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The Tribune.
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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01871
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Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: 05-19-2011
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Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
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General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:01871

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A PROFOUNDLY negative effect is feared for businesses on Prince Charles Drive as the Ministry of Works prepares to close the road for two months. Businesses bracing for a full road closure between Pine Barren Road and College Gardens from June 11 maintain they are bound to feel an eco nomic impact during at least eight weeks of planned road works. The Shell service station and shop at the front of the Plaza del Sol shopping mall is at the centre of the area set for clo sure, as are the Swiss Pastry Shop and Institute of Business and Commerce in the same plaza. Commonwealth Bank and Doris Johnson Senior High School are across the street. Shell station manager Everette Sands said the partial road closure implemented at the eastern end of Prince Charles Drive in March has already had a negative impact on business, and he said the full road closure in front of the shopping plaza is likely to con tinue the downward trend. Over the last month there has been a drop in customers, NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER Business outrage over r oad closure Volume: 107 No.148SATURDAY, MAY 21, 2011 PRICE 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 W EATHER ABUNDANT SUNSHINE HIGH 87F L OW 77F Pr ince Charles Dr iv e set to be shut for two months fr om J une 11 TRY OUR N EW CHICKEN MAC The Tribune THEPEOPLESPAPER BIGGESTANDBEST LATESTNEWSONWWW.TRIBUNE242.COM FREETODAY: BODY & MORE YOUR HEALTHANDFITNESS MONTHLYMAGAZINE THOUSANDSFLOCKTO BAHAMASEMBASSYINWASHINGTONDC TOENJOYBAHAMIANCULTURE n n SEE PAGE 12 TRIBUNE S A Y S F AREWELL TO CHIEF REPORTER RUPERT MISSICK JR. By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net A LOCAL attorney accused of stealing $85,000 from a client was arraigned in court yesterday. Police have charged 57year-old attorney Tyrone Pyfrom with stealing the cash from a client sometime between Tuesday, January 5, and Wednesday, March 2, 2010. LOCAL ATTORNEY CHARGED WITH STEALING $85,000 FROM CLIENT SEE page seven ROAD CONTROVERSY: New Providence Road Improvement and Infra structure Project engineer Charlene Collie. SEE page seven A YOUNG American chef at a Nassau restaurant was treated in hospital for head and other injuries after being beat en in his home by armed invaders. Dan Quirk, 25, had just returned to his Western Road residence shortly after midnight on Wednesday from his job at the Mahogany House, near Lyford Cay, when he was met inside by two men. The men ambushed and punched him, and a struggle followed, according to a family member, who did not wish to be identified. He was beaten all over. He got two blows to the head. Hes doing okay now though, the relative said yes terday. Mr Quirk, who moved to the Bahamas from the US to work at Mahogany House, the restaurant developed and owned by Bahamian hedge-fund manager, Mark Holowesko, received a dozen stitches to AMERICAN CHEF INJURED IN HOME INVASION BY ARMED MEN F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f SEE page seven By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A LOCAL government hopeful who intends to run for North Eleutheras Current Island seat has created waves in the community as locals say he does not have a right to the seat. George Taylor, of Taylors Electrical and Mechanical Company Limited in East Street South, Nassau, claims he has been working to relocate to the North Eleuthera island community of just 50 people over the last three years. However, residents say Mr Taylor does not live in the community, and although his mother is from the community, he is not. LOCAL GOVERNMENT HOPEFULS ELECTION BID R UNS INTO PROBLEMS SEE page seven RYAN PINDER By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A GENEROUS Tribune reader has reached out to help the family struggling to raise a mentally-handicapped womans child conceived when she was allegedly raped by a police offi cer. The junior high school teacher was so moved by the article about the familys hardship and fight for justice, she agreed with her friend, a lawyer, to pay their $2,400 electricity bill so they could once again have power. As the main breadwinner, the 48-year-old single mother who has raised 13 children and now lives with her two sons, seven and 14, her daughter, 26, who has Downs Syndrome, and the TRIBUNE READER PAYS BEC BILL OF S TR UGGLING F AMIL Y SEE page seven MOVINGOCCASION: The Tribune family bid farewell to its long-time Chief Reporter Rupert Missick Jr yesterday. Rupert, who was recently honoured by the Southern Newspaper Publishers Association for his Insight reports, is pursuing a new role in public relations. Reflecting on his time at The Tribune Rupert who was only 19 when he started working as a cub reporter at the paper in 2001 said: It feels like I grew up at The Tribune. I experienced a lot of ups and downs in the nearly ten years I was here, not only professionally, but personally as well. I have always believed, and still believe today, that The Tribune has some of the most creative, tal ented and hard-working journalists working in the industry today. I regret in leaving that I will not be part of this brilliant team when they cover the upcoming election. Managing Editor John Fleet paid tribute to Rupert and his work at The Tribune He said: Rupert will be a hard act to follow. As Chief Reporter he made the job his own, offering advice and guidance to his team of reporters. He always got the very best of them. Rupert is one of the nicest guys I ever met. His impact on The Tribune has been immense. We will all miss him very much. Rupert is pictured here with a framed photo of himself which was used a few years ago as part of an in-house advertisement series.

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SUCCESSFUL END TO FIRST SESSION OF GET WELL BAHAMAS CHALLENGE LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, SATURDAY, MAY 21, 2011 THE TRIBUNE +(/3:$17('&$6+,(5t 6$/(6(56216QHHGHGIRUUHWDLOVWRUHRQ3DUDGLVH,VODQG0DWXUHDQGUHOLDEOHSHUVRQVRQO\ :LOOLQJWRWUDLQWKHULJKWLQGLYLGXDO 0XVWEHDEOHWRZRUNQLJKWVGD\VLQFOXGLQJ 6XQGD\VDQG+ROLGD\V THE inaugural session of the Get Well Bahamas challenge has ended successfully with the achievement of the initiatives shortterm goals. Participants with diabetes saw a drop in their haemoglobin levels while those struggling with weight issues dropped the pounds. The National Insurance Boards Get Well Bahamas (GWB 18 with an awards ceremony under the theme, Recognising Excellence and Rewarding the Best. The short-term goals of this programme to reduce the participants dependence on prescription medication and improve their vital statistics through fitness training and wellness coaching were achieved, GWB representatives said. Dr Carnille Farquharson, family medicine specialist, reported that three per cent of the diabetics in the programme dropped their A1c levels by at least one per cent, therefore decreasing their risk of death by heart attack. Most participants also lost more than 10 pounds during the programme, which can improve blood sugar and cholesterol levels and overall health. While all participants were congratulated for their achievements, the overall winners included Dinah Knowles in first place, who lost a whopping 50 pounds, Reann KellyKing, who lost 15 per cent body of her body weight to place second, and her mother, Ber nice Munnings, who placed third with a 14.1 per cent body weight loss. The closing ceremony, held at Workers House, was the culmination of a three-monthlong partnership betweenNIB, Jemi Health & Wellness and Body Zone Fitness. The GWB programme was designed to combat obesity and the prevalence of chronic non-communicable diseases like hypertension, diabetes, heart disease and high cholesterol which affect one in every three Bahamians. During the ceremony, Minister of Education Desmond Bannister said the treatment of such illnesses consumes the majority of the countrys national health budget, requiring the expansion of hospitals, a greater demand for medical professionals, and increasing the budget for medication and rehabilitative services. Therefore, a focus on preventative, rather than treatment, is essential not only to government spending but also to the health of the public. Those of you who participated in the first Get Well Bahamas challenge are at the forefront of the national prevention movement. A programme like this, which focuses on prevention rather than treatment, is a winner for all. For government, it means containing healthcare spending, retarding borrowing and inflation, and ensuring a better return on its investment. For business and industry, it means fewer staff sick days, more on-task hours, greater productivity and increased ability to compete. For the individual, it increases the chance of remaining physically and mentally fit and socially active for life, said Minister Bannister. Algernon Cargill, NIB director, described the challengers as a family of courageous men and women, and reminded them that the Get Well Bahamas challenge was the first step in their journey to wellness. He also announced the launch of the Get Well Bahamas Shield of Excellence, a formal recognition of exemplary service provided by the programmes partners. To a rousing round of applause from the 40 participants, Dr Cargill presented awards to Janette MartinIsaacs, president of Jemi Health & Wellness, and Albert Rahming, president of Body Zone Fitness. While the ceremony signified the end of phase one of the Get Well Bahamas programme, Mrs Isaacs encouraged participants to continue their wellness maintenance. Y OUNG women representing the Bahamas captured Miss and Junior Miss crowns in the Atlanta Caribbean Carnival Pageant. Representing the Bahamas, 20-year-old Nadia Barr and 14-year-old Serena Turnquest took home the crowns of Miss and Junior Miss Atlanta Caribbean Carnival, respectively, at the recent fourth annual scholarship pageant at Miller Grove High School in Lithonia, Geor gia. The pageant was presented by the Atlanta Caribbean Carnival Bandleaders Association (ACCBA year-old Priya Mungroo, representing the island of Trinidad, walked away with the title of Princess. Other countries represented in the pageant i ncluded Antigua and Barbuda, Guyana, Jamaica, Haiti, Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands. The event which included a variety of enter tainment highlighted the contestants competing in a series of categories including cultural/historical wear; evening wear and talent. I n addition to the crown, Ms Barr won the M iss Congeniality title, peoples choice, cultural/historical presentation, talent and evening wear, while Ms Turnquest also walked away with the people's choice, Miss Entrepreneur, evening wear and cultural/historical presentation wear titles. Ive watched this group of young ladies p repare and rehearse for several months and on the big day they made us all proud. They competed well, made friends along the way and will all go on to achieve great things in the future, said pageant director Nadine Quin l and-Phillips. During the year-long reign, the young ladies will represent Atlanta Caribbean Carnival at various events in metro-Atlanta and around the country. Among their many appearances, the beauties will be seen at the upcoming 23rd Annual Atlanta Caribbean Carnival, to be held May 28, as well as othere vents leading up to the Carnival celebration. T he Bahamian queens were among the popular featured guests at a recent event at the Tyler Perry Studios in Atlanta promoting the Bahamas. THE mission of the ACCBA is to promote a broader understanding and deeper appreci ation for Caribbean culture by seeking