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IHETRI BUM-: GbcGrfbune SaLtursdav. Juns 21. I9I>. To our minds there is no more important department .f the public service than the Education Department, for, an ignorant mass is a menace. The provision for this department should be generous, as generous as it possibly can be made to be, for monev applied to the purposes of educat'on ud ci £??" JS" omly applied, is good Invert-1 "* Up hMh, J to see up to date methods introduced instead of the "goosestep". Of one thing we are confident and that is that he will have a wide field for the exercise of all the ability and talent he possesses. Our school system will not be complete until provision is made for the training of the teacher of the primary school and for Secondary Education. These are things which the people should demand and inment. There is no question that our public schools are not up to the standard at which they should be maintained, nay more they are not up to the standard to which they attained in the long past. Some of the reasons which contribute to this low Standard are, first, the Board of Education has too few among its members of those who are directly interested in the public schools or rather in those who attend them ; second the teachers require pro Cargo shipped per "Vigilancia," bound for New York, June 20, 1913 : 348 bales sponge, 143 bales refuse sponge, 53 bales sponge clippings, 120 barrels shells and shell lips, 5 cases tortoise shell, 4 bales cotton, 5 packages bark and sittings, 677 bales sisal, 30 bales sisal waste, 4 packages 111.nine curiosities, 6 bales jjnk, 4 barrels metal 9 empty drums, etc 6 cases effects, 1 automobile, 1 box guage. J* The Cable Office will be open per training, or at least better from 8.30 a.m. uutd 10 a.m. on training than they get now ; the Normal Training Institute of some years ago, served a good purpose and was unwisely discontinued. Third the teachciS should be sympathetic ; there is Monday, June 23rd. J 110X. HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY Wednesday evening 18th June I913 The Mouse met according to no doubt about it, that students adjournment. Cannot learn from a teacher who PRESENT. isnotin sympathy with them for The Honourable The Speaker the reason that the mind is distt al. turbed and therefore unreceptive we mean that no school should have a teacher who looks upon the scholars with contempt as his inferiors, so much so that he cannot fie civil to them, instead of giving them a book. Qirsgg it at them, and addresses them in such terms of endearment as "you black fool,' "you ytl pw brute (we know schools wnere the boys are address rj as Master Thomas.) fourth, teachers Th • Chief Clerk reported the delivery to the Hon. the Legis lative Council the Mill and amendments passed at I hi last sitting of the lb-use. The Hon. J. P. San Is present* ed Messages No. 47, 48, 49, 50 from His Excel e.;cv the Governor which Wre read and ordered to be printed. The Clerk of the L< gislative Council presented a M sage from the Council conveying .._.•• 1 ,,v/ij| mc v_ouill.ll conveying should be compelled to give the certain amendments made' by full school time to their scholars t .11 to the Bill sent to them punctually*^ regularly. On motion of Dr. Sweeting the I he children should have an I Report of the Select Committee incentive in the form of prizes on ti. petition of certain uihabcertincates or on completi A 11(: i. ants (J f Nlll Stlvudor pr avuig school course and public examlor the erection of a lighthouse (nations at which these prizes, or certificates should be presented, and let these certificates be made to carry some value as recommendations for the publicservice. Now that we have a new InSpector of Schools coming from the centre of learning we hope at Hawks Nest was adopted. Mr. Armbrister from the C ommittce jpponted to carry a message to His Excellency the Governor transmitting a Vote of Indemnity which had been agreed to by the House on the Qth instant and concurred in by the Honourable the Legislative Council, respectfully requesting that His Excellency will be pleased to grant his warrant on the Treasury for payment of the sum of money therein mentioned reported the delivery thereof and the Governor was pleased to sav that he would grant his warrant accordingly. Mr. Moseley moved the Third Reading of A Bill granting a personal allowance to Nigel Bruce Burnside. Mr. Johnson moved in amendment that the Bill be read a third time this day 6 months. The HoUS" divided. Yeas M SSrs Brice, Johnson, Albury. Dr. Sweeting, Cole (5) Nays —Curry, A. K. Solomon Pinder, Young, Moseley, E. V. Solomon, Vdderlev, Bo wen, Anderson, Evans, Malcolm, Dr. Johnson. Sands. (13) I he Bill was read a third time and passed. Mr. Albury moved the Third Reading of n Bill to continue in force certain A< ts, which will expire with the present session of the Legislative which was passed Mr. Alblirv m >ved the Third Reading o| 1 he A 1 iropnation Bill. I >r. Sweeting mo\ ed the in sertion of / 1 ti 8. I' > Allan W. Johnson refund of Duty on a motor ycle. £ijit. o. o. Tie Election of a Eight house at Devils pt. Cat Island. Mr. Sands moved the striking out of Clause (1 and the Bill was pasted Ordered that the Acting Chief Clerk dn convey to the Hon. The Legislative Council the three bills passed the House this evening and desire their concurrence therein. The House adjourned toTufSday next. Notices of Motions for Tuesday evening. June 24 : Appointment of select committees : Mr. Sands— On tiis Excellency the Governor's Message No. S" relating to a contract with tiie Florida East Coast Hotel Co. and the Peninsular and Occidental Steamship Co. Mr. Sands— On His Excellency the Governor's Message No. 48 recommending for the favourable consideration of the House the reimbursement of Mr. II. B. Warner <'f New York for expenses incurred bv him in connection %  with the case of Robert Sawyer a native of the Colony. Bills % Amendments bv the I Ion. Legislative Council. Mr. Sands— That the House do proceed to take into consideration the amendments proposed by the Council to the Bill to amend the Pensions Act 1909, j To the EditOf of the Tribune. Dear Sir, Kindly publish the following for me. It is very amusing to read of the Jamaican jokes which appeared in two of your recent issues. The one copied from the New York Sun, belongs to that class of writing known as Yellow Journalism chiefly seen in American papers. It is often written by some insignificant creature who was never heard of before and finds the only means of so doing by attacking some other race or religion different to his own. The" hookworm mentioned by him, is a parasite that does not only attack Jamaican negr< es, the various slate Boards of