The Tribune.
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS PDF VIEWER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01849
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: 08-04-2009
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:01849

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

( PDF )


Full Text


TRY OUR
HASH BROWNS J
2 FOR$1.15 ,vnr

HIGH 90F
LOW 81F

"' SUNNY WITH
'SHOWER


The


Tribune


YOUR PASSPORT TO MISS UNIVERSE


BAHAMAS EDITION
www.tribune242.com


avol a to esi







in the Bahamas


Hollywood star to give

testimony in person in

alleged extortion case


THE Tribune has
confirmed that US
Hollywood actor
John Travolta will
arrive in the
Bahamas to testify in
person in the extor-
tion case involving .
former PLP Senator
Pleasant Bridgewa-
ter.
Slated to begin on
September 21, Ms
Bridgewater, 49, is
charged with former para-
medic Tarino Lightbourne,
47, in connection with an
alleged plot to extort $25 mil-
lion from John Travolta. The
two, who were charged in
Magistrate's Court in late Jan-
uary, were arraigned again


before Senior Justice
Anita Allen on
April 28.
There was specu-
lation that Mr Tra-
volta might give his
testimony from the
US by video. How-
ever, he will be one
of 12 witnesses for
the prosecution,
which will include
West End MP Obie
Wilchcombe.
According to sources Mr Tra-
volta has decided to go into
the witness box in the
Bahamas Supreme Court.
Bridgewater and her co-
accused Lightbourne were
SEE page 10


Appeal set to be filed over
Hotel Union election ruling
THE attorneys of the recently elected Bahamas Hotel Catering
and Allied Workers Union President Nicole Martin are set to file
an appeal to Justice Jon Isaacs' ruling handed down on Friday that
declared the results of the May 28 election null and void.
At a press conference called yesterday, Ms Martin's attorney
Damien Gomez said that they hoped to file an appeal as early as
today with the hope that they can have the Justice's ruling stayed.
SEE page 10

PLEASE NOTE THAT DUE TO TECHNICAL
ISSUES, SECTION WILL NOT
APPEAR IN TODAY'S EDITION OF


Claims that Perry


Christie 'stacking


the deck' against

any challengers


PLPs set for
explosive
meeting


MISS ICELAND Ingibjorg Egilsdottir enjoys some junkanoo rhythm at the Lynden Pindling Airport at the
weekend. Contestants in the Miss Universe pageant were welcomed to the Bahamas at the weekend ahead


of the pageant this month.

Either Michael
Barnett or Brian
Moree set to be
next chief justice
PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham is
reportedly set to name either former attorney
general Michael Barnett or attorney Brian
Moree as the next chief justice of the Judi-
ciary, The Tribune can reveal.
According to sources close to the matter,
the Prime Minister has reportedly already
advised former Prime Minister Perry Christie
of his choices under the guidelines set out in
the constitution. Under the law, the appoint-
ment of the Chief Justice can only be made by
the governor-general, in accordance with the
recommendation of the prime minister, who
must have consulted with the leader of the
opposition.
On June 26, the Cabinet office announced
that Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall is set to
leave the Bahamas in August, after serving in
SEE page 16


* SEE PAGE SEVEN AND WOMAN SECTION




A 30-YEAR-OLD man was shot and
killed early Monday morning when armed
gunmen stormed his Malcolm Road East res-
idence and opened fire on him.
He is the country's 48th homicide for the
year. Police say that sometime around 3.15
am Monday, they received reports of a shoot-
ing incident in the area of Malcolm Road
East.
When police officers arrived at the scene,
they discovered a man, later identified as
Quincy Cartwright, lying on the floor of the
apartment.
Police say that preliminary investigations
revealed that the gunmen had kicked in a
western living room door to the victim's
home and once inside the residence fired
two shots into his bedroom door and also
kicked it in. The gunmen then shot the victim,
twice in his chest. Police are appealing to
persons who may have any information
regarding the homicide to come forward.


By PAUL G
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net
AN EXPLOSIVE
meeting is set to take
place tonight at PLP
Headquarters as would-be
challengers to the leader-
ship of the party are
incensed that PLP Leader
Perry Christie is reported-
ly set to install at least an
additional 250 stalwart
councillors just one month
before the party's conven-
tion.
This move, which
sources in the party claim
is an apparent attempt at
"stacking the deck"
against any challenger
who would dare face Mr
Christie is being con-
demned by many within
the hierarchy of the par-
ty.
At any convention all
posts within the party are
vacated and fresh elec-
tions are held. With only
stalwart councillors and
convention delegates vot-
ing, this move to newly
install 250 persons to a
group that was originally
already appointed pre-
dominately by Mr
Christie, the party leader
is expected to be chal-
SEE page 16

Boy stabbed
over Big Mac
sandwich
A 14-YEAR-OLD boy is
hospitalized in serious condi-
tion after being stabbed in the
neck and back over a Big Mac
sandwich early Monday
morning, according to police.
According to reports,
sometime around 4am Mon-
day, the teenager was in the
Pinewood Gardens area hav-
ing returned from a local
nightclub, when he got into a
fight with another teenager
over a Big Mac sandwich.
During the altercation, the 14-
year-old was stabbed in his
neck and back. His injuries
are described as serious.
Six hours later, an 18-year-
old was shot in the lower back
in Nassau Village while
attempting to purchase a vehi-
cle, according to police.
According to reports, some-
time around 10am on Mon-


SEE page 16


It wasn't raining when Noah built the Ark...
It's not too late to build yours...
Weather the storm with Fidelity.


Switch to Fidelity products - they have built-in savings plans: . "
MoneyBack Mortgage e Debt$AVER e Asue Visa Card
Nassau: 356.7764 Freeport: 352.6676/7 Marsh Harbour: 367.3135 .r..1 . " MEMEL _ " _-- " |;�









Three US tourists



and two British



women are robbed


THREE American tourists
and two British women were
among those robbed over the
weekend in two separate inci-
dents, the police have con-
firmed.
While all of these persons
were tourists, Chief Superin-
tendent of Police Paul Rolle
said yesterday that none of
them was in any way con-
nected with the Miss Universe
pageant.
The first incident, which
occurred on Saturday,
involved three American
tourists who were robbed at
gunpoint of an undetermined
amount of cash by three men
who had reportedly offered
to assist them with directions.
Police reports state that

TOIi L
EXITERM IN]rO ,


around 9.25 am, the three
American visitors found
themselves lost in the South
Beach area and went to a ser-
vice station for assistance.
Three men in a white Hon-
da offered to assist them and
directed the visitors to the
rear of the station where they
pulled out firearms and
robbed the visitors of an
undetermined amount of
cash.
In another incident, around
9am Monday, two British
women were held up by a


man while walking on St
Albans Drive. According to
police, the man held up the
women and grabbed one of
their purses.
When the other woman
tried to help her, she was hit
in the face with an unknown
object.
The male robbed the
women of a handbag contain-
ing cash and personal effects.
The assailant reportedly ran
to a long grey car which sped
off. Police investigations con-
tinue into both matters.


ISMWil Ami


Mini rm~io.E Bow q-Roll.# Ifia

hi; 41twi;uCombo





I Snack,, CuMb







$4A.49b


Briog LefeTornYour Conipu ta


S7? Monitors
Starting At
$169.99


19" Monitors
Starting At
$190.99


Turn Your Computer
Monitor Into A TV




v , !

LCD TV Converter/
Tuner Starting At
$ 129.9


m m U


Endhance Your
Computer's Sound





2.1 PC Speaker
System s
Starting At
S6.99,


ORIGINAL CONGOS brought spectacular colour to the Junkanoo rushout
early yesterday morning as the Fox Hill community marked the 175th
anniversary of the abolition of slavery.
*SEE PAGE FIVE


� FUEL SURCHARGE 2006


2009


CONSERVATION PAYS - Lo..vr co"ns.Jmption mroons 'ov.r hills


The Fuel surcharge for August 2009 is 9.9158C as compared to 9.6060. for July 2009


t' kn..


,. ,'*- A


*. "**


I ..,.


Your ek.Y* y b*II - mdr.up f two charges: T. 1The ;a~ *rte, P* ** has*no*changedAm' Ocober 2W
2.Th felU Ihage wichis1basedoni IJI I pr1 iicofptlemntheinternational marketand calculaed monthly.


Girl who drowned is identified
The five-year-old girl, who drowned last week in a Freeport
canal, has been identified as Selina Lewis, a resident of Rich-
maur Apartment.
The child was attending a party at the apartment complex
when she disappeared. A police dive team later found her
body in about 30 feet of water at a nearby canal.


9


10090Y


PAGE 2, TUESDAY, AUGUST 4,2009


THE TRIBUNE


N1M


.1.1%A


,, - =:
� ,A


14$964


-1 ^rv"


� 21"�


L �i A .-IAY iC C) C 7


I'M �.�
mwlwb�pl




THE TRIBUNE


TUESDAY, AUGUST 4, 2009, PAGE 3


LOCALNW


38-year-old man

dies in apparent

traffic accident
By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net
A TEAM of police officers from New Provi-
dence are in Exuma investigating an apparent traf-
fic accident that claimed the life of a 38-year-old res-
ident of that island.
Preston Ferguson was found dead in his car on
the side of the road in the area of Ocean Addition
East, near the Forest, Exuma, according to police.
It is believed that Mr Ferguson's car ran off the road
and hit a utility pole while heading west from the
Forest. The driver's side of the vehicle was exten-
sively damaged. According to Corporal 1824
Anderson of the George Town Police Station,
police officers on mobile patrol discovered Mr Fer-
guson around 5.20 am Sunday, however some per-
sons indicated that they might have spotted him ear-
lier, but at the time assumed it was just someone
who had pulled to the side of the road. It is still
unclear whether speed played a factor in the acci-
dent; however a team of officers from New Provi-
dence are in Exuma investigating the incident.
Traffic police on New Providence are investi-
gating an accident that has left a motorcyclist hos-
pitalised in serious condition. Police say that the
incident took place in the area of Robinson Road
around 10.10 am in the area of Super Value food-
store. The driver of a white Nissan Soreno van was
coming out of the parking lot of Super Value and
entering the main Robinson Road when a motor-
cyclist, who was heading west on Robinson Road,
collided with the van. The motorcyclist received
extensive head injuries and is in critical condition in
hospital. A female passenger was also injured, but
her injuries were not described as serious.


Man in hospital



after shooting


A MAN is hospital in serious condi-
tion after being shot several times ear-
ly Sunday morning.
According to reports, around mid-
night, a man was standing outside
Tom's Bar on Quakoo Street when he
received a telephone call.
The man reportedly walked to a
nearby house where he was held up by
two men armed with handguns.
The gunmen shot the man several
times.
The man was taken to hospital where
his condition is listed as serious. Police
are asking for the public's assistance
in their investigation into this incident.
* THREE masked cutlass-wielding
bandits broke into the home of a
Retirement Road resident Sunday
morning and robbed him of cash,
according to police.
It was reported that around 3.45 am
the man was awakened by the sound of
his front door opening.
He saw three masked persons in his
living room armed with cutlasses.
The men robbed the resident of cash,
his flat screen television, computer and
Rolex watch before fleeing the scene.
* A WOMAN is in hospital in seri-


ous condition after being shot in the
stomach while driving on Blue Hill
Road on Sunday.
According to police, around 5.20am
on Sunday, a female resident of Blue
Hill Road reported that while driving
north on Blue Hill Road in the vicinity
of Brougham Street with a male com-
panion, she heard what sounded like
gunshots and immediately felt a burn-
ing sensation in her right side.
The woman continued driving to the
Accident and Emergency section of
the Princess Margaret Hospital where
she was seen by doctors and later
underwent surgery for gunshot wounds
to the stomach.
* A local barbershop was held up by
two armed gunmen who escaped with
cash, jewellery and an assortment of
phone cards, according to police.
According to police, sometime
around 11 am, they received reports
that two armed gunmen had entered
the David and Sons Barber Shop on
Wulff Road. The gunmen reportedly
held up the patrons and robbed them of
cash and jewellery.
The assailants then searched the pro-
prietor's office and took an assortment
of phone cards from him.


Semi-military service held for

businessman shot in robbery


50% 0FF




Qt/eleea~ '




C\ei9'


Established in 1956 by an old Bahamian family
Parliament Street (near Bay St.) Tel: 322-8393 or 328-7157
*Fax: 326-9953
Crystal Court at Atlantis, Paradise Island Tel: 3634161/2
SLyford Cay (Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay)
Tel: 362-5235


By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT - Grand
Bahama businessman and
retired police officer Leslie
Maycock was remembered as a
"good man" who was devoted
to his family, community, and
serving his country.
Mr Maycock, 50, was shot
and robbed while closing his
convenience store in Hawks-
bill on July 15. He died a week
later in hospital.
A semi-military service was
held at the Freeport Bible
Church at 11am. Many persons
came to pay their respects,
including State Minister for
Finance Zhivargo Laing, Fox
Hill MP Fred Mitchell and
Minister of Works Neko Grant.
The retired police sergeant
was dressed in his full police
uniform. His casket was draped
with a Bahamian flag and
escorted into the church by a
convoy of police officers.
Mr Maycock joined the Roy-
al Bahamas Police Force in
1977. He rose to the rank of
Sergeant and was attached to
the Special Intelligence Branch
(SIB).
Retired Supt Archie Fergu-
son, of the Retired Police
Association, said Mr Maycock
was one of the first officers to
support and join the associa-
tion.
After retiring from the
Force, he took the position as
Assistant Director of Security
at the Casino at Bahamia in
1995. Upon completing his
tenure, in 2000, Mr Maycock
decided to manage the family
convenience store in Hawks-
bill.
Fred Mitchell, MP for Fox
Hill, expressed heartfelt con-
dolences to Mr Maycock's fam-
ily on behalf of Dame Mar-
guerite Pindling, himself, and
his constituents.
He said he came to know
Officer Leslie Maycock when
he served as part of a security
detail for the late Sir Lynden
Pindling in Congo Town,
Andros.
Mr Mitchell said the coun-
try's crime situation is getting
worse. He was especially con-
cerned about the senseless
killings of businessmen in the
Bahamas.


"It is an irony we are here
marking the death of someone
who gave so much to this coun-
try; someone who was struck
down by unknown assas-
sins... who want to take things
that don't belong to them.
"This is surely not what our
forefathers fought for. It makes
me very sad and I am disap-
pointed that this happened.
This has been happening too
much, businessmen closing up
shop getting struck down...,
and the society appears to be
numbed by it.
"It appears we have lost our
element of surprise. At one
point when the six boys were
killed in Grand Bahama, I
thought we had reached our
height in this kind of outrage.
And then, you remember, a
minister was killed... and then,
businessman, Mr Carey, was
shot down in Nassau, and each
time it appears to be getting
worse - what do we do?"
When a mourner replied,
"Hang them," the entire con-
gregation applauded in agree-
ment.
Businessman Winston Pin-
nock became very emotional
as he went up to speak. He
blamed politicians on both
sides for the crime situation.
"It is sad to know that...
(Maycock) fell victim to the
very thing he protected others
from and hated so much," he
said.
"Those who serve now and
who served in recent years,
irrespective of political labels,
you are at fault; you refuse to
do what needs to be done in
our country to stop this," he


said, looking at the politicians
seated in the front.
"I don't say what I say here
to embarrass any of my friends
and those in politics, but man,
y'all need to get your act
together and do what needs to
be done to stop this," said Mr
Pinnock.
In his eulogy, Pastor Wilbur
Outten described Maycock as a
good man, friend, and church
member.
"He was someone with so
much promise; someone who
protected us and who served
so graciously and gave so gen-
erously. He was someone who
laboured tirelessly to support
his family; someone who was
totally devoted to his commu-
nity, church and family.
"When a loved one is taken
from us in such a senseless
manner it hurts. But God
understands our hurt. He
encourages us to express our
hurt."
However, Pastor Outten said
that the crime situation is not
the sole responsibility of polit-
ical leaders.
"I want to say the responsi-
bility does not rest solely with
the political leaders, we all
have a role to play in restoring
some sense of normalcy in our
country.
"The Bahamas is still a good
place and the majority of us
are still good people, but there
are some bad apples," he said.
Mr Maycock was buried at
Grand Bahama Memorial
Park. He is survived by his
wife, Beverley, and four chil-
dren, Anjelica, Ryan, Ashton
Maycock, and DeAngelo
Carey.


BACK TO SCHOOL


SALE! " "
10% OFF All Plaids.Stripes & Trigger
LARGEST STOCK IN THE BAHAMAS




Belting in all sizes * Shirt Buttons Skirt Hooks & Eyes
an , S derman, Fila, Bodyglove ..




Belting in all sizes * Shirt Buttons * Skirt Hooks & Eyes

2OT/.OENTIRE


MAIN/SPORTS SECTION
Local News.............P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9,10,16
Editorial/Letters.................................... P4
A dvt.............................................. P 11,15
Sports...........................................P 12,13,14
BUSINESS SECTION
Business........................... P1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8
WOMAN SECTION
W om an ..................................P... 1,2,3,4,5,8
C om ics................................................. P6
W eather................................................ P7

CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES

REAL ESTATE GUIDE 24 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES


FOR ALL YOUR DECORATING

"Lowest Prices On The Island" 4, I


10S


STORE HOURS:
Monday - Saturday
8:30am - 5:30pm


I RE DLIER AY HEE NNASA AD O.HEMAL OA


* E-Z CREDIT TERMS AVAILABLE


Donafd's furniture

And Appliance Centre

SIXTH TERRACE CENTREVILLE TEL: 322-1731 OR 322-3875


BEAM


m


qi


A.6A.6.


