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IIIL T R i B i N E Zbe tribune Tuesdnv. June 10, 1913. Last week, news came of the result of the Australian Federal General Klection. The Labour Party have come back with a small majority over their opponents their position having been worsened through the electoral contest. The Labour programme included what is (ailed the 'New Protection." The idea is to grant a protective tariff to manufacturers on condition that thev pay fair wages to their workmen and charge fair prices to the consumer. As the High Court has decided that this policy is unconstitutional a referendum was to be taken at the same time as the General Election, to decide whether a change in the constitution on that point should be made, so as to allow the Legislature to make a Law embodying the principles of the "New Protection" if they saw lit. Our cablegrams have not told us the result of the Referendum. If the Labour Ministry were to be in a positpB to carry out their progn^flnethey would do it by meaJBW a court of arbi tration which would fix wages and regulate prices The l'usionist or Liberal Party was until lately led bv i 1,eak '" a Protectionist and Mr. Joseph Cook a Free Trader. As Mr. Deakin has retired from granted Mr. public life, Mr. Cook has become the head of the party. On the tariff question the \ %  tralian Liberals would I. been likely, if they had I able to turnout the Labourists, The Mail Steamer "Seguranca" arrived in New York at 12 noon yesterdav (Monday) j* HON. HOUSE OK ASSEMBLY Monday Evening 9th June 1913. The House met according to adjournment: PRESENT: The Honble. the Speaker e t al : His Excellency the Governor's ...essage No. 46. re The Report of Commissioners of The Hospital, was presented by the Hon. J. P. Sands, and read and ordered to be printed. Mr. Moseley asked the following question : In view of what was said in the House on the second reading and committal of the Audit Dill, will the Government reroinmend that a personal allowance be granted to Nigel Bruce Burnside which holding the office of Auditor of Police V ( rtuntS of the Colony. Answered by the Hon. J. P. Sands. If the House desired it, the Governor would be pleased to recommend it. On motion of Mr. Moseley the question asked by him and the answer thereto was ordered to be printed. l>r. Sweeting from the Committee on the Petition of A. U. Johnson, for a refund of a portion of Duty paid on a Motorcycle banded in a report, which was read and ordered to be printed. On motion of Mr. Johnson four weeks leave of abs "nee was Timothy Culmer, r ----— ^ senior member for San Salvador. On motion of Mr. Cole leave of absence for the remaind x of the session was granted Mr. J. R, C. Young,senior member lor Abaco. to have left things as they were'. I Mr. Bowen flom the Commitft will be interesting to see :,ee " 'he petition of Sliadrach praying for a 1 in a report which was read and ordered to be printed. ft will be interesting to see eeon t,,e l )et,, ' what the policy of the dominI Thomas Wood ant party will be on the fiscal f?* l *'ty handed question. At any rate, a rise m the tariff is very unlikely. On motion Of Mr. Sands the Pill to amend the law relating Among the items inserted in F.u mtnd tlW '•* ,n l the Appropriation Bill last night I l Ie e c ura K' '" t f n > a u weare pleased to notice ?£l tojonas^waaraad a third time for seats in the Public Gnnmds a ";l 1 ,aSSe ^ .. ... On motion of Mr. Albtiry the House again resolved itself into and Publicnplnces £750 for expert suiv. v uf Nassau Harbour in connection with II e deep, 1,. ing of the Harbour. £(>o gratuity to Helena Annha aws. and 3d. per day respectively" to Bandmaster and Bandsmen of^jThe Police Band. a Committee of the whole I louse on the Appropriation Bill. The Deputy Speaker in the Chair. The Spaaker having resumed the Cbaii The Deputy Speaker reported that the House had gone through the Bill making several amendments therein, and also That the Committee had reported the following resolutions which they recommended to the adoption of the House viz :— That the petition of certain inhabitants of San Salvador for a light at Hawks Nest San Sal vador be referred back to that Committee with an instruction to consider the advisibility of recommending the election and maintenance of a light house at Devils point,San Salvad r in stead of at Hawks Nest and that the sum of £<>o be inserted in the Appropriation hill for that purpose. On motion of Mr. Sands the • following Resolution was re,id a sec-ond time. Resolved that this I louse will I indemnify ihe Receiver General and Treasurer in p ij ing out of the Treasury by warrant in the usual manner to the Giver nor in Council the sum of £26 1 is. 1 id. being the actual excess (in addition to part of the sum of £1 2 0 granted by Vote of Indemnity 011 the jist March last) of expenditure mi item No. 7 ,. of the Appropriation Act 1913 for food for prisoners m the .\. ss 111 Prison. On motion of \lr San Is the 10th and 15th Rules of the House were suspended foi the evening On motion of Mr. Sands the above Resolution was read a third time an 1 agreed to. Ordered that the Acting Chief ("I ik do carry tit-s lid Vole of Indemnity together ith the Bill passed the I louse thisei n ; ing to the Legislative Council and desire their concurrence therein. ()u motion the I louse ad journed to Tuesdavjevemug. Long Cav F. I. May 2dth 1913 I 'ear Editor of the Tribune Please allow me a little space in your paper to tell of Empire 1 Day doings here. May 261I1—The day substituted for the 24th gave every I promise of doing homage to the IampiciOUS occasion by granting sunshine and cool breezi A week before our new and energetic Commissioner W. T. (Lire, Esq. together with the Revd. Pf. Tucker, the visiting Priest, got their heads together, formed a ways and means Committee and Set things M going. On the morning of the 26th a great crowd of children hsjaded by the Long Cay band and the "Children of the Catechism" organised by Kr. Tucker, marched from the School house to the Parish Church where a thanksgiving Service was held. Father Tucker preached a truly brilliant sermon on the Life of Queen Victoria taking for his text "Fear God honour the King" the Catechist Mr. W. W. Toote reading the lesson. For overa month the Rev. Fr. Tucker has held the keen attention of overflowing congregations not only of v. omen but of men who betori never went to Church. The Baptist Chapels have been empty since he has been here He is not afraid to handle sin