the i nterest of Atlanta Caribbean carnival groups and using the Atlanta Caribbean Carnival as a vehicle for the promotion of Caribbean culture among the broader Metro Atlanta community. Beauties of Bahamian descent claim titles in CARIBBEAN PAGEANT I ve watched this group of young ladies prepare and rehearse for several months a nd on the big day they made us all proud. P ageant director Nadine Quinland-Phillips CHALLENGING TIME: Pictured (l-r ond place winner Reann Kelly-King; Tami Francis, manager of the National Prescription Drug Plan; first place winner Dinah Knowles; Algernon Cargill, director of the National Insurance Board; and third place winner Bernice Munnings. Prizes included year supplies of Nautilus Water, gym memberships from Body Zone Fitness and Jemi Health & Wellness, gift certificates from Solomons Super Center, clothing from Fine Threads, Bonneville Bones, Adam and Eve, and Sizes Womens Full-Figured Fashions. (TCL Photo Wendell Cleare GRAND Bahama could receive a minor boost to its tourism industry as up to 1,500 vacationers are expected to visit t he island over a 14-week period starting at the end of this month. S ome 34 Italian-based travel agents will arrive in Freeport on M ay 31 aboard the Blue Panora ma Airlines Boeing 767 Jet from Milan, Italy as part of the Alpitours charter programme. The programme, now in its s econd year, has been extended by an additional eight weeks to a total of 14 weeks this year. It is expected to deliver approximately 1,500 visitors, arriving at 10.30pm on Tuesdays over fifteen flight rotations through September 6, 2011. Deputy Director-General of Tourism Ellison Tommy Thompson said the islands of the Bahamas continue to maintain a strong presence in the European marketplace. The beaches, pris tine environment and the value of the all-inclusive Grand Bahama island experiences compete favourably against other Caribbean destinations and the nearby Italian vacation favourites such as Kenya, Cape Verde and Senegal, Mr Thompson said. The European arrivals booked at the Viva Wyndham will be assigned to the 72 refurbished spacious guest rooms located on the beach front. The upgrades include vibrant tropical colours, redesigned bathrooms, new furniture, 32 LCD televisions and wireless internet services. The Ministry of Tourism and Aviation, Grand Bahama Island Tourism Board, the Radisson Our Lucaya Resort, Viva Wyndham Fortuna Beach Resort and industry partners have prepared a four-day itinerary of special activities, tours and site inspec tions as part of the destination familiarisation programme. The travel agents will also visit Nassau to experience the product prior to departure on June 7, 2011. The European passengers will be processed at Grand Bahama International Airport upon arrival and through the Domestic Terminal on departure. The flight will stop in Cancun, Mexico on the return to Milan. T OURISM BOOST FOR GRAND B AHAMA

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U N E M PL O Y M E N T nu m b e r s a r e h i g h e s t a m o n g B aha mi a ns wh o ar e li v ing with di sa bi l i t i e s a nd o n "t he m a rgins of soci ety", D isabl ed Pers o ns Or g a nis a tion ( DPO ) p r es id ent Drexel D eal sa id S p e a k i n g a t t h e K i w a n i s Cl ub of N ew Prov id ence t hi s we ek, M r D ea l sa i d t h e gov e rnme nt c ould sa ve mi lli o ns of d o l l a r s i f i t t r a i n e d p e r s o n s w i t h d i s a b i l i t i e s f o r c a r e e r s r a t h e r t h a n s p e n d i n g l a r g e sums of m oney on suppo rti ng t h e m The D PO pres i dent s ai d t h e la ck of proper ed ucat i on and tr ain i n g initiative s is o ne o f th e m a j o r i s s u e s f a c i n g p e r s o n s w i t h d i s a b i l i t i e s i n t h e Baham as. It i s a "syst em t hat is hi nde rin g p ersons wi t h di sabi l it i es, he sai d. In an ef f ort to coun t er t hi s, t he D P O l au n ch ed a n i n i t i a t i ve l a st y ea r w h i ch i s ai m ed at e m p o w e r i n g p e r so n s w i t h di sabi li t i es. In hi s sp eech t o t he K i wa nis C lu b, M r D eal s ai d t hat on Jul y 2 8, 2010 t he D PO and 21 o f i t s m e m b e r s l a u n c h e d i t s own com pany under t he name "Yes W e Can P roduct s. The f irs t phas e o f t his i n i ti ati ve, he sai d, w a s t he i ntroducti on of t w o po wdered l aund r y det ergent s. "T he Y es W e Can i ni t i at ive s e e k s t o a d d r e s s t h e s o c i a l i ssues, f aced by pe rsons wi t h disabil it ies i n t he Bahamas, by u s i n g bu s i n es s p r i n c i p les f o un d in so cial en t er pr i s es," Mr Deal said "O ne o f th e ma ny is s ue s fa cing us persons wi th disabil i ti es i s t h e l a c k o f p r o p e r e d u c a ti on al a nd t rai ni ng oppo rtu ni tie s fo r a ca r e er Th is le ad s to a h i g h l e v e l o f u n e m p l o ym e n t a m o n g u s p e r s o n s w i t h d i s abi l i t i es, w hi ch is t he hi ghe st in ou r cou nt ry. A s a resul t of th i s, t he a verage person w it h a d i s a b i l i t y i n t h e B a h a m a s liv e s b e low th e ma r g ins of s oc iety and i n t oo ma ny cases o ut righ t p overt y, Mr D eal sa id H e f urt her not ed : "W e a r e the mos t vulner able so cioe con o m i c g r o u p i n o u r b e l o v e d count ry, and i t i s t he way we a r e v i e w e d b y o t h e r s t h a t la rg ely hind er s ou r gr owth an d our progress. M r D e al s ai d t h at p er so n s wi t h d isab i li t i es are vi ew ed a s l i a b i l i t i e s an d t o o o f t en as a burden "Th e f o cu s is ce ntre d on our di sabi li t i es, and not o ur cap ab i l it ies. If all you can se e is my probl em and no t t he s o lu t io n, it i s easy t o t reat m e as if I' m t h e p r o b l e m b e c a u s e o f m y d isa bili ty I 'm the one w ho c anno t be ed u ca t e d an d t ra i n ed fo r a caree r," he sai d. M r D e a l c l a i m e d t h a t t h e sys t e m" i s mor e demor ali s i n g a n d d e b i l i t a t i n g t o p e r s o n s w i t h d i s a b i l i t i e s, n o t i n g t h a t w hen a per s on with a dis ab i lity a t t empt s to e arn an income he or she i s no lo nger g iv en go vernme nt a s si st ance "Thi s i s why w e say, i t i s the syste m, t hat i s mo re dem oral i si ng an d d e bil itati ng to u s th a n o u r d i s a b i l i t y i s T h i s i s t h e real i t y we f ace eac h d ay, l iv i n g w i t h a d i s a b i l i t y i n t h e Baham as, he sai d. Mr Dea l noted that it would ma ke m o re sen se f o r t he gov ernm e nt t o t rai n pe rso ns wi t h di sa b i l i t i e s f o r a c a re er t h an t o s p e n d h u n d r e d s o f t h o u s an ds of dol l ars t o si mpl y provi de a ssi st a nce t o t he m. "W hen t he f o cus i s o n t he e m p o w e r m e n t o f a p e r s o n wi t h a di sa bi l i t y, we w i l l n ow b ecome co nt r i bu t ing m e mbers t o t h e s y s t e m r a t h e r t h a n hea vi l y d ep end i ng on i t A s a c o untry we w il l save hu ndreds o f m i l l i o n s o f d o l l a r s i n t h e l o n g r u n M o r e i m p o r t a n t l y th e foo d sto r es w ill ma ke mo r e mone y, the c l o t hing stores wil l m a k e m o r e c a r d e a l e r s h i p ho m e d ev el o p er s, ba n ks a nd in suranc e co mp ani es al l st and t o be nef i t he sa i d. M r Deal sai d t hat under the "Y es W e c an In i t i a t i ve ", t he D P O h a s b e e n o f f e r i n g l o w pr i c e d w a sh i n g a nd c l e an i ng sup pl i es. P e o p l e a r e n o w t a k i n g ad va nt ag e o f ou r d i sc ou nt ed p ri ces f rom 14 p er ce nt an d a s l ow as 31 per cent on product s s uch a s G a in pow de r and l i q ui d lau ndr y d eter gents Cloro x b l e a c h J o y d i s h w a sh i n g l i q u i d, D o wn y, G ai n f abr i c so f t e n e r s M r C l e a n a n d m a n y m o re. "More over i f thre e or mor e pers ons pl ac e a n or der t og et he r, t h ey w i l l rece i ve an add i t i onal 7 per cent of f t hei r cost f or a n u nb el i ev ab l e d i sc ou n t o f up t o 3 8 per ce nt on c l ean i n g su pp l ie s On top of ou r low pric i n g, t h er e i s a lso fre e delive ry r i ght t o yo ur d oo r. To see a c o m p l e t e l i s t i n g o f a l l o u r pac kag es plea se v i s it ou r webs i t e a t : w w w t a k e m e t on ew hei ght s com M r D ea l s ai d. "W h at w e' re do i ng t hro ugh t he "Y e s W e C a n i n i t i at i ve i s n othin g new othe r c oun tries h a ve b ee n em p o we ri n g t h ei r c i t i z e n s w i t h d i s a b i l i t i e s f o r ye ar s thr o ug h se lf e mplo yme nt o pp ort u ni t i es he s ai d. A cc o r di n g t o M r D e a l t h e Y e s W e C a n i n i t i a t i v e s e e k s n o t o n l y t o e m p l o y p e rs o n s w i t h d i s a b i l i t i e s, b u t a l s o t o l i f t t h e m u p m e n t a l l y b y r e b u i l d i n g t h e i r s e l f e s t e e m s e l f w o r t h a n d t h e i r s e l f c o n f i d e n c e LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE SA TURDA Y MA Y 21, 201 1, P AGE 3 A s a C h r i s t i a n B a h a m i a n I am angry a n d v e x t h a t t h e t w o m o t h e r s o f t h e s e v e n you ng kids ages t wo to 10 ye a rs o ld so m e o f w ho m have tragicall y peri sh ed in the h ome ; one m ot he r w as de por te d t o H a i ti a f ew y ea rs ag o a nd the other had left the kids in Ja n u a ry Li tt le Na s s a u c a n t e v e n p a y i t s o w n t e a c h e r s pol i ceme n properl y, muc h l es s to h av e to b aby -sit an d raise t h e s e b a b i e s l e f t b e h i n d b y m o t h e r s i n a s y s t e m w h e r e money is taken from Bahami a n i n s t i t u t i o n s f o r h e a l t h s cho ol ing, et c. It is s imply cr u el and inhuman to leave these l it tl e babi es to grow up almost b y t h e m s e l v e s i n a n o t h e r man's country. No fit parents should leave so many of their y o u n g b a b i e s i n a d i f f e r e n t country to grow up." GOT CUCKOOED "I vex that large banks with b i l l i o n s o f d o l l a r s i n a s s e t s making millions of Bahamian d o l l a r s i n p r o f i t s y e a r a f t e r year from the Bahamian soci ety, should show their corpo ra te c itiz e n sh ip d u r in g th e se e c o n o m i c t i m e s w h e n t h e po l itic ia ns s ay t h in gs g et tin g be tte r b y lay ing o ff all the se female Bahamian bank work ers in their own country. And especial ly those wit h chil dren B e t he un su ng B ah am i a n h er o, Mr Bank, others do it so can you." OBSERVER "I plain vex wid all dis mur deration an crime going on an all of them churches is having what is called a 'low profile'; th e y n e e d s t o c h a n g e A i n t t hey t he o nes w ho is supposed to b e sh o u tin g l ou d e st 'th o u shall not tief,' thou shall not ki l l' t hou sha ll not c ovet y our neighbour's tings' ?" CITIZEN JOE "I am vex with all the land owne rs who gre atly fa ci litate and encourage crime to occur an d gr o w b y a ll o win g t hu g s c r im i na ls pur s e s nat ch er s, j onsers, mu rdere rs, stran ge men to walk through 'track roads' o r s h o r t c u t s a c r o s s t h e i r unsecured properties thereby q u i c k l y e l u d i n g p o l i c e a n d m a k i n g g o o d t h e i r e s c a p e Pol ice s h oul d n ot if y owners o f those track road properties or t h e y s h o u l d b e s e i z e d a n d s ec ure d by t he g over nm ent fo r t h e p ub l i c go od or s ol d t o c o m pensate the victims." V I C T I M S C O M P E N S A T I O N I v e x b e c a u s e d e s p i t e spending almost $300 million o f t h e p u b li c m o n e y f o r t h e Min istry o f Ed uc atio n wh ich expe r ien ced educa t e d p eople ha ve q ue stio ne d, no o ne h as y e t a p p a r e n t l y s p e n t a f e w t ho u s an d do l l a r s t o h av e a s oc i o l o g i c a l a n a l y s i s o f v a r i o u s g r o u p i n t e r a c t i o n s c l a s s e s t hei r makeup, etc, t o i mpr ove education and to also publish the report." TAX PAYER WHY YOU HAPPY? "I am happy that the funny s ea son i s her e bec aus e t he v oters can sit back and be enter t a i n e d b y a l l t h e s p e e c h e s ac tio n s o r in a ct io n s o f th o se seeking our vote." 