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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01853
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: 08-08-2009
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:01853

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The


Tribune


YOUR PASSPORT TO MISS UNIVERSE


BAHAMAS EDITION
www.tribune242.com


Volume: 105 No.212


SATURDAY, AUGUST 8, 2009


PRICE - 750 (Abaco and Grand


Bahama $1.25)


IEI PAGU LCOL


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socie


Controversial

pastor speaks

out against

marital rape

legislation

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net
THE controversial pastor
opposed to legislation which
would outlaw marital rape
now claims the amendment
could create a "society of
rapists".
The proposed amendment
to the Sexual Offences and
Domestic Violence Act pre-
sented in Parliament by
Minister of Social Services
Loretta Butler-Turner last
month undermines the insti-
tution of marriage and could
harm families, Kingdom Life
Church pastor Cedric Moss
claims.
Quoting Biblical text to
cite the "Word of God" Mr
Moss argued rape cannot be
committed in marriage as
the couple give each other
authority over the other's
body and agree to open-
ended sexual consent in the
marriage vows.
By including spouses as
potential rapists the law con-
tradicts the sacrament of
marriage, the pastor argued.
He told the Rotary Club
of West Nassau: "It makes
sense to have such a law to
govern sexual intercourse
between two persons who
are not married to each oth-
er because, unlike married
people, they have no con-
tract that implies open-end-
ed sexual consent; therefore
specific moment by moment
consent is required between
them.
"But can it be right to
bring married people under
such a law designed for
unmarried people? No, and
a thousand times no! It is
not right, and it can never
be right to bring all married
couples under this definition
of rape whereby moment by
moment consent is required
for every stage of every act
of sexual intercourse.
"Each day you will be a
potential rapist in your own
home if you initiate sex with
your wife without her con-
sent."
SEE page 12


coul


S 'Too early to
cr t ~~ tell' if container

iel l~flport relocation
C u I, will cost FNM


rapi


I


MISS UNIVERSE 2008 Dayana Mendoza, of Venezuela, walks the red carpet in Rawson Square yesterday. Miss Mendoza will crown her
successor from 84 contestants on August 23.
* SEE PAGE TWO AND OUR SPECIAL MISS UNIVERSE SUPPLEMENT INSIDE FOR MORE ON THE PAGEANT.


MP Mitchell voted chairman of

Crown Land Select Committee


THE House of Assembly's
Select Committee on Crown
Land matters held its first
meeting yesterday with the MP
for Fox Hill Fred Mitchell vot-
ed in as chairman of the group.
Representing the Govern-
ment's side, FNM MP for [
Golden Isles Charles Maynard
was elected as the deputy
chairman.
Addressing the media short-
ly following their brief meet-
ing, the committee said they hoped their
work would be for the betterment of
the Bahamian people and not end up as
mere recommendations "collecting dust


on a shelf".
According to the commit-
tee's chairman, an announce-
ment will be made in the com-
ing week for people who wish
to make submissions to the
committee to write in to the
clerk of the House of Assem-
bly. In addition, he said notices
will be circulated with every
administrator on the Family
Islands so that persons
throughout the archipelago can
be informed of the committee's pro-
ceedings and make contributions where
necessary.
SEE page 12


next election
By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
AS PUBLIC outcry
mounts over the Govern-
ment's handling of informa-
tion sharing regarding sev-
eral new public work pro-
jects, observers say it's too
early to tell if the issue will
cost the Free National
Movement the next election
race.
In recent weeks the con-
troversy over the Govern-
ment's proposed relocation
of the container port from
Bay Street to Arawak Cay;
the construction of Corridor
18 under the Road Improve-
ment Project; along with the
subsequent dredging of Nas-
sau Harbour and extension
of the man-made island
have boiled to a fever pitch.
Emotions ran high at
Thursday's town meeting
about the port relocation
and its related projects,
where angry attendees blast-
ed the Government for not
allowing sufficient public
discourse before going
ahead.
Despite the heat, political
observers told The Tribune
that public fury now may
have little weight when bal-
lots are cast during the next
election.
Former Chamber of Com-
merce president Dionisio
D'Auguilar said: "The man's
(Prime Miniser Hubert
Ingraham) made a decision.
If you don't agree with him
vote him out of office, but a
lot of people just vote on
who has the best rally, and
2012 is three years away."
Mr D'Auguilar said it is
too soon to say if the port
issue will be a deal breaker
for the FNM in the next
election.
PLP MP for Fox Hill Fred
Mitchell said elections are
won on how the debate is
framed at the time.
He said it's impossible to
predict the next election too
heavily on "what exists in
mid-term" while adding that
the port issue was a subset
of blunders he claims the
SEE page 12


Union president claims nurses
'falling ill' due to mould at PMH


By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net
MOULD infestation in the Eye
Ward of Princess Margaret Hospital
is causing nurses to fall ill with res-
piratory illness, according to
Bahamas Nurses Union president
Cleola Hamilton.
The nurses representative has
expressed "huge" concern over the
problem which was investigated by
the Environmental Health Depart-
ment last year.
A number of recommendations
to get rid of the mould growing on


the walls and ceilings of the ward
were put forward by the depart-
ment to the Public Hospitals
Authority (PHA) and Ministry of
Health to ensure the health and
safety of staff and patients.
But Ms Hamilton maintains nurs-
es are still suffering from the effects
as hospital bosses have failed to
alleviate the mould infestation.
She claims new tiles were simply
placed over the old ones, and the
thriving mould is now growing
through and putting the health of
around a dozen staff at risk.
SEE page 12


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By CHESTER ROBARDS
crobards@tribunemedia.net
THE REIGNING Miss Bahamas
received "plenty nastiness and
hatred" after it was noticed she
attended only a few of the Miss Uni-
verse events held this week.
However, in a letter written by
family members it was revealed that
Kiara Sherman was engaged in
many other Miss Universe events
throughout the week.
Many events featured only a por-
tion of the 88-strong pageant dele-
gation.
According to her family, following
her return from pageant training in
Canada, Ms Sherman's time had
been divided between sessions with
the Bahamas Ministry of Tourism
and the Miss Universe pageant
organizers.
"As much as she wanted to be at
the airport to meet the arriving con-
testants, it was simply impossible,"
the letter read.


Family members defend contestant

over attendance at Miss Universe events


"We all want to see her every-
where but where she goes publicly
during this pageant is in the control
of the Miss Universe people."
The letter recalled a recent 10-
hour day Ms Sherman endured, hav-
ing to dance between radio inter-
views and photo-shoots.
"Part of the problem is that ever
since returning home from Canada
she was booked for numerous
appearances by both the Ministry
of Tourism and the Miss Bahamas
Universe organisation," the letter
continued.
"Ever since she won back in May
it has been one thing or the other
bashing this young Bahamian
woman for absolutely no reason


except that she wasn't some peo-
ple's favourite choice for queen.
"The bashing included vicious lies
and plenty nastiness and hatred."
In an interview with The Tribune
yesterday Ms Sherman explained:
"I'm familiar with my whole home-
town so I guess they figured, you
know, she didn't need to go these
places.
"But I've been doing a lot of film-
ing for final production so you
wouldn't have seen me on the
streets with the other young ladies.
I would have been doing something
else with some other ladies who
were here."
The family's letter called for the
Bahamas' support when their Miss


Universe representative needs it
most.
"It's about time we stop bashing
our queen and instead start to give
her the support she so rightly
deserves," the letter added.



'tOUR VIEW'
To have your say on this or any
other issue, email The Tribune at:
letters@tribunemedia.net or deliver
your letter to The Tribune on
Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207


Sandals Cay enchants Miss Universe contestants


SANDALS CHAIRMAN Gor-
don 'Butch' Stewart is pic-
tured with Miss Canada Mari-
ana Valente; Miss Venezuela
Stefania Fernandez; Miss
Jamaica Carolyn Yapp; Miss
Guatemala Lourdes Figueroa;
Miss Angola Nelsa Alves and
Miss Brazil Larissa Costa.


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SANDALS Royal Bahami-
an's private offshore island San-
dals Cay was the location for
one of the official Miss Uni-
verse pageant events on
Wednesday evening.
The resort hosted 50 contes-
tants, their chaperones, Miss
Universe officials and overseas
media to an extraordinary
island fanfare.
Sandals general manager
Michael James and hotel man-
ager Ken Flockhart met the
young ladies as they arrived.
The beauty queens were given
signature leather sandals, neck-
laces and chilled towels infused
with lemongrass fragrance.
Mr James said: "We laid out
the red carpet for the contes-
tants, giving them a glimpse of


the luxury included experience
we provide at Sandals."
Resort managers escorted
contestants to the pier where
they received custom Sandals
cameras to capture the
evening's events and were then
taken by boat to Sandals Cay.
The ladies were welcomed by
stilt walkers, the Sky Juice
Junkanoo band and offered
tropical drinks. Entertainment
for the evening also included
the Sky Juice Rake and Scrape
Band, a pop band and local bal-
loon artist JuJu.
Executive Chef Josef
Swobada and his culinary team
provided an elaborate mixture
of local and international deli-
cacies such as a sushi station;
seafood on ice; Andros cakes


topped with mango salsa; Por-
tobello mushroom quesadillas
with pepper jack cheese; avo-
cado and mango salad with
raspberry vinaigrette; grilled
mahi mahi steak; chocolate and
fruit display.
Chef Swoboda said: "We
wanted to take into considera-
tion that with so many persons
from different countries and
cultures we covered all the
bases to ensure that there
would be something for every-
one."
Additionally, the ladies were
also treated to shoulder and
feet massages by the resort's
Red Lane Spa. Prior to their
departure each contestant
received a gift bag.


ISKY'lll C rrEJ opeB r ndI p I-rfo


Miss Bahamas 'received




nastiness and hatred'


IL LI�.C*IYI*I


PAG E 2, SATU RDAY, AU G UST 8, 2009


THE TRIBUNE





THE TRIBUNE


SATURDAY, AUGUST 8, 2009, PAGE 3


A SUPREME Court
injunction has postponed
the August 18 election of
the Airport Airline and
Allied Workers Union
(AAAWU) pending a judi-
cial review.
The injunction was grant-
ed by Sir Justice Jon Isaacs
on Wednesday following an
application from the union
to restrain the Registrar of
Trade Unions from seeking
to take a poll by secret bal-
lot.
AAAWU interim presi-
dent and secretary-general
Anthony Bain said a draft
of the union's amended
constitution and proposed
industrial agreement has
been completed by his
executive council and is
now available for members
to make contributions.
The Registrar of Trade
Unions will then be invited
to supervise the poll for rat-
ification by the membership
and registration by the Reg-
istrar.
Once the amended con-
stitution has been regis-
tered, Mr Bain said he will
seek the union council's
approval for a date to nom-
inate and elect officers.
He said: "These amend-
ments made to the consti-
tution are necessary to
bring the constitution up to
date and to address the con-
cerns of the Deputy Regis-
trar of Trade Unions.
"We will be calling a
number of meetings aimed
at apprising the members
of all matters affecting this
union.
"The (goal) is to make
this union more worker
friendly."
Mr Bain advised that for-
mer AAAWU members
Nelerene Harding, Robert
Pickstock, Esther Clarke
and Ivy Smith have been
suspended from the union
owing to their conduct.
He added: "They are not
members of this union and
cannot be a candidate nor
participate in any union
activities. They will pay
agency shop fees."