FOR 3 IN I UWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control
Tpopical ftlepmIndops
322-2157 1






PAGE4,TIUEISDAn ITno EDIAUuGSIT42oR0 THET B


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and A, cI- tiin),, 322-1986
Ad c 'i.ing Manager - (242) 502-2352

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com - updated daily at 2pm


Bay Street prepares for Miss Universe


WITH our special guests now in town many
Bay Street merchants have been criticised for
not doing enough to brighten up the town
centre for the Miss Universe beauty contes-
tants.
Senate President Lynn Holowesko com-
menting on the many dirty, untidy and aban-
doned buildings - particularly on the eastern
end of Bay Street -which, she said although
government had done its part, the private sec-
tor had done little to improve.
Last week with the first contestant - Miss
France - on her way, Mrs Holowesko com-
mented on this "grand event" that will bring
with it much needed international publicity.
But, "unfortunately," she said, "I don't see
enough of what the private sector is doing. It
occurred to me looking at so many buildings,
windows and store fronts that soap and water
is all that's needed."
While the young ladies are in town the
Ministry of Tourism plans to give them a stroll
down what was once New Providence's main
shopping centre. Bay Street, now fallen on
hard times, has to try to look grand for the
occasion.
From a car window - even up to a few
days ago- Bay Street looked grimy, congest-
ed and most unattractive. And so on Sunday
we decided to take our own stroll down the old
street to see what it looked like from ground
level. We started from The Tribune on Shirley
Street, down Victoria Avenue and out onto
Bay. We walked on the southern side of the
sidewalk to the British Colonial Hilton and
returned to The Tribune on the northern side,
detouring for a stroll out to Prince George
wharf. We had the street to ourselves, except
for about three taxis drivers, one of whom
rushed up to us shouting "Taxi! taxi!"
The eastern part of Bay Street from Vic-
toria Avenue almost to Bank Lane can be
written off as a disaster - no amount of art
work can hide what used be shops, now aban-
doned by their owners, and left to accumulate
grime and mounting garbage in the side alleys.
We stopped in front of one store, owned by a
well known businessman, who has a running
dispute with staff now demanding back pay.
The store has been closed down. It should
have had a "gone out of business" sign.
Instead there was a sign that claimed it was
closed for renovations in order to serve its
customers better. It certainly was a blot on
the scenery. As we read the sign, a little taxi
man came up to us. Obviously, embarrassed
by such a blight on a once attractive street, he
started to make excuses. He went along with
the hoax that it was just closed in prepara-
tion for a grander opening. Thinking we were
foreigners, he explained that this was a holiday
weekend, the store would soon reopen. "Stop


kidding us," we exclaimed, "we are locals,
one of you, and we know exactly why this
store is closed!" With that he became confi-
dential, angry confidential. He expended much
verbal heat against the owner. He commented
on how the staff was being treated, and what
should be done to a seemingly wealthy person,
who had failed to consider his needy staff. By
now we were buddies, both natives together,
sharing the same economic destiny. He con-
tinued half way down the block giving his
opinion of the closed store and its owners.
Two persons were busy in front of the Sue
Nan Shoppe scrubbing down the pavement
in front of the store and cleaning the metal
security screens. There was activity on the
roof of Athena Cafe on the northern side of
Bay Street as this eatery was being spruced up.
And what we have dubbed the dilapidated
"tic-tac-toe" building, defaced by X's and
O's, whose owners have refused to pull it
down, leaving it as a defiant embarrassment
for the city, was also getting a face lift. Two
men with paint brushes were trying to give it
a lick of white paint. Two large containers
from the port were parked on its western side
to hide at least that side of it from view. It was
once part of the Imperial Lighthouse service,
now probably only being held up by the ter-
mites. However, despite these negligent land-
lords, old Bay Street still has its charm, it still
has tremendous potential.
From Frederick Street to Market Street
was a most attractive sight. With no humans to
blot the view the attractive pavement with
store fronts on one side and a colonnade of
potted plants and trees on the other was a
lovely view. These stores were well kept,
brightly polished and filled with attractive
merchandise. At the corner of Frederick and
Bay was the street's oldest store - Baker &
Sons, Est. 1894 - probably untouched from
the day it opened, but clean, and wearing its
years well.
From Market Street to George Street was
another pleasant walk, shaded by the over-
hang of the buildings. Some of these areas
and the side streets off the waterfront were
reminiscent of small European towns.
John Bull was the only store that had a
welcome sign up for the 2009 Miss Universe
delegates. Bay Street has many beautiful, well
kept stores.
If it could cut the eastern end of the street
adrift it could pass the test for this walk-about.
Somehow the downtown tour will have to
start at the parliament buildings and continue
west.
And after the show is over government and
merchants will have to seriously get together
and return all of Bay Street to its former glo-
ry.


Immigration




Detention Centre




-a black hole in




the Bahamas


EDITOR, The Tribune.

The Bahamas is very popular
for blue holes and black holes
so let me tell you something
about one of the Bahamas'
most secret black holes. night so they c
The Carmichael Road the third time
Detention Centre of Immigra- You know t
tion is the most inhumane and takes that num
bottomless black hole you can settle back int
ever fall into in the Bahamas. sleep all over
As you know there was And this is
always complaints of this place but females wi
being over-crowded when there nant women,
were two male dorms, and one still breast fee
female dorm, so you can imag- the cold of t
ine now that we still have the counting.
same number of detainees and And there
only one male dorm since the attention in
December fire took away one months, and
of the male dorms. in a doctor or
There is one male dorm left ple here they
which is designed for about 60 doesn't carry
persons and we live in here with prescriptions.
around 200 persons. The last tirn
As if that is too kind, they tor was on Ma
have these very soul-less type of He give m
hours for counting detainees in medication an
this place, after all of the hush- tion a form foi
ing and fussing that it takes 200 to take me t
people to settle into somewhere back and as I
to sleep inside and outside of the 13 of May
the building then you got to get gration hasn't
right back up at 12 o'clock mid- I have been


We need to clean u

EDITOR, The Tribune.

It seems we are looking at the arrival on
our shores of the 85 Miss Universe contes-
tants with dark shades on - the letter writer
H. Sawyer had it absolutely right, every Min-
ister should be assigned specific areas where
the contestants will travel and be filmed to
ensure those areas are spotlessly clean.
I read today that the contestants will have
lunch at Graycliff Restaurant, however the
immediate precincts around the top of Cum-
berland and Prince's Street and Government
House is dilapidated and an extreme example
of just how we don't look after our heritage.
I have no idea who owns the complex of
buildings opposite the main gate to Govern-
ment House, but these buildings have
remained unpainted for years - I ask a stupid
question, will anything be done to them to
clean them up? We are running out of time
Minister of Tourism?
The boarding up of bad sites and what some
see as "art" is awful - imagine if this is taken
to the fullest extent from Elizabeth Avenue,


UM
can count you for
in one day.
he kind of time it
iber of people to
to somewhere to
again.
not just males,
th children, preg-
females who are
ding standing in
that 12 o'clock

e's no medical
this place for
when they bring
nurse to see peo-
y (immigration)
out the doctor's

ie I saw the doc-
y 13.
e some expired
d gave Immigra-
r the second time
o X-ray for my
said that was on
, 2009 and Immi-
taken me yet.
in this place for


almost 15 months and I have
seen everything.
Things that can easily sicken
or kill animals, happen to peo-
ple in this place.
I have been here since April
2008 and nobody can tell me
how much longer I am going to
be.
In my almost 500 days
detained here, I have been
starved, abused, mistreated,
beaten and tortured in this
place.
Everything I bought and was
sent to me for the first eight
months in this place I lost in
the dorms' fire in December.
Plus almost $2,000 cash. "I
haven't got a toothbrush from
immigration up to this day."
"They have made me buy
three tickets valued almost
$4,000 and haven't refunded
even one, nor said anything
about it, plus I'm still here,
about three months after they
made me buy my third ticket.
So I say this is one black hole
to get out of.

DETAINEE
Nassau,
June, 2009.


ip our act - quickly
eastward to beyond Tropic/Bethel dock? Of
course to one it is art but to others it is awful.
I hope as part of the actual event the Min-
istry of Tourism will ensure that the backdrop,
video, behind the contestants will include a
visual of The Bahamas from space - a unique
site and acknowledged by all astronauts as
one of the wonders of the world looking from
space.
Can Physical Planning ensure that all the
hundreds of illegal signage is pulled down
immediately - one wonders if the FNM Kil-
larney branch obtained Town Planning
approval for the banner on the Cable Beach
strip, right by the Gaming Board? By the way
the design of the Miss Universe banners is
simply awful.
I would hate that we present ourselves in a
manner which will put egg all over our faces.
Prime Minister get the whip out, sir! You do
not have much more time.

M. HUMES,
Nassau,
July 29, 2009.


EDITOR, The Tribune.

Miami Television News was
reporting last evening that
Florida Power and Light was


C,(uooAtiL. O.tmF1t1J


applying for environmental
approval for an LNG terminal
and pipeline, you know the
one that the second consecu-
tive Government signed a
promise to approve, which
has wallowed in the depth of
Government red tape ever
since and now seems to have
been lost to Florida.
If you recall the Florida ter-
minal end of the original
Bahamas/Freeport or Ocean
Cay pipeline to Florida was
approved as was the pipeline
through US territorial waters.
Well when we so earnestly
needed this type of project it
seems FP&L have got sick of


The Bahamas and now throw
their support by the alterna-
tive solution of anchoring a
super-tanker terminal off
Florida and will pump the
LNG ashore.
Congrats to all at the vari-
ous ministries who seem to
have screwed up again.
I believe the Bahamas Gov-
ernment could not give a
definitive some 10 years!
Sorry for the loss of jobs so
urgently needy n Grand
Bahama.

T. HANNA
Nassau,
July 27, 2009,


Last minute booking rates now
available for the months of August
and September at New Providence
Community Center on Blake Road.

We offer clean, modern facilities, well lit, spacious
parking area and experienced staff to make your
wedding day extra special.
..............


For more information please c
Gillian Watson at 327.1660
Spaces are limited!
Offer available for Weddings of up to
250 guest for the months of August
2009 and September 2009 only.
Payment must be made in full at
time of booking.


-ontact






new providence
community centre


Congratulations to ministries who


seem to have screwed up again!


*Don R' du teWdoa) Lt

1 *740 HIUZII KMA'IAZATNON"MI' Un~aLPMUD





E. Ahmrm Mir* UWtvu am fGumwIrte
3 M al.m ha idd &~~4me*hl it". Th
3: pW* i o Re4 Md biz pt%-tkn, bi
midIaA A ru1w ta" wI an � Ian
0-6 - .


Th U. mm mk4ed A BuL us
Y~ 1* ~mahtrwruu - hum Im al

NA wd dm wk


kef bin GSMII. Ic, swjra kitui&~g.


we p.pwm~wd4wadoM wW ck.i




hD wo ricuy. dipomn



h*- V i q Mr Hi * Ldoum
Sp'qItepanuli 'rmomo


I


PAGE 4, TUESDAY, AUGUST 4,2009


THE TRIBUNE






THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 4, 2009, PAGEEW5


Fox Hill community



marks the 175th



anniversary of



abolition of slavery


MARKING the 175th
anniversary of the abolition of
slavery, the Fox Hill commu-
nity kicked off its two week
long celebrations over the
weekend with a dramatic
Junkanoo rushout early yes-
terday morning.
Speaking at the event, Fox
Hill MP Fred Mitchell said that
as the representative for the
area, he has seen the protec-
tion of this event and the her-
itage of the village of Fox Hill
as his central mission.
"Today we pay tribute to all
of our ancestors, forefathers
and foremothers on this the
175th anniversary of the
Emancipation of the slaves in
the British Empire. If you look
at the plaque in front of you,
you will see that this village
was originally built on land
granted to Samuel Fox in 1750
and was settled by the Africans
from the Creek Village or New
Guinea village on the coast. It
is believed that New Guinea
or Creek Village existed where
the property of Roy Solomon
is now situate at the bottom of
the hill from St Ann's Church
on the coast.
"Fox Hill is in fact a com-
posite of many villages or
towns, including Congo Town,
Burnside Town. The celebra-
tions here in Fox Hill have
been observed continuously
since slavery was abolished.
Fox Hill Day, a day of special
celebration by the Baptist
Community in Fox Hill, which
is unique to Fox Hill, has been
going since at least the 1880s.
This is a culturally authentic
event. The reason we celebrate
is because we are free. We
must never forget," he said.
Thanking Governor Gener-
al Arthur Hanna, the govern-
ment and in particular the
Ministries of Culture and
Tourism, Mr Mitchell said he
was quite pleased at how Fox
Hill committee members with
the little resources they had


EMANCIPATION DAY JUNKANOO RESULTS


CATEGORY A


CATEGORY B


Shell Saxons................ 156
One Family..................140
Valley Boys.............1.... 38
Roots........................... 32
Music Makers ..............120


this year and the late start due
to the untimely death of Chair-
man Charles Johnson was able
to bring the festival together.
"It has been a great begin-
ning and I have no doubt, we
will have a successful end on
Fox Hill Day. I thank the
Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion of the Bahamas. I thank in
particular Dilith Nairn and
Clinton Whylly and Kevin Bas-
den, General Manager whose
interventions to make this
affair successful were invalu-
able. I thank Charles Johnson,
the late Festival Committee
chair. He was a good man. The
festival is named after him.
May God grant him rest in
peace and may he know the
fullness of joy that is promised
to all those who work in their
lifetime for the Lord. I am
proud to have known him and
to have worked with him.
"I thank the committee
headed by Acting Chair Mau-


One Love ..................... 19
Original Congos.......... 119
Redland Soldiers .........105
Fancy Dancers .............103
Colours...................... 58


rice Tynes and all the mem-
bers for their hard work. This
is a labour of love.
"I thank Cable Bahamas for
projecting this across the
Bahamas with their live cov-
erage of the Junkanoo parade.
I hope we can build a partner-
ship in the future on this great
family brand, the Fox Hill Fes-
tival.
"The Fox Hill Festival is a
place to come where you can
send your teenagers and know
that they are safe and bring
your youngsters and know that
they will have good, clean fun.
"Each year, we must tell the
story of how we became free.
Each year we must remind
those of African ancestry who
are able to live in a free society
that one day there was not this
freedom. We must cherish it.
We must build upon it. We are
passing a great legacy on to
you, the children of the
Bahamas," he said.


JUST WEST OF VFTY MAKETTONIQUE DAR~LING HIGHWAY
"W WLLMACHORBETINYPI CE* NTWN


S H H H! HURRY


Oca Seteae*w

Of Pre-Owned Cars
have started to arrive...


0J Down



[. . . ./ I J ......


GvBer nmen

:::: Workers:


* Honda Accord
-Honda Civic
'Honda Odyssey
* Nissan Cefiro
* Nissan Sunny
, Toyota Camry
* Toyota Corolla
* Toyota 8-Sater Vans
SOME TRADEWN'S ACCEPTED!


I V1 I

41WHOUE FINNCINGAVALBE


Appl icalions should bc suibiittod no later than Aupusi ]12&, 2009.


'mee 393-07568 Fax. 393.3563
- sobo U OY10Mwbmv 34uwm4


EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
SECURITIES COMMISSION OF TH-E BAHAMAS

Tht! sevuiritie, c~nMisskio if The Bahamas, a2 ~dturcyry agemcy rrspun~ibltfor the
ovcmr ight I 5upcrvision andI rcgoIation of the Invcstiricnt Fhiixs, .�cctniicsianctCapital
Markets in or from ThlicBahamwis. as %vcII as chc supcirvision of Fi~nancial and
Corporate Service Providers. inv ites appilicatioris from qualified Bahamians for the
150]]OWiicg pluffik~n:

Ihtibaie SQL AdministraturfDcicdoper

S.QE. �decvioper N~ia Rn'e Admnini51Fralor ~iII be regporsihtIc fbr prn~iding technicm1
support for the database environments, (SQL Semcr Z{X5, including SSAS) as well as
ovemoeIliug the development aindl oganizat~ion of the diitabams. asscmsin~i opi rfxormaiv~
a'nd 'mplemotiation of nc;4 iechnologies.

* LugicaI and phy~oc~I deigin of tables.
*cmaiing NIS S~Q]. 5crvcr sioncd protwcdurcs, iri~ers and 5.51.5 pockagcs.
* aS~gn:' Build OLAF nibes and MDX quercnct wimg Micosioft AnalysisScrVLCCs.
*Civating SSRS and olbier B] reporiN an~d daishboards Do Caipmduy AriaIy�-is.
Pefformance & Tutirin8 for dailabascR.q
*Manage Sharc point poartl for public shing relaoi and dashboards.
*[uidiv~icial will Rhare cih 24.7- erm niihility of inwuting teliableee~cuilon -of all
database prcs~se
Qualifications and Experiece-,
4+ years expcenice in aMS 5Q[ RcreO[.Ar on a indwenvironrnini
Parioecxperience with working in a databasc cnvtronment is riccded..
Sinong daia mu'.k iiugaN4J idamca ipkifalkiflskill s ife-eded.
FStlrnny kno~wledge about pmduict architecture and iznnfiguraticn cof MS SQl. Server
is Twcded.
Fxpetiince with [If tools .'uchrtSSRS and Crysia1 Reporn 2(XtXis aplus.
Wokigknowledge ot'thc securities industry and the rcvnmrt legisation.