in all its weakness, he is without doubt the preaches for the common people. We do hope that the Lord Bishop will grant ihe petition of tha whole Island and send him to us as our Parish Priest. After Divine Service the procession perambulated the town till it finally came to the pavilinn gay with particoloured bunting under which the ladies served rtfn sliments. At two in the afternoon the sp its started. To the surprise of all Fr. Tucker won the H"0 ; ard sprint by a go. d distance, but ben i I at was nearly ime b\ the heat and had to be vigorously fanned. The sports wi re organized by Messrs Toote, Williams, Know* let and Lowe and went well into the evening inu irupled by a slight shower There were high jumps, sack race, egg and spoon race, obstacle race and tug of war in which the married men defeated tiesingle men. Phsei were given to the winners at about 5 P-">a splendid speech was given by the Commissioner, followed by a masterly address—the event of the evening by Dr. J. DuncailSOO, our local practitioner; then speeches weie made by Messrs VV. W. Toote, Lowe, J. K. U. Williams. O. R. I lanna and li. B. Hanna. The ladies also made pretty little speeches among them Mrs. Anna Williams, Mrs. M. A. Farrington, Miss Marion McClain and Annie Blown. It was altogether a very pleasant day and too much praise cannot be given to the Commissioner it r. Tucker and Jose. G. Maura, our popular and cnern i



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r F 1 T H E-T R I B.U N E getic townsman and magnate, wh<5 is ever ready to help 'in very good cause. ev W. W. T. From the London "Dailv News and Leader," May 13. THE RURAL WAGE SCANDAL. A County Living on HalfRations. Cambridge Fanners & Their La homers. ( tiv H irold Spender ) Cambridge, Monday May 12th. This by-election in East Cambridgeshire is certainly a very interesting contest It is an election thai turns round realities. Every other issue hae now given way to the ovorwhelming question of the agi icultural wage. I lome Rule and Welsh Disestablishment are accepted by both sidl S as settled. Marconi shares do not raise a ripple of interest. Newmarket itself seems to have receded into the background. One vital question lias been raised by Mr. George Nicholls, ami that question ke continued to ask with hammering iteration. It it right thai the agricultu ral latnuwert of Cambridgeshire should receive only 13s.a week in waget ? II ;re is a resouding challenge to our whole land system as it Is to !)'• seen in Cambridgeshire. The farmers themselves make no attempt to justify these wages at this time of day. They try to avert condemnation by insisting on the supplements—the harvest monev, the beer allowances, tne potato-patches, and BO forth.' Even with these supplements, the wage cannot he pulled up to anything above 1 is. ; and part of that is made up by a system of truck allowances which would not be permitted by law in any other industry. "NEVER ENOUGH TO EAT." Thenare infinite variations in the labour contract throughout thiscountry ; there arc sometimes "free" cottages, S">met'mej cottage gardens, sometimi • ii' ither But the Solid fad remains that 13s. a wcel< is all that tin' labourer ran be sure and certain of receiving through out the vear ; and that the wage, in the fa e of the present rise of prices, means that neither the men nor the women nor the children ever have enough to eat. It is a county living on half rations. It was interesting to watch the demeanour of the Cam bridgeshire farmers before whom Mr. George Nicholls laid thess farts at the Cambridge Town Hall They gave him a hearing that was respectful but silent and sullen. They listened to bis appeal for co-operation in raising the wages: but they made no reply. It was difficult to tell the reality of their attitude until it was suddenly repealed by an incident. Mr. Nicholls told them that lie had received a letter from a labourer saying that he had to support a wife and six children on 12s. a week. At this a sudden pan Iemonium broke out from the' block of Tory farmers in the \ centre of the room. "Name Name !" thev shouted in chorus for the space of several minutes. | and it seemed as if they would not allow Mr. Nicholls to go on. REFUSAL TO BETRAY. But Mr. Nicholls doggedly stood his ground "I slwll not surrender this man to you" he said quietly. "I kno.v well enough what would happen to him." And, indeed, it was pretti clear from their faces. "Then we shan't believe you," w is their only retort. "Believe me or not, as you choose," said Mr. Nicholls. calmly, but the man has trusted me, ami I will not betray him." Nor did he betray him. Finding themselves up against a have man, the dem mstrators gradually subsided into silence. This scene was a revelation. There were farmers in that room fully ca[)able of hone t ,, idi ven generous d laling, I h sre were others—it bad become char from the cheers—who were beginning to realise that they, too in matters ol loe.il rating, railway rates, or evpn fixity of tenure, stood to gain b\ the Liberal program. It is not at all bey md p lili Cril hope that gradually, in the next few years, thenmay take place in England a in w m •veinat .un mg tlie 111 inert —that the) miy realize that their bt-st policy is to stand side by side with their labourers in England as ci Ireland. But it is too eat ly \et. I'iices are high and rents have not yet begun to respond. The farmers are prosperous ; and prosperous men do not care for j reforms. For the moment the l labourers will have—and, t believe, fully intend to workout their own destiny. ONLY THE FRINGE OF THE PROBLEM. The wage question is only part of the general divorce ol the people from the land. Cambridgeshire has nut d enbadly in small holdings. It stain' cond on the list of the conn But when you remember that after four yean of activity the Small Holdings Act —according to the latest report—has created only 9000 small holders in the whole of England and Wales, you will realise that we have only touched the very fringe of this great problem. See how great it is. The last report of the Board of Agriculture (1912) Contained some very interesting figures as to the tenute of land in England and Wales. Among other things it showed that 83 per cent, of the agricultural land of England is held in farms of over50acres. Cambridge stands high 111 this bad record, as the farms of Cambridge counting over 300 acres each cover 47 per cent, (if the total acreage of the county. In other words, it is a county of big pastures —where the beasts flourish and the men decay. The question raised now is; Is this all we can do with England ? Fortunatelj. Cambridgeshire itself contains a it id illustration to the contrary, In the pa rishes of Burwell and Swaffham Bulbeck, between here and Ely, there is a farm of 1,200 acres b longing to the down. It used to be managed by one farmer; but no one could work it profitably. At last the Crown took it over and put iii a steward. He lost £"300 a vear. HUNDRED IN FLACK OF ONE. finally, the late member. Sir diaries HUM, gave the Crown the necessary guarantee, and the farm was let in small holdings. The Crown built the cot tages, and this 1,000 acre farm n iw supports 100 small holders each on ten BCfl S A hundred families in place of one ; There you have the answer to what can be done with England. I think that Fast Cambridge is going to say that it is tlie right reply. ^^ CaULKGin.MS June 10th 1913. New York, 8.