'I THINK THEREFORE I VOTE (AM).' P O L I C E a r r e s t e d a 2 8 y ear-ol d man who thre at ene d officers with a handgun before lead ing them on a foo t ch as e in Yellow Elder Gardens. At ar ou nd 5.1 5p m on Thu r sd a y o f fic e r s o f th e M o b il e Di v ision acting on a tip proceeded t o Me lv e r n Ro a d Y e ll o w E ld e r G a r d e n s w h e r e t he y s a w a m a n acting suspiciously. As the officers approached, t h e c u lp r i t p u ll e d o u t a h a n d g u n and pointed it in the direction of t he o f f i c er s w hi l e r un n i ng towards the rear of a home in the area. Po li ce cont i nued th eir p urs u it, c a u g h t u p w it h th e 2 8 y e a r o ld wh o is p r es e n tly on b ai l for a r m e d r o b b e r y a n d c a u s i n g harm and reco vered a hand gun with a quantity of ammu nition. The firearm they recovered from the 28-year-old was only o n e o f f i v e i l l e g a l w e a p o n s po l i c e ca p t u r e d ov e rn i g ht i n three separate incidents. S ome time a r ou nd 8 .30 p m o n T h u r s d a y o f f i c e r s o f R a p i d Stri ke wer e on r out ine pat rol o n L i n c o l n B o u l e v a r d w h e n they conducted a search of an area at the rear of a tyre shop o n L i n c o l n B o u l e v a r d a n d r e c ov e r ed a s ho tgu n alo n g w ith s h o tgu n s he lls N o on e wa s ta ken into custody. I n the t h ird incid ent, office rs of the Central Detective Unit discovered three firearms on a property at Westridge Estates. Pol i c e report s in dicat e t hat s ometi me ar ound 11 45 pm on Thursday officers of the CDU, acting on a tip, proceeded to a v a c a n t p r o p e r t y w h e r e t h e y r e c o v e r e d t hr e e h a n dg u n s wi th a quantity of ammunition. No one was taken into cus tody; however, poli ce i nves t i gations into all matters contin ue. POLICE took 10 persons into custody following Opera tion Southern Storm'. O n T hu rsday bet w ee n t he h ours of 1pm and 11p m of fi c ers of t he Sout he rn Di vision continued with their operation wh i ch res ul ted in 10 pe opl e n i n e m e n a n d o n e w o m a n being taken into custody. T h e w o m a n a g e d 2 2 w a s ar rest ed for unl awf ul ly carryi n g a r m s a n d t h e m e n w e re ar re s t e d o n v ar i o u s o f f en c e s s u c h a s b re a c h o f a c ou r t or d er ar m ed robbery, possession of d a n g e r o u s d r u g s b u r g l a r y t h r e a t s o f d e a t h a n d a s s a u l t with a deadly weapon. W H Y Y O U V E X ? DPO pr es id en t: Go vt sh ou ld t r ain dis ab le d POLICE NEW S DISABLED Persons Organisation (DPO) president Drexel Deal addresses the Kiwanis Club of New Providence. L a c k o f p r o p er ed u c a t io n o ne o f m a j o r i s s u e s f a c i n g d i s a b l e d

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EDITOR, The Tribune. I watched with amazement the developing story which involved three high ranking PLP officials sending a letter to the Leader of the Official opposition. The intent of the letter was to advise the Rt Honourable Perry Christie that he should not allow the ratification of several PLP candidates in the upcoming general election. Lets dissect this for a moment. Mr Raynard Rigby is a former chairman of the PLP. Mr Philip Galanis is a former PLP campaign coordinator and Mr George Smith is a former parliamentarian. Obviously, these men have been in the inner circle of the PLP and they have a good grasp on how the PLP operates. The fact that these three esteemed men would send a letter to the PLP leader gives the appearance that democracy as it relates to the ratifi cation of candidates is not alive in the PLP. They addressed this letter to the Rt Hon Perry Christie because they felt that he could influence the selection process of potential candidates. Doesnt the PLP have a selection committee? Dont potential MPs go through a fair process where they are vetted and then the best candidate chosen? Obviously, Mr Rigby, Mr Smith and Mr Galanis dont think so. They feel that the power lies in the partys leader. Shouldnt there be an even keel process where potential candidates can all have a chance to appeal to the masses by way of debates on television and radio? The fact that there is a selection committee to choose candidates is fundamentally flawed and it leaves too much power in the hands of a small few. This doesnt appear to be democratic to me.......I wonder who selects the selection committee. DEHAVILLAND MOSS Nassau,a May, 2011. EDITOR, The Tribune. As a young teenager growing up in New Providence in the mid-1980s, I was fascinated and fearful of drug dealers. I watched them drive fancy cars, ride motorbikes and carry around brick cellular phones. I also watched them carry around stacks of money which would bulge from their pockets. Additionally, drug dealers employed huge posies and if you got in trouble with one of their cronies you could face possible reprisal and would not get any justice. Society back then did not seem too concerned about right and wrong because literally everyone seemed to be profiting from illegal drug activity. Drug dealers could deposit huge sums of money at commercial banks and could buy cars cash without even raising an eyebrow as to the source of funds. I worked for a body work shop during the summer and sometimes after school and saw first hand the number of cars that some of the drug dealers drove andI enjoyed the tips that I would receive when the drug boys came to pick up their cars. Moreover, drug dealers walked around with thousands of dollars and bribery of government officials and the public at large was commonplace. Over 25 years later, the country is still reeling from this openly illegal activ ity that has scarred the lives of many Bahamians. Some have died, are in jail, and have become drug addicts. A lot of the drug dealers from that time are now penniless and they are now passing on their poor work ethics and morals to their children. The numbers game has been illegal in the Bahamasf or as long as I can remember. It has always been controlled by a small few. Now we have web shops. Over the last five years, these web shops have grown exponentially and are more technologically advanced than many government offices. Yet, the web shops continue to open up unabated all across the Bahamas. They seem to be glorified by Bahamians of all sectors of society, inclusive of the armed forces and the legislature. I listened to a talk show recently and members of a web shop were special guests. They talked about their contributions to society and openly admitted their business activities. Will there be outrage?....You guessed right. No there will not. As a child growing up, I had a strong parental base and also I watched the programmes on ZNS which aired the campaign, Just say no and I decided that I did not want to be a part of the drug trade nor use drugs. My focus was to become educated. The message being sent to our children is not a good one. How can numbers be illegala nd then be glorified on n ational radio? Do we think that our children are silly? Do we think that they arent listening? Are certain officials on the numbers racket payroll? Remember that criminala ctivity does not happen in isolation and usually it takes an organised network to successfully profit from crime. We are telling our kids to listen to what we say, but they are watching what we do. We need not be surprised when so many murders are occur ring in the Bahamas. We need not be surprised when no one stops at the traffic lights any more. (Yes you, Rex X, I saw you yesterday when you ran the red light). We need not be surprised when Members of Parliament are not annually declaring their assets. Why hasnt the Attorney General filed any charges? We need not be surprised when web shops are operating on every corner in New Providence. I must admit that in hindsight that the War on Drugs overwhelmed the Bahamas, but much effort has been made to curtail this problem. The police have also raided web shops. But these two industries are profitable and getting an easy dollar will not deter Bahamians from entering these illegal trades. Despite emerging technologies today that can track drug boats and despite forensic accounting that can detect illegal funds from web shops, it remains people who must stand in the gap and take a stand. Only Bahamians who have morals will be able to bring resolution to these illicit businesses. Does history repeat itself? The Bahamas has a long line of blooming illegal industries. From shipwrecking, blockade running, drug dealing, human trafficking to number houses, we always had illegal indus tries that involved many prominent Bahamians and residents alike. Complicit behaviour continues to erode our society. No need to tell the bad man to put down his gun when you are playing the three and four ball. Crime is crime. There is no differ ence. Our social behaviour is not improving and we as a country have much to be con cerned about. We are out of order. D EHAVILLAND MOSS Nassau, May 19, 2011. EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, SATURDAY, MAY 21, 2011 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. Publisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama WEBSITE www.tribune242.com updated daily at 2pm JERUSALEM In laying out some of the parameters for an Israeli-Palestinian peace deal, P resident Barack Obama is presenting the Israeli a nd Palestinian leaders with tricky and fateful choices. Obama said the basis for border talks between the two must be Israel's frontier before it cap-t ured the West Bank, Gaza and east Jerusalem in t he 1967 Mideast War. It's something Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas has been waiting to hear from Obama for more than two years. Abbas must now decide whether these assurances are enough forh im to drop plans to ask the U.N. General Assembly in September to recognize a Palestinian state in the territories occupied in 1967, and instead return to negotiations with Israel. H owever, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu signaled after his meeting with Oba-m a Friday in Washington that he is not prepared to consider the U.S. president's proposals, calling t he 1967 borders "indefensible." There is another big hurdle en route to the resumption of peace talks that Obama clearly wants Abbas' reconciliation with his bitter rival, Hamas. Considered a terror group by theU .S. and Israel, the Islamic militant group has given no indication that it is willing to moderate as i t forms a possible unity government with Abbas' Fatah movement. O bama has asked the Palestinians for a "credible answer" to that problem. Abbas says he and not the Palestinian government will be negotiating and there is a sense that such a finessing would be acceptable to t he world community if Netanyahu would go along. However, Netanyahu said Friday that A bbas would have to choose between Hamas and peace talks. A bbas consulted by phone with several Arab foreign ministers, and planned to meet Satur d ay in Jordan with King Abdullah II, before responding to Obama's parameters, said Palestinian negotiator Saeb Erekat. After his return to the West Bank, he will meet with PLO and Fatah leaders in coming days, Erekat said. E rekat said it's too early to say whether the Palestinians will now drop their U.N. recognitionb id. He said Netanyahu's comments amounted to a "total rejection of the Obama vision and s peech." A U.S. official, speaking on condition of anonymity in exchange for discussing sensitive negotiations, said Obama's formulation in a speech Thursday, endorsing the pre-1967 ceasef ire line, was presented in the hopes of dissuading the Palestinians from going ahead with theirU .N. plan. The president said the 1967 frontier should s erve as a baseline, but allowed for mutually agreed land swaps. It differed from previous U.S. positions in nuance but important nuance. "The U.S. is now formally on record, in no u ncertain terms, advocating for an initial deal based on the 1967 lines, with land swaps, and a greed security provisions," said Scott Lasen sky, an analyst with the U.S. Institute of Peace. "The administration had danced around that formulation for some time, but typically had f ramed it