterprise, and wish Premier Asquith asking for the him success. pardon of Mrs Pankhurst, says that unless he receives from her a promise to abstain in future from all crime he cannot advise granting her any pardon. London, 2nd,—One of the meet princely residences in Ireland, Killarney House, was almost entirely destroyed by fire to day. London, and.—Lord Haldanes visit to America has revived among British barristers the question of establishing an organization similar to tlie .American bar association. London, 2nd. -Both \\\t Unionist and Liberal parties in England are trying to make capital out of the riots in Dublin, regard to which the latest reports say that 330 civilians and 45 policemen have been treated at the hospitals. Manchester and.—Universal interest is being taken in the forty sixth annual Trades Union Congress which opened here today, owing to the unrest in the labour world. The first business of the Congress WHS the adop tion of a resolution denouncing The Hotel "Colonial" is looking smart, with its new coat of paint The same colours are being used, but they certainly look fiesh and bright. The enforcement of the Health Rules by order of the Chief Medical Officer, through the Sanitary Inspector, is causing considerable, annoyance and dissatisfaction, among the Res idents in the suburb*. NEW RULE for persons who die in the Bahamas General Hospital and are buried by their friends, or relatives, Nassau N. P. Sept 4th 1913. To the Editor of the Tribune Dear Sir. The Superintendent of the Bahamas General Hospital en forced a rule yesterday which he said had been made, by ordering the Hearse and carriages with the followers, from the grounds to the Lane leading to Queen's Staircase. It has been customaty for I



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T H £ TRIBUNE the British ghvernment and the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland for prohibiting meeting in Dublin Detrrit Mich: and — Harry Vardon and Edward Ray, the Brititish golfers were again Victorious to day in their matches with local stars. MR. CHURCHHILL ON PRIVILEGED POSITION OF THE TORY PARTY. Mr. Winston Churchill, who was cheered by a surprised House when he rose to reply to the "eloquentspeech to which the House has just listened, "said that Mr. Chamberlain did not seem to be any nearer understanding the position of his op ponents with regard to Parliamentary procedure than he was at the beginning of the long controversy with the House of Lords. He spoke of the Prime Minister's resolution in terms of great severity. He said it inflicted a blow on the elementary liberties of the House of Commons. What libcrtiesdid he refer to? No other party in the country had the power to create the situation they were now discussing except the party to which the right hon. gentleman belonged. The elementary liberty to which he referred was the elem entary liberties of the Conservative party to impose a permanent veto on Liberal measures. (Ministerial cheers, i The Government had tried over and over again to get from their opponents'some recognition of their claim to equality. Mr. Chamberlain spoke of this procedure as though it involved a hardship. Instead of being a hardship.it wasa privilege which theConservative party alone enjoyed. (Ministerial cheers.) What chance would the Liberal party have if they were! by the Opposition. in opposition, of debating over I essential condition to the preser and over again measures which vation b the House of a health v had been passed by theHouse of Commons ? (Ministerial ctieers.) The power the right hon. gentleman and his friends enjoye I Under the Parliament Act w.is .1 power that descended to them It was a pure windfall, which was not enjoyed by any other body of Members in the House. In his reference to the Welch Church Disestablishment Bill, Mr. Chamberlain said that no Churchman would treat Nonconformists in the way in which Nonconformists were treating A open mind that there sh >uld be considerable freedom of debate —(loud Opposition cheers) — and that the sequence of argument should not be broken down by vulgar and foolish clamour (Loud Ministerial cheers and laughter.) The Government would welcome any attempt by Mr. Chamberlain and his friends to free the House from degrada tion by such continual interruption, i Ministerial cheers.) Mr. CHAMBERLAIN. If the right hon. gentleman wants h^lj.; the Church in this measure. The right hon. gentleman entirely ignored the situation .The situa tion as it existed did actually treat the Nonconformists in a wav that Churchmen had never yet been treated. (Ministerial cheers.) DEGRADF.D BY PEERS' VETO. Again, Mr. Chamberlain had talked about the "degradation" of the House of Commons Well, he (Mr. Churchill) remembered that they spent the greater part of three Sessions walking thro' the lobbies, dividing upon and debating, night aftr night, the provisions and details of mea sures which had the support of the largest Government majority ever seen in that House ; and then, when they had finished, every one of those measures were thrown out and ruined bv the partisan vote ol the House of Lords. WHS not that "a degradation of th* It UN' of Commons' and "a blot on its immemorial liberties and elementary rights"? (Loud Ministerial cheersj Those who took a p^rt in the proceedings of the House, really caring about those measures, and fresh from contact with the great majorities in the constituencies, felt their fate as an insult of the vilest Kind, not onlv individually as Memliers, but to the representative system by which the country h id so long been governed. ('Ministerial