—Flaying tennis that run the gamut from sensational to mediocre, the Australian team defeated the United States pair in the doubles* match of the Davis Cup preliml nan tie to di Tinvictory give the visitor! their first match of the series. London, 8.—At the lun :heoa given by the king in honour of I e Balkan peace delegates today, his majesty expressed the hope that their labours would soon be satisfactorily concluded. King George,conversing with the delegates regarding the danger of fresh struggles among themselves, remarked that another war would be a crime against humanity. Eagle Pass, Texas, S. All towns and villages in the State of Nueva Leon, have f illen into the hands of the rebels, according to reports made to-day to (i ivernor Carranz 1, l< ader.of the rebel forces in the North. Ottawa, 8.—Premier Borden announced in the house of commons to-day that the Canadian government would pay for three battleships which the British Admiralty decided to construct yesterday afternoon after the Canadian Senate rejected the Canadian naval lid.bill. This bill sought*to\appropriate #35,000,000 to meet the COSt of three dreadnoughts. Mr. Borden intimated that by the time the three warships were completed the government would have a majority in the senate and tue naval bill would be presented again and passed. Brussels, 8 —The B slgian government is carrying on negotiations in Paris fora loin of about $120,000,000. London, 8.—Militant suffragettes to day almost succeeded in interrupting die deliberations of the peace conference between the delegates ofjthe allies and the Turks by organizing a d • monstration outside St, J8 nee Palace. A large ci > I of hostiI person, pulled the ea . 1 I >m the wagon, andfinall) the police > thi oi tli ipeaker*. WILLrAMS' SHOES / ARE BETTER^ la



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J) T H £ T R i B U N E ity. The only explanation offered for the pleasure.giving efL-ctsare tlie rytlunic movements of the mouth ami tlie presence of the smoke. The lattn r eason is supported by the fact that al! pleasure in smoking ceases with many perrons if they are obliged to smoke, in the w excess, and also impaired vision, with general derangement of the nervoui system. —To be continued — Zachary Taylor Will open at 8 & 10 Market St. on Monday June 9 WITH A FINE LINE OK LADIES DRESS GOODS, PRINTS, DRILL, GENTS SII!R*6, UNDER WAISTS Call Early and See New Stock LOST. \ Cold bar Pin, with seven Amethvsts. Liberal Reward On delivery at T ribuP* Office. NOTICE D uring mv absence fomtheCo. h.iiv, James Sinclair will act MmyAU STANLEY ELLIOTT f RECEIVING THIS WEEK AT B I; A C K'S 222 Bay-SlTtel and THE NASSAU CANDV KITC HEN. H UNTLEY & I'M liF-RS ', NEW Good In. k Biscuits LOOM arid i" ball pound pack, tI at is. 3d per lb. Huntley •* Palmers Petll Beurre.J Marie and Coronation, in half i pound pat kets. CRAWFORD'S Butter Puffs in J; lb. packets at 4d. "U'lllit" and Puff Creams] at t<. 6 I. p-r lb. Currant Puffs at 1/3 lb. UPTON'S COCOA. HH DO YOU REALISE the importance of pure Soap ? Do you know that Sunlight Soap make clothes whiter, and work lighter ? True economy is to use a pure Soap. Sunlight Soap is guaranteed pure, therefore cannot destroy your clothes. Preserve your clothes by using Sunlight Soap. LEVER BROTHERS LIMITED. ^/' Port Sunlight. England. / 4 2 OZ. 6d. TELLS ABOUT KOPS NON-ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES. ALE AND STOUT. A delicious Drink brewed from Hops containing all the tonic value of ale and StOUt but without the after effects, pi ice Gd. bottle, 5^ doz. LIMK CHAMPAGNE. Pints fid. Quarts lod. SPARKLING VAJ.ENTO WINK. Pints 7'd Per do*. 68. GINGER ALE &GINGER BEER Pints t.d. Per do/. 5s. SPECIAL PRICES BY THE CASES. SOLD AT BLACK'S 222 Hay St, and THE NASSAU CANDY KITCHEN. II. S. BI.XCK. A.-nt. wiiiiams Shoes Are BETTER THE SPECIAL CALL AT THE ROVAL STORK O CR "Roval" ll.i,i-ehold Biand Moor selling at 2


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L •* > 1 cr 0) r+ CO U) cr o 0) Nullivm addlctus turnre in verba maglstri. Being bound to iwe&r to Ihe. Dogmas of no Master. VOL. X. Nassau. N. P.. Bahamas. Tuesday June 10. 1913 No. H.07 LEON K. h IHIPI ( H. i*. niroa NU l'k if i'K i %  iok OmCfl • J8 44 M.YKKKT STRIRT NMMU N. I'.. ftAHAMAl. r. ii. Hoi 11, PUBLISHED DULY. Monday, .V'e.hiesii.iv and Friday— liuflc copy ... Jii. ItSOSday, Thursday and S;.tinda\%  %  •• K1 *Cop) .. ... id Weekly ... ... 4 Jd Monthly ...is. 4.1 Quarterly ... ... is, HliY-.-,rlv ... Ss. Veany \tm I'VVAHI.I IN OVA NCI Advertising Kates: Six pence |>rr line fur first insertion; three pHCI pet line 'or iMnnd inseitiiin; ami OMuenfl) pn line fur subsequent insertions. Advertisements under sight lines 4s. HIE LITTLE THINGS. — ;o: >'. — If you are sighing for a lofty work If great ambitions dominate your mind, Just watch yourself and see tliit you do not till 1 k Tin common little ways of being kind If you at? dreaming '" future goal When, crowned with glorv, man shall own your power. Be careful that you let no struggling soul Go l>> unaided in the present hour. If ynu aie moved to pity for the earth, And long <> aid it, do not look vi high You pass siinie poor, (linn'i erea tore faint with thiist ; All life is equal m the eternal eye. If you would help to make the wrong tiling* right Begin at home; there lies a lifetime toil. Weed your own garden fair for ill men's sight Before you plan to till another's soil. —F.lla Wheeler Wilcox. 