Comnpetencies.
"ExceIlcnt nral amd written communication skills.
"PrAfC~Lrnt in HTML, IYJav script. ASP. NEI', SQL, SSL.
"Must hawe ability to g mip now.' ptgra. mming whnoIog.ie s aidapply new lechniqucN

A 'UU11pCL1I I We salary aim] benefils arebeing OifTeed. To applh. pleaseliruyldtJ a r~ueha
to thical'en,1 io of.

MANAGE ER - CORPORATE AFFAIRS
SECUiRITIES CON INISSION OF THE BAHIAMAS
P.O0. BOX NJ.347
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
Fax; 356&7530
E-Mail; info(4sbgvb


THE TRIBUNE


TUESDAY, AUGUST 4,2009, PAGE 5






PAGE^ ^ ^ ^S H5LOCAL 6,WS TUSAI UUT ,209TETRBN


Engineers visit Freeport Container Port


MEMBERS of the Bahamas
Society of Engineers (BSE) vis-
ited the Freeport Container
Port (FCP) and toured the
facilities during their annual
gathering in Grand Bahama
last week.
The trip to Freeport is an
annual event intended to foster
interaction between engineers
in Freeport and Nassau, and
FCP director Godfrey Smith,
together with engineering man-
ager Charles Stewart and four
of his engineers met with the
17-member group and gave
them a briefing and tour of the
port and the harbour area.
The Freeport Container
Port is located only 65 miles
from Florida and is the natural
trans-shipment hub for the
eastern seaboard of the Amer-
icas and the principal east/west
line haul routes through the
region.


JEROME ELLIOTT, president of the Bahamas Society of Engi-
neers (BSE), accompanied by a group of engineers, poses with col-
leagues at the Freeport Container Port.


FCP is a member of the
Hutchison Port Holdings
(HPH) Group, which is a sub-
sidiary of the multinational
conglomerate Hutchison
Whampoa Limited (HWL) -
the world's leading port
investor, developer and opera-


tor with interests in a total of 49
ports, spanning 25 countries
throughout Asia, the Middle
East, Africa, Europe, the
Americas and Australasia.
HPH also owns a number of
transportation-related service
companies.


.iv


US doctor and family


avoid injury after


their airplane crashes


A DOCTOR from the
United States and his family
were fortunate to walk away
uninjured after their air-
plane crashed while attempt-
ing to land at the North
Eleuthera airport Monday
morning.
According to reports,
around 8am, a Cessna
N185MG piloted by Dr
James Graham of Houston,
Texas, crashed at the North
Eleuthera Airport while
attempting to land on its
way from Marsh Harbour,
Abaco.
"Luckily he, his wife,
Chrisiti, and their seven-
year-old daughter, Emily,
who were the only passen-
gers onboard were not
injured in the crash. He was
actually on the runway and I


guess he wasn't paying
attention, the plane was
swerving from side to side
and it flipped," the island's
Chief councillor Abner Pin-
der told The Tribune.
Dr Graham, who was
speaking with House Speak-
er Alvin Smith after the
accident, said it was a fright-
ening and unfortunate expe-
rience, but that the family
would not let it interfere
with their planned vacation
at Pink Sands, which they
intended to enjoy.
Mr Smith, North
Eleuthera MP, was in his
district for the holiday week-
end.
Police are also searching
for a Piper Seneca, which
was reportedly stolen from
the North Eleuthera airport


yesterday. Sometime around
7am police received reports
that a Piper Seneca registra-
tion number N62SA was
stolen from North Eleuthera
Airport. Persons having any
information as to where this
aircraft may be found are
asked to contact the police
at 919.
The airplane is owned by
local contractor Terry Higgs
who was cruising in the Exu-
mas with his family when
friends were trying to con-
tact him to inform him of
the theft. Mr Pinder said
yesterday that it is the first
time in his recollection that a
plane has been stolen from
the North Eleuthera Air-
port.

Revitalisation of

downtown Freeport
is progressing
By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT - The revital-
ization of downtown Freeport
is progressing and plans are now
underway for the establishment
of a legally-formed Association
for merchants and stakeholders
in the downtown area.
The Grand Bahama Port
Authority held a town meeting
on Thursday evening at the Fos-
ter B Pestaina Hall to discuss
ongoing plans for its Downtown
Turnaround Project, which was
launched early this year to
improve the infrastructure of
downtown.
The Port Authority will carry
out improvements in three
phases, which comprises some
33 acres of commercial/retail
space within Explorers Way,
West Mall Drive, Pioneer's Way
and East Mall Drive.
During the meeting, Port offi-
cials announced plans to estab-
lish a Downtown Freeport
Association for the 80 mer-
chants and stakeholders in
downtown.
The association would be a
legal private entity and would
operate as a company limited
by guarantees under the Com-
panies Act.
No shares would be issued
and all income would be applied
towards the promotion of the
downtown area. Association
members would be required to
make a $3 contribution.
There would be three class of
membership: Class A represents
owners of real property in
downtown; Class B would
include tenants occupying com-
mercial spaces who are licensees
of the Port Authority; and Class
C would include the Chamber
of Commerce and Ministry of
Tourism, etc.
The association will hold
elections and elected officers
will serve a two-year term.
A six-member Steering
Committee was appointed to
liaise with stakeholders and
merchants to get feedback to
ensure that their concerns and
needs are addressed within the
proposed Articles of Associa-
tion.
Wilfred Seymour, owner of
the former John S George
Building, has been selected as
Committee Chairman.
The other committee mem-
bers are stakeholder/merchant
Malvene Newbold, stakehold-
er Debbie Pennerman, Assis-
tant Postmaster of the Post
Office Freeport, Garnell Frith,
Royal Bank of Canada, mer-
chant Kelly Russell of H&R
School Supplies and Flourene
Armbrister.


xerox


COPYING
Legal & Banking
documents
Training Manuals
Fiowe Plans


PRINTING
Brochures
Invilutiorns
Pogrpams


OTHER SERVICES
Biding


SCANNING 8:30mn- 5:00pm

hDraKings NASSAU:
WColuiRs A. & 7th raceo
~ PHONE: 302-9250
DESIGNING FREEPORT:

SColendan
o Flkn a Queens HIgmqy
Cer.ficales / PIHONE: 242-352-7022

FOR ALL YOUR DOCUMENT NEEDS


ch/ oo/


Madeira Shopping Plaza - 328-0703 * Marathon Mall - 393-6113 * RND Plaza, Freeport - 351-3274
The ONLYAuthorized Retailer of Genuine Clarks Shoes for the ENTIRE Family!


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


Enjoy being a woman.


FOR SALE BY OWNER








Four(4) - Unit Plaza
East Shirley Street
Zoned for Retail ShoplOffice Use

Sale Opt. 1. En:dfre Comple - $479K nn, a.n.
Sale Opt. 2c Three.Unit Ownership . $394K net
Seruus [nIquire* Only
Ph. (242) 477-3772(dayxi


Bahamas Business
Solutions Ltd.


Bacc' 7;


U7


PAGE 6, TUESDAY, AUGUST 4,2009


THE TRIBUNE


ig.R Sweedno's





THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 4, 2009, PAGEEW7


MISS


2009


Contestants welcomed to the Bahamas


"Lose Yourself In Sty


le"


MISS UNIVERSE contestants dance to Junkanoo at the airport as they are
welcomed to the Bahamas over the weekend. The Miss Universe 2009
pageant takes place at Atlantis this month.


MISS BOLIVIA Dominique Peltier poses with Miss Paraguay Mareike '
Baumgarten and Miss Panama Diana Broce as the contestants are
welcomed to the Bahamas.

Committee for the Privatisation of The
Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd.






Request for Proposals to act
as Registrar of the new

Utilities Appeal Tribunal

The Committee for the Privatisation of The Bahamas
Telecommunications Company Lid. J"ihe CommiHee") is seeking
proposals for the role of Registrar as defined in the new Ulilities
Appeal Tribunal Act, M009. I"the Act").
ine Utilities Appeal tribunal ("the Tribunal`'" will be established to
settle disputes arising in fne communications sector under the
new Communications Act, 2009. 1i is the intention to outsource
the role of the Registrar of the Tribunal ("Registrar") to an
Independent organisofian.
The Committee is pleased to invie the submission of proposals 1o
act as Regiisrar from suitably qualified organizations. Copies of
tihe request for proposal ["RFP") document may be downloaded
from the Government's website at www.bahamrnas.gov.bs or the
privaisation webslte at www.blcpivaiisation.com. Copies can
also be obtained by emailirng Charlene Lewis-Small o'
c*ewis@kpmg.com.bs.

The deadlne for submisiok has been extended to 5pm, August
1. 2009. Responses should be made in the manner oufiined i n the
RFP docurrent.


'II I'
A A

Clearnce yali
MAKING WAY O







Monday 0 F ida 3 m 5:0P



Tel:3930551


The


Save BIG Rigl-t Now!


3 years or 65K warranty, 3 years roadside
assistant, 3 years rust protections warranty
and licensed and inspected up to birthday.
'A,-,-


3 years or 36.000 miles warranty, 3 years roadside
assistant, 3 years rust protections warranty and
licensed and inspected up to birthday.

NOW THAT'S REALLY A [ D


QDeal


FRIENDLY MOTORS CO. LTD
THOMPSON BOULEVARD * TEL.: 356-7100 * FAX: 328-6094
EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com * WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com


THE TRIBUNE


TUESDAY, AUGUST 4,2009, PAGE 7











Handling of the Honduras


, .- TRANSFORMATION MINISTRIES

,, INTERNATIONAL



1 " /,CO-PA/,TOR.




HOST P.STO1


.f---- CONFERENCE OF THE
Sr . - . . /




THEME:





VENUE: B.C.PO.U HALL
FARRINGTON RD., *
SNASSAU. LBA IAMAS
.7...30PM NIGHTLY


GUEST SPEAKER


(EM OWE RM ENT WORISHI1.
LEXINGTON. KY)


insg ht

WORLD VIEW -


By SIR RONALD
SANDERS
(The writer is a Consultant
and former Caribbean
diplomat)
CALL it Latin American
"hot blood" or "Common-
wealth cool", but there is
definitely a marked differ-
ence between how the Orga-
nization of American States
(OAS) and the Common-
wealth handle conflicts in
their member states.
Both the 53-nation Com-
monwealth, and the 34-
nation OAS have had their
share of coup d'6tats, fraud-
ulent elections and abuse of
civil and human rights. And,
both organizations have
drawn up Declarations of
Principle for their member
states, infractions of which
lead to penalties of some
kind.
But, whereas in the OAS,
suspension of a state from
membership of the organi-
zation was the first step tak-
en in relation to Honduras
where it was claimed a coup
d'6tat had occurred, in the
Commonwealth suspension
of a member state is an
action of last resort; taken
only after exhaustion of
many initiatives.
Unlike the OAS, the
Commonwealth has stand-
ing machinery designed to


THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

CULIiNARY & IIOS ITA I ITY MANAUN IENT INST!TUITE,
IN DLISTR TRAINING DEPARTMENT
PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT COURSES - FALL SEMESTER 20419- 04109
COURM TmIrioa& No.of
_______SEC CODE BEINS ENIDS DURATION DAYS TIME FEES RM BG
OCOXK 6:00
81hersilhukiCliosi I W5 5 W. tDO d, ~22 6weeke Thur~j" 19:um T7 1 MK( 12

Ocurma~Ceakin 1 1 823 SW. 7 OGA.10 5 weeIku Monda~y 9:$3W-00MK 1
Glro ooffaI IK4 ISt, OLI.21 6 weeks WViesale 9: S05.00 W I&I? K 12
-coo __ __a_______ __0___

Makm~ingI I M t. 1I Novs. 3 BwYneks IIUir~day g Upm $30030 FvKI-2 _
main 1 1131 o t. i hoWt.51 weeks ITh j rsd~f 9 U"S2M LPK
C-c 9 I60*0-
Cak~e DnwfalruIg I 1I 17 Sept. 2 IWwi.2 aBweekis Mocl~ay 9.001yn i S32.3 P
Ca~i DeoraiI 1 I161 S t. I NDW 9d 6 WeeS ke cmd.~n auy NI Orri S375 311 P-. 2

Alt fmp t incIwdcO is the pirim * qW ad e; rk: i 4Mudtr~t paya ppjlicion FIc WUI ~NI. 4NON RFI' NIIDARLE.F
Applieaiihn Deadline, AugustL9.2009 at 4:00 pm.m
For fi.liLr iEILImIituv i im ut Lijpkku p ii'. m U pli ~IIu1 i PkIL II j ukt~Liuct [tic h urnJiihrir~y tlifitI)i.iIk;jivii.iiL u fic11L .ii.ln.iu I IIi








AMAZING 3 4-524\5 3937781\APPESNHERSENE


393-6897


deal with breaches of the
fundamental democratic
principles to which it
adheres. Among these is the
Commonwealth Ministerial
Action Group (CMAG),
which is a small group of
ministers drawn from every
region of the Common-
wealth with the authority to
engage groups within coun-
tries where principles have
been breached and to work
for the restoration of
democracy.
Fiji, which experienced
an overthrow of the govern-
ment in 2006, has been sus-
pended from the Councils
of the Commonwealth ever
since but not from the Com-
monwealth itself. In other
words, the de facto govern-
ment of Fiji cannot partici-
pate in any ministerial meet-
ings or Conferences of
Heads of Government, but
the state continues to be
regarded as part of the orga-
nization. This allows CMAG
and the Secretary-General
to remain engaged through
their own initiatives and in
efforts by others, such as the
UN, to restore democracy
and constitutionality.
Right now, the Common-
wealth Secretary-General,
Kamalesh Sharma, is work-
ing with the UN to encour-
age within Fiji a compre-
hensive political dialogue
that is broad-based and
inclusive of all major stake-
holders in order to secure
constitutional democracy.
The Commonwealth has
never expelled a member
state. In 1961, the Apartheid
South African government
withdrew itself in the face
of widespread Common-
wealth abhorrence of its
racist policies; in 1972 the
Pakistan government with-
drew itself over recognition
of the breakaway state of
Bangladesh, and in 2003 the
Robert Mugabe government
withdrew Zimbabwe over
the Commonwealth's dis-
pleasure at his rigged elec-


tions and violent intimida-
tion of opposition political
parties.
Despite the withdrawal
of South Africa, the Com-
monwealth continued to be
engaged in the anti-
apartheid struggle and con-
tributed mightily to its
downfall, to the freeing of
Nelson Mandela and to the
election of a Constitutional
government on the basis of
universal adult suffrage.
In all cases where the
Commonwealth has had to
manage infractions of its
democratic principles, the
process has not been swift
or easy. It has required dili-
gence, diplomacy and lever-
age. Even today, there are
several instances of infrac-
tions of principles; some of
them are being watched and
others are being dangerous-
ly ignored.
The system in the Com-
monwealth is not perfect
and there is much room for
improvement, but at least it
has a system which includes
the watchdog group,
CMAG, and the Secretary-
General's office itself.
This does not appear to
be the case in the OAS. As
Peter Hakim, President of
the Inter-American Dia-
logue, recently observed:
OAS "Secretary General
Jose Miguel Insulza
appeared overly identified
with a particular course of
action that did not bear fruit.
The weaknesses of the OAS
in dealing with democratic
breakdowns and other crises
include (1) its difficulty in
addressing critical situations
in their early stages because
the organization must either
wait for a consensus of its
SEE page nine


- r


NEW CONDO



FOR SALE

St. Albans Dr. New 3 Bedroom, 2 1/2 Bath,
3 Storey Townhouse. Well Appointed
Interior - Gated Property With Pool.
$239,000


Bank Financing Available
325-1325 454-2098 or 422-4489


PAGE 8, TUESDAY, AUGUST 4,2009


THE TRIBUNE











crisis flawed from the start


FROM page eight

members or have the autho-
rization of the government
in power (specifically, the
executive branch, not con-
gress, the judiciary, or the
opposition); and (2) the
challenge of reaching con-
sensus-on principles, objec-
tives, and implementation
strategies-among 34 coun-
tries given the hemisphere's
political and ideological divi-
sions. The OAS' crisis
response capacity could be
improved by giving the orga-
nization's secretariat more
operational autonomy or by
creating an executive group
(like the UN Security Coun-
cil) with greater flexibility
in its decision making, but
neither approach would
today have significant sup-
port among OAS mem-
bers."
The OAS Secretary-Gen-
eral was given 72 hours to
find a solution to the Hon-
duran situation. He might
just as well have been asked
to push a huge boulder up a
steep mountain. There was
no way it could have been
achieved given the high
emotion that existed on all
sides.
In giving him such a man-
date, the OAS General
Assembly was clearly
pressed into their decision


by a group of countries led
by Venezuela, Argentina,
Nicaragua and Bolivia (the
key members of ALBA)
who wanted their man,
Manuel Zelaya, immediate-
ly back in the Presidency
whether or not he had been
removed in accordance with
the Honduran Constitution
and law. As an important
aside, let me say in this con-
nection that however legally
correct the impeachment of
Zelaya may have been, the
interim regime wrong-foot-
ed itself by having the mili-
tary remove him from the
country.
OAS Deputy Secretary-
General Albert Ramdin
rightly reminded that Sec-
retary General Insulza acted
under the orders of the Gen-
eral Assembly which had
defined his role including
that he "did not have an
order to talk with represen-
tatives" of the interim gov-
ernment. What sort of medi-
ation could the OAS expect
of its Secretary-General in
that context, except to fail?
Canada, which is a lead-
ing member of the OAS and
an original member of the
Commonwealth, has now
begun to demonstrate some
misgivings about the OAS
approach to the Honduran
problem. Canada's foreign
ministry and its public ser-


vants would know well, from
the Commonwealth experi-
ence, that gradualism, con-
stant diplomacy and dili-
gence are the elements of
conflict resolution and that it
is "cool" not "hot blood"
that have painstakingly built
the machinery in the Com-
monwealth for addressing
problems in member states.
Like Canada, twelve
Caribbean countries are also
members of both the Com-
monwealth and the OAS.
They too should have
learned from the lessons of
the Commonwealth in deal-
ing with the circumstances
that Honduras threw-up.
And, part of the lesson
should have been that the
hands of the Secretary-Gen-
eral, as the chief diplomat
of the OAS should not be
tied, and suspension is not
a first step.
The OAS needs perma-
nent machinery both for
dealing with infringements
of its Democratic Charter
and for early warnings of
conflicts that need to be
resolved within its member
states and between them.
The brewing row between
Venezuela and Colombia
should be at the top of its
priorities.
Responses to:
ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com