cheers) INTERRUPTION OF MINISTERS There was another way in which the degradation of the House of Commons might be brought about. He had noticed a growing tendency—not so pronounced in the afternoon as in the evening—(laughter)--to in terrupt Ministers rising to reply to controversial subjects raised t was an he will hate to begin with him self. (Opposition cheers.) Mr. CHURCHILL said he was content with the large measure of agreement with his remarks. But he readily accepted the right hon. gentleman's promise to co-operate as far as he could in restraining the enthusiasm—on the whole well ment —of his friends.f Renewed Ministerial cheers and laughter.) This amendment of the opposition challenged the whole principle of the Parliament Act, which the Gavernment consider ed necessary to safeguard the elementary rights of the House of Commons and preserve its proceedings from degradation and farce. (Ministerial cheers.) CHANCE FOR TARIFF SCHEME Mr Chamberlain had com plained that the Liberal party had not dealt in detail with such Bills as Home Rule, Tern perance (Scotland), and Welsh Disestablishment at the General Election; but it was surely not customary to do so.(Hear, hear.) A General Election; was not a proper tribunal before which to submit the details of measures. (Hear, hear.) It was open to the right hon. gentleman opposite and his friends to set up a high standard in that respect. If, as they assured the House, they were soon called upon by an enthusiastic nation to assume the responsibil itv of governing the country, there would be no objection at all to their seizing the opportunity before they took oflice of laying before the country some of the details of the measures thev proposed to bring forward. (Loud Ministerial cheers and laughter.) Liberals would be perfectly willing to receive Iron the Oppusttion a iliaft of their Budget schedules, or th detail* of any Landlord's Endowment Bill which might happen to exercise their ingenuity. (Renewed Ministerial cheers and laughter.) But he hoped that whatever the hon. Members opposite might say for the purposes of party warfare they would not under value the svstem of pro cedure by suggestion. SUGGESTIONS "FARCE." Mr. F. E. SMITH, interrupting, remarked that the suggestion stage was of no value whatever. Mr. CHURCHILL: Of course it is not—to those persons who are either unable 01 unwilling %  •>. mate any 5iu.'££siin;is .'.I nud Ministerial laughter.') If there were a desire to shape the legislation now passing through the House in such a way as to bring a linal settlement of the long and insistentquarrelsthat have arisen a full and complete opportunity for doing so is offered by the suggestion stage, stage. ( Ministerial cheers.) In considering the amend ments put forward the Govern ment will have regard to those which promise most favourably to facilitate discussion on the great issues and those on which a settlement might be effected ; but we shall not be weakened in our determination io press for ward to thuir finalty measures which we have so long advocat ed. ( Loud Ministerial cheers. ) COSTLY EUROPEON MOVING PICTURE THEATERS The popularity of moving pictures in Lon Ion and Berlin is shown by the expensive theaters being erected for their display. A theater recently opened in London cost $033,000, and has a first-class restaurant and well furnished foyer approached by a marble staircase. The Jin terior decorations, in a style described as neo-Greek, are in cream and gold, with carpets and upholsteries of a soft tint of chrysanthemum bronze. The finest moving picture theater in Berlin stands in the heart of the fashionable resi deuce section of the capital. The design is that of a Greek temple, and the trimming is in gold and ivory. The roof is re movable, so that the audience may have only the stars over head on pleasant nights. NOTICE. T CLEMENT CLBOPHAS ATI 1ENBOROUGH hereby appoint my brother Herbert A, At. t-mbnrough to act for me as a guardian and to transact all busi Detain my name to the welfaie of my Interest. (signed) fMiss) CLEMEN T CLEOPHA4 A I'TKNBOROUGH. FOR SALE. AND FLY AND I MOSQUITO NETS, At THE SHAMROCK, U.



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1 ~J Hit I K 1 r, u N! lion work by winch the pi in'can I)' multiplied rapidly Rta n in inn] expense, Beds of ordinal\ h icu bund arc j r t %  p i r*< I in I he open ; Ihe t-nttin^s Ure tic,I up in bundle* <>f fifty >> %  IO i a'nl planted in the Mild where ".hey" mot lapullv. llicy me thus quickly pill In, ami can be speed u\ removed, -Ibid, A s contractor for street Scavenging I hereby request Householders will have barrels of yard sweepings &c, at their w 'i I iter than noon eaoh • day. so that the same might l>e removed promptly, : K. U. MALCOLM. Nassau N. P. I Aug. i'th 1913. REPUDI \! IO\". All persons nx m hereby warned tli it, in\ wife Luell 1 Sands h iving deserti d me and my home, I w ill n<>t be responsible for tfhy debts whatever, contracted bv her. ZEPlI WIVI SANDS CLEARANCE Sale. A S Williams' 1 lie •slioem-'iu is 1 \ about t.i make 1 change in that part of Ins business known as W II 1 IAMS' NOVELTY "4TORE, 321 I'av stie-t, He will sell during the next THIRTY DAYS t greatly reduced piirw the entire Stock, consoling • f 1 large variety ol items "f lien Aral Merch mdise such as Ladies Fancy White Dresses, Black and Navy Blue SkirtHousehold necessities and Cook-, ion Lte.isiN. Fancy Articles suitable for X-nas and Birthday Present* A*\ Ac, COME AND HAVE A LOOK TO DAY, and spend from 3d. to £\ to "rent advantage at Williams' Novelty Store 391 Bay^street, City Japenco j SANITARY WASHABLE PAINT TO BE MIXED *l l*H WATER. In While, Grey, Pink and (iieen. 