Man shot in

robbery attempt

By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

A MAN was shot and
injured by would-be armed
robbers who opened fire on
a pedestrian because he had
no money to give them.
Police reported that the
34-year-old victim was walk-
ing through a side street off
Lyon Road sometime
before 9pm on Thursday
when he was approached by
two gunmen who demand-
ed cash.
The victim had no cash
to give them, police said,
and was shot in the left leg
as a consequence.
The 34-year-old Shirley
Street resident was taken to
hospital where he is in sta-
ble condition.
Police are also investigat-
ing the armed robbery that
occurred outside of a bank
in the Palmdale area.
A man, who works for a
company in the eastern area
of New Providence, left the
bank around 10am on
Thursday when he was held
up by a gunman.
Asst Supt Walter Evans
said the employee was
about to get into his com-
pany's vehicle when he was
joined by a gunman who
ordered him to drive off.
"The employee drove to
an area in western New
Providence when the gun-
man stole a large sum of
cash which is believed to be
the property of the compa-
ny. It is reported that the
employee also had personal
funds and two cell phones


which were also taken," Mr
Evans said.
"The gunman took the
keys of the company's vehi-
cle and threw them into
nearby bushes and made his
escape in a white Astro
Van, which was parked
nearby."
The employee was not
harmed, he said. Police are
also probing whether or not
the robbery was an "inside
job."
Both matters are still
under active investigation.


0 * ALNEWS


Mitchell: Govt should increase




funding for educational loans


By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
thhompson@tribunemedia.net

GOVERNMENT funding
for educational loans should
be heavily increased, Fox Hill
MP Fred Mitchell said as he
spoke out against governmen-
t's last-minute announcement
regarding the indefinite sus-
pension of its guaranteed loan
scheme.
Earlier this week Education
Minister Carl Bethel shocked
many students who were
counting on the loan to help
finance costly studies abroad


when he announced that the
plan had been suspended due
to a high default rate.
"We find it appalling that
government can simply with a
wave of a hand say the (loan)
plan is suspended, leaving
scores of parents filled with
anxiety. The investment in
education as far as scholarships
go should be tripled and not
stopped - this is a disgrace, it's
not good enough," said Mr
Mitchell.
"I've had scores of parents
call me and say 'what can we
do?'"
Following the backlash from
frustrated students, Mr Bethel


said his ministry had repeated-
ly warned the public that the
programme's future was uncer-
tain from the start. He added
that the plan would remain sus-
pended until it is able to sustain
itself.
Mr Bethel explained that the
cap on the loans was lowered
from $20,000 a year to $10,000
in 2004 while the average grade
point average of 2.5 per cent
was raised to make the pro-
gramme more exclusive in the
face of rising defaulters.
Still the government's Guar-
anteed Loan Programme accu-
mulated a $68.05 million deficit
because so many students


failed to make good on their
repayment.
"Sometimes the wheels of
government don't operate as
quickly as possible and it's
unfortunate in this case that
the policy decision came as late
as it did, but that's something
we can't control.
"I have spoken several times
about the debts, urging gradu-
ates to pay because of the
threat it was posing to the via-
bility of the fund," Mr Bethel
told The Tribune in a recent
interview.
Those who are already
enrolled in the plan will still
receive their allotment.


"We find it
appalling that
government
can simply with
a wave of a
hand say the
(loan) plan is
suspended,
leaving scores of
parents filled
with anxiety."

Fred Mitchell


I^^ I~ ^^^^ ^^^^ h^^^^BIr^ i I^^ L^^^^^^T^^^^^^^^^^I '^^^i ^^^


pp


THE Australian naval frigate HMAS Sydney prepares to dock as
it cruised up the Hudson River in New York Harbor Sunday,
July 19, 2009.

GOVERNOR General Arthur Hanna along with the
Acting Prime Minister Carl Bethel and other dignitaries
were hosted to a reception onboard the HMAS Sydney
on Thursday night by the Australian High Commissioner
Philip Kentwell.
Thanking the Governor General and the other guests
for attending the function, Mr Kentwell remarked that he
hoped to see the Bahamas and Australia's already warm
relationship continue to grow in the years to come.
Among those persons invited were Minister of Social
Services Loretta Butler-Turner, Parliamentary Secretary
in the Ministry of Housing Brensil Rolle, Commodore of
the Defence Force Clifford Scavella, Commissioner of
Police Reginald Ferguson, US Embassy political counsel-
lor Jeff Dubel, Haitian Ambassador Louis Harold Joseph,
and China's Ambassador to the Bahamas Hu Dingxian.
The HMAS Sydney is expected to depart the Bahamas
today and continue on its journey around the world as a
part of its Northern Trident mission, heading through the
Panama Canal before it makes it way to its homeport in
Australia.



NOTICE is hereby given that JUDE EDOMWONYI of
COCKBURN TOWN, SAN SALVADOR, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 8th day of August, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship,
P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.






MAIN/SPORTS SECTION
Local News............................ P1,2,3,5,6,7,12
Editorial/Letters......................................... P4
C om ics........................................................ P8
S ports...................................................... P9,10
W eather..................................................... P 11

CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES

MISS UNIVERSE 8 PAGE TABLOID

USA TODAY WEEKENDER 8 PAGES



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PAGE 4, SATURDAY, AUGUST 8, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


EDITORI AULETTRS TO THE EDITOR6I


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and A, c, tiinn') 322-1986
Ad c,' iiing Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387


WEBSITE


www. tribune242.comr


-updated daily at 2pm


The Town Hall mob


THERE'S a famous Norman Rockwell
painting titled "Freedom of Speech," depict-
ing an idealized American town meeting. The
painting, part of a series illustrating FDR's
"Four Freedoms," shows an ordinary citizen
expressing an unpopular opinion. His neigh-
bours obviously don't like what he's saying,
but they're letting him speak his mind.
That's a far cry from what has been hap-
pening at recent town halls, where angry pro-
testers - some of them, with no apparent
sense of irony, shouting "This is America!" -
have been drowning out, and in some cases
threatening, members of Congress trying to
talk about health reform.
Some commentators have tried to play
down the mob aspect of these scenes, likening
the campaign against health reform to the
campaign against Social Security privatiza-
tion back in 2005. But there's no compari-
son. I've gone through many news reports
from 2005, and while anti-privatization
activists were sometimes raucous and rude, I
can't find any examples of congressmen
shouted down, congressmen hanged in effigy,
congressmen surrounded and followed by
taunting crowds.
And I can't find any counterpart to the
death threats at least one congressman has
received. So this is something new and ugly.
What's behind it?
Robert Gibbs, the White House press sec-
retary, has compared the scenes at health
care town halls to the "Brooks Brothers riot"
in 2000 - the demonstration that disrupted
the vote count in Miami and arguably helped
send George W. Bush to the White House.
Portrayed at the time as local protesters,
many of the rioters were actually GOP
staffers flown in from Washington.
But Gibbs is probably only half right. Yes,
well-heeled interest groups are helping to
organize the town hall mobs. Key organiz-
ers include two Astroturf (fake grass-roots)
organizations: FreedomWorks, run by the
former House majority leader Dick Armey,
and a new organization called Conservatives
for Patients' Rights.
The latter group, by the way, is run by
Rick Scott, the former head of
Columbia/HCA, a for-profit hospital chain.
Scott was forced out of that job amid a fraud
investigation; the company eventually plead-
ed guilty to charges of overbilling state and
federal health plans, paying $1.7 billion -
yes, that's "billion" - in fines. You can't
make this stuff up.
But while the organizers are as crass as
they come, I haven't seen any evidence that
the people disrupting those town halls are


NOTICE is hereby given that JULLIAN SEARS of BETHEL
AVENUE, P.O. BOX N-4478, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 8th day of August, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship,
P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.









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Florida-style rent-a-mobs. For the most part,
the protesters appear to be genuinely angry.
The question is, what are they angry about?
There was a telling incident at a town hall
held by Rep. Gene Green, D-Texas. An
activist turned to his fellow attendees and
asked if they "oppose any form of socialized
or government-run health care." Nearly all
did. Then Green asked how many of those
present were on Medicare. Almost half raised
their hands.
Now, people who don't know that
Medicare is a government programme prob-
ably aren't reacting to what President Barack
Obama is actually proposing. They may
believe some of the disinformation oppo-
nents of health care reform are spreading,
like the claim that the Obama plan will lead to
euthanasia for the elderly. (That particular
claim is coming straight from House Repub-
lican leaders). But they're probably reacting
less to what Obama is doing, or even to what
they've heard about what he's doing, than to
who he is.
That is, the driving force behind the town
hall mobs is probably the same cultural and
racial anxiety that's behind the "birther"
movement, which denies Obama's citizen-
ship. Sen. Dick Durbin has suggested that
the "birthers" and the health care protesters
are one and the same; we don't know how
many of the protesters are "birthers," but it
wouldn't be surprising if it's a substantial
fraction.
And cynical political operators are exploit-
ing that anxiety to further the economic inter-
ests of their backers.
Does this sound familiar? It should: It's a
strategy that has played a central role in
American politics ever since Richard Nixon
realized that he could advance Republican
fortunes by appealing to the racial fears of
working-class whites.
Many people hoped that last year's election
would mark the end of the "angry white vot-
er" era in America. Indeed, voters who can be
swayed by appeals to cultural and racial fear
are a declining share of the electorate.
But right now Obama's backers seem to
lack all conviction, perhaps because the pro-
saic reality of his administration isn't living up
to their dreams of transformation. Mean-
while, the angry right is filled with a passion-
ate intensity.
And if Obama can't recapture some of the
passion of 2008, can't inspire his supporters to
stand up and be heard, health care reform
may well fail.
(This article was written by Paul Krugman-
c.2009 New York Times News Service).


EDITOR, The Tribune.

THANK YOU for allow-
ing me the opportunity to
address these few points.
Recently, there seemed to
be a trend developing
among certain Caribbean
countries seeking ownership
of key Bahamian banks,
insurance companies, hotels,
and other interests, unen-
cumbered, I might add.
When one considers the
levels of their ambitions and
the reality of what have
already changed hands,
leaves a reasonably think-
ing person with one ques-
tion. Why? Could there be a
blueprint somewhere in a
Caribbean business office,
highlighting the various key
firms in the Bahamas, that
they need to target in order
to achieve their objectives,
whatever that might be?
Another thing, how will
Bahamians benefit? If this
be the case, I hope that the
objective is not to suck the
life blood out of our people
and have them denigrated
to levels similar to Central
American countries.
The Bahamas has a popu-
lation of around 400,000
people. We are a small pre-
dominantly blessed black
nation. The Bahamas can ill
afford to surrender our cher-
ished way of life to countries
that have populations well
in the millions. Why aren't
they targeting American
institutions? German insti-
tutions? Venezuelan institu-
tions? Haitian institutions?
Cuban institutions? Russian
institutions? What we have
in the Bahamas is only
enough for our people, after
all 5,000 young Bahamian
graduates will be joining the
job force this summer. We
are a much smaller nation
than Jamaica, Barbados and
Trinidad. One need not look
very far to figure out what is
happening here.
If they are allowed to own
the major companies or
institutions in the Common-
wealth of The Bahamas,
then by extension will they
be able to dictate immigra-
tions laws? These peoples
would be coming in
increased numbers, to take
up positions of what will
now be businesses owned by
their nationals. Monies as


Share your news

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from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



.-: --
' - - - ---



British Clonial Hilton Hoel
Marlb.ugh St. Shop f#1
Clearance SALE
Everything is $20
We offer Stringing Services, Repairs, Knotting,
Wiring, Driling and The Snack Fix System and
The Mystery Clasps

Pearts and Beads Strands Wholesale and Retail
P.O.Box EE-15827
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: 242-323-1865
Email: gems-peadrs@hotmail.oom

Je er makin cases starts
September gn up now


we have been seen exited
the Bahamas, as an exam-
ple is the Clico situation
without prior knowledge of
the government or its agen-
cies, will continue/these tac-
tics are a direct off route to
our national security. How
can the governments) allow
other countries with their
personal country's objectives
make the kinds of footholds
and receive the kinds of
advantages likely to dictate
commerce/policies in the
Bahamas? These people
should not have the right to
go after institutions in the
Bahamas, no matter what
damage is done as a result.
Any Bahamian who sides,
agrees and assists, a for-
eigner to either cause his
own people hardship, or to
be disadvantaged or by com-
mon design, causes the laws


of the land to be broken,
that person or persons, is a
traitor. God gave the
Bahamas to Bahamians,
Jamaica to Jamaicans,
Trinidad to Trinidadian, etc.
Incidentally, the Bahamas is
not seeking to establish insti-
tutions in any of the
Caribbean countries men-
tioned. We have increased
what God has given us, but
other Caribbean countries
may not have increased
what God has given them. I
believe that they are trying
to take away what our fore-
fathers, grandparents, and
parents have worked so
hard for, but that devil is a
liar.
Please hear me, the
Bahamas does not want
what you, nor can you have
what God has given the
Bahamas to sustain its peo-
ple.