Health in America record that hundreds of whites in the Southern States suffer from that disease thereby producing Lazim The writer should read the book written by Sir Sidney Oliver Governor of Jamaica on West Indian Negroes, or he should be more acquainted about the tropii a and her peoples. Europeans or Northerner! that carry and maintain the civiliz ition of the North within the tropics so met or later pav the penalty'Sickness and death for so doing. It is wiser for the northerner when within the home of the children of the tropics to follow their custom and not the reverse. Nature has en dowe I thechildrenlof the tropics with many blessings natural heat, abundance of fish, fruit. and other vegetation preventing the occasion of hustling to obtain such things that aie of utmost ncc ssity to the northerner such as-fuel, he ivy clothing, COBtly homes, high rents etc. to protect them from the cold. Men who follow nature within the tropics live longer than those in the north. It is a curiosity to see a man over one hundred years in the North. Next Mr. Editor relative to "the Jamaican negroes allowing their women to work and bring home the money to their



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! in-. I R I Jl U IN |£ Lords.*' Is not only seen among Jamatean negroes. The Federal Government nf the United States is daily putting into jail or running down many of its citinens who are too lazy to work, but transport girl* and women from foreign lands and sell their bodies and souls into a life of degradation and shame. A study of the white slave traffic of America, would soon reveal that the Jamaican negro is not so lazy after all. If the Jamaican negroes weir given B decent living wage I doubt if they would not work'. I h ive seen them in the Northern States working, there they seem to be si adier and better workers than the American negroes. In the universities I have seen them outstripping other students — gaming honors and prizes. Mr Editor, many narrow minded Americans make it << pride in going around the world disseminating tar.-hatred. Ens "land governs millions of people who are non-Europeans and ha • C Won their |nve and high esteem Will she follow the foot tteps of a young an.I giddy nation ? I say no she cannot ufford it, her commerce has gain\ cd a strong foothold among the Latin Americans may she never be SO foolish to let a few don.us and cents make her loose the love and respect of the j <•< > | I among whom her son* are reap P'g great reward. Jamaican ne groes belong to Great Britain, mey are loyal British subjects, they love their island and will not let an) Amerii an run t Government, churches, schools or any other institution in the ( bland. This has brought hatred resulting in the recent defamatory article winch we read • bout Jamaica and Jamaican negroes. Thanking you in advance Mr. full tor. Yours respectfully TRUTH. • J Nassau, N. P., June 20th 1913. To the Editor of Hie "Tribune" Dear Mr. Editor Aftei having been ill for several weeks I was advised to take u change and res!, so I decided to go to Harbour Island. Accompanied by my son, we left Nassau on Saturday afternoon. Mav 94th, on the Mad sohooner 'Dart' and arrived at Dunmore Town, Harbour Island, on Sunday 25th. at 10 o'clock a.m. I was quite a stranger to the LEVER BROTHERS Port Sunlight. I -.injl JTJ6 !place .my son having visited it j I 1 e r ore) and yet I received a| jhea y welcome from all classes on the island. We were conducted to the residence of Mrs. Eupheuiia Saunders (better known on the island as ,'Aunt I'hernia" Tor her genial disposition to every body ) where we were most comfortably entertained in her neat little cottage by \ the Sea until our leaving for Nassau, where we arrived on Sunday evening the 15th inst Anyone setkillg <]uiet and i. Si can find no better place to go to than Harbour Island. The inhabitants are hospitable and it seems that they cannot do enough to please visitors to there I lUtiful island IIOIPCS. There [are very fine Streets throughout 'the township and some com'm dwelling houses and Stores, I he Commissioner (P. W. 1). Armbrister, Esq.) seems to be the right man in the right place. I He presides over his office with i much Ability and de. ides cases brow h b.-fore him in a most imps tial manner and is much ieipected bv all classes on the island. It is expected that a new residency for the Commissioner will Soon be erected to supply the place of the one mm occupied, which is in a most dilapidated condition, and it isruiiii. ouied that His Excellency the got 1 rnor will shortly arm > %  tin re to lay the comer stone of the new building. A fine Li bran is here also with a good supph of up to-date books and a Librarian obliging to visitors. The Sea View Hotel affords good accommodation for visitor, and is finely situate near the Sea and most efficiently condui ted by its proprietors, Excellent Sea-bathing can be had, especially at the beautiful beach which stretches for several miles London, 19.—In an atmos at the northern part of the island [ phere of sup| ressed emotion the Any Stranger arriving in poor'great Marconi debate opened in health need not fearjfor the want the house of commons yesterday ol medical advice, for it would and will be continued today, be difficult to fmd a more skilful In view of the attitude of the and obliging Doctor than A. T. I opposition there is certain to be W. Johnson Esq MIX, and he is a party vote when the division much esteemed by the people of takes place to-night. To George Cave, DO YOU REALISE the importance of pure Soap ? Do you know that Sunlight Soap make clothes whiter, and lighter ? True economy use a pure Soap. Sunlig Soap is guaranteed t pure, therefore cannot destroy your clothes. Preserve your clothes by using Sunlight Soap. every one as comfortable as possible. Thanking you, Mr. Editor, in advance for the space allowed me to wnte some things about Harbour Island and my never, to be-forgotten stay there of j three weeks. I remain Yours most si nearly, and \V< >ULD LIKE TO GO AGAIN j GOVERNMENT NOTICES. Monday 23 June being the birthday of II. H. II. the Prince 01 Wales will be observed as a Public Holiday. Mr. II. 1). Dascombf! Tidewaiter has been granted two months vacation lease of absence. ( Mil.LCUAMS Harbour Island and tie neighbouring settlements where he a 1 tends whenever called upon. And last, but not least, I must sav something of our trip on the "Hart" both going and returning. Captain Kussell and his crew were most attentive and obliging to the passengers and did all in their power to make shares of the Marconi Company of America and at the want ol frankness displayed by ministers in communications on the subject to the house. This motion was a very subdued pronouncement compared with the starting accusation originally hurled at the ministers. Annapolis, 19.