7 lb. Tins at 3s. §! Prefix Enamels ,\S>()I( i ED COLOURS in Tins at 6d. is., is. od„ 2S. 6d. Star Vacuum Flasks IN TWO JdZES PINTS AND QUARTS. For Sale by ^mu iy.ii' "" r,v Id. WISE, £ FOOLISH. In housekeeping, as in other th one should look ahead. Do not to spend a few pence less to-day on buying Soap of an inferior quality which will ultimately cost shillings, and even pounds, in ruined Household linen and clothes. This is not economy. True economy is to use a pujre Soap. Sunlight Soap is pure. USE IT, and. preserve your clothes and household linen. LEVER BROTHERS LIMITED, Port Sunlight, England. II NOTICE \ V I N G been aap" AGEN l foi MAPI AI'PLK I EH ril.l/i-K i ml' ihe Bahamas I am aide M suppl customers with vone it mm faciurers price w Inch is $44 |>ert of 8 bariels 01 $550. pei i -ureli 250 lb-. F. O. B. New Yori. I Ins Fertilizei can alvi lie ai lamed through any cm I Km-II, New York, or dim t l Manufacturers at the same pries I shall be ci„,l t.. t ike niyS desi, ious of -i eine the r sultsi' 1 lined from the use of 1 Ins I'tst lizer to icy ( u tivatious in Na> M lull mu>l n 1VIII1 e HII\ "lie I M.i|)es lei iilizi r is 1 In i 1 nd hf -in 1 .1 t > out soil f. ir the -imv< 11| pineapples \\ M.I \:U K. M< )KK. W L would iform all who appreciate a Goal S ke tha' wen •• have ..11 a .nd an extensive Sim k ol ll\\'\\\ CIGARS We guarantee our brand to be made of I be Sliest Havana and Sumatn Wrappers, and Havana Killers throughout. These Cignrs are manufactured .m our premise* by skilled workmen and great pains are taken to produce an article of superior quality. The success we have met with in the p,si leads US Confidently to expect the pationage of connoiseurs, |. I.. SAUNDERS .\ Co. P..\ Street. \Y. \. \| \ I IIIR UNDERTAKER D ESIRES tn inform lus frin| and the Public lliat 1*1 ju-l received a complete mltlll facilities foi Ihe business u! ,,IH derta ker, which pi..res I || position to carrv out Funfialsfi may he entrusted to his c ire t| system and despatch ; and r^fM fully solicits their patmn i* ( %  my Prices first and prove tli |i gfl or the very lowest fnrliistija| woik. Notice. '1"! I|s is t., remind the Public I o| ihe ( lid Stand [N, S, Elliot's Joiner Shop) Bast I'wy street, which is now inuler Ihe Management of JAMES A. EVANS CONTRACTOR AND JOINER I land made Collins of every 1!. Criptlon, I am prt pared to give y-ej excellent woik. Heft of refer. erti is. pur turning etc., nee us. We guarantee in satisfy you mid are (iiulident that We can suil MIL, FOR RENT. H Oi'Si: on i.ast Hay Street, al present occupied by H, P, Sturrup Esq. possession given 1st. August, rSppIV to, WALTER K. MOORE. WILLIAMS' SHOES Mil:KITTEK. NO I I K r I l HIS is to inform my Patron* J and ilic Public in < lew 1.1 that I Irnve opened my Public lll.c k Smith Simp; and am mm ready to do anything in the hue n| General repair or new work Horse Shoeing Swcially. All work done Mechanically. P. A. Hinder, 4 Pay Street. East (Wharf' FOR SALE. T HE Building hack of Steam Riding Gallery 38138 feet to he removed apply to Zacharj Tavlor 8 and 10 Market St. Kops NON-ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES. ( s a S FOR SALE. AND PLY AND MOSQUITO NETS. At llll. si I \MROCK, II. |. RUSSELI P iv street^ CalV. Ml. AND STOUT. A dflicii 'Us I (link hn wed t Hops ( i intainine all the t,I Value id ale mid Stuul hut mill out the aftei effects, pin> gj bottle. 5s doz. LINK CllA\1P\(,NF. Pints 7jd. Qu iris irx). SPARKLING VAl.ENTO \\K Pints 7|d Per dot, 6f, (ilNOER ALE &tilN(iKRO|g Pints 6d. Per dos 5s. SPECIAL PRICES liY 111 CASES. SOLD AT BLACKS 222 P IV St. j llir \-.\ss\i; CANDY Kl FCIIENfl %  S BLACK Agnt FOR SALE F t OL'SEand Lot on W 9 "1 for particulars apply ,„ Q K. Lean or Michael Ryan, 131 \V,' i?2 St. New York City. 1 A



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(0 o 7) a) o (0 s ri. a) Nullivis ml.In His |\irre in verbs rrmglatrl. Being bound lo •weivr lo the Uo|m&s of no Master VOL. X. N.YSS..U. N. P.. Bs.h(>tni. Thursday. September 4. 19H No. 239 i EON t. H nri-i ("II, i 11 k my Paurtitioi OKKlii ,M .,, \i 1KKRT KTRTOT Mai .HI N f I.UAMS. '.ii HoI IM UI.ISIII.I) DMI.Y M MiUay, Vr-ilnr-ilny ami Fiiilay— liuglecop* ... ... |d. I ir.ii,iv r • 1111 -11 a \ami RaturHajr— le4I-V ... !''l'YM'.l.lIV ADVA NCR. Advertising Rate! 'six pence pei line f.n tu-t Insertion tlurr i-i-nce per line '..1 JCIOIKI insertion; ami MM penny pst Imp fur auhsprpient insertions A I III i fo' 'I I I. I'll >rt) v | i(| irv 111 I11-. 11 1 11 %  ; ||f ii 11 la I IIM < %  >untr>'-.eh %  is Through ill • cnni-ii 1 Ii II %  •{ 1 mi %  ; Vi't from his breast at 1111 111 i-jlit. When ilie iliron^ had ceased to elll'IT, I |e to l< :• faded blossom An I kissed n with n far. A little fad"d Violet, A I1I1111111 of withered Inn ; I'.ui more than fame Or Imi'l accl 11111 Hiprized iis faded Mm-. We li.ivc all a hidden story Of a day more blight and dear; We in y hide ii with our laughter, It will hnunl 11with H lear. Anil we've .ill some little keepsake Where 110 rye can ever mark, And, like 111 great commander, We kiss it in the dark, A little faded vicilel, Perchance H loop

The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02078
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Thursday, September 04, 1913
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02078

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Full Text
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Nullivis ml.In His |\irre in verbs rrmglatrl.
Being bound lo weivr lo the Uo|m&s of no Master
VOL. X.