FRANK GILBERT
Retired Policeman
Nassau,
June 22, 2009.


Boundaries



for buildings

EDITOR, The Tribune.
This is an open letter to:
Hon. Neko Grant,
Minister,
Ministry of Works.
Dear Sir,
1. A condo is presently being constructed at the southeast cor-
ner of the roundabout west of City Market, Cable Beach. A por-
tion of the wall around the property has been taken down and
the foundation appears to be very close to the boundary at
Hampshire and Oxford Streets. Prior to the wall being taken
down there was a pathway just outside the wall where persons
were able to walk off the main road. Please ensure that the wall
is not reconstructed beyond their boundary as not to put pedes-
trians' life at risk.
2. While the Yellow condo at the southwest corner of the
roundabout "Riggles Place" was under construction I called the
building inspections section at the Ministry of Works, and
informed them about the wall that was being constructed
approximately five feet beyond their boundary, I was told that
they would know where their boundary lay. Because of this,
pedestrians end up walking in the road, putting their lives at
risk.
3. Large vehicles experience difficulties while driving around
the roundabout, which has been narrowed tremendously due to
the boundary not being adhered to. The wall has been continu-
ously knocked down. So much so, that the owners placed large
rocks in front of the wall. Additionally the corner heading south
on the roundabout was able to accommodate the two-way traf-
fic. As it is now, cars are unable to drive in a north to south
direction at the same time.
4. I contacted Ms. Roach, Director of Works, at the time, and
informed her of the construction work that was being carried
out at an apartment on the north side of Hampshire Street,
immediately west of Skyline Drive, without a work permit hav-
ing been posted. In my opinion the wall has been constructed
beyond its boundary lines, cones have also been placed four feet
from the wall which leaves absolutely nowhere for pedestrians
to walk. As far as I know the Director has yet to investigate
these potential dangers to a person's life.
Kindly refer to the western wall at City Market, Cable Beach,
and the wall/building immediately west of City Market, which
appear to be the only two that are currently within their bound-
aries.
I also mentioned "Riggles Place" to her. She said that she was
aware of the problem, and had sent out a letter to the owners in
reference to removing the wall, but she was unaware that the
instructions had not been acted upon. She promised to follow up
on that letter.
To date, the wall remains in the road causing obstruction and
endangering lives.
Please, Mr. Minister, take the necessary action to have these
complaints thoroughly investigated and the appropriate action
taken.
I await your speedy action in saving lives and ensuring that
the building codes are adhered to.
A CONCERNED PROPERTY OWNER
Nassau,
July 29, 2009


Will PLP politicians

never learn?


EDITOR, The Tribune.
WHY was I not surprised to
read in the newspaper that Sen-
ator Jerome Fitzgerald is Chair-
man of a group who submitted
a bid for a contract for a desali-
nation plant at Arawak Cay to
the Water and Sewerage Cor-
poration in 2006 whilst Perry
Christie was Prime Minister
and the PLP were in power?
And why am I not surprised
the good Senator failed to
declare this apparent conflict
of interest when first he started
grandstanding against moving


the port to Arawak Cay?
To my mind, whatever flick-
er of legitimacy the good Sen-
ator's crusade against moving
the port to Arawak Cay may
have had has been overshad-
owed by his failure to declare
his own self-interest.
Will PLP politicians never
learn they need to come clean
about these sort of things "up
front" if they wish to be taken
seriously?
A True, True Bahamian
Nassau,
July 29, 2009


Ve can ill afford





to surrender





our way of life


-j






THE TRBUNE STURDAYAUGUoST820m0llAGWE


WHY YOU






"I is done vex when I
reads all over that the
turtles must have laws
to protect dem from
harm wid full page ads,
committees an 'ting,
potcake dogs in Grand
Bahama who is abused
have animal cruelty
laws to protect dem,
the illegal Haitians who
squatting on land has
human rights laws to
protect dem, even a
bunch of men pastors
done getting da laws
fixed to protect the
congregation an' peo-
ple wid dey money
from playing lottery -
but I ain't hears no one
talking' as much 'bout
we Bahamian women
getting rights an' laws
fixed to protect dem
from dey husbands rap-
ing dem.
"Ain't dat a shame,
all the others does have
rights and the Bahami-
an women gats ta now
struggle for theirs."

- "Women an'
children fj ,i , Nassau.

"I vex because erry
time I turn 'round to
brush my teeth or
bathe, the water off.
Still when you go to
pay your water bill at
Water and Sewerage,
dey don't even say
"since you ain' had no
water for three hours
last week Monday,
Wednesday and Thurs-
day, we ga take off
$10."
"Man, dey really
does do us wrong in
Pinewood Gardens."

- Debbs, Nassau.

"I vex at how every
time I go in one shop,
restaurant, food store
or the movies, the peo-
ple who work there
have their mouths all
twist up like someone
do them something.
"It really does take
all of my willpower not
to yuck the girl behind
the counter up because
she can't even smile
and say 'good morn-
ing'.
"Dey have to be fool
because they know my
money is pay their
salary. I don't know
why every place in
Nassau it seems have
stink people working in
customer service when
these people lucky dey
ain' picking up garbage
off the streets."

- .%/11lt , Nassau.

"I vex at these fool
people who quote the
Bible to support every
biggoty, selfish, self-
serving agenda they
wan' push.
"The Lord I serve,
and his son Jesus, is a
God who is loving and
wants equality for all.
"And I especially hot
about this law to out-
law martial rape.
"I been hearing hea-
thens quoting the Bible
to support men being
able to dominate over
their wives to the point
where they can abuse
their bodies sexually as
they see fit.
"And some of these
no good men even have
the nerve to say if you
outlaw marital rape it
ga increase sweetheart-
ing. What Bahamian
man, married or not,
you know who don't
cheat on his wife? I


wish I could knock
sense into these nar-
row-minded 'men' and
the women who dumb
enough to sleep with
them."

- Monique M,
Nassau.

Are you vex?
Send your complaints to
whyyouvex@tribunemedia.net
or fax them to 328-2398.


Govt yet to make final





decision on turtle ban


By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net
ALTHOUGH a proposed ban on the
harvesting of sea turtles was expected to
take effect last month, Minister of Agri-
culture and Marine Resources Larry
Cartwright said government has still not
made a final decision on the matter.
"We have finished the consultation
process but the government has to give
the final decision. We were trying to get
it done before the end of July but it did-
n't happen, so as soon as possible now,"
Minister Cartwright told the Tribune.
Meetings were held in Abaco,
Eleuthera, Grand Bahama and Exuma
with fishermen and other people who
wished to comment on the proposed
ban. The turtle season is closed between
April I and July 31. Once the ban is put
in place there will be complete prohibi-
tion on the harvesting of turtles.


The move for the ban is in response
to calls from conservationists seeking
measures to protect the turtles.
Jane Mather, president of Advocate
for Animal Rights and spokeswoman
for the Bahamas Sea Turtle Conserva-
tion Group, said that the ban will ensure


the preservation of turtle species that
are close to extinction.
"We are closer than most people
would like to believe. There's a lot of
talk about Bahamian turtles, but there's
no such thing because turtles are migra-
tory creatures and they usually pass


through the Bahamas on their way down
to mate.
"So when we kill them we are killing
the mating stock and it often takes up to
50 years for some of the breeds to repro-
duce," Ms Mather said.
Species of turtles which have been
seen in the Bahamas are the Green,
Hawksbill, Loggerhead, Leatherhead
and Olive Ridley turtles. Although the
government has not made a final deci-
sion, all indications are that the har-
vesting of turtles will be prohibited in the
Bahamas in the near future.
Ms Mather said that the ban has been
long awaited. "We have waited and wait-
ed and it's been many years. It's not just
this group that's tried to put the ban on
turtles because they are animals that
will be extinct soon if we don't take care;
they are all on the endangered species
list. It's also the brutal way in which they
are killed that's very offensive to a lot of
people," Ms Mather said.


Ground-broken for new Grand Bahama Arts and Craft Centre


GROUND was broken yes-
terday for what is expected to
be the largest and most success-
ful arts and craft centre in the
Bahamas, offering employment
opportunities and creating a new
tourist attraction on Grand
Bahama.
Members of the Grand
Bahama Port Authority
(GBPA), the Bahamas Agricul-
tural and Industrial Corporation
(BAIC) and the government
hosted a special ground-break-
ing press conference to
announce the construction of
the new Grand Bahama Arts
and Craft Centre.
GBPA chairman Hannes
Babak said: "We are very excit-
ed about the Grand Bahama
Arts and Craft Centre. The con-
cept behind this project is to cre-
ate a tourist attraction where
visitors can actually see how
native Bahamian arts and crafts
are made, while providing
employment opportunities with-
in the local community."
Pyramid Construction Com-
pany was awarded the contract
to build the 5,000 sq ft centre
following an open bidding
process meeting hosted by
GBPA in early July.
"This is the first time that
GBPA has done an exercise of
this nature and it is in line with
our 'making it happen' initia-
tives. Our chairman Hannes
Babak was instrumental in
implementing this process," said
GBPA president Ian Rolle.
Pyramid Construction Company
won out over 16 other bidders
for the contract which is valued
at approximately $635,000.
The centre, which will be
located on East Sunrise High-


way accessed via Alcester Road,
will house the offices of BAIC
as well as a training centre for
craft classes and an art gallery
with a display area for finished
products.
Other guests for the ground-
breaking included Neko Grant,
Minister of Public Works and
Transport and MP for Lucaya;
Larry Cartwright, Minister of
Agriculture and Marine
Resources and MP for Long
Island and Ragged Island and
MP for South Abaco; BAIC
executive chairman Edison Key,
and President of GBPA Ian
Rolle.


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FROM LEFT: Neko Grant,
Minister of Public Works and
Transport and MP for Lucaya;
Hannes Babak, chairman of
GBPA; Larry Cartwright, Min-
ister of Agriculture and
Marine Resources and MP for
Long Island and Ragged
Island; Edison Key, MP for
South Abaco and executive
chairman of BAIC and lan
Rolle, president of GBPA.


FO NI. W EVC
FetiierFnicide


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SECURITIES COMMISSION OF THE BAHAMAS

Thc Securitics Comnmi~ssion ol Thc Raharrmas, a Lsit.oricy agcncy rcsponsibk cfor the
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Markets in or from The Bahamas, as well as the superv I sion of Financial and
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following position:

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Primmry Rtspensibilhitis:
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-Creating MS SQL Smre'r storcd procedwms. tn~ggrs, Emd SSIS packaiges.
*D�;siwn Build OLAP icubtvs and MDX quurtL;2-uz-ijigM~i~proft Aa A ysis Svr%-'kCh.
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*FXPicrim icwith RI iovIq such ans SSRS ; nd Crystl Reports 20HlJ i-s plus.
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Applicaidons should be submitted no later than August I 2iii 20019.