Tyreflex Star Motors
Wu[ff Road, P. 0. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas, Tet 242.325.4961 * Fax 242.323.4667


F U R N I E


L �d� : ;


Nassau * Grand Bahama * World Wide Web

www.furnitureplus.com


SUPER ' VIDEO



Back BY Poplar Demand

Now Thru August


BUY ANY 3 MOVIES


GET 1 FREE
of equal or lesser value


Mall at Marathon
Town Centre Mall
Golden Gates Shopping Centre
Harbour Bay Shopping Plaza


THE TRIBUNE


TUESDAY, AUGUST 4,2009, PAGE 9






PAGELOCAL 0,S TUESDAYIAUGUST4,2009THETRIBUN


FROM page one

arraigned together on the
charges of conspiring to com-
mit extortion and attempting
to extort money from the
movie actor between January
2 and 20 of this year.
When asked to enter a plea
to the charges, both Light-
bourne and Bridgewater
replied, "Absolutely not
guilty." Bridgewater also
pleaded not guilty to the


Travolta to testify in the Bahamas


charge of abatement to extort.
Reports of the alleged
extortion attempt emerged
days after Jett Travolta, the
16-year-old son of actors John
Travolta, 54, and Kelly Pre-
ston, 46, died of a seizure at
the family's vacation home in
Freeport, Grand Bahama, on


January 2.
Attorney Carlson Shurland
of Freeport, Grand Bahama,
who represents Lightbourne
pro bono, objected to the
arraignment, submitting that
the prosecution had not pro-
vided him with all of the rele-
vant documents. Mr Shurland


told the court that he had
been provided several typed
statements, but no original
handwritten ones. Mr Shur-
land also requested the state-
ment of Allyson Maynard-
Gibson, who is a lawyer for
the Travoltas, tapes from
which the transcripts were
derived, as well as a copy of
the "refusal to transfer" doc-
ument.
Director of Public Prosecu-
tions Bernard Turner told the
court, however, that Light-
bourne had been served with
all the necessary documents.
Mr Turner told the court that
11 of the 14 typewritten wit-
ness statements had been
signed and that he would
undertake to provide Mr
Shurland with copies of the
originals.
In a letter to the people of
the Bahamas posted on his
website, Mr Travolta said:
"We have always believed
that a person's true character
reveals itself in the most dif-
ficult situations. For us, the
loss of Jett on the morning of
January 2 was the most diffi-
cult situation we could envi-
sion.


"The character, love and
true friendship of the Bahami-
an people became immedi-
ately apparent during our
time of crisis. From the Prime
Minister and the former
Prime Minister, who immedi-
ately expressed the condo-
lence of the Bahamian peo-
ple, to the management staff
and employees of Old
Bahama Bay who fiercely
protected us from further
hurt, at a real cost to them-


I


ANNOUNCEMENT




Nathaniel M. Dean, former Crown Counsel at the
Office of the Attorney General, Registrar General,
Registrar at the Supreme Court and the Court of
Appeal and Judge of the Industrial Tribunal Announces
the opening of the Chambers of:



NATHANIEL DEAN & CO.



Counsel and Attorneys-At-Law
Corporate and Legal Services
Notaries Public
at
2 Priderock Corporate Centre
East Street North (three doors south of Bay Street)
Nassau

Tel: (242) 328-4054/5

Fax: (242) 328-4057



Email: ndean@nathanieldeanlaw.com
Website: nathanieldeanlaw.com


FROM page one

On Friday, Justice Isaacs handed down
an historic judgment, ordering that the first
woman president in the union's 51-year his-
tory be removed from her post. Approxi-
mately 6,000 members cast their votes in
those elections.
Justice Isaacs also granted two other
grounds of relief sought by the First Vice
President Kirk Wilson and 12 other mem-
bers who are listed as applicants in the court
action. Justice Isaacs ordered that the certi-
fication by Registrar of Trade Unions Har-
court Brown on June 2 of the elections held
on May 28 be vacated and that the Registrar
supervise the union's elections within 30
days of the order of the court.
In the ruling Justice Isaacs noted that by
his lack of response to the concerns of the
executive council, "the registrar while pro-
fessing an inability to interfere with the


internal workings of the union has done
exactly that by abetting the minority of the
council to hijack the union's election process
through his agreement to supervise the Dou-
glas election. This is truly an example of the
dog wagging the tail."
"In the circumstances as I have found
them to be, the General Secretary's request
for the Registrar was not the request of the
union, the Registrar's determination to
supervise the Douglas election was outside
his authority and the applicants are entitled
to the declarations they seek, the ruling stat-
ed.
"I recognize that to require the union to
undergo a second election is onerous but
that is an eventuality freely accepted by
those who went forward with the Douglas
election in the full knowledge that it was
opposed by the body responsible for deter-
mining the election dates," the ruling stated.
Wilson and the union members were rep-
resented by Obie Ferguson and Keod Smith.


"Understanding aid Teaching Kingdom Prindpiples"
(How to Teach the Kingdom -Series by Dr. Myles Munroe)

,-.P.Vr A.", ->- 3$300pm


Ap~nlles 6mnggft MhWM. IM

liudu~wy'" K ~rq.~mConceph


74-- -1 1-7W.7L 114


-Ata w, " I 4 I k ~ u i ~ n G G w u f

C-h.m, k

%I' I . J ,$rd , 9 F
T* A I rfmwONI ri J~
i w ir, bi*


I Auus 5h- th*20 vTh ipoa Cetr NsaBaaa


w
SU4t4U
~414w1


4 IM WOWsTo legluiw


U
-Drn


IE


Appeal set to be filed over


Hotel Union election ruling


Vw4oibEA AugLn� 51h

7bhmwboyAug~mhOd
Kk:�ip IAJ f, - -.p , fro 8kt~


F~ky.Am g'l YV


Save BIG Riqcht Now!


2008 FORD FOCUS SEL
2.0L Automatic - LOADED .,


2008 FORD TAURUS SEL
S. 3.5L Automatic
- . . �Leather Interior- LOADED







3 years or 36,000 miles warranty, 3 years roadside assistant, 3 years rust protections
warranty and licensed and inspected up to birthday.


NOW THAT'S REALLY ALi 3Deal




FRIENDLY MOTORS CO. LTD

THOMPSON BOULEVARD * TEL.: 356-7100 * FAX: 328-6094
EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com * WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com


rddkl% MW UM


selves. From the police and
medical professionals in
charge of the official investi-
gation who executed their
responsibilities in a private
and dignified manner, to the
EMTs, Rand Memorial Hos-
pital personnel and coroner
whose pain was as evident as
our own.
"Of special note was the
assistance of Keith
McSweeney and his associate
of the Restview Memorial
Mortuary and Crematorium.
The grace and accommoda-
tion extended by these gen-
tlemen at this most difficult
time will always be appreci-
ated. All actions taken by
both men were at our direc-
tion and pursuant to our
express request.
"The love, sympathy and
protection as a member of
your family, which was
extended to us during this
most trying of times, will nev-
er be forgotten."
"We remain as one, with
the people of the great island
nation of the Bahamas."
The letter was signed by
Mr Travolta, his wife and
daughter.


PAGE 10, TUESDAY, AUGUST 4,2009


THE TRIBUNE


Amfun9m
WN:


h






THE TRIBUNE PAGE 12


iH TIIE,)1 Y AUGUST 4, 2009

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^R^^s~gi


By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net
KERRIE Cartwright celebrated her first Interna-
tional Tennis Federation tennis tournament victory on
Saturday.
She did it at the JITIC Central America and
Caribbean Tournament in Santo Dominigo, Domini-
can Republic as she won the girls 18 singles. As the
number one seed, Cartwright pulled off a 6-0, 6-3 win
over No.4 seed Fausthyara Pietersz from the Nether-
lands Anteles.
"It was a great experience. It was a great feeling
after all of the hard work I've been through to know
that I finally won my first tournament," said
Cartwrght, who moved up to No.361 in the rankings
released on Monday.
En-route to winning the title, Cartwright knocked
off American Rocio D. Portela 6-0, 6-1 in the quarter-
final before she disposed off Carolina Betancourt,
the No.3 seed, 6-0, 6-0 in the semifinal as she avenged
a previous loss in Canada.
"In my first match, I thought it was going to be a
really tough match because most of the people were
telling me that she was a very consistent player, so I
had to work on my mental game a lot more," said
Cartwright, who noted that she was really surprised at
the outcome.
As for her matchup wth Betancourt, Cartwright
said she knew her, but didn't know how well she
played.
"It was a good match. It was a really close match,"
Cartwright said. "But I played really wel because
after I won the first set, I knew that I could do it, so I
just went out and played as hard as I could."
Having advanced to the final, Cartwright said the
only thing on her mind was her ability to go out and
"do it."
After playing on the junior circuit for quite some-
time, Cartwright said it feels really good hat she can
finally call herself a ITF champion.
"I've been working so hard and training so hard,"
she aid. "It was a really good tournament and the
victory could not have come at a better time. It was a
great tournament to win."
Cartwright, 17. is now in Tampa, Florida training,
She's looking forward to playing in her next tournament
in New Jwrsey, followed by the Canadian Open and
then the Junior National qualifying tournament.
"I'm really looking forward to those tournaments,"
she said.
Prior to winning the singles title, Cartwrght teamed
up with Karen Hernandez from Mexico. But as the top
seeds, they didn't have any success at all, losing 7-6 (3),
6-4 in the first round to Betancourt and American
SEE page 13



Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd.
Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 , Fax: 326.7452



S ITH EXTRA,


li


inKI OR,
Large Shipment
of
Used Cars


IN STOCK




S COME CHECK

aus OUT
New Shipments Arrived



Hurry, Hurry, Hurry and
Get Your First Choice
For Easy Financing

Bank And Insurance

On Premises
Check Our Prices
Before buying
-AL 24m12


IAAF WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS IN ATHLETICS






A tean to make








Bahamas p round


23-member team preparing

to travel to Germany for

World Championships


GOLDEN GIRLS Chandra Sturrup and Debbie Ferguson-McKen-
zie.


mkb




S1114




By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net


TEAM manager Ralph
McKinney likes the make-
up of the 23-member team
heading to Berlin, Germany
for the IAAF World Championships in
Athletics.
The team will leave the Bahamas and
the United States on Wednesday for a
training camp in Berlin before the cham-
pionships are held from August 15-23.
McKinney said he's excited about the
team simply because of the fact that this
will be the first time that the Bahamas
will be featured in three of the four
relays.


AND .TI AI


Here's a look at the BAAA'S IAAF
World Championship team:


Male Athletes
liI I li e s A[lbns:- i ll ilbe:' -'l I
A iai , wI Iii il lll'i I 100 m ll e I-
,JC rlli i'. ! , il: Kini 1,,, , .2001 :: elli','
ml ,:i , Bn l:lle'i 1 -100l I * -1 . -100 i ielav,
F:La ,ii:v ii-i 1 N 4 0- -4,04 ile a,. i
-al 1 e li'Pc l I' - 4ill:I: IC la ,j I
S.i ll:iaei lc ll'! 1 i -a i -l idl. i E,, lela,.
. Nmali ui .' - i , j ill4 me4 e-i lirtlji e-
LiConaild TIInw a- 11 1 i ,;li, iiinip I

Women's team
Cl'ii'ii n .. i i iu p 1 e ll l .100 - i: 100 ii lel,,i
lie: '! - , F ,:'ii;|,:,, - ii i C-: rE 1i100 200 4 ' 100 -4 . -00 F c i ,iv.
A .l'e,'IijU1 Fel ,;|I l,'L 'i 1 2 0 I -1 ' l 0l ie1a'l .' l
l' I:il I 'ti'e AI1i , -:I I I 400 -1 1x -1 . -1 400 :ela, i
.I1ani e .1 in1 li e-II i . 100 4-. - 4I 00 i Ile,.,
Ti ':.,: ' 1 13)1 e i 1 .1 00 l iL I ,'ll
. illij O F ll:I- i 4 - i IL00 I'1 ,rI
Sl'lbe [ll'3 Henhiil ,.1 1 i - l . -400 lel v' i
CK , ' _illii .eiimI l E -I -li i FI iii'E,
l:3'li hat Ii ,u in C li -I :' 'el -e1 3, i,


[ ,::, [,:,l - F l:I, L ,, [ 1 1" 00,
lF'r,-,i : ii - Tl,' ,aprI l - Ka tli ,:e F i:,:,bil' :, Il
MIR e iO a llla..,:,r, ,1 r, apelO:, e - .ltllle W ll-:,l'


Reclaiming their spot in the line-up is
the women's 4 x 10 relay team. They will
join the men's 4 x 400 relay tam, which
won the silver medal at the last games in
Osaka, Japan. For the first time ever,
the Bahamas will also have a women's 4
x 400 relay team.
The latter team will have Rashad
Brown and Katrina Seymour, two of the
four women who clinched the bronze
medal at the Pan American Junior
Championships that concluded on Sat-
urday night in Trinidad & Tobago.
The other members are Christine
Amertil, who will run in the 400, along
with Sasha Rolle and Shakeitha Hen-
field. Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie, who
have triple duties with the 100, 200 and 4
x 100 relay, is also listed on the 4 x 4
relay team.


"This is a history breaking feat for the
Bahamas in that we are finally going to
have a women's 4 x 4 relay team at the
championships," McKinney said.
Prior to releasing the full list of the
team, the BAAA was waiting on the fit-
ness status of some of the competitors for
the men's 4 x 4 relay team. That will fea-
ture three of the four medalists from
Osaka.
With the exception of Andrae
Williams, who shut down his season after
finishing eighth in the 400 in , Avard
Moncur, Michael Mathieu and Chris
'Bay' Brown are all entered for this year's
team.
Also on the team are Ramon Miller,
SEE page 13


Major gets World Boxing Association ranking
By BRENT STUBBS Bahamian that got a rating, "I think his activity and his
Senior Sports Reporter so it's a great inspiration for skills has really put him in a
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net me and it let me know that position to get the rating and I i


MEACHER 'Pain' Major
now has his name officially
pegged in the World Boxing
Association's lightweight
ranking.
After waiting for the out-
come of his last fight on June
19 against Michael Clark for
the vacant NABA lightweight
title that ended up in a "no
contest" in Buffalo, New
York, Major has been elevat-
ed to number 15 in the latest
rankings.
"I feel very great about it
because over the last few
years, we have not had a


I'm getting closer to my ulti-
mate goal, which is to get a
world title," Major said.
"I'm just thankful to God
for this opportunity, which
could not have come unless I
made the change that I did.
So I also want to thank Nick
Garone for giving me the
opportunity to fight under his
promotions."
Nick Garone, whose X-Cel
Worldwide Promotions
signed Major to a contract last
November, said he's deight-
ed that his latest protege is
now rated, as he had
promised him.


possibly a world title fight in
2010," said an excited
Garone. "That rating allows
him to be one of the top con-
tenders for the title.
"So to be in the world rat-
ing is a very significant thing."
Now that he have his rank-
ing, Major said he intend to
use every fight as a stepping
stone for a title shot and he
intend to use every opportu-
nity to continue to work hard
on achieving that goal.
"I'm not going to rush any-

SEE page 13


JWITHN IN il in i .111s






TRIBUNESPORTS SPORTSITUESDAYAUGUST4,2009,PAGE1


A team to make



Bahamas proud

FROM page 12

Andretti Bain and newcomer Latoy Williams.
So far, however, McKinney said only Brown and Miller have
been given the go-ahead for the 400. He said a decision will be
made on the final entry between Williams, Mathieu and Bain
at the training camp.
Williams has posted the fastest time than all of the Bahami-
an quarter-milers this year, but he pulled up at the 300 mark at
the BAAA's Nationals and had to undergo a fitness test, along
with Willams, who Iso went down with an injury at the trials.
As for the women's 4 x 1 relay team, McKinney said they
have a good mixture of veterans and youthful competitors
who should help the team to regain its position on the medal
podium since the era of the Golden Girls.
Included on that team are Chandra Sturrup, Ferguson-
McKenzie, Timicka Clarke, Sheniqua 'Q' Ferguson and new-
comer Janice Saunders.
There are two sprinters qualified for the men's 100 metres.
They are Derrick Atkins, the silver medalist from Osaka and
Adrian Griffith. However, the men's 4 x 100 relay team just
missed qualifying.
Also on the team is world champion Donald Thomas, who
will be joined by Trevor Barry in the men's high jump; Olympic
bronze medalist Leevan 'Superman' Sands in the triple jump
and Shamar Sands in the men's long jump.
Tyrone Burrows will travel as the head coach, assisted by
Frank 'Pancho' Rahming and George Cleare. The team's doc-
tor is Ricky Davis and the Physio-therapist is Katrice Robinson.
Julie Wilson will travel as the Media lliason and chaperone.