as an aspiration of the parties rather t han U.S. policy." Netanyahu has said he wanted Obama to reaffirm commitments made by President George W. Bush in a 2004 letter to then-Israelip remier Ariel Sharon. Referring to Israel's sett lements, Bush wrote that "in light of new realities on the ground ... it is unrealistic to expect that the outcome of final status negotiations will be a full and complete return to the armistice lines of 1949" a term synonymous with the pre-1967b orders. The Obama administration has said it did not consider that letter binding. The question has been around ever since the 1 967 Middle East war. A few months later Security Council Resolution 242 called for "with-d rawal of Israeli armed forces from territories occupied in the recent conflict," avoiding use of the territories" and leaving the sides to debate whether this meant Israel could keep some areas. In 2000, then-U.S. President Bill Clinton laid out parameters for a peace deal, proposing that the Palestinians keep all of Gaza and up to 96 perc ent of the West Bank, while Israel would annex areas where it has settled Jews in east Jerusalem a nd some Jewish settlements in the West Bank. The Palestinians would be compensated in a l and swap. That never led to agreement. Netanyahu's predecessor, Ehud Olmert, sought to annex 6.5 per cent of the West Bank to Israel, and offered an equal amount of Israeli land in exchange. Abbas said he was ready to s wap no more than 1.9 per cent, which means the vast majority of settlements would have to go. T hose talks broke off in 2008 as well. For Netanyahu, as head of the right-wing L ikud, it is a major leap that he is willing to state, as he did in Israel's parliament on Monday, that h e would acquiesce to a Palestinian state. But the Israeli leader still rejects a division of Jerusalem, wants to keep troops along the Jordan River on the Palestinian state's eastern flank, and wants to retain major blocs of Jewish settlem ents. Abbas repeatedly has asked Obama to present his own outlines for a final deal. Havingl ost faith in negotiations, the Palestinians have turned to a different plan: Going to the General A ssembly for recognition in September. But that is a problematic gambit, because it takes the Security Council to set membership in motion, and the Palestinians face a likely U.S. veto there. The General Assembly can only reco mmend; although the Palestinians have a nearcertain majority there, the outcome promises tob e messy and there are some concerns about how Palestinians will react after all the buildup p erhaps yields little change on the ground. Bassem Zbeidy, a Palestinian analyst, said Obamas speech did not meet Palestinian expectations and added that he was concerned that Obama criticized the Palestinians' planned U.N. b id and Abbas' recent reconciliation agreement with Hamas. ( This article was written by Dan Perry and Karin Laub of the Associated Press). Bahamian societys decadence LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Abbas, Netanyahu face hard choices Unscrupulous ratification of political candidates

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THE Bahamas Marine E xporters Association (BMEA reported that they are making progress with their initiatives to the protect and sustain thec ountrys $70 million lobster fishery industry. T he Bahamas is currently one of the leading producers of s piny lobster tails in the world earning about $70 million dollars or more per year. Due to t he high demand for Bahamian spiny lobster both domestically a nd internationally, unsustainable fishing practices have o ccurred that place pressure on lobster populations which ulti mately affect landings as well as cause negative impacts on the marine ecosystem. T he BMEA, which is comprised of local licenced lobster e xporters, has been working in partnership with the World W ildlife Fund, the Department of Marine Resources (DMR fishermen, buyers, and local non-government organisatons (NGOs a ble fishing practices and improve management of the s piny lobster fishery. Since 2009, the BMEA and i ts partners have developed and implemented a strategy to improve the lobster fishery industry under an initiative known as the Bahamas Spiny Lobster Fishery Improvement P roject (FIP mote more sustainable mana gement practices so that the industry performs at a level c onsistent with the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC standard. Eventually, the goal is that the Bahamas lobster fishery i ndustry will be able to become MSC-certified. T he MSCs mission is to use their eco-label and fishery cert ification programme to con tribute to the health of the worlds oceans by recognising and rewarding sustainable fish ing practices, influencing thec hoices people make when buying seafood, and working with p artners to transform the seafood market to a sustainable b asis. The objectives of the Bahamas Spiny Lobster FIP include improving data collection, completing a stock assessm ent, conducting education and outreach efforts on the import ance of the FIP, improving monitoring and enforcement, a nd enhancing management. Since the projects inception, the BMEA and its partners have successfully completed a number of activities. Some of t hese activities include: completing a stock assessment for l obster populations that will soon be peer-reviewed; reviewi ng illegal, unregulated, and unreported fishing in the country and its implications; conducting stakeholder meetings with fishermen, buyers, com m unity members, and government officials in New Provi-d ence, Grand Bahama, Long Island, Andros, Spanish Wells, a nd Abaco to increase awareness of the issues facing the lobster industry and the import ance of the FIP; actively supporting the Catch Certificate P rogramme implemented by the DMR, and BMEA memb ers implementing a zero tolerance programme against har vesting, buying and selling of undersized lobster tails. Also, to deter illegal har v esting of lobsters during the closed season, BMEA memb ers refuse to purchase any fresh caught lobster during this t ime and only sell lobster that was previously caught legally during the open season and frozen. Though a number of activi t ies have been completed, there is still much work to be done, t he BMEA. The organisation said it reco gnizes that if the countrys lobster populations, health of the ecosystems that support marine resources and the thriving Bahamian lobster industry are t o be sustained, then active management and enforcement o f the fishery must be put in place by various sectors. LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, SATURDAY, MAY 21, 2011 THE TRIBUNE Y OUNG Bahamians with innovative business ideas are receiving the boost they need to get their companies started with the Ministry of Youths Self Starter Programme, according to participants. The four recipients of the self starter g rant, Jameel Lightbourne (Cheesecake Heaven), Sharell Ferguson (SageEden International), Keshelle Kerr (Creative Wealth Bahamas), and Michael Bien-Aime (Mikes Janitorial Services how the programme has enriched their b usinesses and helped their professional development. It assists me in getting the equipment a nd machinery and the things I needed to get started, said Mr Bien-Aime, owner of Mikes Janitorial Services. Youth Minister Charles Maynard said he hopes the success of this programme will lead to the initialisation of sister programmes that appeal to a broader audience. Its been so successful and proves that funding up to $5,000 can do so much if you have the kind of determination to makey our business work, he said on the Love 97 radio show The Breakfast Club this week. He also shared his displeasure at the fact that many young people in the Family Islands appear misinformed about the prog ramme. Promote I visited Abaco on the weekend and unfortunately many of the Family Islandersw ere under the impression that the programme had ended. So its important for us to continue to promote it and for people tok now that it is an option. Programme director Philip Simon outlined the application requirements that include a 18-30 age restriction, a current business licence, passport, proof of nationa l insurance and a health certificate for those serving food. We encourage people to attach a business summary or executive summary, photograph. So really what you want to do is dist inguish yourself in the application process as best you can from the competition, he said. Self Starter and Cheesecake Heaven owner Jameel Lightbourne said of the programme: I would encourage other applic ants to apply because not every day do you have someone offering to assist you without asking something in return; its a o nce in a lifetime chance. Applications for the Self Starters Programme are available at the Ministry of Youth on Thompson Boulevard and interested persons on Family Islands can contact their local administrators. A committee of five persons chaired by Mr Simon reviews the applications on a monthly basis. Young business-minded Bahamians receive boost THE Bahamas Maritime Cadet Corps, Freeport Group, t ook advantage of invitations to tour the facilities at the G rand Bahama Ship Yard as well as the Royal Bahamas Defence Force vessel "Nassau". D uring the visit to the shipyard, the students learnt of the importance of that facility to the Grand Bahama economy a s well as the prominent position that this company holds in the ship repair industry globally. The Grand Bahama Ship Y ard is located at the Freeport Harbour which is a sheltered, deep water facility and is situated literally at the crossroads of the major shipping lanes of the western hemisphere. A particular niche market the shipyard has been able to acquire is that of the cruise business. I t is considerably more cost-effective to dry dock a luxu ry liner at Freeport than to have the vessel travel all the way t o Europe, thereby saving a significant amount of time and money, the Grand Bahama Ship Yard said. W aiting time for dock space is also minimised as the ship yard has developed a reputation for berthing vessels upon their arrival rather than having them proceed to anchorage or to a lay berth until their dock is ready. They have the facilities to both "wet dock" and "dry d ock" a ship, that is, leave it in the water to do work above the waterline or to fully lift the ship out of the water and perform work on the hull, propulsion system or replace other structural members. The HMBS "Nassau" is presently at Bradford Marine receiving maintenance on its engines as well as other parts of the ship. This is the largest vessel in the Royal Bahamas Defence Force fleet and is presently under the command of Lt Cmdr Michael Saunders. Prior to shifting to Bradford Marine, the HMBS "Nassau" was moored at Freeport Harbour which is where the cadetsw ere able to board the vessel for a guided tour. They were shown all of the major parts of the ship includ ing the bridge, engine room and other public spaces. From the outset, the cadets said they were impressed with not just the physical plant but also with the level of knowledge and professionalism displayed by the seamen. As they moved through-out the vessel they were able to get a hands-on feel for a number of subject areas that were covered in the classroom, such as nomenclature and moorings. The Bahamas Maritime Cadet Corps seeks to introduce high school students to various aspects of the maritime industry and is operated under the auspices of the Ministry of the Environment in conjunction with the Bahamas Maritime Authority. STUDENTS RECEIVE MARITIME LESSON T OUR: S ub-Lieutenant Murphy of the HMBS "Nassau" conducts a t our of the vessel with the members of the Bahamas Maritime C adet Corps. SHIPYARDVISIT: Calle Gustaf Rotkirch, chairman and CEO of the Grand Bahama Ship Yard, is flanked by several cadets following their tour of that industrial facility. Also pictured are (left Forbes and (right PHOTOS: Clayton N. Curtis Progress in protecting, sustaining lobster fishery industry in Bahamas Four recipients of self starter grant THE GOAL is t hat the Bahamas lob ster fishery industry will be able to become M SC-certified.