SATU RDAY, AU G UST 8, 2009, PAG E 5


THE TRIBUNE





PAGE 6, SATURDAY, AUGUST 8, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


Success for ASRS




'Operation Love "
^^.. ,,i s

,1.m=t^^^^^^B~ . ^^ I m iT^^ _j=..,, j' - r-L ^ ^^


By GENA GIBBS


THE Bahamas National
Pride Association's 'Operation
Love Your Country' is sweeping
through the Big Pond, Windsor
Lane and Kemp Road commu-
nities with much success.
Each month residents there
have been volunteering time
keeping their neighborhoods
clean.
"National pride begins with
love for your country," said
Joanne Johnson, executive coor-
dinator of the Bahamas Nation-
al Pride Association (BNPA), a
non-profit organisation affiliat-
ed with 'Keep America Beauti-
ful'.
Also participating are St
Cecilia, Tropical Gardens,
Anne's Town and the Reeves
Street, Lyon Road and Sarah
Robinson Road neighbour-
hoods.
"We need to rediscover our
country again and love it again,"
said Ms Johnson.
"Environmental laws are bro-
ken out of ignorance. If persons
are told what the law expects of
them, and they take part as
neighbours in the clean up of
their communities, then the
accountability will rest with
them.
"I see baby steps and we must
educate people about the histo-
ry of the Bahamas and loving
the land to hold them account-
able," she said.
Under the theme 'Team Up
to Clean Up', BNPA has initi-


.4


Ii
L. III


ated a programme to rid com-
munities of derelict vehicles, dis-
carded appliances and furniture
and other trash. Community
members truck the garbage to
the public dump.
Since 1995, the BNPA has
been inspiring Bahamians to
develop positive attitudes
towards their communities and
change their behavior towards
conserving the natural resources.
The BNPA has various pro-
grammes and projects to pro-
mote pollution prevention on a
continual basis and to change
littering behaviour patterns.
The 'Operation Love Your
Country' campaign was started
by former BNPA executive co-
ordinator, Alpheus Ramsey.
Volunteers can participate in


CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL'
CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS * Tel: 325-221
SUNDAY AUGUST 9TH, 2009.
1130A.M.Spiktthr
PASTOR
MARCEL LIGHTBOURNE
" ba CIIn S a.m. * Ean 4 BMead W nw ce. 1a.4S na.m.
I * Co rm'itty ~n t Ir 11 n O ,.m * tm Servcm7- S S r p.m.
^ * Site4of' Prayefr wn Meeth i ft1nHO [ZnJ Thulireday f el cht montly _/


[-*7


*~


THE BAkAMAS TURKS AND CAMN IMANDS CONFNRNiC(
OF THE METHODIST CHURCH M THE CARIBBEAN
AND THE AMERICAS
L'EOLSE MtTHODTE DAN LA CAATBE ET LES AMRIUES
NASSAU CICUIT OF CHURiCHES
Io MMtas AMnAsU
P9o, tR n E-ItP, IHam, bWwlW T pearm: 5U!fL; Fa:
REPOSITIONG FOR MIRACLES WITH FRESH EMPFRESIONS
"Cetektuirg 221 vemnar of Mntnuwts tM d let wifne Mtr Chfit b
Tim bhham'i

TENTH LORD'W DAY AFTER PENTWO, AUGIUST 9, 20
God Is Our Hwme God ouir nope and nsenMgi. a vry p'Iisl help in
omtu . Trateforle al we Win ta, nahMi emo airi be mrEi wnd though
lha tills h We nb pnt u nail of v Musa.
TtIwog t wiat Uwwt rq un ad .wa, ard Poun 1ii; mmjnfl Mi'u
sii Me iempift of same. Tlere ilea fir, w streams WWrf make glad
ate cf Godf , hO Wd p"iae u dhelabearlde orao*w Wti mo Psai4e:
1.4
WESLEY METiHODIT CHURCH (MalIeS R Ed4)
7:00 B.m. FReerend Edwr J. Syhies ICelebratlm i olE I ly EuctwseQ
1lmta. Lay Pifcher, Sh COcrila Cdivda
RHODES IEMQRIAL ETHO1 ST CHURCH [IMl MDAnlrO Avl.
7:00 e.m. ConuM.e by their 7 a. Felowsip ofH WHip Leaders
10M0 i.m. Lay Prearher, l. Ki Jolly 1mre Saij)
111 a Pazt D Calli Nelmi ird Ijay Precher. Sis Ceryl Newnan
S:30p.m. wxill1t btHe ! ida Memow*l Waw Alft
COKE IMIORIAL MERHODIST CIMICH URC h Sotree FoX Hill
u11OA.m. Lay Pteacher, S&li V1ienne Imgre (Rodo Broadcm 2NS 1)
PRWOVIDENCEI METHODIST CHURCH (hiOrtIy Ia
11t O am. La Prewher, SIB. EBalne Sterl
HERITAGE OF REDEEMING LOVE METHODIST C jRCI I (2 Crawto4r Si,
Oakes Field
tiO mn Re inm d dE-warl J Syl s 0fralr cA 1- Holy Euwrnst
METHODIST C INCH OF THE GOOD SHEPIHE lRD TNF l M4
5:15 p.m. Feerwd EHEmIl A. Demetrtfle
MCONSTEWY PARK FEILOEWU I
Nei BSwvca LorC's Dw. Auguel 30, 2iM 15:15 p.m.
CROM-DE.sMUiIOM S ALDERWGATh (CtMiKa SaleaUN
ChilMn's Qub ags -la8 yr. w, p n on Friday. 11, 2 K at S30 p.m.
MEFHOOIST MSSGH CENTRE (Qua lfeo il| -Thrit Shop and oer
Mhdee

JUM WEBLEY METHODIST COLLE-GE iA Crwl t, St GloaK i FIl)
Reception Made 7
MID WEEK SERVICE:
Mom ,.ucrmdtrSet Gk * Rols Mem&s MuhMdfl Churm -
edirsday, Augur5, OW, IBOamui~ l smr [RrFaldasI erved)w
RADIO PRSAIU
Vhon" - On lhe Lfd'ae Da, ZNS 1 ait 9p..; "Grwe Hrie ot hipragon' -
On im LotdS Dyi, Rala BIDS an ms p.m.;, [amill VD" 21S 1., Tuesday.
7;30 p.m.. lIa God be ha Gloryf /NS I, rufsday. 7,48 p m
CIRCUIT OPENING OF TIE CHURCH YEAR SERIE: IN CELEBRATION
OF YOUTH - Wlfly MmiWlisn OCrlr, 10 B.Lm., LordW D". StemDnir 20.
0mn.


programmes such as 'adopt-a-
spot/adopt-a-bin' or the 'best
kept yard' and 'clean campus
competitions.'
BNPA encourages backyard
composting mulching, Christ-
mas tree and telephone book
mulching projects.
"For effective changes to
occur in community attitudes in
response to National Pride's
campaign for a litter-free envi-
ronment, projects must produce
results from the involvement of
many people," the BNPA said.
Their neighborhood pro-
grammes like garbage bin dis-
tribution, putting up 'no litter-
ing' signs, beach monitoring and
clean-ups, and environmental
and junior pride clubs have
gained popularity.
"To continue to get positive
results, the organisation must
display a clear understanding
that people will only involve
themselves to the extent that
they feel wanted and needed,"
the BNPA said.


IWINDSORLAEvoluneersshowSaionalr i d




*lii E AIIAV~~I Ia~i lI] ~ [II 'LjI] a~II


JUSTICE Hartman Lon-
gley (left) has been sworn
in as Acting President of
the Court of Appeal at
Government House by the


rant's ot b Werte JletoIbbiot COurchb
aSdhMit lSatswt.l csCBOSC-I'm
The -Holy Ghost Prayer-Line nrnber Is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.arg)
SUNDAY AUGUST, 9TH, 2009.

7*00 pw Rev . Carta Cunert/Ss. A/ce Woodsde
1 t00 pMp Rev. Carta CL/maertuth (B)
7- pm;: s. TezelArr~deson/-Merbers-At-Large


Governor General Arthur
Hanna (right).
Mr Longley was called to
the Bahamas Bar on Octo-
ber 6, 1976.
He served as assistant
counsel in the Attorney
General's Chambers from
1976 to 1978.
He also served as a Mag-
istrate in Freeport and


Nassau, and from Septem-
ber 1993 to July 1995. He
also held the position of
Chief Magistrate.
Mr Longley was appoint-
ed judge of the Supreme
Court in July 1995 and
served until 2005.
On September 23, 2005
he was made a judge of the
Court of Appeal.


BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH
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Preaching 11am & 7:30pmrn EVANGELISTIC


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PasIar H. Mills * PhD-c: 39 AO563 * Box N32 I i


I -.. . LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH


Ic



Worship time:
Sunday Sch
Prayer tim


rounded In T


he Past &


Geared To The Future

11am & 7pm
ool: 9:45am
?e: 6:30pm .


Place:
The Madeira
Shopping Center


Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles


ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles

P.O.Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
EMAIL - lynnk@batelnet.bs


- Worship Time: 1a-M.
{ **?srI


Prayer Time;: 0:15a.rm

Church School during Worship Service

I'luce- Twynam IHeights
ff Prince Charles I Drii'

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry
P.O.Box iSS M
Telep home number: 324-2538
T ltfaxs member: 324.2597

COME TO IVORStIIP LE. I I K TO NER! E


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WEDNESDAY at 7:30 p.m.

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| -.j'il : ,,. Shootouts in Mexico

leave at least 12 dead


PACHUCA, Mexico
A RUNNING battle
between police and gunmen
has left 12 people dead in this
central Mexican city, officials
said Friday, according to Asso-
ciated Press.
The dead included three
police officers and nine gun-
men, said Hidalgo state Attor-
ney General Jose Alberto
Rodriguez. Two state police
officers and one city officer
remained hospitalized Friday
after suffering gunshot wounds
in the attacks late Thursday
on the outskirts of Pachuca.


A state officer, who was also
wounded, died Friday at the
hospital.
Hidalgo state police direc-
tor Donanciano Millan said
officers were acting on a tip
that gunmen were in the area
when they stopped four trucks
carrying the assailants, who
opened fire and fled.
Officers pursued them, and
the two groups exchanged
gunfire.
After the attacks, police
seized assault rifles, grenades,
federal police uniforms, hand-
cuffs and 3 kilograms (about 7
pounds) of cocaine.


PASTORS GREET Ministry of Tourism Deputy Director (1-r) Dr Rick Kendall of South East Florida; Dr
Richard Pinder; Dr Myles Munroe; Ministry of Tourism's deputy director religious group Linville John-
son, and Dr Pepe Ramnath of Mirimar Florida.





Ministry aims




for chunk of




$18bn religious



tourism market


THE Ministry of Tourism is taking aggres-
sive measures to get a chunk of the religious
tourism niche market, a $18 billion industry
which has the potential of providing the
Bahamas with year-round visitors.
This from the Ministry of Tourism's deputy
director of the religious group market Linville
Johnson who said that his department is work-
ing along with some 20 denominations to
increase the number of visitors who attend
religious events in the Bahamas annually.
Mr Johnson was speaking to the press at
the first annual Kingdom Seminar hosted by
international author and consultant Dr Myles
Munroe at the Diplomat Centre on Wednes-
day night. The winter season is the peak peri-
od for visitors, but Mr Johnson emphasised
the need for year round visitors.
"We have hundreds of visitors who come
to the Bahamas annually solely for religious
events. It's an $18 billion global market that is
large and is growing. We want to be at the
cutting edge of this market so that we can get
our fair share, and statistics show that we are
one of the destinations of choice for these reli-
gious groups," he said.
Tourism's religious market is targeting large
church groups by giving them the best deals
possible from the Ministry of Tourism's web-
site. Other activities include marketing and
advertising through specialty religious maga-
zines and public relations activities at semi-
nars and conferences. Research by the ministry
shows that the local religious tourism market
is comprised of 54 per cent female visitors,
aged 18 to 24, and 45 to 54, with a household
income from $25,000 to $75,000, and 57 per
cent of them stay an average of six nights in
hotels, accounting for approximately 3,057 vis-
itors and 18,201 room nights in 2007/08.
Said Mr Johnson: "For example, Dr Myles
Munroe's annual conferences for youth, Chris-
tians and international leaders have been draw-
ing a large segment of that market for us.
Florida is our biggest market. What we want to
do now is partner with other denominations


"We have hundreds
of visitors who come
to the Bahamas
annually solely for
religious events. It's
an $18 billion global
market that is large
and is growing."