11 IF. MYSTERY OF TOBACCO. J,unes Fiedirick Rogers, M. I). J It would seem that a thing which is so widely and commonly used as lobftCCO must be verv use. ful ; yet when one attempts to discover just wherein that usefulness lies, he lulls anything but a satis. fnctoiy answer. On the surface its use is chiefly "to sum e,'' but smoking in itsell lies rather out of the realm of utility. A smoking fireplace is not the most us'ful one. To the uninitiated the imoke <>( a wood lire is mine IflVory than th.it fr> TU a cigarrettc; while the consumer of the weed, enveloped in his pungent veil, respond! to our questioning in rhapsodies which render the explanation for Ins puff ng as hazy and intangible as the clouds which emanate from his cigar. Almost until the seventeenth century the consumption of tobacco was confined to the western continent. Ihe remainder of the human r.ice flourished, however, without it, making smoke where smoke seen ed needed, by burning incense o| other nature, and working off their superfluous energy by chewing Straws or whittling pine Sticks, Aristotle, C:rsar. P.ml, Dante, Copernicus, Michelangelo, Columbus, to mention only a few worthies, worked quite contentdly and competently without so much as a whiff of the "divine weed." No greater names have been recorded in any field of work, and no vaster enterprises in which skill and strength were needed have been accomplished, since tobacco became a part of the white man's burden. Tobacco Smoking was introduced into Rnglnod about 1586. The courtiers of Elisabeth set the fashion, which travelled tepidly through Kurope and Asia. The fact that tobacco was believed to possess marvellous medicinal proprieties may have had not a little to do with the spread of the prao tise, which was also aided rather than checked, by the strenuous opposition it received from statesmen and clergy. James I was especially bitter against it, styling it "the lively image arid pic'me of hell." Humbler men than Jamie the Scot have had similar impressions ;. ft' r smoking their fiist cigar. The monarch's more specific objections to the practise were: "First, tobacco is a smoke ; second, it delight* eth them that like it; thud, it maketh men drunker and light in the head; fourth, he that Uketh tobacco saith he can not leave it, it doth bewitch him." James proceeded at once to turn the evil into good fur himself by putting a t tx upon tobacco a stigma upon its usefulness which it has not to tins day been able to shake off, Cromwell had a [st ong dislike for it, and sent Ins soldiers to uproot the plant m the holds, h js related that the soldiers retaliated very irreverently by smsking profusely at his funeral. Vile-looking, vilcsmelling and vile-tasting things w ere lorn erly believed to possess especial healing proprieties, on the principle that evil drives out evil; aniii^is no wonder that, on fust acquainted tobacco shouid have been believef to have virtue in 11• idirection. In praise ol its usefulness ;i writer of 151)9 pronounced it powerful to "cure any grief, dolour, imposture, or obstruction pmceeding of cold or winde, especially in the bead •and breast. The fume taken with pipe is go >d against Rume, Ca t r hs, hoarseness, ache in the bend stomach, lungs, hearl; also in want of me.it, drink, sleep or rest." Alas %  we have come to know it moie in timately and since that utterance many other cure alls, material and immaterial, hive flourished and /..ded. Tobacco finds no place to •lay in therapeutics, and is not even considered fit for a poultice. Habitual users of tobacco claim Some nleasuie from it, though their description of that pleasure is usually vague. The most careful laboratory Study of the ween has been made by scientists, and they, too, are unceitain as tn its effects, Dr. CushnV, <*ne of tbe highest authority, says, "It is not even proved that nicotin is essential to the pleasurable result." It is affirmed and denied that smoking gives repose and thereby aids intellectual work, and investigators are not agreed as to whether it increases or diminishes nervous act iv'Continued on fourth pn e


The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02057
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Tuesday, June 10, 1913
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02057

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Full Text
L
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r+
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Nullivm addlctus turnre in verba maglstri.
Being bound to iwe&r to Ihe. Dogmas of no Master.
VOL. X.
Nassau. N. P.. Bahamas. Tuesday June 10. 1913
No. H.07
LEON K. h IHIPI ( H.
i*. niroa nu l'kifi'Ki iok
OmCfl J8 44 M.YKKKT STRIRT
NMMU N. I'.. ftAHAMAl.
r. ii. Hoi 11,
PUBLISHED DULY.
Monday, .V'e.hiesii.iv and Friday
liuflc copy ..... ... Jii.
ItSOSday, Thursday and S;.tinda\-
* K1 *- Cop) .. ... id
Weekly ... ... 4Jd
Monthly ...is. 4.1
Quarterly ... ... is,
HliY-.-,rlv ... Ss.
Veany \tm
I'vvahi.i IN OVA NCI .
Advertising Kates: Six pence |>rr line
fur first insertion; three pHCI pet line
'or iMnnd inseitiiin; ami OMuenfl) pn
line fur subsequent insertions.
Advertisements under sight lines 4s.
HIE LITTLE THINGS.
;o: >'.
If you are sighing for a lofty work
If great ambitions dominate
your mind,
Just watch yourself and see tliit
you do not till 1 k
Tin common little ways of being
kind
If you at? dreaming '" future goal
When, crowned with glorv, man
shall own your power.
Be careful that you let no strug-
gling soul
Go l>> unaided in the present
hour.
If ynu aie moved to pity for the
earth,
And long <> aid it, do not look
vi high
You pass siinie poor, (linn'i erea -
tore faint with thiist ;
All life is equal m the eternal
eye.
If you would help to make the
wrong tiling* right
Begin at home; there lies a life-
time toil.
Weed your own garden fair for ill
men's sight
Before you plan to till another's
soil.
F.lla Wheeler Wilcox.
11 IF. MYSTERY OF TOBACCO.
J,unes Fiedirick Rogers, M. I).
J
It would seem that a thing
which is so widely and commonly
used as lobftCCO must be verv use.
ful ; yet when one attempts to dis-
cover just wherein that usefulness
lies, he lulls anything but a satis.
fnctoiy answer.
On the surface its use is chiefly
"to sum e,'' but smoking in itsell
lies rather out of the realm of uti-
lity. A smoking fireplace is not
the most us'ful one. To the unini-
tiated the imoke <>( a wood lire is
mine IflVory than th.it fr>tu a
cigarrettc; while the consumer of
the weed, enveloped in his pungent
veil, respond! to our questioning
in rhapsodies which render the ex-
planation for Ins puff ng as hazy
and intangible as the clouds which
emanate from his cigar.