PAGE 6

so I think there will be some affect, Im sure, he said. I just hope they can still access our business from Pine Barren Road. M r Sands said it was the first he had heard of the closure when called by The Tribune yesterday, although the Ministry of Public Works and Transport maintains a nnouncements were made at a public meeting on May 12. New Providence Road Improvement and Infrastructure Project engineer Charlene Collie said: Under full closure we max-i mise the work in a short time. We try to get substantially all of the work completed under full closure before r eleasing the road back to traffic. Ms Collie said a 24ins water main will be i nstalled in the area during the closure, as part of a project to install 20,000ft of water p ipe in New Providence at a rate of 300ft p er week to improve water quality and pressure. T he works are also intended to improve traffic flow in the highly congested area, M s Collie said. But Ryan Pinder the PLP MP for nearby E lizabeth Estates, fears the road closures will not pay off. If you close 10ft in the road it is a major inconvenience, Mr Pinder said. Thats a major artery. So closing the road for eight to ten weeks will have a profoundly negative affect onb usinesses in the area, threatening the longterm viability of some of them. Businesses that are not directly affected by the roadc losure will be indirectly affected because the area will be avoided by vehicular traffic,s o the businesses will be negatively impacted. A s businesses suffer, employees could lose their jobs, and business owners may f ace the possibility of not bouncing back when the roads re-open, he said. I hope it doesnt scar the businesses in Prince Charles Drive forever, Mr Pinders aid. The MP has also raised concerns for the safety of school students who walkt hrough the construction area to Doris Johnson High School, However his calls f or a pedestrian sidewalk have been ignored so far. He said: Its a safety concern and a h azard and my concern is that children will get injured. LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, MAY 21, 2011, PAGE 7 5 2wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y P revious CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.190.95AML Foods Limited1.181.180.000.1550.0807.66.78% 10.639.05Bahamas Property Fund10.6310.630.000.0130.200817.71.88% 7.504.40Bank of Bahamas6.916.910.000.2130.10032.41.45% 0 .530.17Benchmark0.180.180.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 2.842.70Bahamas Waste2.702.700.000.0470.09057.43.33% 2.201.96Fidelity Bank1.961.960.000.0160.040122.52.04% 1 2.008.69Cable Bahamas8.748.740.001.0500.3108.33.55% 2.852.35Colina Holdings2.552.550.000.4590.0405.61.57% 7 .005.80Commonwealth Bank (S1)6.986.980.000.4960.26014.13.72% 2.531.86Consolidated Water BDRs2.001.92-0.080.1110.04517.32.34%2 .541.31Doctor's Hospital1.311.310.000.1070.11012.28.40% 5.994.75Famguard5.405.400.000.3570.24015.14.44% 9.005.65Finco6.006.000.000.6820.0008.80.00% 9.858.60FirstCaribbean Bank8.608.600.000.4940.35017.44.07% 6 .004.57Focol (S)6.006.000.000.4350.16013.82.67% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 7.305.50ICD Utilities7.307.300.000.0120.240608.33.29% 10.509.80J. S. Johnson9.829.820.000.8590.64011.46.52% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.001.2070.2008.32.00% 5 2wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 9 9.4699.46Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029BAH2999.460.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 1 00.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +FBB13100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.00 52wkHi 52wkLow Symbol Bid$ Ask$ LastPrice DailyVol EPS$ Div$ P/E Yield B ISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:7% Interest 7%RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)2 9 May 2015 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-677-BISX (2479) | FACSIMILE: 242-323-232019 October 2022 P rime + 1.75% Prime + 1.75% 6.95%20 November 2029FRIDAY, 13 MAY 2011B ISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,435.26 | CHG -0.08 | %CHG -0.01 | YTD -64.25 | YTD % -4.28BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basis)Maturity 19 October 2017FINDEX: YEAR END 2008 -12.31%30 May 2013 52wk Hi 52wk Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Daily Vol EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield 1 0.065.01Bahamas SupermarketsN/AN/A14.00-2.9450.000N/M0.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.350.400.550.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.650.750.400.0290.00024.130.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 Months %NAV 3MTH 1.55731.4674CFAL Bond Fund1.55732.04%6.13%1.535365 3.01852.9020CFAL MSI Preferred Fund3.01852.41%4.01%2.952663 1.59761.5289CFAL Money Market Fund1.59761.50%4.50%1.580804 3.20252.6384Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund2.6384-3.01%-13.12% 13.638813.0484Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund13.50161.08%0.02% 116.5808103.9837CFAL Global Bond Fund116.58080.71%8.38%115.762221 114.1289101.7254CFAL Global Equity Fund114.12892.39%7.89%111.469744 1.16081.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.16081.25%5.20% 1.12141.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.12140.26%4.18% 1.16201.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.16201.12%5.24% 9.99529.5078Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 19.88910.43%4.27% 11.217310.0000Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 211.49854.04%7.76% 10.42889.1708Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 310.68136.55%7.65% 8.45104.8105Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund Equities Sub Fund8.85645.46%11.17% BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/MNot Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/200730-Apr-11BISX Listed Mutual FundsNAV Date 30-Apr-11 31-Mar-11 31-Mar-11CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752530-Apr-11 31-Mar-11 30-Apr-11 29-Apr-11 30-Apr-11MARKET TERMS31-Mar-11 NAV 6MTH 1.512246 2.907492 1.561030 114.368369 106.552835 31-Mar-11 31-Mar-11 30-Apr-11 30-Apr-11 Business outrage over road closure FROM page one TRIBUNE READER PAYS BEC BILL OF STRUGGLING FAMILY It is further alleged that he fraudulently breached his clients trust by dishonestly appropriating $85,000 which had been vested in him as a trustee for and on behalf of another. Pyfrom, who appeared before Magistrate Guillimena Archer in Court 10, Nassau Street, yesterday was represented by attorney Shaka Serville. Magistrate Archer informed Pyfrom, of Windsor Road, that the court was in possession of a fiat issued by the Attorney General, dated April 18, authorising the prosecution to proceed with the case by way of information. This, she noted, meant that Pyfroms case would proceed by way of preliminary hearing in the Magistrates Court, meaning that he would not be asked to elect which court he wanted his case heard in. The prosecution did not object to Pyfrom being granted bail, noting he was on $30,000 police bail at the time. His attorney Mr Serville, also told the court Pyfrom has strong ties to the community. Magistrate Archer granted Pyfrom $30,000 bail with one surety. His case was adjourned to October 28. LOC AL A TT ORNEY CHAR GED WITH STEALING $85,000 FROM CLIENT FROM page one treat several cuts to his head after he was believed to have been "pistol-whipped" by the robbers. He was left swollen and bruised from the beating but has now been released from hospital. It is suspected the raiders were looking for cash from the restaurant but found none. The police did not suggest a motive for the break-in and attack in their report. A friend and co-worker yesterday said those who know Mr Quirk were left crushed by the incident. He is a very kind and loving person who trusts people, she said. A relative added: "He's a great young man who just wants to cook and has never been in any trouble." Police said they attended the crime scene after receiving a report a man was being attacked inside an apartment on West ern Road. Upon arrival, they reported seeing at least two men jumping out of a window attempting to make an escape. Police yesterday confirmed that four men between 15 and 29 years of age had been taken into custody in connection with the incident. AMERIC AN CHEF INJURED IN HOME INV ASION B Y ARMED MEN FROM page one They also claim the people he expects to support his nomination are not ordinarily resident in the community either. Representatives in any local government seat are required to live in the community they intend to represent for at least three monthsb efore nomination day. Nominees must also have at least five local residents backing their candidacy when they register as candidates in the local government election on June 1. Resident Geleta Turnquest said: He d oesnt really represent the people and hes not going to. He doesnt live here at all. And you have to be resident here in order to sign his nomination paper. But he is trying to get family members to have their registrations transferred. What about the people who are here, who live here andw ere born here? They have the right to be represented. Mr Taylor said although he runs a business in New Providence, he intends to live in Current Island. But locals maintain he is not an active member of the commun ity and does not ordinarily live there. They also claim has made attempts to acquire a parcel of generational property on the island, but failed to secure support from the community. All undeveloped land on Current Island is classified as generational property and any development must bea pproved by the majority of stakeholders. Local government representatives on local councils have responsibility for town planning, building control, road maintenance, sanitation, refuse collection and disposal, cemeteries, environm ent protection, culture, leisure and sports, water supply, small business regulation and tourism promotion. C ouncils provide services at the local level and have discret ionary powers to decide on the award and duration of contacts and t he appointment of boards and committees. Existing Current Island representative Lisa Munroe has held the p ost for two terms and does not plan to continue as she is moving with her new husband to Hatchet Bay. M rs Turnquest, who is Mrs Munroes aunt, said Current Island representatives have never been contested in previous local elec-t ions. She said: Usually it is just someone who lives in the com munity and people know you so they dont oppose you they s upport you they trust you. An official at the Island Administrators office in Upper Bogue said local government candidates must prove they have lived in the constituency for three months and have the support of at least five people who meet the same residency requirements. Nominationsm ust be sealed by a Justice of the Peace and submitted by June 1. Elections will be held June 23. FROM page one toddler conceived in the alleged attack, has not been able to afford the cost of electricity and food. T heir power was cut off by the Bahamas Electricity Corporation (BEC power in the five months since. When the mother of the alleged rape victim, whose name has been withheld to protect her daughters identity, found out her $2,400 bill had been paid, she burst into tears. At a loss for words, she started to sob. Oh my God, she said. God is great. The kids are going to be so happy, and I am so happy. My daughter will be able to have a fan now. It has been so hot, we have got used to it. The mum lost her job when she found out her daughter was pregnant and then made the rape claim in June 2009. When the baby was born in December that year she was unable to work as she had to stay home and help her daughter care for the child. She has also been engaged in a fight for justice for nearly two years, and been waiting for the results of DNA tests to prove the childs paternity. Assistant Commissioner Marvin Dames told The Tribune last week he would ensure the case is brought to a close within two weeks. Ang er ed Readers were angered by the allegations, and the 55-year-old teacher who helped the family said: I am still outraged. In our country there seems to be so little justice for the poor, only those who have financial means seem to be able to achieve justice in the court of law, and I hope that whoever did this is brought to justice, because I think this is a terrible reflection on our justice system. This should not go quietly, it is absolutely wrong. I think whoever is in the highest position of power should take it on personally and see that justice is done. As a mother with two children and two grandchildren at home, the teacher said she could not imagine the discomfort the family must be experiencing without electricity in the heat of summer. Although she admitted to not having a large disposable income, she and her friend have pledged to pay $150 towards the familys electricity bill every month. She said: Its worth it because I am investing in the lives of people. Those children might grow up one day to also help others, so to me its money well spent. The teacher said she did not want to be identified as she said she does not want to divert attention away from the act, and she hopes the gesture will inspire others. There are so many needs you cant help everyone, she said. But whenever something touches me that deeply, I usually consider it worthy of responding to. I wish I had more money so that I would be able to give to more people because there are a lot of people suffering now, especially in this economy. FROM page one L OCAL GOVERNMENT HOPEFULS E LECTION BID RUNS INTO PROBLEMS CONCERN: Plans to close Prince Charles Drive for two months have caused anxiety in the community, with businesses fearing the economic impact. The safety of school children walking through the construction are has also been raised.