— The United States naval academy here was the scene of its first aviation tragedy to-day wh n Ensign Billingsley fell sixteen hundred feet to his death in Chesapeake Bay from his disabled biplane. Lieut. Towers, chief ol th I navy aviators, clung to the tumbling wreck and escaped alive. London. 10, —Buxton, President of the Hoard ol Trade, today declined to accede to a request that the government send a special commissioner to Argentina to watch the actions nf the American beef trust. Mr. Buxton added that the cabinet was carefully watching developments in the meat trade. member for the Kingston division ol Surrey, fell the onerous task of moving the modified vote of censure on the ministers concerned in the Marconi deals, as the official spokesman of the opt osition. Sir Cave's motion expressed "Regret at the transactions in prisonment would surelykill her Hamburg, 19.—A further unsuccessful attempt was made today to launch the German battleship cruiser Dernflinger, which refused to move from the stocks yesterday London, 19. The docto who are attending Mrs. Panichurst say she is suffering from heart disease caused by forcible feeding. Another term of im



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I lie l KI i; i :. i conducting both foreign and home missions. The three Baptist bodies have 34*831 Sunday schools, with 2,758,271 scholars, their churches are valued at $148,000,000, their current church expenses amount to over $20,000,000, annually and the total of their contributions to all purposes to nearly twenty-six and a half million'dollars. The American Baptist Foreign Minion Society has an interesting and successful mission in Russia, which has been specially prosper Outline* religious liberty was proclaimed by the Czar some years ago. There are 159 church-sand 26.126 members, not including Finland, where there are 55 churches and 3,020 members. The I'.ap. tist World Alliance, which held it* second Quinquennial Congress in 1'liiladelphia in June, igu, has taken up the matter of larger freedom o* action for dissenting bodi es in Russia and sent a deputation, including its president, Dr. R. S. MacArthur, to St. Petersburg with this object in view. The Congress raised a large fund for the work. A site for a Baptist training school lias been secured in the Russian capital, near the University of St. Petersburg, the title to which under the law is vested in Russian trustees. The Baptists of America will endeavor to raise H fund of $125,000 for the college, of which some $60,000 was pledged at the Congress in Philadelphia. (To be continued.) A CONCERT E NTITLED THE WHOLE BAND OF PILGRL\1.\ will he given in Bethel Baptist Church by the Choirs of Bethel and St, Paul's, Foxjllill, on Tuesday 24th June 1913. Admission—Reserved Seas is. Genera6d. T Wanted WO CIGAR MAKERS Apply to J. P. SANDS CO. Ragtime Piano Playing 1 P OSITIVELY taught any per. son in 10 to 20 lessons, Success guaranteed. Call or write for Free Booklet. WALT. F. WEIR. Dillett street. Zachary Taylor Will open at 8 & 10 Market •St. on Monday June 9 WITH A PINB LINE OF LADIES DRESS GOODS, PRINTS, DRILL, GENTS SHIRTS, UNDER WAISTS Call Erly at* Ses New Stock gUlS Baby's Welfare MB THE ALLENBURYS' FOODS being perfectly digestible and closely resembling human milk, give freedom from digestive ailments, promote sound sleep and ensure vigorous health and development. Sltenburgs m and the -ALLENBURYS' FEEDER. Simplest and Best. MILK FOOD No. 1. From birlb lo 3 months. MII.K FOOI> No.9. From 3 lo b moritha. MALTED POOD No 3 From 6 monthi upward*. RUSKS (MalKd) From lo woaiba upwards. TO BE OBTAINED FROM ALL CHEMISTS AKD STOKtS A Pamphlet on Infant Feeding* •and Management Free. ALLEN c. HANBURYS Ltd.. London. England. THE Nassau Bargain House. Have been receiving by last weeks steamer A very large and varied assortvu nl of Goods jor their department Stem A LARGE variety of Ladies and children's trimmed and untrimmed Hats. A beautiful lot of Faro N Hair Ribbon-, LarjjeRoses and Wff I Brocaded and plain Velvets, h and coloured, A quantity Furniture in Bun &ables, Dining Chairs, Mattrasse Te. One very fine Gent'i Bicycle, a UT and new. A quantity China and White S nne (. hma Earthenware, Market flaskets, Brooms, Talcum Powder. Enameled Ware &c. A Fin*) Lot Dr-m c><.-Is in Lin* enes, Linettes, Muslim, Ac, 10 yard pieces Sanitary Diaper, Children'* p'ain coloun and fancy Lisle So< kl .it I I. ond gd. pair. NOl ICE. Th dwelling formerly occupied by myself for Rent from the iCih instant. Apply to A l. MOORE. June loth, i NOTICE D uring my absence fomtheCo. lony, |amci Sinclair will m t If my At torrev. STANLEY ELLIOTT Cutlery Sheffield a fine assortment of: RAZORS Table Knives Pocket Knives Butcher Knives Bread Knives. Carving Sets in Cases. and SCISSORS. for sale by Chas. E. Albury. THE SPECIAL CALL AT THE ROYAL STORE O UR. "Royal" Household Biand Hour selling at 2d pence pel lb. ami 30s. per bag of 196 ll*. "(i..iii--n Star Flour 2 lbs for 3J1I. and "I. •urel Brand" Flour" 2 lbs f... mal I'lour per bap 28s. IV'I >•< t m Vine. 'I per lb. Brown -u.'.ir at 2.J1I. per lb. Our rice hii md clean, best in town sellm %  ,11 .jd. pel quart. All inn Groceries are fresh and gixil <|i liiy and cheap. Line Inmaiea Rum at 10s, psr •a>li 11. I Wil-s I SAUNDERS .t Co. N 's-oi x. P. lie ha mas, April 15th I913. RECEIVING 1MIS WEEK AT R L A C K'S 222 Ray-Street and THE NASSAU CANDY KITCHEN. H UNTLEY t I'M All'K'S NEW Good Luck Biscuits Loose, and in half pound packets at is. jd. per lb. Hunt ley & Palmers Petit Renrre, Marie and Coronation, in hall pound pat kets. CR IW FORD'S Mutter Puffs in I lb. packets at 4


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£* 0> Nullni'. addlt ttts |urnre in verba ma. K latri. Being bound to iweitr to the Dogma.* ot no Master. VOL. X. Nassau. N. P.. Bahamas. Saturday June 21. 1913 No. m LEON E. H. DUIM (II. EuiT'iK OD PauPIIS lok OK KICK J H MAKKKT STBKKrl Nassau N. I'., KAHAMAS. i. i" ' ii i'iihi.isni;u i) \ILY. II .iiilay, -Vednesday anil Friday— iugleci>) ... |il. Tuesday, rinu--cl.iv and nftturda* single <•., 11 \ ... ... nl (Vsslclv ... ... 4 1(1 M'> 11:• i v .. iv. 4'l Divte | |i. ll.t"Ye..i I || v I** %  • v '. ".' IN llVA\TI ,\ | i, %  %  Id I.-is |*Hrt |H i fc.i fii-t i %  %  --11•• •!•: thiM fence |#l 1'iie '••r : ri'i"l in— i tn MI : ami rote |.eim\ i %  r line f"i subsequent iii-rilii'iiAdvertisements umlei tiuhl lines ^s. R| I I ,IOI> UNI I BODIES IN ruE EM ST A ItS Wll\ I THEY ARK. WHAT I III V HO, AND Wll \l THEY NUMBEU n H K. CIRI'tLL, LL.D ADVENIISTS A group or f.'innly of denominaturns who believe in tlie proximate peiMinal second coming of Christ. The movement VII begun in 1831, \\* 1111. %  :• 1 Miller being the leader. Various tiniCI were -et fur the adviit, Mild when nun after another the predictions railed, the followers divided on various lines and the uuicomt is six bodies or branches. 