Almost until the seventeenth
century the consumption of tobac-
co was confined to the western
continent. Ihe remainder of the
human r.ice flourished, however,
without it, making smoke where
smoke seen ed needed, by burning
incense o| other nature, and work-
ing off their superfluous energy by
chewing Straws or whittling pine
Sticks, Aristotle, C:rsar. P.ml,
Dante, Copernicus, Michelangelo,
Columbus, to mention only a few
worthies, worked quite content- dly
and competently without so much
as a whiff of the "divine weed."
No greater names have been re-
corded in any field of work, and
no vaster enterprises in which skill
and strength were needed have been
accomplished, since tobacco be-
came a part of the white man's
burden.
Tobacco Smoking was introduc-
ed into Rnglnod about 1586. The
courtiers of Elisabeth set the fa-
shion, which travelled tepidly
through Kurope and Asia. The
fact that tobacco was believed to
possess marvellous medicinal pro-
prieties may have had not a little
to do with the spread of the prao
tise, which was also aided rather
than checked, by the strenuous op-
position it received from statesmen
and clergy. James I was especial-
ly bitter against it, styling it "the
lively image arid pic'me of hell."
Humbler men than Jamie the Scot
have had similar impressions ;. ft' r
smoking their fiist cigar. The
monarch's more specific objections
to the practise were: "First, tobac-
co is a smoke ; second, it delight*
eth them that like it; thud, it
maketh men drunker and light in
the head; fourth, he that Uketh
tobacco saith he can not leave it,
it doth bewitch him." James pro-
ceeded at once to turn the evil
into good fur himself by putting a
t tx upon tobacco a stigma upon
its usefulness which it has not to
tins day been able to shake off,
Cromwell had a [st ong dislike for
it, and sent Ins soldiers to uproot
the plant m the holds, h js relat-
ed that the soldiers retaliated very
irreverently by smsking profusely
at his funeral.
Vile-looking, vilcsmelling and
vile-tasting things w ere lorn erly
believed to possess especial healing
proprieties, on the principle that
evil drives out evil; aniii^is no
wonder that, on fust acquainted
tobacco shouid have been believef
to have virtue in 11 i- direction.
In praise ol its usefulness ;i writer
of 151)9 pronounced it powerful to
"cure any grief, dolour, imposture,
or obstruction pmceeding of cold
or winde, especially in the bead
and breast. The fume taken with
pipe is go >d against Rume, Ca
t r hs, hoarseness, ache in the bend
stomach, lungs, hearl; also in want
of me.it, drink, sleep or rest." Alas !
we have come to know it moie in
timately and since that utterance
many other cure alls, material and
immaterial, hive flourished and
/..ded. Tobacco finds no place to
lay in therapeutics, and is not even
considered fit for a poultice.
Habitual users of tobacco claim
Some nleasuie from it, though their
description of that pleasure is usu-
ally vague. The most careful la-
boratory Study of the ween has
been made by scientists, and they,
too, are unceitain as tn its effects,
Dr. CushnV, <*ne of tbe highest
authority, says, "It is not even
proved that nicotin is essential to
the pleasurable result." It is af-
firmed and denied that smoking
gives repose and thereby aids in-
tellectual work, and investigators
are not agreed as to whether it in-
creases or diminishes nervous act iv-
'Continued on fourth pn e


iiiL T R i B i N E
Zbe tribune
Tuesdnv. June 10, 1913.
Last week, news came of the
result of the Australian Federal
General Klection.
The Labour Party have come
back with a small majority over
their opponents their position
having been worsened through
the electoral contest.
The Labour programme in-
cluded what is (ailed the 'New
Protection." The idea is to grant
a protective tariff to manufac-
turers on condition that thev
pay fair wages to their work-
men and charge fair prices to
the consumer.
As the High Court has decid-
ed that this policy is unconsti-
tutional a referendum was to
be taken at the same time as
the General Election, to decide
whether a change in the consti-
tution on that point should be
made, so as to allow the Legis-
lature to make a Law embody-
ing the principles of the "New
Protection" if they saw lit. Our
cablegrams have not told us
the result of the Referendum.
If the Labour Ministry were
to be in a positpB to carry out
their progn^flnethey would do
it by meaJBW a court of arbi
tration which would fix wages
and regulate prices
The l'usionist or Liberal
Party was until lately led bv
i 1,eak'"a Protectionist and
Mr. Joseph Cook a Free Trader. ,
As Mr. Deakin has retired from granted Mr.
public life, Mr. Cook has be-
come the head of the party.
On the tariff question the \
tralian Liberals would I.
been likely, if they had I
able to turnout the Labourists,
The Mail Steamer "Seguran-
ca" arrived in New York at 12
noon yesterdav (Monday)
' j*
HON. HOUSE OK ASSEMBLY
Monday Evening
9th June 1913.
The House met according to
adjournment:
Present: The Honble. the
Speakeret al:
His Excellency the Governor's
...essage No. 46. re The Report
of Commissioners of The Hos-
pital, was presented by the Hon.
J. P. Sands, and read and order-
ed to be printed.
Mr. Moseley asked the follow-
ing question :
In view of what was said in
the House on the second read-
ing and committal of the Audit
Dill, will the Government re-
roinmend that a personal al-
lowance be granted to Nigel
Bruce Burnside which holding
the office of Auditor of Police
V ( rtuntS of the Colony.
Answered by the Hon. J. P.
Sands.
If the House desired it, the
Governor would be pleased to
recommend it.
On motion of Mr. Moseley
the question asked by him and
the answer thereto was ordered
to be printed.
l>r. Sweeting from the Com-
mittee on the Petition of A. U.
Johnson, for a refund of a por-
tion of Duty paid on a Motor-
cycle banded in a report, which
was read and ordered to be
printed.
On motion of Mr. Johnson
four weeks leave of abs "nee was
Timothy Culmer,
r........- ----- ---------------- ^ ------.......,
senior member for San Salvador.
On motion of Mr. Cole leave
of absence for the remaind x of
the session was granted Mr. J.
R, C. Young,senior member lor
Abaco.
to have left things as they were'. I Mr. Bowen flom the Commit-
ft will be interesting to see :,ee"" 'he petition of Sliadrach
praying for a
1 in a report
which was read and ordered to
be printed.
ft will be interesting to see ',eeon t,,el)et,,'
what the policy of the domin- I Thomas Wood
ant party will be on the fiscal f?*l*'ty handed
question. At any rate, a rise m
the tariff is very unlikely.