Ministry of Tourism's deputy
director of the religious group
market Linville Johnson

during their events to increase the numbers
through hotel bookings."
Dr Munroe's three-day Kingdom seminar
attracted delegates from more than 30 coun-
tries including the United States, Indonesia,
Malaysia, the United Kingdom and other parts
of Europe.
"It's great when I can do what I love which
is teaching and at the same time be a part of
tourism in this country. This is a time when
people everywhere are cutting back, but this
event has not been impacted by the recession.
Really this seminar is a response to a demand
for the past ten years. When I travel people
always ask me, 'when are you going to have a
seminar in the Bahamas?' So this is different
from the conferences, but it still attracts Chris-
tians from around the world," said Dr Munroe.
The Ministry of Tourism and the Wyndham
Nassau Resort provided a welcome reception
and tour of Paradise Island and Cable Beach
Hotels to international pastors from Dr
Munroe's Kingdom Seminar.


Williams/Russell Town


developments on track


By SIMON LEWIS


FREEPORT - The revital-
isation of Williams and Rus-
sell Towns in Grand Bahama
continues on track, Minister
for Works and Transport
Neko Grant said this week.
He was speaking to the
media on Thursday "to dis-
pel the rumours and untruths
that have been circulated by
some rejected politicians."
Mr Grant represents the
Lucaya constituency, which
includes the two communi-
ties, in parliament.
The revitalisation project
started shortly after Mr Grant
became the Minister of Public
Works and Transport.
Seawalls, sidewalks, and
paved parking have already
been constructed and persons
can now easily walk from one
community to the other, he
said.


Restrooms are to be built,
the entire area landscaped,
and 21 pastel-colored booths
provided for local vendors.
Mr Grant said the residents
have responded favourably to
the project.
"I have been honoured to
have represented the people
of Williams and Russell
Towns for the past 17 years,"
he said. "That speaks vol-
umes of their trust is me.
Four consecutive terms.
"I promised them in 2007
that if re-elected I would seek
to revitalise Williams and
Russell Towns, and as you
can see we are well underway
to doing that."
Roads in the area will be
paved soon, he said.
"One of the reasons why
we have not paved to date is
that we would wish to have a
first class operation out
here."


B Bank of The Bahamas

INTERNATIONAL




AMENDED


GOVERNMENT GUARANTEED ADVANCED

EDUCATION LOAN SCHEME

In collaboration with The Education Guaranteed Fund Loan Program of
the Ministry of Education, Bank of The Bahamas International is pleased
to advise that the cheque disbursement for RETURNING students
in the Loan Program will continue at Holy Trinity Activity
Centre, Stapledon Gardens, Monday, August 10th, to Friday,
August 14th, 2009 from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. as follows:


S . am- O O Oe n gwh .

K- Mi Monday, August 10, 2009
Mo- 0 Tuesday, August 11, 2009
P - R Wednesday, August 12, 2009
S Thursday, August 13, 2009
T - Z Friday, August 14, 2009



TIME: 9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

PLACE: Holy Trinity Activity Centre

Stapledon Gardens




* Returning Students AND Guarantors should be present and must
bring relevant identification, (valid Passport and National Insurance
Card).


* Cheques will not be released until completion of all required
documentation.




PLEASE NOTE: DISBURSEMENTS MADE AT THE
BANK WILL INCUR A PENALTY FEE!


ROYA FIDELITY CAPITAL MARKETS

C FA L" �:<> FRiD.'YV 7 AIGI�JST LIO'J
Ei . ,.LL E Ht REILrl E. *:L,:, E 1 : 111Ct - - " " C - _ i |VYT -1 : - IYTD -* 1
nrjO _, C -.L E. E ",. 4 | y TO - ,-,-," - | ,-'- -1 . - ", 1
WWW.BISXBA AMAS.COM I TELEPEIONE:242-323-2330 |I FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
1 81 1 28 Abaco Markets 1 39 1 34 -0 05 1,000 0 127 0 000 106 000%
11 80 1000 Bahamas Property Fund 1100 1100 000 992 200 11 1 1 82%
930 625 Bank of Bahamas 694 625 -069 2,500 0244 0260 256 4 16%
089 063 Benchmark 063 063 0 00 -0877 0000 N/M 000%
349 315 Bahamas Waste 315 315 000 0078 0090 404 286%
237 214 Fdelity Bank 237 237 000 0055 0040 431 169%
14 20 10 18 Cable Bahamas 11 35 11 35 0 00 1 406 0 250 8 1 220%
2 88 2 74 Colna Holdings 2 74 2 74 0 00 0 249 0 040 110 1 46%
7 50 5 50 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 5 60 560 0 00 201 0 419 0 360 134 643%
478 1 27 Consoidated Water BDRs 347 348 001 0111 0052 314 1 49%
285 1 32 Doctor's Hospital 1 82 1 82 0 00 0 240 0 080 76 440%
8 20 660 Famguard 660 6 60 000 0420 0240 157 364%
12 50 1000 F ncO 1063 10 63 000 400 0322 0520 330 489%
11 71 1030 FirstCarbbean Bank 1030 1030 000 0794 0350 130 340%
553 495 Focol (S) 513 513 000 0332 0150 155 292%
1 00 1 00 Focol Class B Preference 1 00 1 00 000 0 000 0000 N/M 0 00%
0 45 0 30 Freeport Concrete 0 30 0 30 0 00 0 035 0 000 86 000%
902 550 ICD Utlhtbes 549 549 000 0407 0500 135 911%
1200 1039 J S Johnson 1039 1039 000 0952 0640 109 616%
1000 10 00 Premier Real Estate 1000 10 00 0 00 0 180 0000 556 000%
52wk-H, 52wk-Low Security Symbol Last Sale Change Dally Vol Interest Maturity
1000 00 1000 00 Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100 00 0 00 7% 19 October 2017
1000 00 1000 00 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100 00 00 Prime + 1 75% 19 October 2022
1000 00 1000 00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100 00 0 00 7% 30 May 2013
1000 00 1000 00 Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100 O0 0 00 Prime + 1 75% 29 May 2015

14 60 14 25 Bahamas Supermarkets 7 92 8 42 14 60 -0 041 0300 N/M 2 05%
8 00 6 00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 4 00 6 25 6 00 0 000 0 480 N/M 780%
054 0 20 RND Holdings 0 35 0 40 0 35 0 001 0 000 256 6 000%
055 0 40 RND Holdings 0 45 0 55 0 55 0 002 0 000 261 90 0 00%
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Div $ Yield % NAV Date
1 3860 1 3231 CFAL Bond Fund 1 3860 240 475 30-J un-09
30350 28952 CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 29047 -1 20 -366 31-Ju1-09
1 4817 1 4059 CFAL Money Market Fund 1 4817 335 538 31-Jul-09
36090 3 1031 Fidelty Bahamas G & I Fund 3 1031 -8 35 -13 82 30-Jun-09
12 9801 12 3289 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 12 9801 2 87 5 79 31-May-09
101 6693 1000000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 101 6693 1 10 1 67 30-Jun-09
100 9600 93 1992 CFAL Global Equity Fund 96 7398 035 -418 30-Jun-09
1 0000 1 0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1 0000 0 O0 0 00 31-Dec-07
9 4733 9 0775 Fidelty International Investment Fund 9 2765 2 00 -2 98 30-Jun-09
10622 1 0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1 0622 256 622 30-Jun-09
1 0364 1 0000 FG Financial Growth Fund 1 0243 -0 84 2 43 30-Jun-09
� - - - . . . . . . . " , , . . . . .. . - - - _ . - --- -. ,

52wk Lowest closing pe ce Ie n last 52 weeks Ask $- Selling ce of Colna and fidelity
PreviousClos e ,Previous ay's w eight .pr or odallyvOlum. L t Pric Lst trade overth counter pic
Today Close -Cuent days weighted pce for daIly volue Weekly vol- Trading volue of the por week
Change -Change in closing price from dayto day EPS $- A company repoed eangs per share for the last 12 mths
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 onths N/M- Not Meaningful
PIE -C1losin pi diiddby th l.ast 12 onth n s FINDEX The F elty aha-as Stok In.x January 1, 1994 = 1 00
(S) -4-or-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
S1) 3 or 1Stoc Spit Efctive Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL COLINAf 242-5 O2-7010 | RWYALFIDELITV 2422 /.T7784 | 1F CAPITAL IVMARKETS 242.396-4000 | COLONIAL 242.502-7525


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SATU RDAY, AU G UST 8, 2009, PAG E 7


THE TRIBUNE






THE TRIBUNE PAGE 0


I AGE 0 Itenaioal sporsew


B0)



By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net


ers on med a iuest




Amateurs get ready to fight at World Boxing Championships


Amateur boxers
Valentino Knowles
and Carl Hield have
their bags packed
for a 32-day excur-
sion in Italy fully sponsored by the
International Amateur Boxing Asso-
ciation.
The duo, along with coaches
Andre Seymour and Prince Fergu-
son are expected to travel to Rome
Sunday for a 17-day training camp
before they end up in Milan for the
World Boxing Championships.
The contingent is scheduled to
return home on September 13, hope-
fully with a medal, according to
Wellington Miller, president of the
Amateur Boxing Federation of the
Bahamas.
"This is a great honour for our
federation because it means that the
AIBA, which is the governing body
for amateur boxing in the world, has
recognized the value of our training
efforts and our boxers' participation
in international boxing tourna-
ments," Miller said.
"I would like to thank all of those
boxers who started off with the
Amateur Boxing Association many
years ago on whose shoulders these
young boxers now stand. As a result
of their concerted efforts over the
years, these young boxers now have
this opportunity to represent the
Bahamas in these World Champi-
onships."
The boxers will train in Rome
until September 1 when they are
expected to head to Milan for the
championships slated to run through
September 12.
Miller said the boxers have
showed a lot of determination and


fortitude to have stuck with the pro-
gramme to get to the level that they
have reached.
He also thanked their parents for
allowing their sons to be a part of the
programme.
Both the boxers and their parents
expressed their gratitude at a press
conference yesterday as they were
sent off by Minister of Youth, Sports
and Culture Desmond Bannister.
"I want to congratulate Carl and
Valentino, two young men who are
doing progressively well in this coun-
try," Bannister said. "It's always
good when I see young men mov-
ing ahead, looking ahead and set-
ting goals to move the country for-
ward.
"I appreciate the fact that your
parents have come here and spoke
so positively about where you're
going and where you're heading. I
hope you listen to Andre (Seymour)
and the goals he has set for you."
Bannister said after watching both
Seymour and Ferguson in action at
the Olympic Games in Beijing, Chi-
na, he's confident that the boxers
will live up to what is expected of
them.
"I want to say how delighted I am
to have been awarded this opportu-
nity to go down to Italy," said
Valentino Knowles, who will be
competing in his second World
Championships.
"Nothing in life is easy, so after
all my hard training and desire, I
stuck around and my reward is now
coming."
His father, McAllen Knowles, was
extremely grateful for his son's par-
ticipation in the sport.


BOXER CARL HIELD and his mother, Norma Hield...


(L-R) - ABFB president Wellington Miller, coach Prince Ferguson, boxer Carl Hield, Minister Desmond Bannister, boxer
Valentino Knowles, coach Andre Seymour, permanent secretary Archie Nairn and ABFB secretary general George Turner...
Photo: Raymond Bethel/BIS


"He has been trying hard for a
long time, now his time has finally
come and he's going somewhere,"
he said as he thanked the ministry
and the federation for all of their
help in supporting Valentino.
Carl Hield, who will be appear-
ing in his third World Champi-
onships, thanked God for allowing
him to see the day when he was
afforded the scholarship.
"It's been a hard road with some
downs and outs, I stuck around and
I'm here," he said. "I just have to
go down and do my thing and carry
the flag for my country."