PAGE 7

THE TRIBUNE P A GE 9 SA TURD A Y MA Y 21, 2011 By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net T H E c o m b o o f K e r r i e Cartwright and Larakah Russell pul le d of f both sing le m atche s t o sec ure the Bahama s b e r th i n t o t h e p l a y o f f s o f t h e F e d C u p s A me r i c a n Zo n e I I G r o u p T wo yesterday. A f t e r C a r t w r i g h t c a m e f r o m be h i n d fo r a 46 6 4 7 5 de ci s i o n o v e r A l e j a n d r a A l v a r e z a n d R u s s e l l p r e v a i l e d 6 3 3 6 7 6 ( 3 ) o v e r H i l d a Z u l e t a C a b r e r a t h e E c u a d o r i a n t e a m o p t e d n o t t o play the doubles. That gave the Bahamas a 2-0 victory and the second place fin i s h i n G r o u p B b e h i n d V e n e z u e l a as they advance to today's play offs and a chance to advance to Group One for 2012. T h e B a h a m a s c a p t a i n e d b y Gr an d Ba h amia n Ro d n ey Ho t R o d C a r e y w i l l h a v e t o w i n t h e i r m a t c h i n o r d e r t o a d v a n c e I f t h e y f ail to d o s o t h e Ba h am as w i ll remain in Group II. C o n t a c t e d y e s t e r d a y a t t h e i r h o t e l a l l f o u r o f t h e p l a y e r s inc l u ding Nikk ita Fou ntain and Grand Bahamian Simone Pratt, who didn't get to play, were all e l a y e d a b o ut t he i r pe r f o rm a n ce s "It was very good. It was very c l o s e t h r o u g h o u t t h e m a t c h s a i d C a r t w r i g h t R u s s e l l c o m b o s e c u r e Bahamas' berth into playoffs BOXING RAHMING SILVER GLOVES THE second week of the W e l l i n g t on S on n y B o y Ra h m in g' s Si l v e r G l ov e s To urn am e n t o r g a n i s e d b y C h a m p i o n B o x i n g C l u b w i l l c o n t i n u e tonight at 6 p.m. at the Wulff Road Boxing Club. A c c o r d i n g t o o r g a n i s e r R a y M in u s J r t h e r e w i l l b e t e n matches contested with com p e t i t o r s f r o m S t e v i e t h e H e a t L a r i m m o r e s L i o n H e a r t B o x i n g C l u b a n d T a u r e a n o R en o J oh n s o n 's P i ne w o o d B o x i n g C l u b c o m p e t i n g a g a i n s t C h a m p i o n B o x i n g Club. Th e s h o w go t s t a r t ed la s t w e e k a nd wi s e x pe c t e d t o r un through next weekend when the finals will be staged. SOFTBALL NPSA SCHEDULE T H E N e w P r o v i d e n c e S o f t b a l l A s s o c i a t i o n w i l l r e s u m e i t s f a s t p i t c h r e g u la r s e a s o n t o n i g h t a t t h e B a n k e r s F i e l d a t t h e B a i l l o u H i l l s S p o r t i n g C o m p l e x w i t h t h e following games on tap: 7 p.m. Sigma Brackettes vs Pineapple Wildcats (L). 8:30 p m D o r s e y P a r k B o y z v s Miller Rams (M). VOLLEYBALL BSC MEETING T H E B a p t i s t S p o r t s C o u n c i l w i l l h o l d a m e e t i n g t o d a y a t 1 0 a m a t t h e v o l l e y b a l l c o u r t a t t h e T o m t h e B i r d G r a n t P a r k i n Y e l l o w E l d e r f o r a l l C h u r c h e s i n t e r e s t e d i n p a r t i c i p a t i n g i n t h e 2 0 1 1 J a s o n S a u n d e r s V o l l e y b a l l C l a s s i c T h e c l a s s i c i s t e n t a t i v e l y s e t t o b e g i n n e x t m o n t h C o m p e t i t i o n w i l l b e s t a g e d i n t h e 1 7 a n d u n d e r l a d i e s a n d me n 's d iv is io n Th e r eg i s t r a t i o n f e e i s $ 1 0 0 p e r t e a m i n e a c h d i v i s i o n A l s o d u r i n g t h e m e e t i n g t h e B S C w i l l o u t l i n e p l a n s f o r b o w l i n g l e a g u e t h a t w i l l b e h e l d a t M a r i o s B o w l i n g a n d F a m i l y E n t e r t a i n m e n t P a l a c e s t a r t i n g n e x t m o n t h spor ts NOTES SEE page 10 By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net IT wa sn' t t he ty pe o f y ea r t h a t M a r k K n o w l e s a n d h i s n e w p ar tn er M i c h al M er ti ne k a n t i c i p a t e d b u t t h e y r e h o p i n g t o t u r n t h i n g s a r o u n d w h e n t he y he a d to Pa r i s Fr a n c e f or t he s e c on d G r a nd S l am T ou r n a me nt of t he y e ar K n o w l e s a n d M e r t i n e k pe gg ed at nu m b er 17 on th e A T P Do ub le s T e a m r an ki n gs f r o m e i g h t t o u r n a m e n t s p l a y e d i n s o f a r t h i s y e a r h a v e n o t w o n a ti tl e y e t, bu t t he y h a v e ma d e i t t o b a c k t o b a c k s e m i f i n a l t o u r n a m e n t s i n M e m p h i s T e n n e s s e e a nd Sa n J o s e C a li fo r n i a T he y a ls o g ot i n to t he q ua r t e r f i n a l i n t w o c o n s e c u t i v e t our na me nts in I ndi an We ll s C a l i f o r n i a a n d B a r c e l o n a S p a i n b e f o r e t h e y g o t e l i m i n a t e d i n t h e r o u n d o f 1 6 i n t h e i r l a s t t o u r n a m e n t i n R o m e I t a l y A f t e r b o w i n g o u t i n t h e r o u nd o f 32 in t he A us t r a l ia n O p en t he f irst G rand Sla m f o r t h e y e a r i n J a n u a r y Kn ow l e s s a i d th ey r e e a g er to p u l l o f f t h e i r f i r s t t i t l e i n Rola nd Ga r ro s that s tar ts on M o n d a y I m e x c i t e d W e h a v e n t r e al l y d o n e t h a t g re a t s o f ar th is y ea r We w on a c o up l e of m a t c h e s s o w e f e e l t h a t t h e r e i s s t i l l so m e t h i n g o u t t h e r e f o r u s K n o w l e s p o i n t e d o u t a s h e p r e p a r e d f o r t h e t r e k t o F r a n c e y e s t e r d a y "I m e xc ite d b ec au se I s ti ll ge t r e al ly pum ped up for the Gr a n d Sl a m. I t' s a c h a nc e fo r us t o g o ou t a n d tr y t o r e a ll y m a k e a n i m p r e s s i o n s o I m r e al l y e x c it e d a bo ut it L o o k i n g b a c k o n t h e w a y t h e y h a v e p e r f o r m e d s o f a r t h i s y e ar, K n o wl es a dm i t te d th a t "t im i ng is e v e r y th in g I ha d th e b ir th o f my t hi r d c h i l d a n d I h a v e n t h a d a c ha nc e to p l ay a f lu e nt s c h e dul e, r e fl e c te d K no w l es o f t he b i rt h o f P r esl e y. "W h e n y o u o n l y p l a y s p o r a d i c a l l y i t s i m p o r t a n t f o r y o u t o d o a s w e l l a s y o u c a n i n t he ma tc he s th a t y ou p l ay U nf or t un a te l y, w e ha v en t h a d t h a t m u c h c o n s i s t e n c y W e wo n s ome g ood m atc he s an d w e c a me p r e tt y c l os e in s o me othe r ma tch es But it' s r ea lly im po r t an t th at w he n yo u pl a y, y ou t r y t o w in a s m uc h m a tc h e s a s y ou c an a nd w e ha v en t be e n a bl e t o d o th a t a s c o n s is te n c y a s w e s ho ul d. K n o w l e s h o w e v e r s t a t e d t h a t t h e d r a w s h a v e n o t a l w a y s b e e n o n t h e i r s i d e a n d t h e y w er e h oo ke d u p a g ai n s t s o me to ug h te a ms t ha t ha v e m a de i t m o r e d i f f i c u l t f o r t h e m t o a d v a n c e W i t h t h i s b e i n g a G r a n d S l a m t h e b i g g e s t t o u r n a m e n t s o n t h e c a l e n d a r K n o w l e s s a i d th e d r a w s ho ul d a s us ua l b e a v e r y c o m p e t i ti v e o n e w h e n i t s r e le a s e d n e xt w ee k E v e r y on e' s go in g t o b r i ng t h ei r be st t e nn i s b e cau se i t 's t h e G r a n d S l a m K n o w l e s s tr es s e d. "T h a t' s th e s a m e fo r u s I th i n k w e r e g o i n g t o b r i n g ou r be s t te nn i s as w e l l. W e h a v e t h e ta l e n t a n d t h e a bil it y t o p la y we ll i n t he bi g e v en ts W e r e g e tt i ng to kn ow e a c h o t he r a l i tt l e m or e h a v i n g p l a y e d s o m a n y m a t c h e s s o f a r w i n n i n g a n d l o s i n g W e r e l ea r n i ng fr o m t ho s e ma tc h e s A t t h e c o n c l u s i o n o f t h e F r e n c h O p e n K n o w l e s s a i d h e w i l l r e t u r n h o m e t o s p e n d a b r ie f t im e w it h hi s w if e, Da w n a n d t h e r e s t o f t h e i r f a m i l y b ef or e t he fo c us s w i tc h to th e g r a s s s u r fa c e T h e n h e wi l l h ea d to E as t b o u r n e G r e a t B r i t a i n t o p l a y i n t h e A e g o n I n t e r n a t i o n a l s t a r t i ng o n J un e 1 2 a s a le a d up t o th e t hi r d Gr a n d Sl a m a t W im b le d on th a t b e g in s o n J u ne 2 0 I t 's a ve r y i mpo r ta n t t im e w i th t w o Gr a n d Sl a ms on th e h ee l s of e ac h ot h er ," K no w le s sta te d. So it 's goo d t o h ave t h e s e G r a n d S l a m s c o m i n g u p Kn o wl e s sa i d h i s f a m i l y i s d oi ng g r e a t a n d h i s tw o s o ns Gr aha m an d Br ody a r e now g e tt in g in v ol v ed i n s p or ts a n d s o h e' s r el i s hi n g th e mo me n ts h e s p e nd w i t h th e m. Knowles hoping to tur n things around at next tour ney SEE page 10 T H E B a h a m a s B a s k e t b a l l F e d e r a t i o n a n n o u n c e d t h e f o r m a t f o r t h e C a r i b b e a n B a s k e t b a l l C h a m p i o n s h i p s t h a t w i ll t ak e p l ac e at t he en d of J u l y a t t h e K e n d a l I s a a c s G y m n a s i u m T he champ ions hips w ill be split in two segments with ten teams competing in two divi s i o n s i n t h e m e n s d i v i s i o n w h i l e t h e w o m e n w i l l c o m p r i s e o f s i x t e a m s i n t h e r o u n d r o b i n I t' s been a dec ade s inc e t he B a h a m a s l a s t h o s t e d s u c h a p r es t ig i ou s ev en t w hi c h w i l l s e r v e a s a q u a l i f i e r f o r t h e C entr oBas ket, the s econ d leg o f t h e p r o c e s s f o r t h e e i t h er th e W orl d C hampio nshi ps or th e O l ym p ic G am e s, w hi che v er co me s f irs t. T he feder a t ion have a diffic u lt t as k i n t h at th e c o ac h in g s t af f i s no w p r ep ar i ng to p ut t o ge t h er t h e t ea ms w hi c h i s e x p e c t e d t o c o m p r i s e o f a c o m b i n a t i o n o f p r o f e s s i o n a l and c ollegi a t e p layers comi ng home t o mes s w it h the loc al ly b as ed p la yer s Wh i l e t h e l o ca l p l a y e r s h a v e be gan t h ei r p r epa r at io n w i th th e as s i s ta nt c oa c hes th e tw o A m e r i c a n h e a d c o a c h e s a r e n o t e x p e c t e d i n t o w n u n t i l ne xt w ee k. W i t h t h e t o u r n a m e n t j u s t a b o u t a m o n t h a w a y t h e q u e s t io n i s w i l l t h at b e s u f fi c i e nt t i m e f o r t h e f e d e r a t i o n t o b rin g al l of the t al en t tog e the r to pr oduce a formidable team t o r epr e s ent th e c ou n tr y ? C o ns id er i n g t ha t t h e t o ur n a me n t wil l sho wca se s om e o f t he t op n at i on s i n t he r eg io n, t he B ah amas ne ed t o p ut it s b est foo t f orward a s th e ho s t s. F e d e r a t i o n p r e s i d e n t L a w r e n c e H e p b u r n h a s revealed that the tournament w i l l b e h e l d i n h o n o u r o f Mychal Sweet Bells' Thomp s o n t h e f i rs t Ba h a m i a n t o p l a y i n t h e N a t i o n a l B a s k e t b a l l Association. Th om p son wh o a lo ng wit h O sb ou rn e G oo se Th om p so n w er e b ot h r e c og ni s ed by t h e M in ist ry