On motion Of Mr. Sands the
Pill to amend the law relating
Among the items inserted in F.u *mtnd tlW '*,nl
the Appropriation Bill last night I l Ie ec"uraK','"!"t f n>au
weare pleased to notice ?l tojonas^waaraad a third time
for seats in the Public Gnnmds a";l1,aSSe^ .. ...
On motion of Mr. Albtiry the
House again resolved itself into
and Publicnplnces 750 for ex-
pert suiv. v uf Nassau Harbour
in connection with II e deep, 1,.
ing of the Harbour.
(>o gratuity to Helena Ann-
ha aws. and 3d. per day respec-
tively" to Bandmaster and Bands-
men of^jThe Police Band.
a Committee of the whole
I louse on the Appropriation
Bill.
The Deputy Speaker in the
Chair.
The Spaaker having resumed
the Cbaii The Deputy Speaker
reported that the House had
gone through the Bill making
several amendments therein,
and also That the Committee
had reported the following re-
solutions which they recom-
mended to the adoption of the
House viz :
That the petition of certain
inhabitants of San Salvador for
a light at Hawks Nest San Sal
vador be referred back to that
Committee with an instruction
to consider the advisibility of
recommending the election and
maintenance of a light house at
Devils point,San Salvad r in
stead of at Hawks Nest and that
the sum of <>o be inserted in
the Appropriation hill for that
purpose.
On motion of Mr. Sands the
following Resolution was re,id
, a sec-ond time.
Resolved that this I louse will
I indemnify ihe Receiver Gener-
al and Treasurer in p ij ing out
of the Treasury by warrant in
the usual manner to the Giver
nor in Council the sum of 26
1 is. 1 id. being the actual excess
(in addition to part of the sum
of 120 granted by Vote of In-
demnity 011 the jist March last)
of expenditure mi item No. 7 ,.
of the Appropriation Act 1913
for food for prisoners m the
.\. ss 111 Prison.
On motion of \lr San Is the
10th and 15th Rules of the
House were suspended foi the
evening
On motion of Mr. Sands the
above Resolution was read a
third time an 1 agreed to.
Ordered that the Acting Chief
("I ik do carry tit-- s lid Vole of
' Indemnity together ith the
Bill passed the I louse thisei n
; ing to the Legislative Council
and desire their concurrence
therein.
()u motion the I louse ad
journed to Tuesdavjevemug.
Long Cav F. I.
May 2dth 1913
I 'ear Editor of the Tribune
Please allow me a little space
in your paper to tell of Empire
1 Day doings here.
May 261I1The day substitut-
ed for the 24th gave every
I promise of doing homage to the
IampiciOUS occasion by granting
sunshine and cool breezi
A week before our new and
energetic Commissioner W. T.
(Lire, Esq. together with the
Revd. Pf. Tucker, the visiting
Priest, got their heads together,
formed a ways and means Com-
mittee and Set things m going.
On the morning of the 26th a
great crowd of children hsjaded
by the Long Cay band and the
"Children of the Catechism" or-
ganised by Kr. Tucker, marched
from the School house to the
Parish Church where a thanks-
giving Service was held.
Father Tucker preached a
truly brilliant sermon on the
Life of Queen Victoria taking
for his text "Fear God honour
the King" the Catechist Mr. W.
W. Toote reading the lesson.
For overa month the Rev. Fr.
Tucker has held the keen atten-
tion of overflowing congrega-
tions not only of v. omen but of
men who betori never went to
Church. The Baptist Chapels
have been empty since he has
been here He is not afraid to
handle sin in all its weakness,
he is without doubt the preaches
for the common people.
We do hope that the Lord
Bishop will grant ihe petition
of tha whole Island and send
him to us as our Parish Priest.
After Divine Service the pro-
cession perambulated the town
till it finally came to the pavil-
inn gay with particoloured bun-
ting under which the ladies
served rtfn sliments.
At two in the afternoon the
sp its started. To the surprise of
all Fr. Tucker won the H"0
; ard sprint by a go. d distance,
but ben i I at was nearly
, ime b\ the heat and had
to be vigorously fanned.
The sports wi re organized by
Messrs Toote, Williams, Know*
let and Lowe and went well
into the evening inu irupled by
a slight shower
There were high jumps, sack
race, egg and spoon race, ob-
stacle race and tug of war in
which the married men defeated
tie- single men.
Phsei were given to the win-
ners at about 5 P-">- a splendid
speech was given by the Com-
missioner, followed by a mas-
terly addressthe event of the
evening by Dr. J. DuncailSOO,
our local practitioner; then
speeches weie made by Messrs
VV. W. Toote, Lowe, J. K. U.
Williams. O. R. I lanna and li. B.
Hanna.
The ladies also made pretty
little speeches among them Mrs.
Anna Williams, Mrs. M. A. Far-
rington, Miss Marion McClain
and Annie Blown.
It was altogether a very plea-
sant day and too much praise
cannot be given to the Commis-
sioner it r. Tucker and Jose. G.
Maura, our popular and cner-
n
i


r
F
1
T H E-T R I B.U N E
getic townsman and magnate,
wh<5 is ever ready to help 'in
very good cause.
ev
W. W. T.
From the London "Dailv News
and Leader," May 13.
THE RURAL WAGE
SCANDAL.
A County Living on Half-
Rations.
Cambridge Fanners & Their
La homers.
( tiv H irold Spender )
Cambridge, Monday May 12th.
This by-election in East Cam-
bridgeshire is certainly a very
interesting contest It is an elec-
tion thai turns round realities.
Every other issue hae now given
way to the ovorwhelming ques-
tion of the agi icultural wage.
I lome Rule and Welsh Dises-
tablishment are accepted by
both sidl S as settled. Marconi
shares do not raise a ripple of
interest. Newmarket itself seems
to have receded into the back-
ground. One vital question lias
been raised by Mr. George
Nicholls, ami that question
ke continued to ask with ham-
mering iteration.
It it right thai the agricultu
ral latnuwert of Cambridgeshire
should receive only 13s.a week in
waget ?