1. Evangelical Adventists believe in the immurtaliiy <>f the Miul, the Saints to riseat the begin, nmg ol lbs millennium and the wicked al the end ol '•• They have been gradually deceasing, having onlv about 8 ministers, 18 churches and 487 communicants, according to the census of 1906, all found in New England. a. Advent Christians believethai body and MMll a e both mortal and that eternal life is the c 1 ft of God. 'I hey -lie the most numerous body next to the Seventh Day brain b, having, Recording to the census of Hyi 6, tome 528 ministers, 550 chuichesand 96,799communicants. They have Increased only slightly since 1890. They are strongest in the New England States, nltlnugh there are. congregations in most of the other States. This body car on foreign missions. 3. Seventh Day Adventists, constituting the largest, best organized and most active body, observe the Seventh Diy as the Sabbath, pi ictise 1 oraersion and hold that the state of the dead is one of unconsciousness. They are found in most of the Mates and have extensive foreign missions m Europe, Asia, Africa and Australia lne> numbei 65,284 communicants and have 534 ministers and l,86o ci uri 1 I I he Church of God, a small ( nid chit fly in Indiana and Missouii, arose about 1865 or 1866 in .1 •-, |> iratioti from the Seventh May Atlventists over the claims of the latter that Mrs. Ellen Ci. White, lung a prominent leader, had the gift of prophecy. Theie are twenty Congregations with 32 ministers and 611 communicants. 5 I he Life and Advent Union, a Sew England body almost excliisu.-lv. differs from moat other Atlventists in holding that the wicked dead will nevei rise, but a e do lined in denial sleep. In common with most other Adventi^t branches the Life and Advent Union reportsno statistics. The census of 1906 allows ihem 509 communicants, 12 churches and 12 ministers. 6 The Churches of God In |esus Christ are mostly in the Middle West. ThCV believe in the restitution of all things, with Christ enthroned on earth as King of Kings, the dead to have a literal resurrection, the saints to receive the blessings of immortality, the wicked to be destroyed. According to the census of 1906 they have 2,114 communicant*, 56 ministers and 62 churches. The six Adventist bodies have 1.170 ministers, 2,522 churches and 95,80.8 commumi ant-. BAH A IS A development fiom the Moslem faith, standing for love and liberty and a universal brotherhood in one faith. Ablins hlfendi, the [iresent head of the movement, has visited England, the United States and othet countries on a mi si n of peace and fraternity. According to the ccr.sus of 1 xx there are 24 societies in the United States, with 1,380 members. ;There is DO ministry. BAPTISTS There are some fourteen or fifteen bodies of baptists, all agreeing in the principle that only believers should be baptized and that the proper form of baptism is immersion. The chief bodies, known formerly as Regular Baptists, and Calvinistic in doctrine, are popularly distinguished as Northern, Southern and Colored Baptists. These, it is claimed, form really but one bo ly ; but as they separate Si ite and national organizations and sepai n:' beni ent and mission try organizations, they are reported as distinct bodies. The three bodies, according to the American Baptist Year Booh for 1912, have 5.454.198 communicants, an increase loi 1911 of 215,254; 35,175 IT inisters, a decrease of 193; and 49.780 chuiches, an increase of 27. I. The Northern Baptist Convention has formed a plan of co. operation with the Free Baptists, involving the consolidation of the missionary and o'her interests ol the two bodies. As a result there 11 tendency toward consolidation of chinches, particularly in New England. New York, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota and lows, Connected with the Northen Baptist body are Geriian, Danish ana Swedish Conferences. Its foreign missionary work 1 '-1 parts cf the world is carried on by the American Baptist Foreign tis> %  ion Society, formerly the American Baptist Missionary Union, and its domestic missions by the American Baptist Home Mission Society. a. The Southern Baptist Convention represents the largest body of white Baptists in the world, reporting more than 2,300,000 com municants. It carries on foreign missionary work in South America, Mexico, Italy, Africa, China and Japan, expending upward of half a million dollars a year upon it. 3. The Colored Baptists are re1 ssented In i National Baptist Convention organized in 1 (Continued >n fourth | n| JL


The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02067
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Saturday, June 21, 1913
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
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General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02067

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Full Text
*
0>
Nullni'. addlt ttts |urnre in verba ma.Klatri.
Being bound to iweitr to the Dogma.* ot no Master.
VOL. X.
Nassau. N. P.. Bahamas. Saturday June 21. 1913
No. m
LEON E. H. DUIM (II.
EuiT'iK OD PauPIIS lok
OK KICK J H MAKKKT STBKKrl
Nassau N. I'., Kahamas.
. i. i" ' ii
i'iihi.isni;u i) \ily.
II .iiilay, -Vednesday anil Friday
iugleci>) ..... ... |il.
Tuesday, rinu--cl.iv and nftturda*
single <., 11 \ ... ... nl
(Vsslclv ... ... 41(1
M'> 11: i v .. iv. 4'l
Divte | ...... |i.
ll.t"Ye..i
I || v I**
v '. ".' IN llVA\TI
,\ | i, Id I.- -is |*Hrt |H i
fc.i fii-t i --11 !: thiM fence |#l 1'iie
'r :ri'i"l in i tn mi : ami rote |.eim\ i r
line f"i subsequent iii-rilii'ii-
Advertisements umlei tiuhl lines ^s.
R| I I ,IOI>
UNI I
bodies in ruE
EM ST A ItS
Wll\ I THEY ARK. WHAT
I III V HO, AND Wll \l
THEY NUMBEU
n H K. CIRI'tLL, LL.D
ADVENIISTS
A group or f.'innly of denomina-
turns who believe in tlie proximate
peiMinal second coming of Christ.
The movement VII begun in 1831,
\\* 1111.: 1 Miller being the leader.
Various tiniCI were -et fur the ad-
viit, Mild when nun after another
the predictions railed, the followers
divided on various lines and the
uuicomt is six bodies or branches.
1. Evangelical Adventists be-
lieve in the immurtaliiy <>f the
Miul, the Saints to riseat the begin,
nmg ol lbs millennium and the
wicked al the end ol ' They have
been gradually deceasing, having
onlv about 8 ministers, 18 churches
and 487 communicants, according
to the census of 1906, all found in
New England.
a. Advent Christians believethai
body and MMll a e both mortal and
that eternal life is the c 1 ft of God.