His mother, Norman Hield, also
thanked God for opening the doors
for her son to enhance his boxing
career.
"I want to thank Mr Miller, the
president, Mr (George) Turner (sec-
retary), Mr Seymour and all those
who worked hard with C J to get
him to where he is today," she said.
"I mostly want to express my sin-
cere thanks to the minister for allow-
ing C J to be a part of this team offi-
cially by being a part of the subven-
tion so that he can do all the things
that the boxers...before he was able
to do and train without having to


BOXER VALENTINO KNOWLES and his father, McAllen Knowles


worry about anything."
Coach Seymour said both boxers
are seasoned and they are quite
ready for the challenge that awaits
them.
"What we can expect at the cham-
pionships from both of these box-
ers is good performances," Seymour
said. "We're going to take it one day
at a time.
"We are going to try and get a
medal at the championships. This is
not a trip for experience. They have
the experience. This is now time to
win a medal. Gone are the days
when we go for experience. We will
train, train and train and when we
step into the ring, our aim is to win."
Ferguson, who will be assisting
Seymour, said he's also proud of the
achievement of the two boxers in
their quest for a medal at the cham-
pionships.
"I had the liberty of traveling with
them to many countries and many
tournaments and regardless of the
struggles that they had, they always
stuck to their game plan and when
they fell down, they always got back
up," he said.
"To attend a tournament such as a
World Championships, it means a
whole lot to them and to the federa-
tion and I'm proud that I will be able
to work with them and hope that
they are successful in their quest for
a medal."


BFA hires youth development officer for soccer


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net


THE Bahamas Football Associa-
tion (BFA) has engaged the services
of Paul James Jr of Guyana as the
soccer youth development officer
for the next two years.
"Soccer is the sport in the
Bahamas and it seems to have the
most vibrant youth development
programme," said Minister of Youth,
Sports and Culture Desmond Ban-
nister as he was officially introduced
to James yesterday.
"What the ministry is extremely
pleased about is that they are serious
about youth development and the
community outreach programme. I
think anywhere you go on this island
on a Saturday morning, you see hun-
dreds and hundreds of young people
playing soccer.
"It's a sport that is growing. We
had the FIFA World Congress here
recently and we anticipate the sport
growing more and more popular in
the Bahamas."
Welcoming James to the
Bahamas, Bannister said he antici-
pates only good things for the sport,
which has now also been able to
secure lights in its national facilities
at the Baillou Hills Sporting Com-
plex.
"It's the only artificial turf in the
Bahamas and now they are going to
have lights," Bannister said. "So I
want to congratulate them on how
progressive they are and assure them
that they have the ministry's contin-


(L-R) Paul James Jr, BFA president Anton Sealy, permanent secretary Archie Nairn and BFA secretary general Lionel Haven...


ued support."
BFA president Anton Sealy
thanked Bannister for ensuring that
all of their programmes are pressed
without any hindrance in his min-
istry.
Secretary general Lionel Haven,
however, said James brings a wealth
of experience from Guyana where
he will help to continue to develop
their youth programme.
"The initial programme calls for us
to establish community programmes


here and in three different Family
Islands," Haven said.
"In addition to that, we met this
morning with the Ministry of Edu-
cation and Dawn Knowles, and we
will be working with them in trying
to improve that programme."
Last year when they hosted the
programme, Haven said they were
able to attract some 25 boys and 18
girls teams from the primary schools,
but he anticipates that these num-
bers will increase this year.


"What we want to do with them,
not necessarily increase in terms of
numbers, but we want to improve
in terms of the quality that the kids
are getting in terms of their educa-
tion of the sport."
During his tenure, Haven said
James will be responsible for
instructing the coaches and also pro-
viding the skills for the youngsters in
their quest to become better play-
ers.
Here for the first time since


August 1, James said he's delighted
to be invited to participate in the
programme, but after spending the
past eight years working with young-
sters between the ages of eight and
15, he sees the value of getting them
grounded in the discipline of the
sport at an early age.
"I think at the 15-and-under level
throughout the Caribbean, we are
not that far apart," James reflected.
"But because of lack of competition
and exposure, we tend to fall back.
"I think once we have the support
of the federation and the ministry
and the media, I think we will be
successful in our youth programme."
James, however, said he saw the
under-16 girls national team and he
was impressed with what he saw,
especially with their enthusiasm.
But he admitted that a lot more
work needs to be done with the
coaches.
Having had a chance to view the
College of the Bahamas' Caribs soc-
cer team in practice, James said
there's nothing much that can be
done for them at this stage.
He said the focus has to be on the
youth, which will be one of his pri-
mary goals.
But his ultimate goal is to ensure
that the under-15 national teams are
developed much stronger than they
are now.
With a plan to start working with
the players from October, James said
he's confident that by the time the
national team gets ready to play next
year, they will be better prepared
for their Caribbean counterparts.


-X I i(i I N T , I I I I





PAGE~NERAIOA 10,RT SAUDYIUUT8 20TIUE SOT


GM calls


Roy pillar of


Trail Blazers


franchise

By RYAN KOST
Associated Press Writer

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP)
- Trail Blazers general
manager Kevin Pritchard
called Brandon Roy a pil-
lar of the franchise at a press
conference Friday during
which he formally
announced Roy's multiyear
contract extension.
Pritchard said it was "an
amazing day" and that he
looked forward to Roy's
future with the team.
He recalled going out to
watch Roy in a workout
before he was first signed to
the team.
"I remember driving back
from that workout thinking
this is our guy, and he's
going to be a pillar of our
franchise," he said. "Bran-
don is a leader. He's a guy
who cares about his team-
mates."
The Trail Blazers have
declined to release contract
terms, but Roy's agent said
it's a five-year deal which
could be worth more than
$80 million. The fifth year,
ending in 2015, the agent
said, is at Roy's option.
The two-time All-Star,
who grew up in Seattle, said
he never had any reserva-
tions about signing for the
long-haul with team, despite
free agency and the salary
cap.
"From my first year in
this organization, I knew
where I wanted to be," he
said. "I couldn't imagine
being anywhere but here in
Portland."
The 25-year-old Roy led
the Trail Blazers with 22.6
points and 5.1 assists per
game last season. He's been
instrumental in helping the
team win back a fan base
that had been alienated by
the so-called Jail Blazers of
the past.
Contract negotiations
took longer than Roy had
hoped, he said. It was frus-
trating, but it "is something
that's part of the business."
When his agent called to
tell him the deal had finally
been completed, "I just had
this huge smile on my face
- of relief," he said.
Now, he says he's
"chomping at the bits" to
get the new season started.
"Being the best team at
the end of the season is my
ultimate goal," Roy said.
"I'm chasing the champi-
onship."
The Trail Blazers are still
working on an extension
with the team's second-lead-
ing scorer, forward LaMar-
cus Aldridge.
Roy said he hopes a deal
gets done soon.


LeBRON JAMES answers questions from the media after revealing his new Nike Air Max LeBron VII shoes during an event at Ed Davis Community Center in Akron, Ohio, Fri-
day, Aug. 7, 2009 in Cleveland, Ohio...


AP source: Pistons, Wallace agree to deal


By LARRY LAGE
AP Sports Writer


DETROIT (AP) - A person
with knowledge of the deal says
Ben Wallace is coming back to
the Detroit Pistons.
Wallace will receive a $1.3 mil-
lion, one-year deal, said the per-
son, who spoke on the condition
of anonymity because the contract
has not been signed. Wallace is
expected to do that early next
week.
The four-time defensive player
of the year helped the Pistons win
the 2004 NBA title. He left as a
free agent to play for the Chicago
Bulls, signing a four-year, $60 mil-
lion deal.
He was traded to the Cleveland
Cavaliers and most recently to the
Phoenix Suns as part of the
Shaquille O'Neal trade. Wallace
was due $14 million for the last
year of his deal but gave up $4
million to become a free agent.
Wallace was considering retire-
ment as recently as May after the
Cavs were ousted from the play-
offs by Orlando. He cited a com-
bination of injuries, declining pro-
duction and a loss of passion for
the game.
The 14-year veteran suffered a
broken leg last season and suf-
fered from tendinitis in his knees.
At his best, Wallace is one of
the best defensive players in the
NBA, a fierce rebounder despite
his small size for a center (6-foot-
9, 240 pounds).


IN THIS February 3, 2009 file photo,
Cleveland Cavaliers' Ben Wallace (4)
grabs a rebound in front of Toronto
Raptors' Joey Graham (14) during a
game in Cleveland. A person with
knowledge of the deal says Wallace
is coming back to the Detroit Pistons.
Wallace will receive a $1.3 million,
one-year deal, said the person, who
spoke on the condition of anonymity
because the contract has not been
signed.
(AP Photo: Mark Duncan)


He has never averaged more
than 9.7 points per game in any
season, but is valued more for his
work on the boards (10.3
rebounds and 2.1 blocks per game
over his career).
Wallace will be a familiar face
for a team in the midst of big
changes. He will recognize former
Cavaliers assistant John Kuester,
who last month became Detroit's
sixth head coach in the past 10
years.
Kuester replaced Michael Cur-
ry, who was fired on June 30 after
going 39-43 in his first season and
being swept by Cleveland in the
first round of the playoffs.
Detroit had reached the Eastern
Conference finals in the previous
six seasons under Rick Carlisle,
Larry Brown and Flip Saunders.
Detroit has almost completely
dumped that roster, with only
Richard Hamilton and Tayshaun
Prince remaining from the 2003-04
championship team. They added
Charlie Villanueva and Ben Gor-
don in the first hours of free
agency, and now they are bringing
back another cog from their cham-
pionship run.
The Pistons have been known
as a defensive team under Joe
Dumars, the former Piston who is
the team's president of basketball
operations.
Kuester has said that isn't going
to change, despite his stint as
Cleveland's offensive coordinator
and the addition of two score-first
players in Gordon and Villanueva.


Hawks re-sign

forward Marvin

Williams


ATLANTA (AP) - The Atlanta
Hawks re-signed forward Marvin
Williams on Friday, their last bit of unfin-
ished offseason business.
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
reported the restricted free agent agreed
to a five-year, $37.5 million deal, with
incentives that could raise the package
to as much as $43 million.
"A big priority this summer was to
retain as many of our free agents as pos-
sible and keep our nucleus intact, so Mar-
vin's return is significant for us," general
manager Rick Sund said.
Williams averaged 13.9 points and 6.3
rebounds during his fourth season with
the Hawks. He was the second overall
pick of the 2005 draft after spending one
season at North Carolina.
The Hawks largely have kept together
a team that reached the second round of
the playoffs for the first time in a decade.
They already re-signed point guard Mike
Bibby and backup center Zaza Pachulia.
Atlanta also bolstered its backcourt by
trading for Jamal Crawford and drafting
Wake Forest star Jeff Teague.
"Marvin is an important part of our
core, and we're very pleased to keep him
in a Hawks uniform," Sund said. "As one
of our talented and versatile young vet-
erans, he's shown improvement every
year in the league."
Williams could have accepted the
Hawks qualifying offer of $7.5 million
and become an unrestricted free agent
next summer. Instead, like Bibby and
Pachulia, he decided on a long-term com-
mitment to the Hawks.


Quality Auto Sales Gonzalez defeats Haas,


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WASHINGTON (AP) -
Fourth-seeded Fernando
Gonzalez defeated Tommy
Haas 7-5, 6-4 to advance to
the semifinals of the Legg
Mason Tennis Classic on Fri-
day.
Gonzalez will play second-
seeded and defending cham-
pion Juan Martin del Potro,
who advanced after Robin
Soderling withdrew before
their quarterfinal with a right
elbow injury.
Tied at 5-all in the first set,
Gonzalez angled a forehand
past the charging Haas for the
first break point of the match.
He then had three forehand
winners in his own service
game to close out the set.
"Both of us played really
good tennis in the beginning,"
Gonzalez said. "I only had
one break point and I did it.
That gave me a lot of confi-
dence for the rest of the
match."
Gonzalez broke serve to
open the second set and again
to go up 5-2 against a clearly
frustrated Haas. Haas, a Wim-
bledon semifinalist this year,
broke back and then held his
serve to get to 5-4. But the
llth-ranked Gonzalez
rebounded and put away an
overhead smash to win the
match. He improved to 5-0 in
quarterfinals this year.


advances to semis


l~i~-


FERNANDO GONZALEZ, of Chile, returns a forehand against Tommy Haas, of Germany, at the quarter finals
of the Legg Mason Tennis Classic, in Washington, on Friday, Aug. 7, 2009. Gonzalez won the match 7-5,
6-4...