II ;re is a resouding challenge
to our whole land system as it
Is to !)' seen in Cambridgeshire.
The farmers themselves make no
attempt to justify these wages
at this time of day. They try to
avert condemnation by insisting
on the supplementsthe
harvest monev, the beer allow-
ances, tne potato-patches, and
bo forth.'
Even with these supplements,
the wage cannot he pulled up to
anything above 1 is. ; and part of
that is made up by a system of
truck allowances which would
not be permitted by law in any
other industry.
"NEVER ENOUGH TO EAT."
Then- are infinite variations
in the labour contract through-
out thiscountry ; there arc some-
times "free" cottages, S">met'mej
cottage gardens, sometimi
ii' ither But the Solid fad re-
mains that 13s. a wcel< is all
that tin' labourer ran be sure
and certain of receiving through
out the vear ; and that the wage,
in the fa e of the present rise
of prices, means that neither the
men nor the women nor the
children ever have enough to
eat.
It is a county living on half
rations.
It was interesting to watch
the demeanour of the Cam
bridgeshire farmers before
whom Mr. George Nicholls laid
thess farts at the Cambridge
Town Hall They gave him a
hearing that was respectful but
silent and sullen. They listened
to bis appeal for co-operation in
raising the wages: but they
made no reply. It was difficult
to tell the reality of their atti-
tude until it was suddenly re-
pealed by an incident. Mr.
Nicholls told them that lie had
received a letter from a labourer
saying that he had to support a
wife and six children on 12s. a
week. At this a sudden pan I-
emonium broke out from the'
block of Tory farmers in the \
centre of the room. "Name !
Name !" thev shouted in chorus '
for the space of several minutes. |
and it seemed as if they would
not allow Mr. Nicholls to go on. '
REFUSAL TO BETRAY.
But Mr. Nicholls doggedly
stood his ground "I slwll not
surrender this man to you" he
said quietly. "I kno.v well
enough what would happen to
him." And, indeed, it was pretti
clear from their faces. "Then
we shan't believe you," w is
their only retort. "Believe me
or not, as you choose," said Mr.
Nicholls. calmly, but the man
has trusted me, ami I will not
betray him." Nor did he betray
him. Finding themselves up
against a have man, the de-
m mstrators gradually subsided
into silence.
This scene was a revelation.
There were farmers in that room
fully ca[)able of hone t ,, idi ven
generous d laling, I h sre were
othersit bad become char
from the cheerswho were be-
ginning to realise that they, too
in matters ol loe.il rating, rail-
way rates, or evpn fixity of ten-
ure, stood to gain b\ the Liber-
al program. .
It is not at all bey md p lili
Cril hope that gradually, in the
next few years, then- may take
place in England a in w m ve-
in- at .un mg tlie 111 inert that
the) miy realize that their bt-st
policy is to stand side by side
with their labourers in England
as ci Ireland. But it is too eat ly
\et. I'iices are high and rents
have not yet begun to respond.
The farmers are prosperous ; and
prosperous men do not care for
j reforms. For the moment the
l labourers will haveand, t be-
lieve, fully intend to workout
their own destiny.
ONLY THE FRINGE OF
THE PROBLEM.
The wage question is only
part of the general divorce ol
the people from the land. Cam-
bridgeshire has nut d en- badly
in small holdings. It stain'
cond on the list of the conn
But when you remember that
after four yean of activity the
Small Holdings Act according
to the latest reporthas created
only 9000 small holders in the
whole of England and Wales,
you will realise that we have
only touched the very fringe of
this great problem. See how
great it is. The last report of
the Board of Agriculture (1912)
Contained some very interesting
figures as to the tenute of land
in England and Wales. Among
other things it showed that 83
per cent, of the agricultural land
of England is held in farms of
over50acres. Cambridge stands
high 111 this bad record, as the
farms of Cambridge counting
over 300 acres each cover 47 per
cent, (if the total acreage of the
county. In other words, it is a
county of big pastures where
the beasts flourish and the men
decay. The question raised now
is; Is this all we can do with
England ?
Fortunatelj. Cambridgeshire
itself contains a it id illustra-
tion to the contrary, In the pa
rishes of Burwell and Swaffham
Bulbeck, between here and Ely,
there is a farm of 1,200 acres
b longing to the down. It used
to be managed by one farmer;
but no one could work it profit-
ably. At last the Crown took
it over and put iii a steward.
He lost "300 a vear.
HUNDRED IN FLACK OF
ONE.
finally, the late member. Sir
diaries Hum, gave the Crown
the necessary guarantee, and
the farm was let in small hold-
ings. The Crown built the cot
tages, and this 1,000 acre farm
n iw supports 100 small holders
each on ten BCfl S
A hundred families in place
of one ; There you have the an-
swer to what can be done with
England.
I think that Fast Cambridge
is going to say that it is tlie
right reply. _______^^
CaULKGin.MS
June 10th 1913.
New York, 8.Flaying ten-
nis that run the gamut from
sensational to mediocre, the
Australian team defeated the
United States pair in the doubles*
match of the Davis Cup preliml
nan tie to di
Tin- victory give the visitor!
their first match of the series.
London, 8.At the lun :heoa
given by the king in honour of
I e Balkan peace delegates to-
day, his majesty expressed the
hope that their labours would
soon be satisfactorily conclud-
ed.
King George,conversing with
the delegates regarding the
danger of fresh struggles among
themselves, remarked that
another war would be a crime
against humanity.
Eagle Pass, Texas, S. All
towns and villages in the State
of Nueva Leon, have f illen in-
to the hands of the rebels, ac-
cording to reports made to-day
to (i ivernor Carranz 1, l< ader.of
the rebel forces in the North.
Ottawa, 8.Premier Borden
announced in the house of com-
mons to-day that the Canadian
government would pay for three
battleships which the British
Admiralty decided to construct
yesterday afternoon after the
Canadian Senate rejected the
Canadian naval lid.bill.
This bill sought*to\appropri-
ate #35,000,000 to meet the
COSt of three dreadnoughts.
Mr. Borden intimated that by
the time the three warships
were completed the government
would have a majority in the
senate and tue naval bill would
be presented again and passed.
Brussels, 8 The B slgian
government is carrying on ne-
gotiations in Paris fora loin of
about $120,000,000.