Debbie's super performance7


~b -


DEBBIE Ferguson-McKenzie turned in another
super performance as she continue her trek to the
IAAF World Championships in Berlin, Germany later
this month.
At the DN Galan Meet in Stickholm, Sweden on Fri-
day, Ferguson-McKenzie clocked 22.23 seconds for
second place in the women's 200 metres. The race was
won by American Allyson Felix in a meet record of
21.88. Jamiacan Kerron Stewart was third in 22.72.
Also at the meet, Shamar Sands won his heat of the
men's 110 hurdles in 13.11. However, the time was only
good enough for fifth place overall with the two heats
combined.
Cuban world record holder Dayron Robles won the
other heat in 13.11 for the fastest time overall.
Three Americans followed with Joel Brown second
in 13.38, Jason Robinson third in 13.43 and Eric Mitchum
fourth in 13.49.
The World Championships are scheduled for Berlin
from August 15-23.




Cartwright celebrates


tournament victory

FROM page 12

Giovanna Manifacio, who went on to win in the final over
Ana Sofi Sanchez and Marcela Zacarias from Mexico.
Also at the tournament was Grand Bahaman Davis Cupper
Rodney Carey Jr.
In singles as the No.3 seed, Carey won his opening quarter-
final match in the boys' 18 singles eith a 6-4, 6-3 win over
Cesar Escobar Serrano, the No.8 seed from Spain. However, he
lost 6-4, 2-6, 6-3 to No.6 seed Gabriel Flores from Puerto Rico.
Despite the loss, Carey is now tied for at 165 with Ivan
Levar from Croratia, surpassing Barbados' Darian King (167),
who defeated him here in the singles' final at the ITF Junior
Tournament before they teamed up to win the doubles.
King, the top seed, won his quarter-final opener 6-0, 6-0 over
Mariano Porter, the No.11 seed, before he was ousted 1-6, 6-4,
6-2 in the semi's by Alexis Carlos, he No.4 seed, who went on
to win the title.
In the doubles playing as the No.2 seeds, Carey and Pablo
Nunez of Cro were eliminated 7-6 (4), 2-6, (10-5) by No.3
seeds Flores and Jose Sierra Short, both of Puerto Rico. But the
title was won by the top seeds of King and Brandon Burke of
Jamaica.


Swimmers change




record books again


SAlicia Lightbourne swims 32.83 in 50 breast stroke

l Women's 4 x 100 medley relay team sets new record


Bahamas swimming has changed the
record books again in the 50 breast
stroke when Alicia Lightbourne swam
a 32.83 dropping almost two seconds
off the old record that she held and
set at the recent Nationals.
The women's 4 x 100 medley relay
team also swam to a 4:15 setting a new
Bahamas record by dropping 3 sec-
onds off of the previous record set at
the Pan Am games where they won
bronze.


The quartet of Alana Dillette (back-
stroke), Alicia Lightbourne (breast-
stroke), Arianna Vanderpool-Wallace
(butterfly) and Teisha Lightbourne
(freestyle) swam the relay early Sat-
urday morning in Rome.
Arianna Vanderpool-Wallace and
Teisha Lightbourne both swam the 50
free prelims and narrowly missed best
times in this individual event.
Elvis Burrows set 4 individual
records and broke one of the longest


standing Bahamian records in the 50
freestyle. Alana Dillette, Arianna
Vanderpool-Wallace and Alicia Light-
bourne each set two individual
Bahamas records and with teammate
Teisha Lightbourne also swam two
Bahamas relay records.
Team Bahamas represented the
country very well as they totalled 10
individual
Bahamas records and two female
relay records.


Bahamas golf team leaves for Turks and Caicos competition


THE Bahamas has an 11-
member team, minus a
women's squad, at the 53rd
Caribbean Amateur Golf
Championships in Provi-
denciales, Turks and Caicos.
The team, managed by
James Gomez, left town on
Sunday and was scheduled
to go through its practice
rounds yesterday and today.


The competition will actu-
ally begin on Wednesday
and run through Saturday.
The team is due to return
home on Sunday.
Named to the team are
the following:
Hoerman Cup for Regu-
lar players - Richard Gib-
son Jr., Peter McIntosh,
George Swann, Devaughn


Robinson and Rashad Fer-
guson.
Ramon Baez Trophy for
Mid-Amateur players 35-
years and older - Shane Gib-
son and Christopher Harris.
Francis Steele Perkins
Cup for seniors - Milford
'Shaggy' Lockhart and
Kevin Marche.
Higgs & Higgs Trophy for


super seniors - Harcourt
'Coins' Poitier and George
Turnquest.
The team's head coach is
Fred Wright and the captain
is Vernon Wells.
Puerto Rico is the defend-
ing champions.
The Bahamas finished
fifth last year.


Majo gets Wold Boxing r'Asscitin anin


FROM page 12
thing. I'm just going to
take it step by step," he
said. "I'm just hungry and
ready and whenever the
opportunity presents
itself, I hope to take that
step to achieving that
goal."
If all goes well, Major
could be appearing in his
first step at home under
his new promotional
team, along with Charlie
Major Jr. on August 22
at the Nassau Stadium.
However, both Major
and Garone have decided
to wait until the contract
is signed before revealing
too much more details.
Hopefully by Wednes-
day, Garone said he
should be able to confirm
whether or not the show
will be staged or they will
have to wait until Sep-
tember when Major will
get his next opportunity
to fight again.
"The world rating is a
very exciting thing for me
and Meacher because it
now makes him a legi-
mate cpntender, s he
could be fighting for a
world title as early as next
year."
Major, who turns 28 on
October 28, s currently
16-3 with 14 knockouts.

Show
In the meantime,
Major has formed a local
organization called Major
Promotions and Enter-
tainment. Under that
organization, he intend to
host a show in December
when he will get the
chance to showcase a lot
of the local talent.
"This promotional
company is being orga-
nized to help provide the
opportunity a training
camp so that the guys can
go off and get the same
type of promotional con-
tract that I got with
Excel," Major pointed
out.
"I just want to use my
company to provide a
guideline for the local
guys and to give them the
exposure so that they
have an opportunity to go
to the next level. And if I
get the opportunity to
fight for a world title
fight, my company will
get the opportunity to
organize it."
On Saturday, Major
will also be hosting his
annual Major Urban
Youth Programme Back-
to-School Summer Bash
between the hours of 1-6
pm in Strachan's ally off
Kemp Road where he
grew up.
"We will be having a
lot of giveaways for
school and entertainment
and fun for the children,"
Major stressed. "So we
are encouraging all of the
youngsters in the com-
munity to come out and
participate."


I
r~


I ~KLK



~Kj
I 1










k


ii
1 / \
* j I-.-



- ri r r) 1>\[ r~


1*---.~'


p#j- ___ r j j-


The Wuraflo is a 4-di-Or, 5.POS~enger UPrL-11111ava Ib~ifl&@in5 rihs, 'aflgiog from me S 2WD
to [he SE AVID.

Upon inlroduclicn :hS WDIs -P.cu pptid wli a *slandord 3.51 ir itt H 2AQ~hcirSO;QWer a9rF
that acIhi~Ewc-2Ornpg in the city 5fl� 2S-rrp~g on :N;- igiigkw. The SE AWIJ is equipped Kith a
standard 3 5Ililef, V65 24 horsepoiusr e4r~e that achlees 20-mrp'� In The ciI rnd �!-Fh~pi, on,


AIU MAN C


SprPT-Ito mgI t Pot rMuAw


EWC M~iQrs Ltd SANPIN MOTORS LIMITED '*"PT ftik~l bT
02SOV~ffRwdThompnpw P4, ao w.d C Wl-qV ,-T"A-
PO. Lw N.4KC4 2 42,320,677-. 2230035,UA ZAWLAL T
~ 4..~7 Lp s2~a. Sin~pnt o'ralwawGa~com IPOKEIn 6ALP1%LIJ


TRIBUNE SPORTS


TUESDAY, AUGUST 4, 2009, PAGE 13


� '** .


-�


wr






PAGE 14, TUESDAY, AUGUST 4, 2009RNTRIBUNE SPORTS
VC IC E:ASH SSEIEA


Defiant Australia




save third Test


AUSTRALIA'S MICHAEL CLARKE, centre right, shakes hands with England's Andrew Strauss after their
team's draw on the fifth day of the third Ashes cricket test match between England and Australia in
Birmingham, England, Monday Aug. 3, 2009.


AUSTRALIA'S MICHAEL CLARKE plays a shot on his way to an unbeaten 103 on the fifth day of the third
Ashes cricket test match between England and Australia in Birmingham, England.


ENGLAND'S CAPTAIN Andrew
Strauss, centre, shakes hands
with umpire Rudi Koertzen on
the fifth day of the third cricket
Ashes test match between Eng-
land and Australia in Birming-
ham, England, Monday Aug. 3,
2009.' -






(AP Photo/Jon Super) 1W _







For the best deal in town on
pre-owned cars, with warranty!
Trade-ins on new car sales


NOW


IN bUuwK!

'01 TOYOTA CAMRY
'05 TOYOTA CAMRY (
'07 TOYOTA YARIS
'06 HYUNDAI TERRACAN
'01 HYUNDAI COUPE
'04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
'06 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
'06 HYUNDAI SONATA
'01 HYUNDAI HD-65 TRUCK
'94 MITSUBISHI DIAMANTE
94 TOYOTA CAMRY

QUALITYY&
LIMIfiD
F1 AUTO DEIR IN THE MAYASM
EAST SHIRLiY STINET * 322-3775 * 325-3079
V1 iai tlcErmn i a ,ikltAjk . S e I f mr n LkiU iraz d h iomno M - . -1| 122
a, se w 'Na5s1. LknV stlcFWN- 1 ay4 : t,


WASHINGTON
Andy Roddick is healthy and
ready for his first match since
losing the Wimbledon final,
according to Associated Press.
Roddick, who hasn't played
since being beaten by Roger
Federer on July 5, said Mon-
day he is recovered from the
right hip flexor he sustained in
that championship match at
Wimbledon. Roddick is the
top-seeded player in the Legg
Mason Tennis Classic and has
won the event three times.
He was originally scheduled
to open play Tuesday after an


AUSTRALIA'S MICHAEL CLARKE, left,
his century in an unbeaten innings of 1
England suffered a final day of fru
Edgbaston as Australia delivered
display to save the third Test and
contention for the Ashes.
Michael Clarke's 103 not out and
Marcus North helped Australia with
overs on the final day to reach 375
the close and finish 262 runs ahead.
Starting the final day as favourite
victory and secure a 2-0 series lead -
in the Ashes since 1986-7 and first on
since 1977 - England were confron
Australian side determined to spoil
Spurred on by the prospect of a fa
queues formed before the gates o
ensure a packed Edgbaston after 8,(
were sold in advance and 11,000 n
online overnight.

Denied

But the crowd were denied the d
tension of the tense two-run triun
years ago by a visiting side intent o
out a draw and denying England'
any rest before the fourth Test in th
series at Headingley on Friday.
Resuming 25 runs adrift on 88 for
tralia faced the prospect of 98 over
England attack which had dismissed
under 300 in successive Tests.
However, this time it was the
bowlers who looked impotent a


- il


40


opening-round bye, but his start
was pushed back to Wednes-
day. Defending champion Juan
Martin del Potro is the No. 2
seed.
"Physically I feel great,"
Roddick said. "I didn't want to
make the error of coming back
until I felt physically prepared
to play in an event."
Mikhail Youzhny opened the
first full day of play at the tour-
nament with a 7-5, 3-6, 6-1 vic-
tory over Robert Kendrick.
Youzhny will face fifth-seeded
Robin Soderling in the second
round. Qualifier Somdev Dev-
varman, a two-time NCAA


is congratulated by teammate Graham Manou after reaching
03.
station at marked his 50th Test with his 12th century.
a defiant Having terrorised Australia with their abil-
remain in ity to swing the ball earlier in the match, Gra-
ham Onions and James Anderson struggled to
d 96 from have the same impact.
stand 84.2 The only time England looked capable of
for five at victory was before lunch when they claimed
two wickets to leave Australia just 48 runs
s to claim ahead on 161 for four, and two new batsmen in
their first Clarke and North at the crease.
home soil England were frustrated for over three hours
ted by an while Clarke and North forged a match-saving
the party. 185-run stand. Overnight batsmen Shane Wat-
mous win, son and Michael Hussey had set the tone for
openedd to Australia's resistance by forging an 85-run
)00 tickets stand, which was not broken until the 16th
more sold over of the day. Drafted in as a makeshift
opener following Phillip Hughes' struggles
against the short ball, Watson responded by
hitting 62 in the first innings and followed up
with another half-century. He bravely resisted
a hostile early spell from all-rounder Andrew
trama and Flintoff, including being hit in the groin area
mph four and on the left elbow, but fell in the first over
on batting after drinks when he edged Anderson behind.
s bowlers England's optimism was boosted by Stuart
ie power Broad, under pressure for his place at Head-
ingley following a disappointing series with
two, Aus- the ball, striking four overs before lunch when
s from an Hussey also edged behind pushing outside off-
d them for stump. Such optimism was soon punctured by
the discipline and resolve demonstrated by
England both Clarke and North during their 209 min-
is Clarke utes of defiance.
ENGLAND PLAYERS
celebrate the wicket of
Australia's Marcus
North, caught by James
.Anderson off the bowl-
ing of Stuart Broad, on
the fifth day of the third
cricket test match
between England and
* Australia at Edgbaston
cricket ground in Birm-
, I ingham, England, Mon-
S day, Aug. 3,2009.








(AP Photo/
Kirsty Wigglesworth)


champion from the University
of Virginia, advanced to the
second round with a 6-0, 7-6 (6)
win against Yuichi Sugita. Yen-
Hsun Lu defeated Michael
Russell 4-6, 6-1, 7-5; Philipp
Petzschner won 4-6, 6-3, 6-4
against Teimuraz Gabashvili,
and Frank Dancevic advanced
by beating Santiago Giraldo 6-
4, 6-3. Roddick injured his hip
when he fell in the fourth set
against Federer. He went on to
play for another 1 1/2 hours
before losing 16-14 in the
longest fifth set in Grand Slam
final history, a match that is still
on Roddick's mind. "Heart-


breaking," Roddick said. "But
at the same time, not a lot of
people get a chance to play for
that title and be a part of some-
thing like that, so that part of it
is never lost on me. Ten sec-
onds after the final, I still real-
ized it's a pretty special thing."
Roddick said the hip didn't
bother him in the final -
"Adrenaline does a lot for you"
- but he compared the feeling
in the days after to falling on a
rock. He said he doesn't expect
any lingering problems.
Last year, Roddick was upset
in the quarterfinals of this tour-
nament.


TENNIS

Roddick ready for first action since Wimbledon


PAGE 14, TUESDAY, AUGUST 4,2009


TRIBUNE SPORTS


.^*






PAGELOCAL 6,S TUESDAYIAUGUST4,2009THETRIBUN


Either Michael Barnett or Brian

Moree set to be next chief justice


FROM page one
his post for over eight years. Sir Burton will
become a Permanent Judge at the Interna-
tional Criminal Tribunal for the former
Yugoslavia.
In the past, Prime Minister Ingraham has
remained tight-lipped over who would be the
new appointment to the Judiciary's top post,
maintaining always that there was "no vacan-
cy" at the time.


In fact, former Prime Minster Christie has
often lamented the fact he was not being con-
sulted on the issue, promptly challenging the
Prime Minister to speak to him on the matter
as the discussion "needs to take place."
Prior to this revelation, some attorneys in
the legal profession have suggested that
Senior Supreme Court Justice Anita Allen
would be the most likely and worthy replace-
ment to Sir Burton. However, it is unclear
at this time if Mrs Allen is still being consid-
ered for the post.


I
I. ~


F II
1J'~~


C Walk-In


Your /XI ll r for qua(~lityI ea It/ware,


-:,AY *ULTH. I' 1-1,0 LJCi. L- N Y I:~~j~L

;,I I A 1 I*; . . 1 1.. I...




TV�Y) LOCATION a' 03 Collins Aveniue 328-a783/1328-2744 Sandy port 32 7-548ad5


Claims that Perry Christie

'stacking the deck'

against any challengers


FROM page one
lenged on this point at tonight's
meeting.
A PLP insider told The Tri-
bune: "Christie wants some lev-
el of security that even if he is
challenged he will come out vic-
torious. This new block of del-
egates is supposed to be per-
sons around the age of 40, who
obviously would be loyal to
him."
According to the PLP's con-
stitution there are seven dele-
gates per constituency and the
party's leader is capable of
installing as many stalwart


councillors as he sees fit. These
stalwart councillors are there-
fore generally assumed to fol-
low in support of the leader
who would naturally appoint
persons "loyal" to him.
In another move equally as
disturbing, sources inside the
party claim that the convention
is now being pushed to be held
for only three days, instead of
the originally publicized week.
With only three days, these
sources lament that there will
be little to no opportunity for
anyone to mount any "serious
challenge" to Mr Christie as
delegates and stalwarts would
have little time to be coaxed or


Boy stabbed over


Big Mac sandwich

FROM page one
day; police received reports of a shooting at Jackson Street, Nas-
sau Village. When police officers arrived at the scene, they
discovered an 18-year-old man suffering from a gunshot wound
in his lower back.
The young man told police that he had gone to Butler
Street to purchase a vehicle when he was held up by a man
armed with a handgun, who demanded cash. The victim told
police that he was trying to run away when the gunman shot him
in his back. Police are investigating these incidents.