'I hey -lie the most numerous body
next to the Seventh Day brain b,
having, Recording to the census of
Hyi 6, tome 528 ministers, 550
chuichesand 96,799communicants.
They have Increased only slightly
since 1890. They are strongest in
the New England States, nltlnugh
there are. congregations in most of
the other States. This body car
on foreign missions.
3. Seventh Day Adventists, con-
stituting the largest, best organiz-
ed and most active body, observe
the Seventh Diy as the Sabbath,
pi ictise 1 oraersion and hold that
the state of the dead is one of un-
consciousness. They are found in
most of the Mates and have exten-
sive foreign missions m Europe,
Asia, Africa and Australia lne>
numbei 65,284 communicants and
have 534 ministers and l,86o
ci uri 1
I I he Church of God, a small
. ( nid chit fly in Indiana and
Missouii, arose about 1865 or 1866
in .1 -, |> iratioti from the Seventh
May Atlventists over the claims of
the latter that Mrs. Ellen Ci. White,
lung a prominent leader, had the
gift of prophecy. Theie are twenty
Congregations with 32 ministers
and 611 communicants.
5 I he Life and Advent Union,
a Sew England body almost ex-
cliisu.-lv. differs from moat other
Atlventists in holding that the
wicked dead will nevei rise, but
a e do lined in denial sleep. In
common with most other Advent-
i^t branches the Life and Advent
Union reportsno statistics. The
census of 1906 allows ihem 509
communicants, 12 churches and 12
ministers.
6 The Churches of God In |esus
Christ are mostly in the Middle
West. ThCV believe in the restitu-
tion of all things, with Christ en-
throned on earth as King of Kings,
the dead to have a literal resurrec-
tion, the saints to receive the bless-
ings of immortality, the wicked to
be destroyed. According to the
census of 1906 they have 2,114
communicant*, 56 ministers and
62 churches.
The six Adventist bodies have
1.170 ministers, 2,522 churches and
95,80.8 commumi ant-.
BAH A IS
A development fiom the Moslem
faith, standing for love and liberty
and a universal brotherhood in
one faith. Ablins hlfendi, the [ire-
sent head of the movement, has
visited England, the United States
and othet countries on a mi si n
of peace and fraternity. Accord-
ing to the ccr.sus of 1 xx there are
24 societies in the United States,
with 1,380 members. ;There is do
ministry.
BAPTISTS
There are some fourteen or fif-
teen bodies of baptists, all agree-
ing in the principle that only be-
lievers should be baptized and that
the proper form of baptism is im-
mersion. The chief bodies, known
formerly as Regular Baptists, and
Calvinistic in doctrine, are popu-
larly distinguished as Northern,
Southern and Colored Baptists.
These, it is claimed, form really
but one bo ly ; but as they
separate Si ite and national or-
ganizations and sepai n:' beni
ent and mission try organizations,
they are reported as distinct bodies.
The three bodies, according to the
American Baptist Year Booh for
1912, have 5.454.198 communi-
cants, an increase loi 1911 of 215,-
254; 35,175 it inisters, a decrease
of 193; and 49.780 chuiches, an
increase of 27.
I. The Northern Baptist Con-
vention has formed a plan of co.
operation with the Free Baptists,
involving the consolidation of the
missionary and o'her interests ol
the two bodies. As a result there
1- 1 tendency toward consolidation
of chinches, particularly in New
England. New York, Michigan,
Wisconsin, Minnesota and lows,
Connected with the Northen
Baptist body are Geriian, Danish
ana Swedish Conferences. Its
foreign missionary work 1......'-1
parts cf the world is carried on by
the American Baptist Foreign tis>
ion Society, formerly the Ameri-
can Baptist Missionary Union, and
its domestic missions by the Ame-
rican Baptist Home Mission So-
ciety.
a. The Southern Baptist Con-
vention represents the largest body
of white Baptists in the world, re-
porting more than 2,300,000 com
municants. It carries on foreign
missionary work in South Ameri-
ca, Mexico, Italy, Africa, China
and Japan, expending upward of
half a million dollars a year upon
it.
3. The Colored Baptists are re-
1 ssented In i National Baptist
Convention organized in 1
(Continued >n fourth | n|
JL


IHETRI BUM-:
GbcGrfbune
SaLtursdav. Juns 21. I9I>.
To our minds there is no more
important department .f the
public service than the Educa-
tion Department, for, an ignorant
mass is a menace.
The provision for this depart-
ment should be generous, as gen-
erous as it possibly can be made
to be, for monev applied to the
purposes of educat'on ud ci ??" JS"
omly applied, is good Invert-1 "* Up hMh,J
to see up to date methods intro-
duced instead of the "goose-
step".
Of one thing we are confident
and that is that he will have a
wide field for the exercise of all
the ability and talent he possess-
es.
Our school system will not be
complete until provision is made
for the training of the teacher
of the primary school and for
Secondary Education.
These are things which the
people should demand and in-
ment.
There is no question that our
public schools are not up to the
standard at which they should
be maintained, nay more they
are not up to the standard to
which they attained in the long
past.
Some of the reasons which
contribute to this low Standard
are, first, the Board of Education
has too few among its members
of those who are directly inter-
ested in the public schools or
rather in those who attend them ;
second the teachers require pro
Cargo shipped per "Vigilan-
cia," bound for New York, June
20, 1913 :
348 bales sponge, 143 bales
refuse sponge, 53 bales sponge
clippings, 120 barrels shells and
shell lips, 5 cases tortoise shell,
4 bales cotton, 5 packages bark
and sittings, 677 bales sisal, 30
bales sisal waste, 4 packages
111.nine curiosities, 6 bales jjnk,
4 barrels metal 9 empty drums,
etc 6 cases effects, 1 automo-
bile, 1 box guage.
J*
The Cable Office will be open
per training, or at least better from 8.30 a.m. uutd 10 a.m. on
training than they get now ; the
Normal Training Institute of
some years ago, served a good
purpose and was unwisely dis-
continued. Third the teachciS
should be sympathetic ; there is
Monday, June 23rd.
J
110X. HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY
Wednesday evening
18th June I913
The Mouse met according to
no doubt about it, that students adjournment.