N.YSS..U. N. P.. Bs.h(>tni. Thursday. September 4. 19H
No. 239
i EON t. H nri-i ("II,
i 11 k my Paurtitioi
OKKlii ,m .,, \i 1KKRT KTRTOT
Mai .hi N f i.uams.
'.ii HoI
IM UI.ISIII.I) DMI.Y
M MiUay, Vr-ilnr-ilny ami Fiiilay
liuglecop* ... ... |d.
I ir.ii,iv r 1111 -11 a \- ami RaturHajr
l- e .Vee,l- ... ......4|d
tfoatlili ......is.4.1
P 11 lei l* .........
Half Yrh .....8s,
V>4I-V ... !''-
l'YM'.l.l- IV ADVA NCR.
Advertising Rate! 'six pence pei line
f.n tu-t Insertion tlurr i-i-nce per line
'..1 jcioikI insertion; ami mm penny pst
Imp fur auhsprpient insertions
A THE CAPTAINS* SSt-RE I*.
'I'll 'T* W l< ') IV II |) > I III i fo' 'I I I.
I'll >rt) v | i(| irv 111 I11-. 11 1 11 ;
||f ii 11 la I Iim < >untr>'-.eh is
Through ill cnni-ii 1 Ii II {
1 mi ;
Vi't from his breast at 1111 111 i-jlit.
When ilie iliron^ had ceased to
elll'IT,
I |e to l< : faded blossom
An I kissed n with n far.
A little fad"d Violet,
A I1I1111111 of withered Inn ;
I'.ui more than fame
Or Imi'l accl 11111
Hi- prized iis faded Mm-.
We li.ivc all a hidden story
Of a day more blight and dear;
We in y hide ii with our laughter,
It will hnunl 11- with h lear.
Anil we've .ill some little keepsake
Where 110 rye can ever mark,
And, like 111 - great commander,
We kiss it in the dark,
A little faded vicilel,
Perchance h loop A gift of love,
W* prize above
All th.it the earth can hold.
Samuel M. Peck,
DIGESTIVE DISORDERS.
D. II. KrernM. I).
(concluded J
Autointoxication due to hypol;y.
dfoddorifl is responsible to a
great exlent for the rapid increase
in the mortality rate from Bright'*
I i-e. heart Failure, and apoplexv
in thf |nsi iw 1 dflC idi*s. So longaS
there is h ii'irmaI or an excessive
production of'.' istri'c juice, putrefac
lion of albuminous foods is impos-
. and C Hi' ei Sell lom if ever ap-
pears either m ihe stomach or parts
lie from ihe stnmach.
stomach irritation is usu illy the
Ii'-1 step in the Causation of ulcer
ol the -'mi ich and later canciH. It
mirks thehetfinntngofBright'sdis-
ease i'il degenerative diseases. If
stmn ick irritation can be pievent-
ed, wa shall I)-- al le to prevent ma-
I i'ii-s which t'i-1 iv are carrying off
tli-- masses. It is import nil lo /is.
certain the cau*e uft'om ich Irrita.
tion.
Wliv is irritability of the stomach
so c Hiimon ? I'll'- p'im try trouble
lies not with the stomach, but
with wliat is put into it. If the
sin 11 n-ii bothers an in lividu al, it is
liecause lie has lor a long ti.ne
pru ililv been bothering hisstom
Sioaiacti irri a tion is due to
errors ineatinganddrinking. From
infincv up chi dree are given indi-
gestible fools, and these foods are
usu illy bolted. The presence in the
-10111 ich ol indigestible foods cam
es mechanical irritation, and liter,
when fermentation has occurred,
chemical iritation fnwn the acids
which are formed.
Children are permitted to eat
freely of cane-sugar, fried foods,
and fit", all of winch favor fermen-
tation and the fonnitio'i of irri-
tants Meats also contain acid
wastes wliKii.iiiii.it'" an I simulate
the production of highly acid gas
trie juice. The pepper, mustard,
Worcestershire sauce, and other
irritating substances Usually eaten
with meats still further aggravate
this condition,
I attribute largely to the free use
in America of meats, sugars, fats,
combine its, nhd tea and coffee the
prevalence of stomach disorders
and their consequent evils."Life
an I Health."
TUBERCULOSIS IN FOWIA
The following note dealing with
tuberculosis in fowls is abstracted
from the "Journal of the Depart-
ment of Agriculture of New Zea-
land" Vol. VI, N02:-
Birds are most liable tothis dis-
ease at the moulting period, or
when from any other cause the
body is in a we ikened condition.
The symptoms arem my, but ex-
perience is require I in th:ir detec-
tion. To the untrained observer a
wasted appearaace is perhaps t*e
plainest sign. Then the breast bone
stand- mil sharply from the body,
and the neck is devoid of flesh. The
com!) presents an unhealthy appear-
ance I barbie 1 acco npanies the div
I 1 and the excreta are of an un-
natural colour. The bird is gener-
ally seen to limp in the right leg in
the later stage of the disease.
When openinq up a tuberculosis
bird, the liver is found to be gieat-
ly enlarge I, from the presence of
tubrcle nodules which are scattered
throughout the tissue. Theie is, it
is almost needless to add, no cure
for this diseas, but it may be pre-
vented to same extent by keeping
the bird in good condition, and the
surroundings as sanitary as possi-
ble. A nourishing diet, with a plen-
tiful provision of green food, ctsatl
watei and grit are of much impor-
tance. Those birds which-are visi-
bly wasters should be killed, and
gteat attention must be paid to
cleansing the fowl house, ami to
removing all traces of infection,
more particularly the droppings of
affected birds.AgriculturalN.-ws.
"
THE HIBISCUS IN HAWAII.