0 1


petitioned by anyone else.
"Once these people arrive
from the Family Islands you
know they have to visit their
relatives, so after the opening
prayer they're gone. So you
might as well write off the first
day. The second day they will
come down for breakfast, speak
to old friends and then try and
catch the foodstores. So before
you know it, nothing would
have happened and convention
would be over.
"But if you had a week long
event, Paul Moss, Jerome
Fitzgerald, Dr Bernard Not-
tage, Fred Mitchell and the
likes would have a chance to
talk to delegates and push the
need for some change in the
party. They can talk and coax
for three days before they go
into vote on Thursday," he said.
Another concern expected to
be raised by some within the
party is the growing suspicion
surrounding PLP MP for West
End and Bimini Obie Wilch-
combe who is also chairing this
year's convention. As a candi-
date for the deputy leadership
of the party, some within the
PLP feel that Mr Wilchcombe
should remove himself from
chairing the event as it may
offer him an upper-hand over
the other candidates.
It is believed that amongst
those expressing this concern
would be Cat Island, San Sal-
vador and Rum Cay MP Philip
Davis who is expected to
announce his decision to run
for the deputy leadership post
today.
Although well known within
the party, Mr Davis faces an
uphill battle to familiarize him-
self with the party's delegates,
who ultimately would be greet-
ed first by the convention's
chairman.


Packages of

cocaine seized

in Freeport

THIRTY packages of
cocaine were seized at the
Freeport container port on
Sunday, according to police
reports.
This is the second major
drug seizure at the container
port in recent weeks. The
drugs were reportedly dis-
covered inside a black bag
in a 20-foot long container.
Only July 14, 24 packages
of suspected cocaine were
seized from a 20-foot long
container at the Freeport
container port. The drugs
had a street value of
$600,000.


^3RM FRAME
WINDOWS

JONESER RESISTANT
10 Years Tried and Proven















.... . .....





Call for your FREE quote or
Coe visit our factory locked on 74 Mount Royal Avee, Nassau

TEL: 1-242-325-6633
FAX. 1-242-325-6638


SWEET TREAT


* 0' 1THEBRIISH
NOWm PEN*OWNTWN (OLONAL HLTO
AD2CNEIENTLOATON ATTH ARPRT0 O ERE OU


PAGE 16, TUESDAY, AUGUST 4,2009


THE TRIBUNE









THE TRIBUNE J





)US1


SS


TUESDAY, AUGUST 4, 2009


ECIO Bo uines- ibuneedig -


NASSAU
(242) 356-9801
FREEPORT
(242) 351-3010
MARSH HARBOUR
(242) 367-3135

roafdlt.co.


Albany's opening Government assesses

a As - water franchise plan


to create 500 jobs


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
U p to 500 full-
time jobs will
likely be creat-
ed when the
$1.4 billion Albany Golf &
Beach Resort starts its oper-
ational phase in summer
2010, Tribune Business has
been told, as the project
developers prepare to
increase the current 600-
strong construction work-
force by "cranking up"
Phase I vertical building.
Christopher Anand, Albany's managing
partner, told this newspaper that with the
project's management team "largely iden-
tified and in place, from an operational
standpoint it will be early next year when
we start hiring the majority of employees".
Some 200-300 persons were likely to be
hired by Albany for when Phase I had its
soft opening in 2010, Mr Anand said, but he
explained that the direct impact for the
Bahamian workforce could be up to 500
new jobs as a result of the development
contracting out the provision of certain ser-
vices to Bahamian businesses.
"We're going to sub-contract with local
businesses on the landscaping [and other
areas]," Mr Anand explained. "That will
ramp up, so probably as many as 500 jobs
will come out of that as opening day


* Developers invest $250m to date,
with current 600-strong construction
workforce to ramp up to around 1,000
* Albany to hire 200-300 full-time jobs
by 2010 summer opening, with others
created in Bahamian-owned service suppliers
* Marina basin completed, and amenities
and hotel cottages going vertical


approaches. It's not just us, but local busi-
nesses who've got contracts as well."
The promise of several hundred jobs
being created will bring a much-needed
boost to the workforce and Bahamian soci-
ety at a time when the economy is strug-
gling, unemployment continues to rise and
Albany remains the only major mixed-use
resort development project continuing to
make substantial headway.
The southwestern New Providence
development's amenities, such as the spa,
fitness centre and clubhouse, plus the mari-
na, golf course and hotel cottages compo-
nent are scheduled for a summer 2010 soft
opening, with a more formal ceremony
likely to take place in November/December
2010.
Mr Anand told Tribune Business that


some 600 construction workers were cur-
rently employed on the project site, but
this number was due "to be cranked up as
the vertical work starts to happen. That
number will start to grow. That's still not at
the peak. I imagine it would get close to
1,000".
Albany's shareholders, who include the
Tavistock Group, the vehicle by which
Lyford Cay-based billionaire Joe Lewis
makes his worldwide investments, and
golfers Tiger Woods and Ernie Els, have
invested more than $250 million into the
project to date, Mr Anand said.
"Things are good," he added. "We've
seeded about one-third of the golf course.
There's six holes done out of 18, and next

SEE page 4B


By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net
THE GOVERNMENT is
currently reviewing New Prov-
idence Development Compa-
ny's application for a
water/wastewater treatment
franchise for western New
Providence, the minister
responsible has confirmed to
Tribune Business, adding that if
it was granted it would not
impact the Water & Sewerage
Corporation's customer base
and potential revenue streams.
Phenton Neymour, minister
of state for the environment,
said New Providence Develop-
ment Company had begun dis-
cussions with the Water and
Sewerage Corporation regard-
ing the franchising of sewage
treatment and potable water
facilities some time ago.
He said through its New
Providence Water Develop-
ment Company affiliate, New
Providence Development Com-
pany had historically supplied
water for an area in western
New Providence for 50 years.
Mr Neymour said water and
sewerage treatment was criti-
cal for that area of western New
Providence where some devel-
opments have not fully com-
plied with their requirements
for such facilities.
He could not say which


developments those were, but
said some developers were
required to put in sewerage
treatment facilities and had not
done so.
Now, the Government is
looking at the zoning for New
Providence Development Com-
pany's proposal, in order to
establish a franchise agreement
that would "put in place nec-
essary sewerage collection and
treatment for the rapidly devel-
oping area".
Mr Neymour said the fran-
chising of such utilities provi-
sion to a private company
would not lead to the loss of
potential revenue streams and
customers for the Water and
Sewerage Corporation, as water
would still come from the gov-
ernment-owned utility.
"With existing franchise
agreements, Water and Sewer-
age does not see it as severely
impacting benefits," said Mr
Neymour. The Water and Sew-
erage Corporation has several
other such franchise agree-
ments, including one on Win-
dermere Island, Eleuthera.
Mr Neymour said the Gov-
ernment was moving forward
diligently with reviewing this
latest franchise proposal for the
western New Providence area.
However, he said the

SEE page 4B


Fidelity 'scales back Bank still eyeing $40m-plus profit


our expansion plans

quite significantly'


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
FIDELITY Bank (Bahamas)
has "scaled back our expansion
plans quite significantly", its
chief executive telling Tribune
Business that the BISX-listed
institution has placed efforts to
grow its loan book and balance
sheet "on hold for the next 15-
18 months" due to the reces-
sion.
Speaking after the bank
unveiled a modest 7.5 per cent
increase in net income to
$582,089 for the first six months
of 2009, Anwer Sunderji, Fideli-
ty Bank (Bahamas) chief exec-
utive, said the dramatic fall-off
in credit demand and general
poor quality of new borrower
applicants would, in the short-
term, stymie its previously
announced plans to grow the
bank.
Pointing to the 95 per cent
year-over-year increase in
Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) loan
loss provisions, which rose to
$584,248 compared to $299,244
for the first six months in 2008,
Mr Sunderji said that if the
increase was "netted off" then
the bank's 2009 first half net
income would have risen by 60
per cent to more than $867,000.
Pointing out that the loan


* BISX-listed bank places
loan book and balance
sheet growth strategy 'on
hold for 15-18 months'
* Says loan defaults
'running at half
industry average'
* Expects improvement in
interest margins to partly
compensate for rising
loan loss provision impact
loss provision increase was, like
with other Bahamian commer-
cial banks, "impacting our bot-
tom line", Mr Sunderji said:
"Our provisions will continue
to increase in line with the dete-
riorating economy and loan
delinquencies."
However, the Fidelity Bank
(Bahamas) chief executive said
his organisation was still "in a
good spot", as its loan defaults
- borrowers more than 30 days
past due on repayments - were
"running at roughly half the
industry average. The industry
average is 4 per cent, and we're
about 7 per cent".
As for the more important

SEE page 8B


WESTWARD VILLAS #4960 Beautiful Bahamian 3 bed 3 bath home with
open floorplan is located in a quiet area near Cable Beach. Secluded landscaped
property with swimming pool and covered patio. Roll-down shutters through-
out, generator, garage and laundry room. Offered fully furnished and equipped.
Picture perfect and just US$745,000. Exclusive.
Ridley.Carroll@SothebysRealty.com 242.424.5801


Damianos


Sotheby's
INTERNATIONAL REALTY


I I Member of
SIRbahamas.com t 242.322.2305 1 f 242.322.2033 The Bahamas MLS


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
COMMON-
WEALTH
Bank's chairman
believes the
institution can
generate $40
million-plus in
net income for
its 2009 full year
"unless disaster
befalls the sys-
tem", as it pre- on
pares to "experi-
ment" with Sat-
urday morning banking at its
newest Prince Charles Branch.
Stating that the bank's Board
and management felt "we're on


* Commonwealth Bank to 'experiment' with Saturday banking
at new Prince Charles branch, set for August 31 opening
* But 'puts on hold' debit card and other
new initiatives due to impact from recession


a pretty good track", with half-
year net profits before prefer-
ence share dividends standing
at $20.682 million, T. B. Don-
aldson said it had nevertheless
placed product initiatives such
as a new debit card "on hold"
until the recession abated.
The former Central Bank
governor said that based on
half-year net income, Com-
monwealth Bank should again
"be looking at some $40 mil-
lion-plus in net income" for the


full 12 months to December 31,
2009, provided the Bahamian
economy and its financial sys-
tem suffered no major shocks.
The third quarter, featuring
the traditionally slowest part of
the tourism year, would largely
determine how the full year
panned out, Mr Donaldson
said, as any further hotel indus-
try redundancies would likely
fall in this period.

SEE page 6B


$3.96



50so $3.90

T $4.10
T g

0t. - 11 u . , r,' t, " i '.1 . , , 6n Ir, T f, ,,- ,I - r t. -


pg * I


Where do you want to be? >


We can get you there!


S[ Learn more at royalflelity.com]








S . 4 5*
* A * * *n at *






PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 4, 2009 THE TRIBUNE


Law Firm is seeking skilled professional litigation legal
secretary. The following are needed:
* Proficiency in Microsoft Word
* Experience in drafting legal letters with little supervision
* Experience in drafting legal documents with
little supervision
* Ability to confidently speak with clients
* Ability to take instructions and carry same out with
S little supervision
* Excellent organizational skills
* Excellent memory
* Ability to multi-task
* Works beyond the standard 9 to 5 when necessary
* Energetic
* Self-motivated
* Pleasant personality
* Despises mediocrity

c/o The Tribune * P.O. Box N-3207* DIA #81242
Email: legalsecretary911@gmail.com






* Accounting records in bad shape?
* Need financial statements for the bank? (2-4 weeks)
* Need a business plan and financing proposal prepared?
* Need business licence prepared/certified? (1-2 weeks)
CALL US WE CAN HELP
* Business Start-Up Assistance/Consultations
* Business Success Packs....($5) off
* Construction & Contract Accounting
* Quickbooks Accounting - Problem Solving - Setup
* Business Survival Packs....($5) off
* Controllership Services - Per Diem - Low Rates
* Small Business Accounting Services/System/Journals
* Handbook - Analysing Financials....($25)
NEW BUSINESS START-UP KIT ..... ($5) off
A guide to starting and managing a small business
(Business Start-Ups Checklist...$10)
BUSINESS SEMINARS - REGISTRATION - $20
(Materials + Refreshments + Special Discounts)
* Reading & Understanding Financial Statements
* August 29 @ 10am

Business Start-Ups Special
Start-Up Advice + Business Planning
TEL: 325-7313 or 322-6000 * FAX: 323-3700


Small Business Consultants




NOTICE

In the Estate of CYRIL THEOPHILUS KNOWLES,
late of Queen's Cove in the City of Freeport, Grand
Bahama, one of the Islands in the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, deceased

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons
having claims or demands against the above Estate are
required to send the same duly certified in writing to
the undersigned on or before the 21st day of August
A.D. 2009, after which date the Executor will proceed
to distribute the assets of the Estate among the persons
entitled thereto, having regard only to those claims of
which the Executor shall then have had notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby given that all persons
indebted to the Estate are requested to make full
settlement of the same on or before the date aforesaid.

DUPUCH & TURNQUEST & CO.
Attorneys for the Executor
Chambers
Chancery House
The Mall
P.O. Box F-42578
Freeport, Grand Bahama


dIIkliMiJi] lJ'Aii i Li1 i'iM'Ji^


By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets
TRADING momentum
decreased last week in the
Bahamian market, with
investors trading in eight out
of the 24 listed securities, of
which one advanced, four
declined and three remained
unchanged.
EQUITY MARKET
A total of 66,940 shares
changed hands, representing a
decrease of 9,127 shares or 12
per cent, compared to last
week's trading volume of
76,067 shares.
Commonwea 1 th
Bank(CBL) was the sole
advancer and volume leader
this week with 20,223 shares
changing hands, its share price
up $0.07 to end the week at
$5.71.
FirstCaribbean Interna-
tional Bank Bahamas (CIB)
was the big decline, its stock
falling by $0.04 to end the
week at a new 52-week low
of $10.34 on a volume of
6,900 shares.
Focol Holdings (FCL) saw
18,064 shares trade, its stock
losing $0.03 to end the week
at $5.13.
ICD Utilities (ICD) traded
10,000 shares to end the week


unchanged at $5.49.
J. S. Johnson (JSJ) traded
5,778 shares, its share price
decreasing by $0.01 to end the
week at a new 52-week low
of $10.39.
Finance Corporation of the
Bahamas (FIN) also fell by
$0.01, trading 5,075 shares to
end the week at a new 52-
week low of $10.79.
BOND MARKET
No notes traded in the
Bahamian market last week.
COMPANY NEWS
Focol Holdings (FCL)
announced its Board of Direc-
tors has approved a $10 mil-
lion share buy back pro-
gramme that will last for 10
years.
Dividend Notes
Bahamas First Holdings has
declared a dividend of $0.20
per share, payable on July 31,
2009 to all ordinary share-
holders of record date July
27, 2009.
Premier Commercial Real
Estate Investment Corpora-
tion (PRE) has declared a
dividend of $0.40 per share,
payable on August 5, 2009, to
all ordinary shareholders of
record date July 31, 2009.


ENERGY SAVING

CONSULTANTS

Cut Your Ele II p B


Up To 40%

*Tankless Water Heaters
* Compact Fluorescent Bulbs
* Energy Saving Capacitors for
Motors, A/C Pumps etc.
* Fridgl-tech oil additive to increase A/C
efficiency

For more Inlomaticon m survey
Email: enwgjaingsoonsullants@hmrnail co,
Contact 326-6121


S - -" i,,, . -


British ClnlnT.iIil lli] i ]i t
']Marlbiuwh StL, Slp #1
Clearance SALE
Everything Must Go
Everything for $20
Free parking at the Hilton

We offer Siringing Services, Repairs, Knotting,
Winrng, Driling and The Snack Fix System and
The Mystery Clasps
Pearls and Bread Strands Wholesale and Retail
PO.Box EE-15B27
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: 242-323-1865
Email: gerns-peadrs@holmail.com
Jewerty making closes starts
September sign up now


The Bahamian Stock Market
FINDEX 787.45 (-5.68%) YTD


BISX
SYMBOL
AML
BBL
BOB
BPF
BSL
BWL
CAB
CBL
CHL
CIB
CWCB
DHS
FAM
FBB
FCC
FCL
FCLB
FIN
ICD
JSJ
PRE


CLOSING
PRICE
$1.39
$0.63
$6.94
$11.00
$7.92
$3.15
$11.39
$5.71
$2.74
$10.34
$3.52
$1.82
$6.60
$2.37
$0.30
$5.13
$1.00
$10.79
$5.49
$10.39
$10.00


Consolidated
(CWCO) has declared
dend of $0.013 per
payable on August 1(
to all ordinary share]
of record date July 1,

Focol Holdings (FC
declared a dividend o
per share, payable on
11, 2009, to all ordinary)
holders of record da
31, 2009.


CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
CHANGE
$- 0 -18.71%
$- 0 -4.55%
$- 0 -9.16%
$- 0 -6.78%
$- 0 -22.28%
$- 0 0.00%
$- 800 -18.82%
$0.07 20,223 -18.43%
$- 0 -3.18%
$-0.04 6,900 -1.05%
$-0.01 0 56.44%
$- 100 -28.63%
$- 0 -15.38%
$- 0 0.00%
$- 0 0.00%
$-0.03 18,064 -0.77%
$- 0 0.00%
$-0.01 5,075 -9.10%
$- 10,000 -10.44%
$-0.01 5,778 -6.40%
$- 0 0.00%

Water Annual General Meeting
I a divi- (AGM) Notes:
share, Bahamas First Holdings
0, 2009, announced its Annual Gen-
holders eral Meeting will be held on
2009. Thursday, August 13, 2009, at
5pm at The British Colonial
L) has Hilton Hotel, No. 1 Bay
)f $0.03 Street, Nassau, Bahamas.
August Shareholders of record as of
y share- July 9, 2009, will be qualified
te July to vote at the Annual Meet-
ing.


i-a-


International Markets

FOREX Rates
Weekly % Change
CAD$ 0.9279 +0.63
GBP 1.6720 +1.67
EUR 1.4261 +0.31

Commodities
Weekly % Change
Crude Oil $69.20 +1.67
Gold $956.50 +0.22

International Stock Market Indexes:
Weekly % Change
DJIA 9,171.61 +0.86
S & P 500 987.48 +0.84
NASDAQ 1,978.50 +0.64
Nikkei 10,356.83 +4.15


k


PAG E 2 B, TU ES DAY, AU G U ST 4, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


Fl- A
i ne'. I

Estat.
Tir WbUtdIF1144 RHIF-�Apiflffbl fitffild[P� 1. PtINS





THE TRIBUNE


TUESDAY, AUGUST 4, 2009, PAGE 3B


$56.5m engineering costs for two projects


By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net
ENGINEERING costs for
the Nassau Harbour improve-
ment project and the Arawak
Cay extension have been
pegged at a collective $56.5 mil-
lion, a preliminary report on
the initiatives said, while the
arrival of RoyalCaribbean's
Genesis Class Cruise ships at
the end of 2009 will not be
delayed even if the dredging of
Nassau Harbour is not com-
pleted in time.
The preliminary engineering
report for the Nassau Harbour
Improvement Project, by engi-
neering consortium Cox &
Shal, pegged engineering costs
estimates at $35 million for
Nassau Harbour, and $21.5 mil-
lion for Arawak Cay.
Meanwhile, a Ministry of
Works engineer said contin-
gency plans for delays in the
Nassau Harbour dredging were
embedded in the Environmen-
tal Impact Assessment (EIA),
and in the recently submitted


Environmental Management
Plan (EMP).
Robert Garaway, a civil engi-
neer for the Ministry, suggested
RoyalCaribbean's Oasis of the
Seas will be able to sail into the
harbour with a minimum
amount of dredging done,
should the project have to stop
for any reason.
He said all the protocols
were in place for dredging com-
pany Boskalis to begin. How-
ever, he cold not give a specific
date for the start.
It was thought that material
could not be removed from the
sea floor until the EMP had
received the Government's
stamp of approval.
But director of the Bahamas
Environment, Science and
Technology (BEST) Commis-
sion, Philip Weech, told Tri-
bune Business that dredging
will be able to begin once the
EMP, developed by Boskalis
and Cox and SHAL consul-
tants, had been reviewed by the
Ministry of Works and
approved.
However, Mr Garaway said


the start of the dredging is not
being delayed because the
almost 1,000 page document is
being reviewed.
He said strict final approval
has not been given to the EMP,
because the document will
change throughout the course
of the project.
Boskalis has begun staging
the pipelines that will move the
dredged material to a holding
pond on Arawak Cay.
According to Mr Weech,
they have also put in place
monitoring equipment neces-
sary to track some aspects of
the environmental impact.
The EMP will constantly
manage the environmental
effects of the dredging process,
and could include mitigation
measures not mentioned in the
original EIA.
As dredging commences,
Boskalis will have to ensure
that an acceptable amount of
turbidity is maintained in the
harbour.
Turbidity control measures
have already been put in place
for other aspects of the two-


sided project, which also
includes the extension of
Arawak Cay.
One focus of the EIA was
the level of mercury found in
substrates of the harbour floor,
which were excessive in one
area.


Mr Weech said it was not
uncommon for the sea floor,
but could be amplified in Nas-
sau Harbour because of rain
water run -ff mixed with pollu-
tion on the streets of Down-
town Nassau.
He said vehicle emissions


and dust, as well as garbage, all
get washed into the harbour
after a rain shower and settle
to the bottom, where their
chemical construct changes.
"It's not indicative of a wide-
spread problem," he said.


LYFORD CAY, E.P. TAYLOR DR.



FOR SALE
Great investment opportunity in a safe environment.
Best price ever on E. P. Taylor Drive!
Exclusively offered by Mario Carey Realty at US-$1 5 million
SH\ eb Listing H 83"


F .:. ' 1 IHII.

Tel.242-o77-8251 Cell. 3557-7013
info@mariocareyrealty.com
www. mariocareyrealty.com


c

S&6s


Bank: Foreclosures are


not at alarming levels


By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net
SCOTIABANK'S mortgage
defaults reflect the state of the
Bahamian economy, its man-
aging director told Tribune
Business, as the bank contin-
ues to find ways to assist cus-
tomers who may have trouble
meeting their debt obligations.
Barry Malcolm said the num-
ber of foreclosures that Scotia-
bank (Bahamas) has undertak-
en over the past year has
"tracked the downturn", but
has not hit alarming numbers.
"It reflects the economic
condition," he said.
While there are a number of
distressed properties in the
bank's portfolio, Mr Malcolm
said the bank was continuing


to issue new loans, while plac-
ing those that had been fore-
closed on, on to the market in
order to recover debt.
"We're still in business," he
said.
Mr Malcolm said the bank
tries to reserve the original sale
price in order recover the loan
made to the debtor, and max-
imise any amount of difference.
Mr Malcolm did not say out-
right that the present market
is a difficult one for the sale of
distressed properties, but he
added that the ease with which
the bank can sell a foreclosed
property is based on its loca-
tion, design and ambiance, and
varies from island to island.
He added that the bank's
focus, instead of the sale of
such properties, was to assist
its customers who are experi-


encing challenges in keeping
up with mortgage payments.
"Our approach is to work
with customers and try to find
ways to support their efforts,"
said Mr Malcolm.
Scotiabank has said recently
that foreclosures are not in the
bank's best interest.
"It makes far more sense to
work with you to help you keep
your house than to go through
foreclosure procedures, take
your house, advertise it and sell
it to someone else - that is
stress for us, too," Mr Malcolm
said.
"If we can find the common
ground to work together, it
makes much more sense for the
bank to work with the cus-
tomers to help address how you
work through and work out
your situation."


� THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
SVisit websie at www.cob.d.&bs


STAFF VACANCY


Suitably qualified persons are invited to apply for the following posi-
Lion: ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Il

The Administrative A-sistant I will provide direct assistance to the
Dean, Faculty of Iiberal & Fine Arts, including the necessary adminis-
trative support for the overall IItanagemient of tihe notice. The lieuccess-
fiul candidate will hc someone iih strong interpersonal, communica-
lion (hotLh oral and writen)a nd organi/zatlln skills w ho enjoys Lhe chal-
Icnge of engaging individuals on a one-on-one level,

Applicants should posses a Bachelor's degree or the equivalent with no
work experience and Associate Degree in relevant area with [enr (10)
years work experience at the AS-I level, For a detailed job description,
visit www.cob.edu.bs/hrapply. Interested candidates should submit a
detailed resume and cover letter of interest no later than Friday, August
7th, 2{X)9.





$Bank of The Bahamas
INTERNATIONAL

GOVERNMENT GUARANTEED ADVANCED
EDUCATIONAL LOAN SCHEME


In collaboration with The Education Guaranteed Fund Loan Program of
the Ministry of Education, Bank of The Bahamas International is pleased
to advise that the cheque disbursement for ALL students in the Loan
Program will take place at Holy Trinity Activity Centre, Stapledon
Gardens, beginning Tuesday, August 4th to Monday, August 17th,
200O from 9g00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. as follows:

WEEK ONE


A-B
C-D
E-G
H-J
K-MI


Tuesday, August 4, 2009
Wednesday, August 5,2009
Thursday, August 6, 2009
Friday, August 7, 2009
Monday, August 10, 2009


WEEK TWO


LbO.O
P-R
s
T-V
w-z


Tuesday, August 11, 2009
Wednesday, August 12, 2009
Thursday, August 13, 2009
Friday, August 14, 2000
Monday, August 17, 2009


TIME g9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
PLACE: Holy Trinity Activity Centre
Stapledon Gardens


* Retuming Students AND Guarantors should be present and must
bring relevant Identificatlon, (v1ad Passport and National Insurance
Card).

* New Students AND Guarantors should be present and bring
relevant identification, (Gvad Passport, Marriage Certificate where
applicable, National Insurance Card, current job letter and copy of
a utility bill).

* Cheques whi not be r leased until compleon of al required


PLEASE NOTE: DISBURSEMENTS MADE AT THE
BANK WILL INCUR A PENALTY FEE!


Have a DOCTOR'S
or BUSINESS
appointment in Nassau?
STAY WITH US;


4'l $200

HOME AWAY FROM HOME
cm328-2325
*fnWa: atT wuk Jl~V~m"tfu =br


THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
Visit our website at ww.weed a~bs

CENTRE FOR CONTILtI Ni EDUCATION AN DE XTEN~IAON SE R% CE.'s

P'E RSONAL DEVE ILOPI NE Yr - FALL SEM1ESTER 04Imilog
'MI1R'.F 'WC$ C M Wi�' F DiqfRIP1TIN Tivy D%1" ',TART' Dt'R rFI







.1 L11 1 lI~. I~iINI 1 :Iiii :. i'rii II kI%1 -P jr-l� Nip , IN
ACI1.11 1 % 1I'di,; i I'.: 4\'.II W, ~.IIU 01T.11. 1.1- 'A:-I 'I Ill ,IrI

%L L A1112 .I..'. I IA1 11 I-I' MI *'Ir 2.1- 4C'.1-111 S�1c ''i


-I I 4 - w



I\Trqm i I I TI'I T~Ik-f l I ~L .. ,,k411,, , 1 . 1-1 - L. V"IIrIW



:,I 'L P i4 JI VI % I rm ,rii Iq , I*- -~* ~ :'
I II'IANI t i, Ii k %1,1,1 Tlil,,,u I ~ -s., ii I
C EI I . lkrh II ,II P.A ll %IIINh.-r
liE ' qlE 1%h~fh % . 1H li 16- 'l.IL k IIC L P

I %A'rI llIikil Il % .1!1 , 1
cU I w M r I ' Ilk l IIW 11 * Ii, o %:*ep 1I1, 1 f WI4 00 fThi rL I p


111111111111111




PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 4, 2009


THE TRIBUNE


Albany's opening to create 500 jobs


FROM page 1B
majority of the marina is com-
month it will be nine. The plete. The basin is done, and


there's a little bit to be done to
the channel - a couple of weeks'
work. Now the slips and walk-
ways and stuff like that can be
put in."
Some 30 hotel cottages were
now under vertical construc-
tion, the Albany managing
partner added, with drywall and
windows being installed, and
roofs set to go on.
"In every aspect of the devel-
opment that we're delivering,
it's going vertical," Mr Anand
added. And a further 20 homes,
likely to have an average value
of $3 million, were going
through the design process as
purchasers of Albany's custom
lots moved to construct their
own homes.
Pointing out that this repre-
sented at least $60 million
worth of work for the Bahami-
an construction industry when
building work on these prop-
erties likely started next sum-
mer, Mr Anand said: "We've
always said the benefits of
Albany are longer term. It's a
marathon, not a sprint. Here,


the benefits to the construction
industry will be longer term."
The construction work com-
ing from Albany's real estate
buyers was likely to provide
steady construction work for
some 10 years, he explained,
the "spurts" coming when the
project's developers were
engaged in work.
Despite the depressed global
economy, Mr Anand told Tri-
bune Business: "We've had an
encouraging few months from a
sales perspective, and had
about eight sales in the last few
months, which is pretty awe-
some."
The Albany managing part-
ner added that provided 2009
finished smoothly, the devel-
opers would look to roll into
Phase II - sale and construction
of the Marina Residences - in
early 2010. If sales went as
planned, construction work was
likely to start in early summer
2010 - around the time when
Phase I was set to have its soft
opening. The first part of Phase
II, Mr Anand said, was likely


to involve an investment worth
between $125 million and $150
million. He explained that the
developers might "release" the
Residences in phases of 25 to 30
properties at a time, selling
some as construction was ongo-
ing to enable them to move into
the next phase.
When asked how Albany
had been able to keep going
when most other Bahamas-
based and Caribbean develop-
ment projects of a similar
nature had ground to a halt, Mr
Anand replied: "It's really the
strength of the initial buyers
and, most importantly, our
shareholders. They're serious
people and they're committed
to this.
"That's been hugely impor-
tant. We've got a group of part-
ners that, when the going gets
tough, the tough get going."
Pointing to the numerous
stalled investment projects, Mr
Anand added: "We continue to
benefit from the uncertainty
and unsettling developments
around the Caribbean. Just


about every other project in the
Caribbean has been shelved,
and that's allowing us to stand
out, it seems, as the only ones
left standing.
"It's a testament to the way
we've gone about financing and
building Albany, and getting
the right people involved. The
Bahamas is still a great place
to be, and New Providence is
the right place to be in the
Bahamas. All these factors
have allowed us to buck the
trend."
Mr Anand added, though,
that the Government's decision
to remove the $35,000 real
property tax cap had impacted
real estate sales at Albany, as
with other developments, as it
increased costs and uncertainty
for potential buyers.
He explained that any
increases in costs associated
with buying and holding
Bahamas-based property
inevitably made sales harder,
and it was an issue Albany's
developers had discussed both
internally and externally.


Government assesses water franchise plan


FINANCIAL MANAGER

We seek to employ a tlented, innovative, leader with a passion
to succeed and the capacity to Inlrlae process.

Job Requlreasts d xptwfmc
* Bachelor's Degree in Accourning or an equivalent from a
recognized terry lev Institution,
* Minimum of 5 years practical experirice in a swllar roe,.
* Expuerbieor in Management ReporTng in a conwnmrial
enterprise. with Oracle database management syrcom.
* Demonstixratd ability wo manag rnmotivaw and devemlop a
tarn and .eff crsIly work with staff,
* Exmntivc experiemsi using autmanted accounting sysatmns
such as Quickbooks and Ptschtrqi.
* Demonstrated ability in imanaging projects.
* Well adjusted to working for arpniz tians with 21/7
operations.

PractJcoaSpecladist Sklls include
* Technical and practical skills in financial ac-oo ting.
* Skls in f~recastirn, budgeting and analyses of variances.
* Strvng customer focus (intenral and external).
* Srong communication and interperional skill to effectively
translate ideal
* Stron reasoning ard Interpretation skdls.
* Demonstrated abllity to resear& Innovatilve solutions.
* Strong computer and Microsoft Office skAs.
* The overs c of (A) payroll processing and reporting, {B)
customer billing and (C) account recuon6odacoi,
* Managing yar ernd audr

APPLY VIA E-MAIL BEFORE August 14, 2009 TO;
execvTrefifbds gmaIl corn


I I


MEDICAL


QUALIFICATIONS:


* Baccalaureate degree in Medical Technology
* 2 years experience
* ASCP, NCA or AMT Certification
* Excellent written and oral communication
skills

POSITION SUMMARY:

The successful candidate will be required to:

* Cross-train through all areas of the lab -
Chemistry, Hematology, Blood Bank and
Microbiology;
* Perform phlebotomy and specimen
processing and any other duties assigned.


Pessumtrsm viemaiI wtis - - *.. sho555o
or ... hn -deie o Docto s H . . , umn esoures eparmen
ONL QUAIFIED APIANT WLBCNACTED
DotosH. .a IRO o. N3080Nssu:,haa


FROM page 1B

approval process is much more
complicated in New Providence
because of the interrelated par-
ties in the project area. "The
water system and sewerage sys-
tem are all interconnected
underground," he said.
In a previous interview with
Tribune Business, New Provi-
dence Development Compa-
ny's president and chief execu-
tive, T. Rhys Duggan, had
warned that the water supply
franchise agreement was key to
its development plans for west-
ern New Providence, including
the proposed $30 million new
Town Centre. Without it, the
company is unlikely to proceed.
New Providence Develop-


ment Company is looking to tie
down a long term, formal
arrangement for their supply of
water to developments such as
Old Fort Bay, Lyford Cay and
Albany, which is thought to
have run into opposition from
some who will argue that it
would deprive Water and Sew-
erage of a customer base and
revenue stream.
"That's probably the most
important component of this
whole deal," Mr Duggan told
Tribune Business. "Growth
can't happen out west without
that being resolved, and I don't
have that yet. We need to have
that resolved to move forward.
"We supply everyone west
of the airport, and are looking
at upgrading technology and


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



MORTLAKE OVERSEAS CORP

Co number: 84740B

("The Company")

The company, whose principle place of busi-
ness is Burleigh Manor, Peel Road, Douglas,
Isle of Man IM1 5EP British Isles, hereby an-
nounces its intention to discontinue the Com-
pany in the Bahamas and continue the com-
pany in the Isle of Man in accordance with Part
1 of the Companies (Transfer of Domicile) Act
1998. The Company s name on continuance
shall be Mortlake Overseas Corp Limited



By order of the board:
J E McKenna (Director)




NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF Bethany Jones Major late of Wilson Street
n the Eastern District of the Island of New Providence one of the
Islands of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any claim or
demand against the above Estate are required to send the same
duly certified in writing to the Undersigned on or before the 10th
day of August, A.D., 2009, after which date the Executors will
proceed to distribute the assets having regard only to the claims of
which they shall then have had notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby given that all persons indebted to the
said Estate of Bethany Jones Major are requested to make full
settlement on or before the date hereinbefore mentioned.