London, 8.Militant suffra-
gettes to day almost succeeded
in interrupting die deliberations
of the peace conference between
the delegates ofjthe allies and
the Turks by organizing a d
monstration outside St, J8 nee
Palace.
A large ci > I of hostiI per-
son, pulled the ea . 1 I >m
the wagon, andfinall) the police
> thi oi tli ipeaker*.
WILLrAMS'
SHOES /
ARE BETTER^
la


J)
T H T R i B U N E
ity. The only explanation offered
for the pleasure.giving efL-ctsare
tlie rytlunic movements of the
mouth ami tlie presence of the
smoke. The lattn reason is sup-
ported by the fact that al! pleasure
in smoking ceases with many per-
rons if they are obliged to smoke,
in the writer attributes the pleasure to j
the effect ol smoke in shielding the j
eves from the light.
' The effects of overuse of tobac-
co are easily discovered. A chronic
inflammation of the throat is very
common. This is produced through
the irritation of the smoke, and is
accompanied by ovtrsecietion of
saliva, which, if it does not find its
way into the tpitton as waste di-
neMing fluid (if it misseth not,) is
carried to the stomach, where the
dissolved nicotin it contains pro-
duces qyspeps-a and impaiis the
appetite. Pa'pitation anil iregular
action of the heart fo|h>w excess,
and also impaired vision, with
general derangement of the nervoui
system.
To be continued
Zachary Taylor
Will open at 8 & 10 Market
St. on Monday June 9
With a fine line ok Ladies
Dress Goods, Prints, Drill,
Gents Sii!r*6, Under Waists
Call Early and See New Stock
LOST.
\ Cold bar Pin, with seven
Amethvsts.
Liberal Reward
On delivery at TribuP* Office.
.....NOTICE
During mv absence fomtheCo.
h.iiv, James Sinclair will act
MmyAUSTANLEY ELLIOTT
f
RECEIVING THIS WEEK
AT B I; A C K'S
222 Bay-SlTtel
and THE NASSAU CANDV
KITC HEN.
HUNTLEY & I'M liF-RS ',
NEW Good In. k Biscuits !
LOOM arid i" ball pound pack, t- I
at is. 3d per lb.
Huntley * Palmers Petll Beurre.J
Marie and Coronation, in half i
pound pat kets.
CRAWFORD'S Butter Puffs in J;
lb. packets at 4d.
"U'lllit" and Puff Creams]
at t<. 6 I. p-r lb.
Currant Puffs at 1/3 lb.
UPTON'S COCOA.
HH
DO YOU REALISE
the importance of pure Soap ?
Do you know that
Sunlight Soap
make clothes whiter, and work
lighter ? True economy is to
use a pure Soap. Sunlight
Soap is guaranteed
pure, therefore can-
not destroy your
clothes. Preserve
your clothes by
using Sunlight Soap.
LEVER BROTHERS LIMITED. ^/'
Port Sunlight. England. /
4
2 OZ.
6d.
TELLS
ABOUT
KOPS
* NON-ALCOHOLIC
BEVERAGES.
ALE AND STOUT.
A delicious Drink brewed from
Hops containing all the tonic
value of ale and StOUt but with-
out the after effects, pi ice Gd.
bottle, 5^ doz.
LIMK CHAMPAGNE.
Pints fid. Quarts lod.
SPARKLING VAJ.ENTO WINK.
Pints 7'd Per do*. 68.
GINGER ALE &GINGER BEER
Pints t.d. Per do/. 5s.
SPECIAL PRICES BY THE
CASES.
SOLD AT BLACK'S
222 Hay St, and
THE NASSAU CANDY
KITCHEN.
II. S. BI.XCK. A.-nt.
wiiiiams Shoes
Are BETTER
THE SPECIAL CALL AT
THE ROVAL STORK
OCR "Roval" ll.i,i-ehold
Biand Moor selling at 2 pence per lb. and 30s. per bag of
196 lbs.
"tfolden 'Mar Flour 2 lbs for 3|d.
and "Laurel Brand" KlourM 2 lb*
for (id.
Centennial Flour per bap 28s.
Pigs Feet in Vinegar at jA. per lb.'
Brown Sugar at ajd.pei lb Our j
rice white and clean, best in town j
selling at 4d. per quart.
All our Groceries are freab and
good quality and cheap.
Pure Jamaica Ruin at tos, pit
gallon.
I \MFS L. SAWDERS & Co.
Nassau N. P.
Bahama*.
April 15th 1913-
50000 BOOKS
Free By Mail j
WORTH tOTO MYMM
mStfSm <&** ?'..A-"!!'rd.'-
THE
H0M
CURE
OF
MEN'S AILMENTS
quick tr rue copy *rf jBI-------

nr.-l 1
DR. JOS. USTERtCp.^"ar
Sands'STUDio
C DOSES Thursday 22nd f
month only.
r
W. A. MATHER.
UNDERTAKER
DESIRES to inform his friends
and the Public that he lias
just received a complete outfit of
facilities for the business of an un-
dertaker, which places him in a
position to carry out runeiala that
may be entrusted to his care with
system and despatch ; and respect'
fully solicits their patronage GeJ
mv Price! liist and prove that '.hey
are the very lowest for first class
'''l -------------
WL would .form all who appreciate a Good Smoke that we nr
have on h.nd an extensive Slock of HAVANA I IGARS. \\J
guamnteeour brand to be made of the finest Havana and Mimati
Wrappers, and Havana Fillers throughout. ...... j ,
These Cigars are manufactured on our premises by skilled workmi
and treat pains are taken to produce an a.tide of superior quality.
The Rucresn *re have met with in the past leads us confidently to exp*-
,he patronage of connoiMun L SAWDERS c,
Bat St reel
N 0 T I C E.
THIS is to inform my Patrons
and the Public m General
that I have opened my Public
Black Smith Shop; and am now
ready to do anything in the line Ol
General repair or new work Horse
Shoeing Specially. All work done
Mechanicallv.
P. A. Huvler.
453 Pay Street. East (Whai.f;
Shef-
field
Cutlery
a fine assortment of:
RAZORS
Table Knives
Pocket Knives
Butcher Knives
Bread Knives
Carving Sets in Cases,
and
SCISSORS.
^^^^^^^^^^ for sale by
Chas. E. Albury.


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