Cannot learn from a teacher who PRESENT.
isnotin sympathy with them for The Honourable The Speaker
the reason that the mind is dis- tt al.
turbed and therefore unreceptive
we mean that no school should
have a teacher who looks upon
the scholars with contempt as
his inferiors, so much so that he
cannot fie civil to them, instead
of giving them a book. Qirsgg it
at them, and addresses them in
such terms of endearment as
"you black fool,' "you ytl pw
brute (we know schools wnere
the boys are address rj as Master
Thomas.) fourth, teachers
Th Chief Clerk reported the
delivery to the Hon. the Legis
lative Council the Mill and
amendments passed at I hi last
sitting of the lb-use.
The Hon. J. P. San Is present*
ed Messages No. 47, 48, 49, 50
from His Excel e.;cv the Gover-
nor which Wre read and order-
ed to be printed.
The Clerk of the L< gislative
Council presented a M sage
from the Council conveying
--------, .._. 1 ,,v/ij| mc v_ouill.ll conveying
should be compelled to give the certain amendments made' by
full school time to their scholars t .11 to the Bill sent to them
punctually*^ regularly. On motion of Dr. Sweeting the
I he children should have an I Report of the Select Committee
incentive in the form of prizes on ti. petition of certain uihab-
certincates or on completi A .11(: i.ants (Jf Nlll Stlvudor pravuig
school course and public exam- lor the erection of a lighthouse
(nations at which these prizes,
or certificates should be present-
ed, and let these certificates be
made to carry some value as re-
commendations for the public-
service.
Now that we have a new In-
Spector of Schools coming from
the centre of learning we hope
at Hawks Nest was adopted.
Mr. Armbrister from the C om-
mittce jpponted to carry a
message to His Excellency the
Governor transmitting a Vote
of Indemnity which had been
agreed to by the House on the
Qth instant and concurred in by
the Honourable the Legislative
Council, respectfully requesting
that His Excellency will be
pleased to grant his warrant on
the Treasury for payment of the
sum of money therein mention-
ed reported the delivery thereof
and the Governor was pleased
to sav that he would grant his
warrant accordingly.
Mr. Moseley moved the Third
Reading of A Bill granting a
personal allowance to Nigel
Bruce Burnside.
Mr. Johnson moved in amend-
ment that the Bill be read a
third time this day 6 months.
The HoUS" divided.
Yeas M SSrs Brice, Johnson,
Albury. Dr. Sweeting, Cole (5)
Nays Curry, A. K. Solomon
Pinder, Young, Moseley, E. V.
Solomon, Vdderlev, Bo wen, An-
derson, Evans, Malcolm, Dr.
Johnson. Sands. (13)
I he Bill was read a third
time and passed.
Mr. Albury moved the Third
Reading of n Bill to continue in
force certain A< ts, which will
expire with the present session
of the Legislative which was
passed
Mr. Alblirv m >ved the Third
Reading o| 1 he A 1 iropnation
Bill.
I >r. Sweeting mo\ ed the in
sertion of / 1 ti 8. I' > Allan W.
Johnson refund of Duty on a
motor ycle.
ijit. o. o. Tie Election of a
Eight house at Devils pt. Cat
Island.
Mr. Sands moved the striking
out of Clause (1 and the Bill
was pasted
Ordered that the Acting Chief
Clerk dn convey to the Hon.
The Legislative Council the
three bills passed the House
this evening and desire their
concurrence therein.
The House adjourned toTufS-
day next.
Notices of Motions for Tues-
day evening. June 24 :
Appointment of select com-
mittees :
Mr. Sands
On tiis Excellency the Gov-
ernor's Message No. S" relating
to a contract with tiie Florida
East Coast Hotel Co. and the
Peninsular and Occidental
Steamship Co.
Mr. Sands
On His Excellency the Gov-
ernor's Message No. 48 recom-
mending for the favourable con-
sideration of the House the re-
imbursement of Mr. II. B. War-
ner <'f New York for expenses
incurred bv him in connection

with the case of Robert Sawyer
a native of the Colony. _
Bills ?
Amendments bv the I Ion.
Legislative Council.
Mr. Sands
That the House do proceed
to take into consideration the
amendments proposed by the
Council to the Bill to amend
the Pensions Act 1909,
j
To the EditOf of the Tribune.
Dear Sir,
Kindly publish the following
for me. It is very amusing to
read of the Jamaican jokes
which appeared in two of your
recent issues. The one copied
from the New York Sun, belongs
to that class of writing known
as Yellow Journalism chiefly
seen in American papers. It is
often written by some insigni-
ficant creature who was never
heard of before and finds the
only means of so doing by at-
tacking some other race or reli-
gion different to his own. The"
hookworm mentioned by him,
is a parasite that does not only
attack Jamaican negr< es, the
various slate Boards of Health
in America record that hundreds
of whites in the Southern States
suffer from that disease thereby
producing Lazim
The writer should read the
book written by Sir Sidney
Oliver Governor of Jamaica on
West Indian Negroes, or he
should be more acquainted
about the tropii a and her peo-
ples.
Europeans or Northerner!
that carry and maintain the
civiliz ition of the North within
the tropics so met or later pav
the penalty'Sickness and death
for so doing. It is wiser for the
northerner when within the
home of the children of the tro-
pics to follow their custom and
not the reverse. Nature has en
dowe I thechildrenlof the tropics
with many blessings natural
heat, abundance of fish, fruit.
and other vegetation preventing
the occasion of hustling to ob-
tain such things that aie of ut-
most ncc ssity to the northerner
such as-fuel, he ivy clothing,
COBtly homes, high rents etc. to
protect them from the cold. Men
who follow nature within the
tropics live longer than those in
the north. It is a curiosity to see
a man over one hundred years
in the North.
Next Mr. Editor relative to
"the Jamaican negroes allow-
ing their women to work and
bring home the money to their


! in-. I R
I Jl U IN |
Lords.*' Is not only seen among
Jamatean negroes. The Federal
Government nf the United Sta-
tes is daily putting into jail or
running down many of its citi-
nens who are too lazy to work,
but transport girl* and women
from foreign lands and sell their
bodies and souls into a life of
degradation and shame. A study
of the white slave traffic of
America, would soon reveal
that the Jamaican negro is
not so lazy after all. If the
Jamaican negroes weir given B
decent living wage I doubt if
they would not work'. I h ive
seen them in the Northern States
working, there they seem to be
si adier and better workers than
the American negroes. In the
universities I have seen them
outstripping other students
gaming honors and prizes.