of Yo u th Sp o rts a n d C u l t u r e i n t h e n o w d e f u n c t S u m m e r B a s k e t b a l l P r o gr am me, was ins tr um ental in he lp i ng t he Los An g e le s L ak ers cl in ch t hr ee ch am p io n shi p tit le s. T w o p r o m i n e n t f e m a l e s a c c o r d i n g t o H e p b u r n w i l l a l s o be honoured, but he objected to r e l e a se t h e n a m e s u n t i l th e y ha v e a cce pt ed t he i r in v it a ti on With that in place, it's just l e f t f o r t h e f e d e r a t i o n t o a s s e m b l e t h e b e s t p o s s i b l e teams to compete. The Bahamas have quite a num be r o f pl ay e rs pe rform in g o v e r s e a s a n d i t s i n c u m b e n t upon the federation to ensure t h a t a s m a n y o f t h e m t a k e advantage of this opportunity to represent the country. A c c o r d i n g t o U s i e R i c h a r d s th e p r e s i d e n t o f t h e C a r i b b e a n B a s k e t b a l l C o n f e d e r a t i o n there could be the possibility t ha t a t lea s t one play er from t h e N B A a n d t h e W o m e n s N ational B a s ke t ba ll Ass ociat i o n ( W N B A ) c o u l d b e m a k i n g an appearance here. Ri ch a rd s s a id t h e y a re l o ok i n g f o r w a r d t o t h e p a r t i c i p a t i n g te a m s b rin g in g th e m aj o rit y of their top players to the tour n a m e n t w h i c h c o u l d m e a n th a t t h e f a n s c o u ld e n d u p se e ing quite a number of profes s i o n a l s f r o m t h e E u r o p e a n league in attendance. I n t h e p a s t m a n y o f t h e i n t e r n a t i o n a l p l a y e r s e i t h e r j o i n e d t h e t e a m e n r o u t e t o t h e ch a m p i o n sh i p s o r a t t h e ch a m p i o n s h i p s W i t h t h e t o u r n a m e n t b e i n g s t a g e d i n o u r b a c k y a r d i t w o u l d c e r t a i n l y b e good to have the players here in advance of the start of the tournament. In an effort to generate the fans participation, it would be g o o d f o r t h e p l a y e r s t o b e h e r e i n a d v a n ce a n d t h e r e i s a t l e a st a c h a n c e t o v i e w t h e t e a m s e i t h e r i n a p r a c t i c e s e s s i o n o r i n a public forum. Onc e th e pub lic get t o view t h e t e a m b e f o r e t h e s t a r t o f t he t our nament I 'm s ure th at t h ey w i l l ta ke t he ti me o ut t o c o me ou t a nd w at c h t h em i n a c t i o n B B F a n n o u n c e s f o r m a t f o r C a r i b b e a n B a s k e t b a l l C h a m p i o n s h i p s O P I N I O N S T U B B S Mark Knowles STRONG BACKHAND: Larakah Russell returns a ball during her single match the Fed Cup's American Zone II. "It w as v er y g ood. It w as v er y c lose throughout the matc h. I f eel like I'm pla ying r eall y g ood and I'm v er y conf ident. Kerrie Cartwright

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VOLLEYBALL BAISS ACTION W I T H i t s s e n i o r b o y s a n d g irl s cha mpio ns cr owne d, t h e B a h a m a s A s s o c i a t i o n o f I n d e p e n d e n t S e c o n d a r y S c h o o l s w i l l k i c k o f f i t s j u n i o r b o y s a n d g i r l s v o l l e y b a l l t o u r n a m e n t n e x t w e e k a t S t Augustine's College. The junior boys will be in a c tio n on M o nd a y s ta r tin g a t 4 p .m. wh ile th e j uni or girls w i l l b e g i n c o m p e t i t i o n o n Tuesday at the same time. SPORTS P AGE 10, SA TURDA Y MA Y 21, 201 1 TRIBUNE SPOR TS DALLAS Associated Press T H U N D E R c o a c h S c o t t B r o ok s h a d a bi g d e c i s i o n t o m a k e W i t h G a m e 2 o f t h e Western Conference finals on the line, he either had to stick with a lineup of four reserves w h o w e r e p l a y i n g w e l l o r s w i t c h to th e g ro up he usually trusts late in the fourth quarter. He bet on the backups. And now the series is headed back to Oklahoma City all tied up, thanks to his gutsy call. J am es H ar d en E r i c M ayn o r N i c k C o l l i s o n a n d D a e q u a n C o o k t e a m e d w i t h K e v i n Durant to build a healthy lead late in the fourth quarter, then made it hold up for a 106-100 victory ov er the Da ll a s Mave ricks on Thursday night. "W e' ve al ways f el t co n f i d en t i n t h e b e n c h B r o o k s s a i d T h e y r e a l l y d i d a g o o d j o b B u t i t s a l w a y s a t e a m e f f o r t when you win." All-Star point guard Russell W e s t b r o o k s a t a l o n g s i d e Brooks as Maynor guided the T h u n d e r s o f f e n s e d o w n t h e s t r e t c h S e r g e I b a k a a n d K e nd ri c k P e r ki ns c he e re d on C o l l i s o n a s h e t r i e d t o s l o w Dirk Nowitzki. Reser ves spark Thunder to 1-1 series tie with Mavs CAPTAIN Ned Stone giving pre touney talk. GUY Harvey Welcoming the Teams. By ALPHEUS FINLAYSON LAST week we chronicled the top Bahamia n athletes who par t icipate d i n t h e T r i p l e J u m p i n i n t e r n a t i o n al c o m p e t i t i o n T h i s w e e k w e c o n t i n u e t o the present time. MICHAEL JOHNSON T h e y e a r a f t e r T i m m y B a r r e t t m a d e hi s b ig breakt hrough Mic hae l J ohnson made his, competing in the 1967 P an A m eric an G ames in Wi nn ip eg. J o h n s o n j u m p e d 1 5 0 2 m f o r n i n t h place. B a r r e t t f i n i s h e d o n e p l a c e b e h i n d i n ten th w ith a j um p of 14 40 m J ohn so n enrolled in Mankato State that fall. OBED GARDINER O b e d G a r d i n e r c o m p e t e d i n t h e 1 9 7 0 Co m mo n we a l th Ga m e s i n Ed in burgh, Scotland. He jumped 14.79m. Gardiner att e nd e d So uthern Illino is University. DON MILLER Do n Mill e r c ompet ed at th e 1970 C o m m o n w e a l t h G a m e s j u m p i n g 14.52 m Mil le r also att ended Sout hern Illinois University. He is a broth er of Leslie Miller. DUDSON HIGGINS D u d s o n H i g g i n s w o n a S i l v e r m e d a l a t t h e 1 9 8 6 C e n t r a l A m e r i c a n a n d Caribbe an Junior C ha mpionships in Mexico City. Higgins leapt 16.38m. He won a Bronze medal at the Pan A m eri c an J u ni o r C ham p io ns hi p s in O r l a n d o t h a t y e a r w i t h a 1 6 1 1 m j u m p Dudson a t tende d The Uni v ers i ty of Alabama. EMMIT HIGGINS Em m i t H i g g i ns b r o th e r o f D ud s on won a Br on ze m ed a l i n th e 1 99 0 C en tral American and Caribbean Junior C h a m p i o n s h i p s i n H a v a n a i n 1 9 9 0 H i s j u m p w a s 15 1 9m W i n n i n g t h e event with a 16.69m jump was Cuban Yoelbi Quesada who went on to win t h e 1 9 9 7 W o r l d C h a m p i o n s h i p s c r o w n E m m i t at t e n d e d S t A u g u s t i n e' s College in North Carolina. PATTERSON JOHNSON P a t t e r s o n J o h n s o n a t t e n d e d Arkansas State University. J o h n s o n c o m p e t e d i n t h e S e o u l O l y m p i c G a m e s i n 1 9 8 8 w h e r e h e jumpe d 1 6. 03 m to finis h 20 th pla ce in the qualifying round. FRANK RUTHERFORD F r a n k R u t h e r f o r d h a d n e v e r m a d e a national team as a junior athlete but made up for it in his senior years. At t h e 19 85 S r. C e n t r al A m e ri c an an d Ca r ib be a n C ha mp io ns hi ps in N a ss a u, Rutherford, at the age of 20, finished in fifth place with a 15.87m jump. The University of Houston athlete w o n t h e 1 9 8 6 a n d 1 9 8 7 N C A A C h a m pionships in the Triple Jump. At th e 1 9 86 C e ntr a l Am e ri ca n a n d Caribbean Games in the Dominican Rep ub li c Rut h erf or d pl aced seco nd with a jump of 16.40m. A t t h e i n a u g u r a l I A A F W o r l d Indoor Cham pionships in I ndiana pol i s R u t h e r f o r d m a d e B a h a m i a n T r a c k and Field history, becoming the first B a h a m i a n to w i n a n I A AF m e d a l H e w o n t h e B r o n z e w i t h a d i s t a n c e o f 17.02m. At the Pan American Games, also in Indianapolis, Rutherford won the B r o n z e m e d a l w i t h a d i s t a n c e o f 16.68m. He f ail e d t o qu a l if y f or t he fina ls a t the World Outdoor Cham pio n s h i p s i n R o m e t h a t A u g u s t j u m p i n g 15.99m. A t t h e 1 9 8 8 S e o u l O l y m p i c s Rutherford jumped 15.84m to finish 26th in the qualifying round. R u t h e r f o r d p l a c e d e i g h t h a t t h e W o r l d I n d o o r C h a m p i o n s h i p s i n Seville in March of 1991 and jumped 1 6 .7 4 m to fi ni sh 1 5 th in th e q ua l ify i ng round of the Tokyo Olympic Games. Th e y e ar 1 9 9 2 wa s a s pe ci al on e for Rutherford. He set a new Bahamian N a t i o n a l r e c o r d o f 1 7 4 1 m a t a m e e t i n Sao Paulo in May. A t t h e B a r c e l o n a G a m e s h e j u m p e d 17.36m for third place, becoming the f i r s t B a h a m i a n t o w i n a T r a c k a n d Field medal in the Olympic Games. S ho r t ly a ft e r th e Ga me s h e fi n i s he d s eco n d t o J on at h an E dw ar ds i n t h e World Cup in Havana with a 17.06m effort. R u t h e r f o r d s p e r f o r m a n c e s a f t e r this historic was lackluster and some ti m e s fa c e d w it h in j ur y a s h e w a s ta k en off the field in the 1993 Stuttgart Wor ld Cha mp ion sh ips on a str e tche r. He was able to show good form at the Atlanta Olympics when he made the final and finished eleventh with a 16.73m performance. ALLAN MORTIMER A ll a n M o r t i m e r f o l l o we d i n t he t r a d i t i o n o f g r e a t B a h a m i a n T r i p l e Jumpers. He h el d th e N a tio na l Ju nio r r e cor d of 16.58m. Mortimer finished sixth in t h e Tr i p l e J u mp a t t h e 1 9 96 W o r l d Junior Championships in Sydney. I n 2 0 0 0 M o r t i m e r w o n t h e N A C A C Unde r-25 Cham pionships in Mo nt e rrey, Mexico with a 15.74m jump. LEEVAN SANDS L e e v a n Sa n d s d o m i n a te d th e j u n i o r competitions in the Central America a n d C a r i b b e a n r e g i o n i n t h e l a t e n i ne t i es an d ear l y yea rs of t h e n ew century. In 1999 he finished sixth in t h e T r i p l e J u m p a t t h e P a n A m G a m e s i n W i n n i p e g w i t h a 1 5 5 1 m jump. At the 2 0 0 0 Ce ntr a l Am e ri ca n a n d Caribbean Jr. Championships in San J u a n S a n d s j u m p e d 1 5 9 5 m ( w i n d a i d ed) to win. La ter that y ea r, in Sa ntiag o, Chile a t t h e I A A F W o r l d J r C h a m p i o n s h i p s S a n d s j u m p e d 1 6 2 2 m f o r f i f t h place. L e e v a n w h o a t t e n d e d A u b u r n U n i v e r s i t y u n d e r t h e g u i d a n c e o f Bahamian Henry R o lle, made a b ig j u m p o f 1 7 2 6 m w h e n h e w o n a Bronze medal at the 2002 Common wealth Games in Manchester. In 2003 Sands won the Sr. Central A m e r i c a n a n d C a r i b b e a n C h a m p i o n s h i p s i n G r e n a d a w i t h a 1 7 1 6 m effort. Pr ior to the Wor ld Cha m pio ns hip s i n P a r i s t h a t y e a r S a n d s d e f e a t e d W o r l d r e c o r d h o l d e r J o n a t h a n Edwards at a meet in London with a 17.41m performance. A t t h e W o r l d C h a m p i o n s h i p s i n P aris S and s jum ped 17.26m f o r th e Bronze. He just missed the Bronze at the 2005 Helsinki World Championships by one centimeter, 17.39m to Roma nia's Marian Oprea, 17.40m. By the time Beijing rolled around, Sa n ds wa s re a dy f or a ctio n, wi nni ng a Br o nz e me d a l wi th a 1 7 .5 9 m Ba h a m ian National record jump. Sa nds finis hed fourth in t he Ber lin World Championships with a 17.32m j u m p. H is co m p e ti t i on s i n t h e l a s t tw o s e a s o n s s h o w t h a t h e i s r e a d y to g e t t o the level of his former successes. If Sands is able to medal in either the upcoming World Championships in Daegu, or the Olympic Games in L o n d o n h e w o u l d b e t h e o d d s o n f a v o u r i t e t o b e n a m e d t h e B e s t Bahamian Triple Jumper ever. THE COLLIEMINNS TWINS A s w e b e g a n th i s a r ti c l e s a y i n g T h e Bahamas can be considered a Triple J u m p f a r m W e c o n t i n u e t o b r e e d some of the best in the world. The Collie-Minns twins were born on March 10th, 1994. L a t a r i o m a d e i t t o t h e W o r l d J u n i o r Championships in Moncton last year and finished eighth in the qualifying round with a 15.35m performance. L a s t y e a r L a t ho n e e a r n e d a s p o t o n the Americas Youth Olympics team that competed in Singapore. He fin i sh e d te nth o v e ra l l wi th a 1 4. 