"He made two mistakes in
the first game (of the second
set) and I took advantage,
said Gonzalez, who reached
the finals in Washington in
2003.
Soderling, a finalist at the


French Open this year, is
expected to have an MRI
scan on Friday. "My elbow
started to bother me two
weeks ago and this morning it
was really sore," the Swede
said, adding that he hopes to


(AP Photo: Jacquelyn Martin)

play one or two tournaments
before the U.S. Open.
Top-seeded Andy Roddick
will play Ivo Karlovic and
John Isner will face No. 8-
seeded Tomas Berdych in the
evening quarterfinals.


PAGE 10, SATURDAY, AUGUST 8, 2009


TRIBUNE SPORTS











THE WEATHER REPORT"


" 0 ORLANDO
High: 92� F/33� C
Low:760�F/240�C
Q.
TAMPA
High: 930�F/340 C
Low: 780�F/260 C
Q.


A, *~


Partly sunny with a Partly cloudy with a Breezy and pleasant Periods of sun, a Partly sunny, a Partly sunny, a
thunderstorm. thunderstorm. with sunshine. t-storm possible. t-storm possible. t-storm possible.
High: 910 High: 890 High: 900 High: 890
Hih: 890 Low: 810 Low: 790 Low: 780 Low: 800 Low: 810

S 97o F | | 91� F | | 107o-871 F | 101-79 F | I 98o-88o F | 104o-86o F
The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature� is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and
elevation on the human body-everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.


I. Al R.A l I


I_ lIlurANrACP


WEST PALM BEACH
High: 91� F/330 C
Low: 780 F/260 C


FT. LAUDERDALE
High: 90� F/320 C
Low: 800 F/270 C


MIAMI
High: 91� F/330 C
Low: 80� F/27� C


KEY WEST
High: 90� F/320 C
Low: 830 F/280 C
Q.


Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonight's lows.


Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Baltimore
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston, SC
Chicago
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Detroit
Honolulu
Houston


High
F/C
91/32
71/21
94/34
84/28
88/31
78/25
76/24
90/32
93/33
85/29
100/37
90/32
86/30
89/31
96/35


Low
F/C
64/17
56/13
73/22
70/21
68/20
64/17
68/20
72/22
78/25
72/22
78/25
52/11
73/22
75/23
76/24


W High
F/C
s 91/32
s 72/22
s 92/33
pc 88/31
pc 92/33
s 78/25
r 86/30
pc 94/34
t 96/35
t 92/33
s 98/36
pc 84/28
t 92/33
s 90/32
pc 94/34


Sunday
Low
F/C
65/18
55/12
73/22
75/23
74/23
67/19
73/22
74/23
73/22
73/22
79/26
56/13
72/22
76/24
78/25


Indianapolis
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City
Orlando


Today
High Low
F/C F/C
94/34 73/22
93/33 73/22
98/36 75/23
96/35 70/21
96/35 74/23
82/27 62/16
95/35 74/23
96/35 75/23
91/32 80/26
89/31 73/22
96/35 71/21
88/31 77/25
78/25 71/21
100/37 74/23
92/33 76/24


W High
F/C
pc 92/33
t 91/32
s 94/34
s 101/38
s 92/33
pc 82/27
pc 93/33
s 93/33
t 90/32
t 90/32
pc 93/33
t 89/31
s 88/31
s 96/35
t 93/33


ABACO
High: 89� F/320 C
�. --7 Low: 79� F/260 C





FREEPORT -",
High: 89� F/320 C
Low: 76� F/240 C




NASSAU
High: 89� F/320 C
--- Low: 81� F/27� C











ANDROS
High: 92� F/330 C
Low: 80� F/27� C


Sunday
Low
F/C
73/22
73/22
74/23
76/24
73/22
64/17
74/23
75/23
79/26
67/19
72/22
78/25
79/26
72/22
76/24


Today
High Low
F/C F/C
Philadelphia 86/30 73/22
Phoenix 104/40 80/26
Pittsburgh 85/29 68/20
Portland, OR 72/22 59/15
Raleigh-Durham 94/34 70/21
St. Louis 96/35 78/25
Salt Lake City 73/22 53/11
San Antonio 100/37 77/25
San Diego 75/23 67/19
San Francisco 73/22 57/13
Seattle 70/21 56/13
Tallahassee 94/34 74/23
Tampa 93/33 78/25
Tucson 100/37 74/23
Washington, DC 90/32 75/23


Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday
Temperature
H igh ........................... .................. 9 1� F/33� C
Low .................... ...................... 79� F/260 C
Norm al high ................................... 890 F/32� C
Norm al low ...................................... 76� F/24� C
Last year's high ............................... 970 F/360 C
Last year's low ............................... 810 F/270 C


I I



~i I


01112 31 5 617 819
LOW MODERATE HIGH V. HIGH EXT

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexm number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection.




High Ht.(ft.) Low Ht.(ft.)
Today 9:57 a.m. 2.7 3:48 a.m. 0.2
10:14 p.m. 2.7 4:03 p.m. 0.3
Sunday 10:32 a.m. 2.8 4:21 a.m. 0.2
10:49 p.m. 2.6 4:43 p.m. 0.4
Monday 11:10a.m. 2.8 4:55 a.m. 0.2
11:26 p.m. 2.5 5:25 p.m. 0.4
Tuesday 11:51 a.m. 2.9 5:31 a.m. 0.2
6:11 p.m. 0.5


Precipitation Sunrise ...... 6:41 a.m. Moonrise .... 9:17 p.m.
As of 2 p.m. yesterday .............................. 0.04" Sunset....... 7:50 p.m. Moonset ..... 8:50 a.m.
Year to date ........... ....................... 20.82" Last New First Full
Norm al year to date .................................... 26.34"

AccuWeather.com .. .
Forecasts and graphics provided by .,
ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. @2009 Aug. 13 Aug. 20 Aug. 27 Sep. 4
High: 90� F/320 C
Low: 780 F/260 C



CAT ISLAND
. s High:870F/31�C
Low: 740 F/230 C


GREATEXUMA
High: 90� F/320 C
Low: 80� F/27� C

*'" -. "''


W High
F/C
s 90/32
s 105/40
pc 90/32
c 76/24
pc 98/36
s 96/35
c 78/25
s 98/36
pc 76/24
s 78/25
c 72/22
t 94/34
t 92/33
s 100/37
pc 94/34


Sunday
Low W
F/C
76/24 t
81/27 s
70/21 s
57/13 pc
76/24 s
77/25 pc
58/14 s
78/25 pc
66/18 pc
57/13 s
56/13 c
72/22 t
77/25 t
73/22 s
78/25 s


SAN SALVADOR
High: 90� F/32* C
Low: 76� F/24� C


LONG ISLAND
High: 91� F/330 C
Low: 760 F/240 C


45
f~1'~


CROOKED ISLAND/ACKLINS
RAGGED ISLAND High: 940F/340 C
Low: 76� F/24� C
High: 91� F/330 C
Low:720F/220C

GREAT INAGUA
High: 940�F/340 C
Low: 76� F/240 C


H


MAYAGUANA
ligh: 91� F/330 C
.ow: 740�F/230 C





.'.' ,4


-4�~


QlQ INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
) (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSI.ANCE BROKERS & AGENTS


I WRDCTE I


-Ablh- Z,


"" ""5"'"


.:~�'L:


WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: E at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet 3-5 Miles 850 F
Sunday: ESE at 8-16 Knots 2-3 Feet 3-5 Miles 850 F
FREEPORT Today: E at 6-12 Knots 2-3 Feet 3-5 Miles 86� F
Sunday: ESE at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet 3-5 Miles 86� F
ABACO Today: E at 6-12 Knots 2-3 Feet 3-5 Miles 82� F
Sunday: ESE at 6-12 Knots 2-3 Feet 3-5 Miles 82� F


Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace


_ _ ___


I ramVINSLI'los I111111 I


U.S. CITIES Il sll lll1 sll 1 sll sll 11


ri VWi;


Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Paris
Prague
Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei
Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg


High
F/C
95/35
73/22
82/27
88/31
56/13
90/32
86/30
78/25
88/31
80/26
87/30
82/27
86/30
66/18
75/23
86/30
59/15
100/37
93/33
72/22
91/32
80/26
77/25
76/24
64/17
86/30
78/25
73/22
89/31
75/23
91/32
107/41
84/28
86/30
62/16
90/32
70/21
73/22
91/32
86/30
77/25
100/37
75/23
63/17
80/26
78/25
97/36
72/22
77/25
82/27
85/29
105/40
88/31
90/32
59/15
90/32
66/18
91/32
81/27
86/30
73/22
63/17
86/30
86/30
75/23
93/33
68/20
82/27
73/22
74/23


Today
Low W
F/C
79/26 pc
55/12 pc
54/12 c
74/23 s
42/5 s
79/26 t
78/25 pc
70/21 t
73/22 pc
75/23 s
59/15 s
64/17 pc
76/24 t
46/7 sh
54/12 pc
59/15 s
39/3 pc
76/24 s
84/28 t
50/10 s
75/23 pc
68/20 t
61/16 s
63/17 sh
52/11 sh
66/18 t
59/15 t
55/12 s
75/23 r
55/12 pc
81/27 t
85/29 s
68/20 sh
63/17 s
45/7 s
79/26 pc
57/13 pc
54/12 pc
63/17 pc
79/26 r
55/12 t
73/22 s
63/17 s
50/10 pc
56/13 pc
53/11 c
86/30 pc
54/12 sh
61/16 pc
56/13 s
70/21 s
81/27 s
68/20 s
79/26 s
31/0 pc
70/21 t
37/2 s
73/22 pc
61/16 s
73/22 r
54/12 pc
46/7 pc
81/27 r
79/26 sh
63/17 r
64/17 s
58/14 sh
62/16 s
50/10 s
61/16 r


High
F/C
92/33
72/22
81/27
88/31
59/15
89/31
88/31
78/25
89/31
80/26
86/30
81/27
85/29
66/18
73/22
85/29
59/15
98/36
93/33
72/22
91/32
83/28
77/25
72/22
66/18
84/28
80/26
72/22
93/33
77/25
88/31
109/42
85/29
83/28
66/18
88/31
69/20
75/23
84/28
88/31
75/23
102/38
72/22
68/20
82/27
79/26
99/37
66/18
77/25
81/27
84/28
104/40
86/30
89/31
69/20
90/32
66/18
85/29
77/25
87/30
75/23
64/17
94/34
84/28
91/32
79/26
70/21
82/27
75/23
75/23


Sunday
Low W
F/C
79/26 s
55/12 sh
54/12 s
72/22 s
43/6 s
79/26 sh
77/25 pc
68/20 t
74/23 c
77/25 s
61/16 s
61/16 pc
75/23 s
44/6 sh
55/12 sh
59/15 s
45/7 s
75/23 s
82/27 r
52/11 s
74/23 pc
72/22 t
63/17 s
62/16 sh
55/12 pc
63/17 c
62/16 t
59/15 s
73/22 sh
55/12 pc
82/27 r
85/29 s
67/19 s
63/17 s
45/7 s
79/26 sh
58/14 pc
57/13 pc
59/15 t
78/25 r
54/12 t
75/23 s
63/17 c
52/11 pc
53/11 t
52/11 pc
88/31 pc
54/12 r
59/15 sh
51/10 s
70/21 s
81/27 s
67/19 pc
80/26 sh
36/2 s
74/23 t
41/5 s
73/22 sh
60/15 pc
76/24 sh
55/12 pc
50/10 s
81/27 sh
79/26 t
66/18 t
52/11 pc
58/14 c
64/17 s
50/10 s
60/15 sh


I


I


I


I


--C


. . .. ........


o,







PAGELOCA 12,S STRAU ST8TAGS,2RB


Man dies in

tragic work

accident
JESSEKEN Ferguson was
tragically killed today while
working at Tile King on
Wulff Road. Employed in the
warehouse, 26-year-old Mr.
Ferguson, was critically
injured when the forklift he
was operating became unbal-
anced.
He jumped from the fork-
lift as it fell over but was
unable to escape the boom
which trapped him under-
neath.
Two ambulances arrived
on the scene and Mr. Fergu-
son was pronounced dead. A
mortician removed the body
while police took statements
from witnesses to the acci-
dent and the staff who had
tried to rescue him. Foul play
is not suspected.
Mr Ferguson, who had
joined Tile King in October
last year, was the youngest of
six children. One of his broth-
ers, representing the family,
arrived at Tile King on learn-
ing of the accident, and met
with management.
Builders Mall was closed
immediately after the acci-
dent and will remain closed
until Monday, management
announced.
Mr Mark Roberts, propri-
etor of Builders Mall, said
that "all management and
staff are shaken by the tragic
loss and want to express their
sincere condolences to the
family, friends and loved ones
of Jessie."
Mr Ferguson, who was pre-
deceased by his mother, is
survived by his brothers and
sisters and two children.