Mr Editor, many narrow
minded Americans make it <<
pride in going around the world
disseminating tar.-hatred. Ens
"land governs millions of people
who are non-Europeans and
ha C Won their |nve and high
esteem Will she follow the foot
tteps of a young an.I giddy
nation ? I say no she cannot uf-
ford it, her commerce has gain- \
cd a strong foothold among the
Latin Americans may she never
be SO foolish to let a few don.us
and cents make her loose the
love and respect of the j<<>| I
among whom her son* are reap
P'g great reward. Jamaican ne
groes belong to Great Britain,
mey are loyal British subjects,
they love their island and will
not let an) Amerii an run t
Government, churches, schools ,
or any other institution in the (
bland. This has brought hatred
resulting in the recent defama-
tory article winch we read
bout Jamaica and Jamaican
negroes.
Thanking you in advance Mr.
full tor.
Yours respectfully
TRUTH.
j
Nassau, N. P.,
June 20th 1913.
To the Editor of Hie "Tribune"
Dear Mr. Editor -
Aftei having been ill for sever-
al weeks I was advised to take u
change and res!, so I decided to
go to Harbour Island. Accom-
panied by my son, we left Nas-
sau on Saturday afternoon. Mav
94th, on the Mad sohooner 'Dart'
and arrived at Dunmore Town,
Harbour Island, on Sunday 25th.
at 10 o'clock a.m.
I was quite a stranger to the
LEVER BROTHERS
Port Sunlight. I -.injl
JTJ6
!place .my son having visited it j
I 1 erore) and yet I received a|
jhea y welcome from all classes
on the island. We were conduct-
ed to the residence of Mrs. Eu-
pheuiia Saunders (better known
on the island as ,'Aunt I'hernia"
Tor her genial disposition to
every body ) where we were
most comfortably entertained
in her neat little cottage by
\ the Sea until our leaving for
Nassau, where we arrived on
Sunday evening the 15th inst
Anyone setkillg <]uiet and i. Si
can find no better place to go to
than Harbour Island. The in-
habitants are hospitable and it
seems that they cannot do
enough to please visitors to there I
lUtiful island Iioipcs. There
[are very fine Streets throughout
'the township and some com-
'm dwelling houses and
Stores,
I he Commissioner (P. W. 1).
Armbrister, Esq.) seems to be
the right man in the right place.
I He presides over his office with
i much Ability and de. ides cases
brow h b.-fore him in a most im-
ps tial manner and is much ie-
ipected bv all classes on the is-
land. It is expected that a new
residency for the Commissioner
will Soon be erected to supply
the place of the one mm occu-
pied, which is in a most dilapi-
dated condition, and it isruiiii.
ouied that His Excellency the
got 1 rnor will shortly arm >
tin re to lay the comer stone of
the new building.
A fine Li bran is here also with '
a good supph of up to-date
books and a Librarian obliging
to visitors.
The Sea View Hotel affords
good accommodation for visitor,
and is finely situate near the
Sea and most efficiently condui
ted by its proprietors, Excellent
Sea-bathing can be had, especi-
ally at the beautiful beach .--------------------------------------------
which stretches for several miles London, 19.In an atmos
at the northern part of the island [ phere of sup| ressed emotion the
Any Stranger arriving in poor'great Marconi debate opened in
health need not fearjfor the want the house of commons yesterday
ol medical advice, for it would and will be continued today,
be difficult to fmd a more skilful In view of the attitude of the
and obliging Doctor than A. T. I opposition there is certain to be
W. Johnson Esq MIX, and he is a party vote when the division
much esteemed by the people of takes place to-night.
To George Cave,
DO YOU REALISE
the importance of pure Soap ?
Do you know that
Sunlight Soap
make clothes whiter, and
lighter ? True economy
use a pure Soap. Sunlig
Soap is guaranteed t
pure, therefore can-
not destroy your
clothes. Preserve
your clothes by
using Sunlight Soap.
every one as comfortable as pos-
sible.
Thanking you, Mr. Editor, in
advance for the space allowed
me to wnte some things about
Harbour Island and my never-
, to be-forgotten stay there of
j three weeks.
I remain
Yours most si nearly, and
\V< >ULD LIKE TO GO AGAIN
j
GOVERNMENT NOTICES.
Monday 23 June being the
birthday of II. H. II. the Prince
01 Wales will be observed as a
Public Holiday.
Mr. II. 1). Dascombf! Tide-
waiter has been granted two
months vacation lease of
absence.
( Mil.LCUAMS
Harbour Island and tie neigh-
bouring settlements where he
a 1 tends whenever called upon.
And last, but not least, I must
sav something of our trip on the
"Hart" both going and return-
ing. Captain Kussell and his
crew were most attentive and
obliging to the passengers and
did all in their power to make
shares of the Marconi Company
of America and at the want ol
frankness displayed by ministers
in communications on the sub-
ject to the house.
This motion was a very
subdued pronouncement compa-
red with the starting accusation
originally hurled at the minis-
ters.
Annapolis, 19. The United
States naval academy here was
the scene of its first aviation
tragedy to-day wh n Ensign
Billingsley fell sixteen hundred
feet to his death in Chesapeake
Bay from his disabled biplane.
Lieut. Towers, chief ol th I
navy aviators, clung to the tum-
bling wreck and escaped alive.
London. 10, Buxton, Presi-
dent of the Hoard ol Trade, to-
day declined to accede to a re-
quest that the government send
a special commissioner to Ar-
gentina to watch the actions nf
the American beef trust.
Mr. Buxton added that the
cabinet was carefully watching
developments in the meat trade.
member
for the Kingston division ol
Surrey, fell the onerous task of
moving the modified vote of
censure on the ministers con-
cerned in the Marconi deals, as
the official spokesman of the
opt osition.
Sir Cave's motion expressed
"Regret at the transactions in prisonment would surelykill her
Hamburg, 19.A further un-
successful attempt was made to-
day to launch the German bat-
tleship cruiser Dernflinger,
which refused to move from the
stocks yesterday
London, 19. The docto
who are attending Mrs. Panic-
hurst say she is suffering from
heart disease caused by forcible
feeding. Another term of im-


I lie l ki i; i :. i
conducting both foreign and home
missions.
The three Baptist bodies have
34*831 Sunday schools, with 2,-
758,271 scholars, their churches are
valued at $148,000,000, their cur-
rent church expenses amount to
over $20,000,000, annually and
the total of their contributions to
all purposes to nearly twenty-six
and a half million'dollars.
The American Baptist Foreign
Minion Society has an interesting
and successful mission in Russia,
which has been specially prosper
Outline* religious liberty was pro-
claimed by the Czar some years
ago. There are 159 church-sand
26.126 members, not including
Finland, where there are 55 church-
es and 3,020 members. The I'.ap.
tist World Alliance, which held it*
second Quinquennial Congress in
1'liiladelphia in June, igu, has
taken up the matter of larger free-
dom o* action for dissenting bodi
es in Russia and sent a deputation,
including its president, Dr. R. S.