In the Annual Report of the)Hi-
waii Agricultural LxperimentJSta-
tion for 1911, p. 41. mention is
made of the successful holding
of an exhibition of Hibiscus in
Hawaii, and methods are also
given for the propagation Of this
useful ornamental plant.
The first exhibition, held
during the month of June iqn, if
said to have astonished even those
most familiar with these plants,
by the number and beauty of the
varieties which were brought to-
gether. The Hawaii Agircultur.il
Experiment Station co-operated
in this undertaking by exhibiting
flowers ; over 3,000 cuttings of
different varieties have been sent
out from the station. A method
his been adopted in this propagi-
(Continued on fourth page).


IHt rRlBUNE
Zbc tribune
Thursday, September 4. 1913
The Imperial Parliament ter-
minated its labours for the year
on August t5'.h, after having sat
almost continuously since the
beginning of last year.
Of the three contentious mea-
sures sent to the Peers for the
second time, one. the Scottish
Temperance Bill has beei. pass
ed by means of a compromise
not affecting its main principles.
But for the Parliament Act. the
Lords would no doubt have re-
jected this measure a second
time. As it is, thev have flung
back the Home Rule and Welsh
Disestablishment Bills. If the
Government pass these two bills
in the spring of next year, thev I
will pass into Law automatical-
ly. The Peers may throw them
out or not, but their action .me
way or the other would not for
an hour keep these bills from
finding a location in the Statute
Book.
The Plural Voting Bill has
been rejected for the first time.
The Peers are afraid to state
their real reason for rejecting it.
They are content with arguing
that it should be part of a larger
measure : "Will you walk into
my parlour ? Said the Spider to
the fly". The Liberal fly did not
take the walk, and is all the
safer for not going into the pro-
fessed compromise. If the gov-
ernment should be in office in
1915, that measure also will pass
over thecoroneted heads of the
legislators of the Gilded Cham-
ber.
The Insurance Act has been
usefully amended, as was inevi-
table in the case of a law so
complicated and experimental.
Experience will reveal other
minor defects, and these too will
be remedied. But neither the
Tories nor the Liberals are like- and if things were handled bet-
1> to either repeal it or to in j ter, many who are now prejudic-
any way alter its general out-| ed about coing there, would do
lines. Mark Antonys words will s<>. and thus enjov and pay' for
from the beach north of the
Eastern parade. The magistrate
very wisely inflicted no punish-
ment. These boys were nearly
all of them under fifteen years
of age, and t" them at this time
of the year the water is simply
irresistible ; and swimming is
a most healthy exercise and
really a life safe-guard, which
the law would do well to
encourage, and wisely to en
force ; but instead the law for-
bids bathing here and bathing
there, and provides no place
where bathing max be enjoved
We are of opinion th it the time
has come for the establishment
of properly regulated public
bathing places for the good of
all the people.
Not every magistrate will lie
as wise as the one who dealt
with the cases referred t->, and
until provision is made for, or
the restrictions removed from
public bathing, our youths will
be deprived of a healthy form
of recreation and lack a most
desirable acquirement.

Yesterday afternoon a burial
not a pauper's, took place from
the Hospital. The Undertaker
as usual, ordered Hearse and
carriages, to go to the front en
trance, but the Superintendent
refused to allow the funeral to
pass out that way, and ordered
the Hearse and Carriages to go
around to the back gate from
whence the Pauper burials pro-
ceed. This should not be so, and
we therefore ask why ?
If a man, woman, or child, or
any of their relatives or friends
have means, and upon requiring
Medical Treatment, decide to
take the advantages of the Hos-
pital, and die there, why should
they be treated as if paupers?
Why should it not be, as in all
other civilized places ? There is
nothing disgraceful or humilia-
ting in dying in the Hospital,
die at the Hospital
their friends to
who have
not apply in this jase : I come
to bury Caesar, not to piaise
him. "Unionists in future days
will say over this very lively
law" I come to praiie Caesar
nut to bury him "
In the Police News published
yesterday we find the names of
no less than eight boys who
were hauled before the magis-
rate, for what ? For bathing at
the privileges which the Tax-
payer's money provides.
If the Board of Works would
purchase Cracked Stone for
Road Making, and Repairing,
at a price per Barrel, and store
the same in the open space to
the East of the Prison Walls, it
would employ a number of per-
sons, would be an incentive to
lot owners-to gather the loose
come forward
and bury them to proceed
through the Central gate on
Shirley Street.
We did not know of this Rule
I and it caused great annoyance
to the friends of the deceased
! Mr Clifford Goern, a stranger
! here, but I have been told a very
J respectable man.
We hope this Rule made by
the Commissioners of the B. G.
H. will in future be carried out
without discrimination. It is a
pity that they did not publish a
notice to that effect, as this un
pleasantness would not have
happened.
Yours Trulv
T. G. JOHNSON,
Undertaker.
CABLEGRAMS,
trie toot of Dorchester St, and and disorderly looking store, many years to take persons who
and get something for their
trouble, and at the same time,
it would obviate the unplea-
santness and discomfort of hav-
ing our streets* blocked, when
being remade or repaired.
Why does not the Street Con-
tractor used the Sweeper ? It
certainly would look more busi-
ness like and be more in keep-
ing with the pteeeiit day civili- I
zation.
The new Schooner "Winifred"
recently built at Biminis by,
the two Francis Brothers, An-1
drew and Ernest, sailed into our
Harbour on Monday morning,
for her owner Walter K Moore,
Esq. to see her for the first time
and to have the finishing fit-
tings attached.