Mitchell

FROM page one

The time allotted for sub-
missions to the committee
will end at the end of this
month, and the committee is
expected to meet again and
review this information on
September 4.
Mr Mitchell added that
they plan to include voice
evidence in their body of
work once they get a handle
on what the scope of the
investigations will be. He
also said the committee has
agreed there would be pro-
tection for those who wished
to remain anonymous.
A representative from the
Attorney General's office
will also be made available to
the committee in case any
legal matters arise.
This Crown Lands Com-
mittee was formed following
a series of articles revealed in
The Tribune relating to
claims of nepotism and cor-
ruption in the Department
of Lands and Surveys.
Following these reports,
the former director of Lands
Tex Turnquest was forced to
resign from his post after The
Tribune published allega-
tions that members of his
own family, including his
mother-in-law, were granted
Crown land lots on the island
of Exuma.
These beachfront lots,
which were sold at less than
$2,500 each, were flipped a
few years later for more than
$550,000 apiece. Mr Turn-
quest denied any connection
to any of the transactions.


'Too early to tell' if container port


relocation will cost FNM next election


FROM page one

Government has made.
Several members of the Opposi-
tion, most notably Senator Jerome
Fitzgerald, have led the charge against
the port's move to Arawak Cay rais-
ing questioned about potential envi-
ronmental harm from the subsequent
dredging of Nassau Harbour and
extension of the man-made island.
For months they have continuous-
ly lambasted Government's behav-
iour on the port relocation as "secre-
tive" pandering to unnamed special
interest groups.
Some have criticised the Opposi-
tion for harping on issue for political
gain.
But Mr Mitchell said his party
needs to focus on strengthening itself
to regain power and cannot rest on
any possible points gained from cur-
rent public disapproval of govern-
ment.


"There are certain trends from
which a government may never
recover and it is incumbent upon the
PLP to ensure that it has
an organisation to fight an
election in 2012 and have a
properly framed debate
which shows that the PLP
is best for the country," he
told The Tribune yester-
day.
At Thursday's heated
town mnclin,2. Environ-
ment Minister Earl
Deveaux revealed that the
port relocation may not be
set in stone.
"The 19 shareholders
are free to say to the Gov- *
emrnment they are no longer
interested.
"They are free to say that if they
wish. We are responding to an ini-
tiative expressed by them," Dr
Deveaux is reported to have said.
This revelation may give govern-


ment a window to backtrack on its
decision regarding the port, ex-FNM
minister Tennyson Wells said yes-
terday.
"I think Earl's state-
ment, it would be the best
* thing to sit down will all
the interested persons and
do it openly and transpar-
ently," said Mr Wells, who
has also been vocal in his
protest to the Arawak Cay
proposal.
He admitted that his
family has an interest in
Arawak Cay but claimed
this did not influence his
opinion. He feels it's in the
country's best interest to
have the site remain an
unblemished cultural and tourist
attraction.
The public's strong resistance to
the FNM's failed proposal to build a
resort at Clifton Cay in 2000 is a les-
son that should have prepared the


government for the backlash, said
Mr Mitchell.
The FNM lost the election in 2002,
which some pundits said was a key
issue in that election race.
"It appears that there's a decision
to be bloody-minded about it without
waiting (to hear) what the public
thinks. That same thing ran Mr Ingra-
ham into trouble in 2002," said Mr
Mitchell. "Those who don't know
their history are doomed to repeat
it".
The Arawak Cay site was chosen
as the sixth best location for the con-
tainer port with the fifth option being
the present location on Bay Street.
But supporters of the move argue
that the downtown revitalisation pro-
ject hinges on the swift removal of
the container facilities.
Government has said that the
Opposition's idea of moving the con-
tainer port to Clifton Pier is too
expensive and argued that Arawak
Cay is the best choice at this time.


Union president claims nurses


'falling ill'


FROM page one

She said: "We have huge
concerns about staff health.
The nurses are suffering from
upper respiratory tract infec-
tion, and one of the nurses'
whole face is swollen because
of exposure to the spores of
this mould.
"We have been asking the
hospital to please deal with
this mould problem and noth-
ing is happening. We just need
the staff to be safe.
"The Health and Safety Act
says staff should work in a safe
and healthy environment and
I feel that the nurses health is
being compromised by the
mould infestation."


due to mould at PMH


Up to five nurses work in
the Eye Ward at a time on a
rotation of three shifts per
day, and Ms Hamilton claims
Allied health staff are also at
risk.
The Department of Envi-
ronmental Health ensured the
ward was inspected when
complaints were made last
year and recommendations
were put to the Public Hospi-
tals Authority (PHA).
Anthony Ryan, senior lab
technologist at the Environ-
mental Monitoring and Risk
Assessment Divison, main-
tains the PHA were very
receptive to advice and acted
quickly on their recommen-
dations.


He said: "We inspected it
and there was a local compa-
ny brought in to do all the
remediation work and we
oversaw a lot of that work
and were pleased with the
result.
"The PHA were great in
this exercise, they followed
all our instructions and got
the company in, and every-
thing was above board and
there have been no subse-
quent complaints.
"I'm actually shocked to
hear this because I haven't
heard one complaint."
But the nurses union pres-
ident maintains the mould is
growing back and nurses are
being ignored.


She said: "We need the
government to pay attention
to the hospital because it is
really going down and we
need them to protect the
health and safety of the work-
ers."
Up to 100 PHA employees,
including 40 nurses, found out
this week they will likely face
pay cuts this month as a con-
sequence of taking more than
their allotted sick days.
Hundreds of nurses who
participated in a mass sick-
out in June who were found
to have exceeded the num-
ber of allowed sick days will
be among those having their
pay cut.
However, Ms Hamilton


said this has come as no sur-
prise to nurses.
She said: "Every public
servant who exceeded their
20 days sick pay will have a
pay cut and nurses were
aware of that before they
became ill so it is nothing
new to us."
The Bahamas Nurses
Union has yet to come to an
agreement with government
following the sick-out over
pay and health insurance
benefits.
Calls to Princess Margaret
Hospital press officer Thel-
ma Rolle regarding the cur-
rent mould situation were
not returned before The Tri-
bune went to press.


Controversial pastor speaks out



against marital rape legislation


FROM page one

Therefore, the amendment in its
current form would create a society
of rapists, Mr Moss said.
He added: "The truth is that
under such an amendment, based
on the new definition of rape, a
society of rapists will be the result,
even if wives do not press charges
against husbands who do not seek
consent before initiating sexual
intercourse."
But psychologist and Crisis Cen-
tre director Sandra Dean-Patter-
son said Mr Moss has confused sex-
ual activity with rape.
Rape, Dr Dean-Patterson said,
can and does occur in the home
when sex is forced in a violent act.
She supports the legislation as it
names violence in the home as
unacceptable and protects all peo-


ple in the home from domestic vio-
lence and rape.
While there are no statistics to
show how many women fall victim
to rape under their husbands, Dr
Dean-Patterson and other counsel-
lors are well aware that sex is used
as a violent act in the home and
rape does occur between husband
and wife.
The psychologist describes
instances of women turning down
sex from their husband because
they have been promiscuous, and
then being raped by their husbands,
to become infected with sexually
transmitted diseases and HIV.
She said: "This legislation will
not create a society of rapists. Rape
is a very difficult crime to prove,
you cannot just go to the police and
say you have been raped. You have
to be examined and gather evi-


dence, and obviously if there may
be evidence of sexual activity
between a husband and wife, but
there would also need to be evi-
dence of violence."
Public debate over the legislation
has revealed a fear men have of
being wrongfully accused of rape
by their wives, and Dr Dean-Pat-
terson said this should be addressed
in the legislation by making wrong-
ful accusations a punishable
offence.
Dr Dean-Patterson also hopes
the controversy will also make men
and women aware of how impor-
tant it is to be clear about what they
want when it comes to sex.
She said: "There are times when
a woman says 'no' and she ends up
participating in the sexual activity,
and it's this poor communication
that make men believe that 'no' is


not no, so hopefully this will be an
opportunity to talk to young people
about the impact of communicat-
ing very clearly that if you don't
want to be in sexual relationships
you need to make yourself very
clear."
Mr Moss said he is not totally
opposed to the legislation as he sup-
ports the protection of women and
believes it is wrong for a man to
force sex with his wife when she is
unwilling, just as it is \ ing ' and
"prohibited" to withhold sex from
one's spouse without reason.
The outspoken pastor appealed
to the Government to change the
amendment to define sexual vio-
lence within estranged and non-
estranged marriages as 'spousal
abuse' rather than rape, and to
ensure it can only be prosecuted in
cases of provable force and harm.


MALIK R.A. PRATT

with love from your mom, Mercier, dad,
Roderick Jr., grandmothers, grandfathers,
aunts, uncles, godparents, cousins,
family & friends


FBI agent is accused in



shooting death of PR officer


SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico

AUTHORITIES charged
an FBI agent with negligent


homicide on Friday in the
alleged "friendly fire" shoot-
ing death of a Puerto Rican
policeman during a gunbat-


FEATURES REPORTER
THE TRIBUNE is seeking a new reporter for its fea-
tures sections. Applicants must be motivated, self starters
with a strong command of English.
Those interested can send their CVs to The Tribune at
PO Box N-3207 or bring them into The Tribune premis-
es on Shirley Street.
All applications should be marked for the attention of
news editor Paco Nunez.


tle with kidnappers last year,
according to Associated
Press.
Justice Secretary Antonio
Sagardia told reporters that
special agent Jared Hewitt
is accused of shooting 12-
year police veteran Orlan-
do Gonzalez Ortiz during a
joint raid to rescue a kidnap
victim.
Sagardia said Hewitt is no
longer in Puerto Rico, but
FBI commanders have
assured local authorities that
he will soon travel to the
U.S. Caribbean territory for
the prosecution.
"We are working shoul-
der to shoulder with the fed-
eral authorities, hand in
hand," Sagardia said in the
capital, San Juan.
The local FBI office said
in a statement that it would
not comment on the case,
but promised to work close-
ly with Puerto Rican author-


ities on security issues.
The FBI did not disclose
Hewitt's whereabouts, and
it was not clear if he had a
lawyer.
FBI agents and police offi-
cers launched the late-night
raid last August in the city of
Carolina to free a Domini-
can man.
Police say kidnappers
were holding him in the
trunk of a car and demand-
ing $650,000 in ransom.
As FBI agents freed the
victim, the suspects tried to
flee in an SUV but crashed
into another vehicle.
Police say a second group
of U.S. agents fired at the
kidnappers, and Gonzalez,
who was guarding a side
street, was hit by stray bul-
lets that pierced his body
armor.
If convicted, Hewitt faces
a maximum sentence of
three years.


I


PAGE 12, SATURDAY, AUGUST 8, 2009


THE TRIBUNE




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