MacArthur, to St. Petersburg with
this object in view. The Congress
raised a large fund for the work.
A site for a Baptist training school
lias been secured in the Russian
capital, near the University of St.
Petersburg, the title to which un-
der the law is vested in Russian
trustees. The Baptists of America
will endeavor to raise h fund of
$125,000 for the college, of which
some $60,000 was pledged at the
Congress in Philadelphia.
(To be continued.)
A CONCERT
ENTITLED THE WHOLE
BAND OF PILGRL\1.\ will
he given in Bethel Baptist Church
by the Choirs of Bethel and St,
Paul's, Foxjllill, on Tuesday 24th
June 1913.
AdmissionReserved Seas is.
Genera6d.
T
Wanted
WO CIGAR MAKERS
Apply to
J. P. SANDS CO.
Ragtime Piano
Playing1
POSITIVELY taught any per.
son in 10 to 20 lessons, Suc-
cess guaranteed. Call or write for
Free Booklet.
WALT. F. WEIR.
Dillett street.
Zachary Taylor
Will open at 8 & 10 Market
St. on Monday June 9
With a PINB LINE of Ladies
Dress Goods, Prints, Drill,
Gents Shirts, Under Waists
Call Erly at* Ses New Stock
gUlS Baby's Welfare MB
THE ALLENBURYS' FOODS being perfectly digestible and closely resem-
bling human milk, give freedom from digestive ailments, promote sound
sleep and ensure vigorous health and development.
Sltenburgs
m
and the -ALLENBURYS' FEEDER. Simplest and Best.
MILK FOOD No. 1.
From birlb lo 3 months.
MII.K FOOI> No.9.
From 3 lo b moritha.
MALTED POOD No 3
From 6 monthi upward*.
RUSKS (MalKd)
From lo woaiba upwards.
TO BE OBTAINED FROM ALL CHEMISTS AKD STOKtS
A Pamphlet on Infant Feeding* and Management Free.
ALLEN c. HANBURYS Ltd.. London. England.
THE
Nassau Bargain House.
Have been receiving by last weeks
steamer
A very large and varied assortvu nl
of Goods jor their department Stem
A LARGE variety of Ladies
and children's trimmed and
untrimmed Hats.
A beautiful lot of Faro n Hair
Ribbon-, LarjjeRoses and Wff I
Brocaded and plain Velvets, h
and coloured,
A quantity Furniture in Bun
&ables, Dining Chairs, Mattrasse
Te.
One very fine Gent'i Bicycle, a
ut and new.
A quantity China and White
S-nne (. hma Earthenware,
Market flaskets, Brooms, Talcum
Powder. Enameled Ware &c.
A Fin*) Lot Dr-m c><.-Is in Lin*
enes, Linettes, Muslim, Ac,
10 yard pieces Sanitary Diaper,
Children'* p'ain coloun and fancy
Lisle So< kl .it I I. ond gd. pair.
NOl ICE.
Th dwelling formerly occupied
by myself for Rent from the iCih
instant.
Apply to
A l. MOORE.
June loth, i
NOTICE
During my absence fomtheCo.
lony, |amci Sinclair will m t
If my At torrev.
STANLEY ELLIOTT
Cutlery
Shef-
field
a fine assortment of:
RAZORS
Table Knives
Pocket Knives
Butcher Knives
Bread Knives.
Carving Sets in Cases.
and
SCISSORS.
for sale by
Chas. E. Albury.
THE SPECIAL CALL AT
THE ROYAL STORE
OUR. "Royal" Household
Biand Hour selling at 2d
pence pel lb. ami 30s. per bag of
196 ll*.
"(i..iii--n Star Flour 2 lbs for 3J1I.
and "I. urel Brand" Flour" 2 lbs
f...
mal I'lour per bap 28s.
IV'- I >< t m Vine. 'I per lb.
Brown -u.'.ir at 2.J1I. per lb. Our
rice hii md clean, best in town
sellm ,11 .jd. pel quart.
All inn Groceries are fresh and
gixil <|i liiy and cheap.
Line Inmaiea Rum at 10s, psr
a>li 11.
I Wil-s I SAUNDERS .t Co.
N 's-oi x. P.
lie ha mas,
April 15th I913.
RECEIVING 1MIS WEEK
AT R L A C K'S
222 Ray-Street
and THE NASSAU CANDY
KITCHEN.
HUNTLEY t I'M All'K'S
NEW Good Luck Biscuits
Loose, and in half pound packets
at is. jd. per lb.
Hunt ley & Palmers Petit Renrre,
Marie and Coronation, in hall
pound pat kets.
CR IW FORD'S Mutter Puffs in I
lb. packets at 4 "1'flllit" and lull Creams
at is. 6d, per lb.
Currant Puffs ai 1/3 lb.
LIP IONS COCOA.
J lb. tins is.
2 OZa (nl.
NOT IC E.
THIS is to inform my Patrons
and the Public in General
tli.it I have opened my Public
Black Smith Shop; and am now
ready to do anything in the line ot
General repair or new work Horse
Shoeing Specially. All work done
Mechanically.
P. A. I'luvler,
4S3 Bay Street. East (Wharf)
J
w a. MATHER.
UNDERTAKER
DESIRES to inform his friends
and the Public that he has
just received a complete outfit of
facilities for the business ol an un-
dertaker, which places him in a
position to canv out Funerals that
may be entrusted to his rare v\ nil
system and despatch; and reap
fully solicits their patronage Gel
my Prices lint and prove that they
are the vary lowest for fust class
work.
WILLIAMS'
SHOPS
ARE BETTER.
KOPS
NON-ALCOHOLIC
BEVERAGES.
ALP AM) STOUT.
A deli' ions Drink brewed from
Mops containing all the tunic
value nl ale and Stout but with,
out the after effect-, pi 1 e r,d.
bottle. ss do*.
LI Nil CHAMPAGNE.
Pints 7lr|. Quarts lod.
SPARKLING V A LENTO WINE.
Pints 7J.I Per dot. 6*.
GINGER ALL & GINGER BEER
Pints fxl. Pel doz 5s.
SPECIAL PRICKS BY THE
1 ASKS.
SOLD AT BLACK'S
222 Bay St. and
THE NASSAU CANDY
KITCHEN.
H. S. BLACK, Ak ni.


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