She is 71 ft." keel, 25 ft beam,
and registers 95 tons. She is
ready for any business which
may come her way, but w.ll Panama, 2nd.-The last
star, out possibly in the Miami; maining barrier at the Pacific
passenger trade, under the able ed ()f the Panama Canal was
and p 'polar Captaincy of An- blown up by Dvnamite this
drew M. Francis, of Biminis. lmorning.lt was witnessed bv the
As the vessel now lies at the officers of the British cruiser
dock of Messrs J. P Sands Co. New Zealand" and fifteen
she presents the appearance of hundred others,
having been well and substanti-
ally built, ami we congratulate London, and 1.Secretary Mc-
our fellow citizen Mr. Moore,on kenna replying to petition' sent
his new enterprise, and wish Premier Asquith asking for the
him success. pardon of Mrs Pankhurst, says
that unless he receives from her
a promise to abstain in future
from all crime he cannot advise
granting her any pardon.
London, 2nd,One of the
meet princely residences in Ire-
land, Killarney House, was al-
most entirely destroyed by fire
to day.
London, and.Lord Haldanes
visit to America has revived
among British barristers the
question of establishing an or-
ganization similar to tlie .Ame-
rican bar association.
London, 2nd. -Both \\\t
Unionist and Liberal parties in
England are trying to make
capital out of the riots in Dub-
lin, regard to which the latest
reports say that 330 civilians
and 45 policemen have been
treated at the hospitals.
Manchester and.Universal
interest is being taken in the
forty sixth annual Trades Union
Congress which opened here to-
day, owing to the unrest in the
labour world. The first business
of the Congress whs the adop
tion of a resolution denouncing
The Hotel "Colonial" is look-
ing smart, with its new coat of
paint The same colours are be-
ing used, but they certainly
look fiesh and bright.
The enforcement of the Health
Rules by order of the Chief
Medical Officer, through the
Sanitary Inspector, is causing
considerable, annoyance and
dissatisfaction, among the Res
idents in the suburb*.
NEW RULE
for persons who die in the
Bahamas General Hospital
and are buried by their
friends, or relatives,
Nassau N. P.
Sept 4th 1913.
To the Editor of the Tribune
Dear Sir.
The Superintendent of the
Bahamas General Hospital en
forced a rule yesterday which he
said had been made, by ordering
the Hearse and carriages with
the followers, from the grounds
to the Lane leading to Queen's
Staircase.
It has been customaty for

I


T H
TRIBUNE
the British ghvernment and the
Lord Lieutenant of Ireland for
prohibiting meeting in Dublin
Detrrit Mich: and Harry Var-
don and Edward Ray, the Briti-
tish golfers were again Victo-
rious to day in their matches
with local stars.
MR. CHURCHHILL
ON PRIVILEGED POSITION
OF THE TORY PARTY.
Mr. Winston Churchill, who
was cheered by a surprised
House when he rose to reply to
the "eloquentspeech to which
the House has just listened, "said
that Mr. Chamberlain did not
seem to be any nearer under-
standing the position of his op
ponents with regard to Parlia-
mentary procedure than he was
at the beginning of the long
controversy with the House of
Lords. He spoke of the Prime
Minister's resolution in terms
of great severity. He said it
inflicted a blow on the ele-
mentary liberties of the House
of Commons. What libcrtiesdid
he refer to? No other party in
the country had the power to
create the situation they were
now discussing except the party
to which the right hon. gentle-
man belonged.
The elementary liberty to
which he referred was the elem
entary liberties of the Conserva-
tive party to impose a permanent
veto on Liberal measures. (Min-
isterial cheers, i The Government
had tried over and over again
to get from their opponents'some
recognition of their claim to
equality. Mr. Chamberlain spoke
of this procedure as though it
involved a hardship. Instead of
being a hardship.it wasa privi-
lege which theConservative par-
ty alone enjoyed. (Ministerial
cheers.) What chance would the
Liberal party have if they were! by the Opposition.
in opposition, of debating over I essential condition to the preser
and over again measures which vation b the House of a health v
had been passed by theHouse of
Commons ? (Ministerial ctieers.)
The power the right hon. gentle-
man and his friends enjoye I
Under the Parliament Act w.is .1
power that descended to them
It was a pure windfall, which
was not enjoyed by any other
body of Members in the House.
In his reference to the Welch
Church Disestablishment Bill,
Mr. Chamberlain said that no
Churchman would treat Non-
conformists in the way in which
Nonconformists were treating
_
A
open mind that there sh >uld be
considerable freedom of debate
(loud Opposition cheers)
and that the sequence of argu-
ment should not be broken down
by vulgar and foolish clamour
(Loud Ministerial cheers and
laughter.) The Government
would welcome any attempt by
Mr. Chamberlain and his friends
to free the House from degrada
tion by such continual interrup-
tion, i Ministerial cheers.)
Mr. CHAMBERLAIN. If the
right hon. gentleman wants h^lj.;
the Church in this measure. The
right hon. gentleman entirely
ignored the situation .The situa
tion as it existed did actually
treat the Nonconformists in a
wav that Churchmen had never
yet been treated. (Ministerial
cheers.)
DEGRADF.D BY PEERS'
VETO.
Again, Mr. Chamberlain had
talked about the "degradation"
of the House of Commons Well,
he (Mr. Churchill) remembered
that they spent the greater part
of three Sessions walking thro'
the lobbies, dividing upon and
debating, night aftr night, the
provisions and details of mea
sures which had the support of
the largest Government majori-
ty ever seen in that House ; and
then, when they had finished,
every one of those measures
were thrown out and ruined bv
the partisan vote ol the House
of Lords.