6 6 m pe r formance. T h is s e a s o n L a ta r i o ju m p e d 1 6 5 5 m to win the Scotiabank National High School Championships. This was just 3 cm off of Al le n M or time r 's Bah am ian National Record. Unfortunately Latario had a freak a c c i d e n t w h i l e p l a y i n g a t h o m e a w e e k afterward and could not compete at t he C ari f t a G ame s. It is h op ed t h at he will be ready for the World Youth Ch am pi ons hi ps in Li ll e, Fr a nce e ar ly in July. L a t ho n e j u mp e d 1 5 7 3 m a t th e S co tiabank National High School Track a n d F i e l d C h a m p i o n s h i p s H e f i n i s h e d secon d in th is y ear's C a ri ft a G a m e s with a 15.24m jump. T h e t w i n s l e a d t h e I A A F Y o u t h lists this y ear wi th their 16. 55m and 15.73m performances. Their coach is Peter Pratt, the first B a h a m i a n m e d a l i s t i n t h e C a r i f t a Games. T h e f u t u r e l o o k s g r e a t f o r T h e Ba ham as t o continue its Gre at T riple Jump tradition. After all, what more can we expect f rom Th e B aham as, Smal l Co unt ry, Great Athletes. Tribute to Bahamian triple jump athletes By FRED GARTH B I M I N I F i s h i n g b e g a n t o d a y a t t h e B i l l f i s h I n v i t at i o n al T o u r n a m en t w i th cl e ar s k i es an d l i g h t wi nds. L o ca l f ish er me n ha v e r e port e d g ood ac t iv it y in re c ent da y s l ea din g up t o t oda y' s kic k of f so there's plenty of optimism in the air. T w e l v e bo a t s he a d e d o u t e a r l y r i g g e d a n d r e a d y for action. A n g l e r s a n d d i g n i t a r i e s e n j o y e d a f u l l e v e n i n g o f fe s t i v itie s We d ne s day ev ening a t t h e newly r e no va t ed B ig Game Club, whic h ha s bee n re brande d and rebuilt as a Guy Harvey Outpost Resort. Numerous world records have been caught in t h e w a t e r s h e r e a n d o f c o u r s e B i m i n i w a s a f av or it e ha unt o f le g e nda ry f ish e rme n a nd a ut hor Ernest Hemmingway. VIP guests in attendance at the opening party a n d c a p t a i n ? s m e e t i n g i n c l u d e d G u y H a r v e y M i k e M y a t t of t he I GF A B i ll S he d d of A F T CO F ra n k J o h n s o n o f M o l d C r a f t a n d S c u l p t o r K e n t U l l b e r g who built one of the perpetual trophies for the event. Th i s i s th e fir s t b il l fi s h to u r n am en t s i n ce th e r eso rt was reb ui lt wi th th e h e l p a n d co-o rd in ation of Guy Harvey. T he t our na m e nt h a s n ot o nl y a t t ra c t e d t op f i she rm e n b ut a ls o a n e c l e c t ic c ol l e c t io n o f a r t is t s a n d t op m a rin e ph ot og ra p he rs suc h a s Pa t F o rd, Sc ot t Kerrigan, and Bill Boyce, who is shooting a doc umentary with Guy and his crew. B i l l f i s h I n v i t a t i o n a l T o u r n a m e n t b e g i n s t o d a y Spor ts Notes FROM page nine Fed Cup FROM page nine Cartwright about her singles. "I feel like I'm playing really g o o d a n d I m v e r y c o n f i d e n t Lo o ki n g ah ead t o t od ay 's p l a y o f f s C a r t w r i g h t s a i d s h e s co nf i den t t hat t hey ca n pu ll it off. W e r e p l a y i n g v e r y w e l l ( a s a te a m ) s h e po i nt e d o ut "So I think she can really do it." P r a t t t h e y o u n g es t m e m ber of the team, said as long a s t h e y c o n t i n u e t o p l a y a s w el l as t he y ar e do i ng r i gh t n o w s h e d o e s n t s e e w h y t h e y can't advance. O n c e w e g i v e ou r b e s t w e can do it," she insisted. "The g i r ls went out t her e (y esterd a y ) a n d th e y g a v e i t 1 1 0 p e r c e n t W e c o u l d n t a s k f o r a n y thing more from them." O n h e r p e r f o r m a n c e o n T hurs day whe n sh e p lay ed in the singles, Pratt said: "I felt g r e at a bo ut g o in g ou t the r e I wa sn't ner vous or an ything. I j u s t w e n t o u t t h e r e a n d g a v e i t my best." Russell, admitting that she had to really dip down deep, s a i d a f t e r w i n n i n g t h e f i r s t s e t I s t o p p e d m o v i n g t h e b a l l a roun d an d I l ost the se t. But in the third set, I got a game p l a n f r o m N i k k i t a t h a t worked." D o w n 4 0 i n t h e s e t R u s s e l l s a i d s h e w e n t t o t h e s h o r t g m e and that made the difference as she rallied back and even t u a l l y p u l l i t o f f i n t h e t i e breaker. "That was not my goal to p l a y a t h i r d s e t b u t I m h a p p y b e c a u s e I w o n a n d n o w w e are in the playoffs," she stat ed. Fountain said she was just t h r i l l e d b y t h e w a y R u s s e l l k e p t h e r c o m p s o u r e a n d bounced back to pull off her singles match. "I t h i nk bo t h gi rl s p la yed w e l l F o u n t a i n s t r e s s e d B u t I t h in k L ar a k ah j u s t h ad t o fight in the third set and she was able to push forward by coming forth to the net. We were very proud of her." With a chance to advance to Group One with a victory t o d a y F o u n t a i n s a i d a l l o f th e p l a y e r s a r e c o m m i t t e e t o g o i n g o u t a n d g i v e i t t h e i r b e s t shot. SPOR TS IN BRIEF

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LOCAL NEWS P AGE 12, SA TURDA Y MA Y 21, 201 1 THE TRIBUNE By K QUINCY PARKER Press/Cultural AttachŽ Embassy of The Bahamas W ASHINGTON, DC About 4,600 people visited the Embassy of the Bahamas in Washington, DC, as part of Passport DC's "Around the World Embassy Tour" last Saturday, hankering for a taste of Bahamian culture. For the third consecutive year, the Embassy took part in the popular event which sees tens of thou sands flock to DC to sample the cultures of the countries represented by the Embassies in Wash ington. T h o u s a n d s f l o c k t o B a h a m a s E m b a s s y f o r P a s s p o r t D C E m b a s s y T o u r And for the third consecu t i v e y e a r w o r d a b o u t t h e conch fritters and Sky Juice' of fe r e d b y t h e E mb a ss y o f t h e Ba ha ma s fil tere d thro ugh th e c ro wd of tr a vel le r s ma ki ng the B a ha ma s one of th e mo re popular stops on the circuit. Ne ar l y tw o do zen Ba hamia n s h e a d e d b y B a h a m a s Ambassador to the US Cor nelius A Smith and including b o t h E m b a s s y s t a f f a n d B a h a m i a n s a n d p e o p l e o f B ah a m ia n d es c en t l i vi n g i n t h e D C M e t r o a r ea ca me together to put on the event, wo r ki ng d ays in adv ance t o pre p a re t he E mb a ssy g rou n ds to host the event, putting up dec ora tio ns a nd a dju s t ing th e la y o u t o f t he g ro u nd s t o m a k e th e v i si to r ex p e ri e nc e th e b e st it could be. I n a d d i t i o n t o B a h a m a s t hemed decorati ons, pos ter s o f J u n k a n o o a n d o t h e r B ah a mi a n sc e ne s w e re p ut u p a ro u n d t h e g r o u n d s, p r o v i d i n g r i ch s p l a s h e s o f co l o u r a n d vi bra nc y Ho w ev er, it w as th e other sort of decoration that p r ov ed t o b e mo s t p op ul ar : J u n k a n o o h e a d p i e c e s A n u m b er o f Ju n ka n o o h e ad pi e c e s w e r e pl a c e d a r o u n d t h e g r o u n d s a n d i t w a s o n l y a s h o r t w h i l e b e f o r e p e o p l e s t a r t e d t r y i n g t h e m o n a n d posing for pictures. T h e J u n k a n o o p i e c e s p r o v e d t o b e o n e o f t h e b i g g e s t a t t r a c t i o n s o f t h e Bahamas experience. The main attraction, how e v e r w a s t h e c u i s i n e T h e conch fritters with a batter p r e p a r e d b y C h e f A p p l e Wells, who will also be cateri n g t h e B a h a m a s I n d e p e n den c e c ele bra tio ns in DC this J u l y w e r e a n i m m e n s e l y p o p u l ar o f f e r i n g g a r n er in g f uls ome p rais e fr om t ast ers M an y peo ple co uld be s een t aking notes on the ingr edients, and many a thoughtful ex pressi on c oul d b e ob s e rve d on w h a t c ou l d on l y h a ve be e n slow-chewing home cooks. T h e S k y J u i c e t h a t Ba ha mia n c onc oc tio n of spirit s and coc onut w ater was also extremely popular. "W hat is tha t? Tha t is delic iou s, e xc l ai me d o ne p a tron His sentiments were ec hoed m a ny t im e s t hr ou g ho u t th e course of the day. The Emba s sy also pu mped u p t h e v o l u m e o n t h e J u n k a n o o m u s i c w h i c h played from the early morn ing until after the event end e d T h e r e w e r e o c c a s i o n a l d a n c e l e s s o n s w h e r e i n Embassy staff taught visitors how to rush, a nd h ow t o do t h e V o l a a m o n g o t h e r dance steps. Among the many benefits of th e eve nt whi ch inc lud ed a c ha nc e f or th e v olu nt ee rs to s a mp le some o f C he f Appl e's cu is i ne a ma jo r b oo n wa s that me mbe rs o f th e Ba ha mia n co m m u n i t y i n D C c am e t o g e t h e r a n d g o t t o k n o w each other while enthusiasti c a l l y p r o m o t i n g B a h a m i a n culture. C U L TU R A L T ou r i sm D C a D C b a s e d c o m p a n y t h a t ai m s to b o ost to ur ism in to th e DC Metro area, he ld th e fir st Embassy Open House part of "Passport DC" in 2008. The event was a success, and C ul t ur a l To u ri sm D C d ec id e d to make it an annual event. BAHAMIANS and many of Bahamian descent came together in Washington, DC, as the Embassy of the Bahamas sought to give DC a taste of Bahamian culture. The Embassy recreated the 'Fish Fry' aesthetic on the grounds, a sort of "Party in the Backyard" to which 4,600 people flocked over the course of the day on Saturday, May 14. K. Quincy Parker /Photos


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