Whs not that "a degradation of th*
It un'- of Commons' and "a blot on its
immemorial liberties and elementary
rights"? (Loud Ministerial cheersj
Those who took a p^rt in the
proceedings of the House, really
caring about those measures,
and fresh from contact with the
great majorities in the constitu-
encies, felt their fate as an in-
sult of the vilest Kind, not onlv
individually as Memliers, but to
the representative system by
which the country h id so long
been governed. ('Ministerial
cheers)
INTERRUPTION OF
MINISTERS
There was another way in
which the degradation of the
House of Commons might be
brought about. He had noticed
a growing tendencynot so pro-
nounced in the afternoon as in
the evening(laughter)--to in
terrupt Ministers rising to reply
to controversial subjects raised
t was an
he will hate to begin with him
self. (Opposition cheers.)
Mr. CHURCHILL said he
was content with the large
measure of agreement with his
remarks. But he readily accepted
the right hon. gentleman's pro-
mise to co-operate as far as he
could in restraining the enthu-
siasmon the whole well ment
of his friends.f Renewed Minis-
terial cheers and laughter.)
This amendment of the oppo-
sition challenged the whole
principle of the Parliament Act,
which the Gavernment consider
ed necessary to safeguard the
elementary rights of the House
of Commons and preserve its
proceedings from degradation
and farce. (Ministerial cheers.)
CHANCE FOR TARIFF
SCHEME
Mr Chamberlain had com
plained that the Liberal party
had not dealt in detail with
such Bills as Home Rule, Tern
perance (Scotland), and Welsh
Disestablishment at the General
Election; but it was surely not
customary to do so.(Hear, hear.)
A General Election; was not a
proper tribunal before which to
submit the details of measures.
(Hear, hear.)
It was open to the right hon.
gentleman opposite and his
friends to set up a high standard
in that respect. If, as they as-
sured the House, they were soon
called upon by an enthusiastic
nation to assume the responsibil
itv of governing the country,
there would be no objection at
all to their seizing the opportu-
nity before they took oflice of
laying before the country some
of the details of the measures
thev proposed to bring forward.
(Loud Ministerial cheers and
laughter.)
Liberals would be perfectly willing to
receive Iron the Oppusttion a iliaft of
their Budget schedules, or th detail* of
any Landlord's Endowment Bill which
might happen to exercise their ingenuity.
(Renewed Ministerial cheers
and laughter.)
But he hoped that whatever
the hon. Members opposite
might say for the purposes of
party warfare they would not
under value the svstem of pro
cedure by suggestion.
SUGGESTIONS "FARCE."
Mr. F. E. SMITH, interrupting,
remarked that the suggestion
stage was of no value whatever.
Mr. CHURCHILL: Of course
it is notto those persons who
are either unable 01 unwilling
'>. mate any 5iu.'siin;is .'.I nud
Ministerial laughter.') If there
were a desire to shape the legis-
lation now passing through the
House in such a way as to bring
a linal settlement of the long and
insistentquarrelsthat have arisen
a full and complete opportunity
for doing so is offered by the
suggestion stage, stage. ( Minis-
terial cheers.)
In considering the amend
ments put forward the Govern
ment will have regard to those
which promise most favourably
to facilitate discussion on the
great issues and those on which
a settlement might be effected ;
but we shall not be weakened in
our determination io press for
ward to thuir finalty measures
which we have so long advocat
ed. ( Loud Ministerial cheers. )
COSTLY EUROPEON
MOVING PICTURE
THEATERS
The popularity of moving
pictures in Lon Ion and Berlin
is shown by the expensive thea-
ters being erected for their dis-
play. A theater recently opened
in London cost $033,000, and
has a first-class restaurant and
well furnished foyer approached
by a marble staircase. The Jin
terior decorations, in a style
described as neo-Greek, are in
cream and gold, with carpets
and upholsteries of a soft tint
of chrysanthemum bronze.
The finest moving picture
theater in Berlin stands in the
heart of the fashionable resi
deuce section of the capital.
The design is that of a Greek
temple, and the trimming is in
gold and ivory. The roof is re
movable, so that the audience
may have only the stars over
head on pleasant nights.
NOTICE.
T CLEMENT CLBOPHAS AT-
I 1ENBOROUGH hereby ap-
point my brother Herbert A, At.
t-mbnrough to act for me as a
guardian and to transact all busi
Detain my name to the welfaie of
my Interest.
(signed)
fMiss) CLEMEN T CLEOPHA4
A I'TKNBOROUGH.
FOR SALE.
AND FLY AND
I MOSQUITO NETS,
At THE SHAMROCK,
U.


1
~J
Hit I K 1 r, u N!
lion work by winch the pi in'- can
I)' multiplied rapidly Rta n in inn]
expense, Beds of ordinal\ h icu
bund arc j r t p i r*< I in I he open ; Ihe
t-nttin^s Ure tic,I up in bundle* <>f
fifty >> io i a'nl planted in the
Mild where ".hey" mot lapullv.
llicy me thus quickly pill In, ami
can be speedu\ removed, -Ibid,
As contractor for street Scav-
enging I hereby request
Householders will have barrels
of yard sweepings &c, at their
w 'i I iter than noon eaoh
day. so that the same might l>e
removed promptly, :
K. U. MALCOLM.
Nassau N. P. I
Aug. i'th 1913.
REPUDI \! IO\".
All persons nxm hereby warned
tli it, in\ wife Luell 1 Sands h iving
deserti d me and my home, I w ill
n<>t be responsible for tfhy debts
whatever, contracted bv her.
ZEPlI WIVI SANDS
CLEARANCE Sale.
A S Williams' 1 lie slioem-'iu is
1 \ about t.i make 1 change in
that part of Ins business known as
W II 1 IAMS'
NOVELTY "4TORE,
321 I'av stie-t,
He will sell during the next
THIRTY DAYS
. t greatly reduced piirw the entire
Stock, consoling f 1 large
variety ol items "f lien Aral
Merch mdise such as
Ladies Fancy White Dresses,
Black and Navy Blue Skirt-
Household necessities and Cook-,
ion Lte.isiN. Fancy Articles
suitable for X-nas and Birth-
day Present* A*\ Ac,
COME AND HAVE A LOOK
TO DAY, and
spend from 3d. to \ to "rent
advantage at
Williams'
Novelty Store
391 Bay^street, City
Japenco j
SANITARY WASHABLE
PAINT
TO BE MIXED *l l*H WATER.
In While, Grey,
Pink and (iieen.
7 lb. Tins at 3s. !
Prefix Enamels
,\S>()I( i ED COLOURS
in Tins at 6d.
is., is. od 2S. 6d.
Star Vacuum Flasks
IN TWO JdZES
PINTS AND QUARTS.
For Sale by
^mu iy.ii' ""r,v
Id. WISE, FOOLISH.
In housekeeping, as in other th
one should look ahead. Do not
to spend a few pence less
to-day on buying Soap of an
inferior quality which will
ultimately cost shillings, and
even pounds, in ruined House-
hold linen and clothes. This is
not economy. True economy
is to use a pujre Soap.
Sunlight Soap
is pure.
USE IT, and. preserve your
clothes and household linen.
LEVER BROTHERS LIMITED,
Port Sunlight, England.
II
NOTICE
\ V I N G been aap"
AGEN l foi MAPI
AI'PLK I EH ril.l/i-K
i ml'

ihe Bahamas I am aide M suppl
customers with vone it mm
faciurers price w Inch is $44 |>ert
of 8 bariels 01 $550. pei i -ureli
250 lb-. F. O. B. New Yori.
I Ins Fertilizei can alvi lie ai
lamed through any cm
I Km-- ii, New York, or dim t l
Manufacturers at the same pries
I shall be ci,l t.. t ike niyS
desi, ious of -i eine the r sultsi'
1 lined from the use of 1 Ins I'tst
lizer to icy ( u tivatious in Na>
M lull mu>l n 1VIII1 e hii\ "lie I
M.i|)es lei iilizi r is 1 In i 1 nd hf
-in 1 .1 t > out soil f. ir the -imv<
11| pineapples
\\ M.I \:U K. M< )KK.
WL would iform all who appreciate a Goal S.....ke tha' wen
have ..11 a .nd an extensive Sim k ol ll\\'\\\ CIGARS We
guarantee our brand to be made of I be Sliest Havana and Sumatn
Wrappers, and Havana Killers throughout.
These Cignrs are manufactured .m our premise* by skilled workmen
and great pains are taken to produce an article of superior quality.
The success we have met with in the p,si leads US Confidently to expect
the pationage of connoiseurs,
|. I.. SAUNDERS .\ Co.
P..\ Street.
\Y. \. \| \ I IIIR
UNDERTAKER
DESIRES tn inform lus frin|
and the Public lliat 1*1
ju-l received a complete mltlll
facilities foi Ihe business u! ,,ih
derta ker, which pi..res I..... ||
position to carrv out Funfialsfi
may he entrusted to his c ire t|
system and despatch ; and r^fM
fully solicits their patmn i* (
my Prices first and prove tli |i gfl
or the very lowest fnrliistija|
woik.
Notice.
'1"! I|s is t., remind the Public
I o| ihe ( lid Stand [N, S, Elliot's
Joiner Shop) Bast I'wy street,
which is now inuler Ihe Manage-
ment of
JAMES A. EVANS
CONTRACTOR AND JOINER
I land made Collins of every 1!.
Criptlon, I am prt pared to give
y-ej excellent woik. Heft of refer.
erti is. pur turning etc., nee us. We
guarantee in satisfy you mid are
(iiulident that We can suil mil,
FOR RENT.
HOi'Si: on i.ast Hay Street, al
present occupied by H, P,
Sturrup Esq. possession given 1st.
August,
rSppIV to,
WALTER K. MOORE.
WILLIAMS'
SHOES
Mil:- KITTEK.
NO I I K
r I lHIS is to inform my Patron*
J and ilic Public in < lew 1.1
that I Irnve opened my Public
lll.c k Smith Simp; and am mm
ready to do anything in the hue n|
General repair or new work Horse
Shoeing Swcially. All work done
Mechanically.
P. A. Hinder,
4 Pay Street. East (Wharf'
FOR SALE.
THE Building hack of Steam
Riding Gallery 38138 feet to
he removed apply to Zacharj
Tavlor 8 and 10 Market St.
Kops
NON-ALCOHOLIC
BEVERAGES.
(
s
a
S
FOR SALE.
AND PLY AND
MOSQUITO NETS.
At llll. si I \MROCK,
II. |. RUSSELI ,
P iv street^ CalV.
Ml. AND STOUT.
A dflicii 'Us I (link hn wed t
Hops (iintainine all the t,I
Value id ale mid Stuul hut mill
out the aftei effects, pin> gj
bottle. 5s doz.
LINK CllA\1P\(,NF.
Pints 7jd. Qu iris irx).
SPARKLING VAl.ENTO \\k
Pints 7|d Per dot, 6f,
(ilNOER ALE &tilN(iKRO|g
Pints 6d. Per dos 5s.
SPECIAL PRICES liY 111
CASES.
SOLD AT BLACKS
222 P IV St. j
llir \-.\ss\i; CANDY
Kl FCIIENfl .
"S. BLACK, Agnt
FOR SALE
Ft OL'SEand Lot on W 9
"1 for particulars apply , Q
K. Lean or Michael Ryan, 131 \V,'
i?2 St. New York City.
1
A


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