LEANDRA A. ESFAKIS
Attorney for the Executors
Chambers
P.O. Box SS-19269
No. 16 Market Street
Nassau, New Providence
The Bahamas


providing world class potable
water. Water and waste water
disposal, along with electricity,
are the three most important
components, and without those
in place development is impos-
sible."
New Providence Develop-
ment Company is the largest
private land owner on New
Providence with more than
2,300 acres. It has developed
Old Fort Bay and the Old Fort


Club, and owns the New Prov-
idence Water Development
Company.
It is also an affiliate of the
Tavistock Group, the Albany
developer. Both it and Tavis-
tock Group are owned by Joe
Lewis, the Lyford Cay-based
Billionaire. Mr Lewis's Busi-
ness partner, Terry White, is an
investor in both Albany and
New providence Development
Company.


THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
.a ya tw v at wwW.ykda&h,


IMPORTANT DATES

Fall Semester 2009

New Student Orientation


Parents' Evening
Tuesday 18tlh AuusL, 2(X09
6:3p.m. - 8:0 p.Imn.

Orientation
Wednesday, 19th August. 2009
8:00 a.m.,- I:00 p.m.

Advisement & Registration
Wed lwsdtay, 19th August, 2009
1:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.

Advisement, Registralion & Bill Payment
Thursday. 20th August. 2009 anid
Friday, 21st August, 200)
9:-,00 a.m. - 7.()() p.m.

Venue:
Front of Portia Smith Student Services
Centre,
Poinciallu Drive







Colin a Imperial

Career Opportunity
Sales Agents (Exuma Branch)


We are looking for customer-focused, team-oriented
individuals with a passion for service excellence to
service the sales needs of our Exuma Branch.

Qualifications
* Self-motivated and assertive individuals with
excellent people skills
* Basic computer literacy
* Sales knowledge and skills or the ability to learn and
adapt in a sales-driven environment

Opportunities
* Competitive commission structure
* Training, development and growth
* Advancement to management
* Long and mutually beneficial career
* Expansion in a new territory

Compensation is commensurate with experience and
qualifications.

To apply:
Send r6sum6 by 7 August 2009 via email to
careers(acolinaimperial.com. Subject: Exuma

or

Send r6sum6 to:
Human Resources Manager
308 East Bay Street
P.O. Box N-4728
Nassau, Bahamas









Why a growing economy may still feel like a recession


By FLOYD NORRIS
c.2009 New York Times
News Service
A YEAR ago, the Ameri-
can economy was in recession.
Now it may be about to
emerge from that downturn.
But if the economy is about
to begin growing again, it will
be from a very low level. The
recession has produced
declines far greater than in
previous downturns over the
past half-century. As a result,


the economy may seem to be
depressed even after growth
resumes.
One area where that can be
seen is shipments of durable
goods produced by American
companies. The rate of such
shipments fell by more than
20 per cent during this reces-
sion, and would have declined
further were it not for
increased production of
weapons.
In no previous downturn
since 1958, when the figures


began being recorded, had the
decline been as much as 14
per cent.
The drop is all the more
remarkable because such
shipments rose at a relatively
restrained rate in the preced-
ing period of economic
growth, particularly when mil-
itary sales were excluded.
The accompanying charts
show the trend in durable
goods spending, for military
purposes and for other ship-
ments of durable goods, from
2000 through this June. In
June, seasonally adjusted
shipments for civilian pur-
poses were 19 per cent below
the average monthly figure
for 2000. Shipments of mili-
tary items were running 123
per cent above the 2000 aver-
age.
Those figures are in nomi-
nal dollars, not adjusted for
inflation. That fact may exag-
gerate the trend, since prices
of some durable goods, like
computers, have fallen over
the years.
The United States remains
primarily a civilian economy.
The military now takes about
eight per cent of all durable
goods, up from three per cent
in 2000.
The charts also show just
how much change there was
in durable goods orders, and
shipments, in the first half of
2009 compared with the first
half of 2008.
Overall, shipments for non-
military purposes were down
by 20 per cent, while orders
fell by 27 per cent. The
declines in some areas were
much larger, with orders for
primary metal products, like
iron and steel, plunging by 44
per cent. The government
cannot track orders for semi-








iiionay


BTVI Technical Night (a) The Hilton
Programmes to feature:
S arErirgy Technology. Cisco Cmtified Network Astocaa, Coaulr Repair Tehnician,
ectronic Engieering Insers & Repairs, Electron & Cable Installation, Costnuction
Technology, information Tedinology Support Spealist, InfImulkm Technology Management,
Inlomatin Tedrnology Managament Server +, Informairi Tedmology Managemnlni Sicurily
+, Assoale OfApp#ed Sc wcs in Oi Adinnlra~n and Business Office Thnoogy

This is your opportunity to:

� Meet and speak with faculty and counselors

n Learn about our New Programmes

� Explore what BTVI has to offer you

Don't miss this opportunity to see what The Bahamas Technical &
Vocational Institute is all about.


RSVP TODAY!
Call 502-6300 or emall intnootil@gmail com to 'esfrvw your place
' s' Us al www b�vi or, bs


conductors because Intel will
not provide figures, but ship-
ments in that category were
down by a third.
Shipments of commercial
aircraft and parts fell by just
seven per cent, largely
because there are long lead
times for such orders, and that
helped to keep the shipment
decline lower than it would
otherwise have been. But


orders fell 65 per cent.
Those declines are not from
boom periods. By early 2008,
the recession was on, and
durable goods shipments were
already coming down. They
had peaked the previous sum-
mer, and the National Bureau
of Economic Research later
determined the recession
began in December 2007.
In reporting the June fig-


ures this week, the Census
Bureau said durable goods
orders for some categories
were up from the previous
month, although shipments
were still declining.
That provided more evi-
dence that the recession might
be nearing an end. But a
return to high levels of orders,
or shipments, may be many
months away.


REQUEST FOR


NAD
j L. :,,ju A (u ,'p,(:i


PREQULIAFICA17ON

LPLA Exponswn PRoeSt Sage I


USDepamesTerminirr

Ledcr s seekanS contrac'tors to asi~ in ccor~4eion of Stage I of the LPIA Expansin
Pnivjet (&5 Departures Th'-mir.,il) A I contrwcors, p~rticvisd� Bahamian cctrcw-r. are
encouraged to oarbcipate in this r~nrt.r icani QuonI prcleft. Scopes to be tendered to
con-plete the lit utA of the new terminal include:
# Mmiwy #*Dma &&Ned~m .Mmd*f
.0 Mb~rk -Phtwiv Qcud * Derukod
4 Sfe te #I)rriTf


RFq..ircIatIoon will irclude, based on the tender~ packages, the following criteria:







4O X OAWAPr .~ M K&A W M. I47R7W Jr (y Ma d XW
-*-~ i~A*MW~ ~ dd fi# IM W sP )24J/ #/ w eu ,v M


Kingsway Academy High
School Teaching positions
For September, 2009

Kingsway Academy High School Invites
qualified applicants for the following leaching
positions tor September, 2009.

* Chemistry
* Music
* Spanish
* French

The successful candidates MUST be
qualified, born again Christian with a valid
Teacher's Certificate and minimum if a
Bachelor's Degree. He or She must also
be willing to participate in Extra Curricurar
activities, etc.

Applicalion forms can be collected from
Human Resources section at the Business
Office on Bernard Road. Telephone 242-
324-6269 / 324-6887.

DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS IS
FRIDAY, AUGUST 7, 2009.


PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
ADVERTISEMENT

VACANCY

TWO (2) VACANCIES FOR
EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN (EMT) BASIC

Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the post
Emergency Medical Technician - Basic, Corporate Office, Public Hospitals
Authority.

Applicants must possess the following qualifications:-

A minimum of two (2) subjects at the B.G.C.S.E level at grade "C" or above,
or equivalent (including Math, English, Science); Good oral, writing and
reading skills; Certification as an Emergency Medical Technician, Basic with
three years relevant experience; Must be able to communicate and interact
with members of the public and other public safety and health professionals
during times of extreme stress, while maintaining composure.

LICENSES CERTIFICATIONS

Obtains certification equivalent to US National Registry EMT-Basic.

2.Maintains certification in Basic Life Support (BLS); Pre-hospital Trauma
Life Support (PHTLS); American Heart Association (AHA) and Cardio
Pulmonary Recitation (CPR) for the Professional Rescuer.

Registered and licensed with the Health Professions Council (Bahamas).


JOB SUMMARY

Responsible for providing timely pre hospital care to patients who require
emergency medical assistance; Secure scene and maintains safety.

DUTIES:

* Responds immediately to emergency calls.

* Secures the scene of an emergency situation and maintains safety

* Performs basic life support and other medical assistance until the
patient arrives at the hospital.

* Completes required reports related to patient care and provides
electronic, verbal and written report to medical staff.

* Communicates with hospitals and dispatch center using various radio /
telephone equipment.

* Ensures that all emergency equipment are in the ambulance at all
times.

* Prepares and submits an inventory of supplies at the end of each shift.

Letters of Application, resume, documentary evidence of qualifications
and three (3) references should be submitted, no later than Friday, 21st
August 2009, to the Human Resources Director, Public Hospitals Authority,
P.O. Box N-8200 or Corporate Office Building 'B', 3rd & West Terraces,
Centreville.


THE TRIBUNE


TU ES DAY, AU G U ST 4, 2009, PAG E 5 B




PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 4, 2009 THE TRIBUNE


NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF
NORMAN STAFFORD SOLOMON

NOTICE is hereby given that alt persons
having claims or demands against the above-named
Estate are requested to send the same duly certified to
the undersigned on or before 9"* August 2009.

AND NTO1CE is hereby also given that at the
expiration of the time mentioned above, the assetA of
the late NORMAN STAFFORD SOLOMON will be
distributed among the persons entitled thereto having
regard only to the claims of which the Authorized
Officer of the Estate shall then have had Notice.


G LRAHAM. THOMPSON & CO
*\tiuhr'n. for the Executtonr
Ch.inmli'r,
Sasawm Housle
Mlrl.,s *St\ns & Vilddia Aveft
P.O. BnsxN-272
NaTout. tHil , 5. iii.




* ijji[7h ^^1I yitA


FROM page 1B
"If we get through Septem-
ber, and the hotels do not feel
it's disastrous", both Common-
wealth Bank and the Bahamian
economy would be able to
"muddle through" to the end
of 2009 without any further
major damage, Mr Donaldson
explained.
But the lingering uncertainty
over whether there would be
more major lay-offs in the
resort sector, an event that
would lead to more loan
defaults, was why Common-
wealth Bank had adopted its
aggressive loan loss provision-
ing stance.
However, explaining the
impact the recession has had
on Commonwealth Bank's
plans, Mr Donaldson told Tri-
bune Business: "A lot of the
new initiatives we were going to
introduce are IT-related pro-
jects.
"They are expensive projects.
We had got a debit card and a
whole stream of things, but now
is not the time to spend on that
because we're not sure what
the revenue earnings potential
might be. Quite frankly, we've


JIl|apples male age 3


AT
M


LANTIC
MEDICAL


ATLANTIC MEDICAL USURANCE CO, LTD,
Adllntl Hoq*, 2rd Ti rkaA &A CulA - AvI..Au, P O. O SL&-S9 I1 N sau
Tel. 356-5433 www.cgroup.bm
A merner of Czoonial Croup Intbernvonal Insurance, Health. Prtnins, Life


put a lot of things on hold."
Still, Mr Donaldson said
Commonwealth Bank's new
Prince Charles Drive branch
was set to open later this month
on Monday, August 31, herald-
ing the start of its Saturday
banking initiative.
"We're going to experiment
with that and do a Saturday
opening from 9am to 1pm," Mr
Donaldson told Tribune Busi-
ness of the Prince Charles Dri-
ve branch. "Is there a need and
appeal for people to bank on a
Saturday morning?
"We intend that that branch
should open on Saturdays.
We've done a costing on it, and
if after three to four months it's
a disaster, it's not going to
wreck our profits at all."
The move follows Scotiabank
(Bahamas) foray into Saturday
morning retail banking via its
newly-opened Caves Village
facility, with Saturday banking
being an established practice in
major industrialized countries.
Mr Donaldson said Com-
monwealth Bank would staff
the Prince Charles Branch with
workers transferred from other
parts of its business, and it was


also one of the few businesses
seeking to recruit by hiring
tellers with experience in the
sector.
While Commonwealth
Bank's net income before pref-
erence share dividends for the
six months to June, 30, 2009,
was down by 15.6 per cent upon
last year's comparative of
$24.509, million, this was large-
ly due to the fact it had more
than doubled loan loss provi-
sions year-over-year.
These increased by 125.5 per
cent to $14.103 million, com-
pared to $6.255 million, and if
the almost-$8 million contin-
gency had not been taken Com-
monwealth Bank's net income
would have exceeded 2008
comparatives by some way.
Acknowledging that he had
been criticised for the bank's
aggressive loan loss provision-
ing, which at June 30, 2009,
stood at 159 per cent (more
than two times) in excess of
Commonwealth Bank's non-
performing loans, Mr Donald-
son said: "I think that's the
Central Banker in me.
"I believe in being prudent
if things don't work out as we


Weaidy'� tn i eD Al bwplrI Saking oH '








Deedmin s Friday. August 71h, 20HO


think they might." He added
that the bank could always
write back the provisions it had
made at year-end if they did
not have to take them.
"I think the bank is posi-
tioned very well," Mr Donald-
son said. "The whole system
has liquidity. The big problem is
that there's a whole heap of
money and not that many qual-
ified borrowers.
"The whole position is being
exacerbated by the Govern-
ment borrowing in US dollars
and converting to Bahamian
dollars, loan payments from
borrowers in Bahamian dollars
coming into the system, and
weak demand for loans. We
saw this from the beginning of
the year. The loan demand is
out there, but they are not peo-
ple we want to lend to."
Weak credit demand is show-
ing itself in Commonwealth
Bank's loan book, which is flat
and has actually declined year-
over-year from $1.049 billion
to $1.043 billion.
Yet Commonwealth Bank's
total non-performing loans, as a
percentage of the total loan
portfolio, stood at just 1.95 per
cent as at June 30, 2009, com-
pared to 1.78 per cent at the
end of the 2009 first quarter.
This compared to an industry
average of 7.77 per cent as at
May 31, 2009.
Mr Donaldson said the
bank's relative success in this
area had resulted from its focus
on consumer loans, typically
between $12,000-$14,000, which
meant the impact from a sin-
gle default was minimal - as
opposed to a large commercial
loan going bad.
"I'm quite pleased with the
half-year personally," Mr Don-
aldson added. "Where other
companies are losing money,
we're far from losing money."
He added that by centralising
the expenses approval process,
the bank had trimmed its gen-
eral and administrative expens-
es.
Commonwealth Bank's
return on shareholder equity
and return on assets, at 27 per
cent and 2.6 per cent respec-
tively, were slightly down on
2009 first quarter figures of 28
per cent and 2.7 per cent.


THE BAHAMAS PUBLIC

SERVICES UNION


URGENT

NOTICE


The Bahamas Public


Services


Union (BPSU)


Contributory Medical Plan will cause to come into

effect new medical premium rates effective 1st, July

2009.



The new premium rates are due to the escalating

cost of healthcare services and treatment for all our

members.



All members of the Contributory Medical Plan are

urged to contact the Medical Plan Office at the

George Lafleur Building on Wulff Road immediately

with regards to the increase of medical premiums.



For more information please visit our website at:

http//www.bpsubahamas.com


Bank still eyeing


$40m-plus profit


YOU CONNECfrO Q THE WORLD








IIEN ER'MOORIS UR*'E 009-'210


The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. (BTC)Is
pleased to invite Tenders to provide the Company with
Motor Insurance coverage.


Interested companies/firms may collect a Tender Specifi.
cation from the Security's Desk located in the Administra.
tive building on John F. Kennedy Drive, between the hours
of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 pm. Monday through Friday.



The deadline for submission of tenders is on or before
Friday, August 21st, 2009. Tenders should be sealed and
marked "TENDER FOR MOTOR INSURANCE" and should be
delivered to the attention of the "Mr. 1 Kirk Griffin, Acting
President and CEO."


BTC reserves the right to reject any or all Tenders,


www.btcbahamas.com












AutoNation 2Q profit


falls


29%, revenue falls


By MICHAEL
FELBERBAUM
AP Business Writer


RICHMOND, Va. (AP) -
AutoNation Inc., the nation's
largest auto dealership chain,
said Friday that its second-
quarter profit fell 29 per cent
as consumers bought fewer
cars in a stressed economy,
but remained optimistic that
the industry is beginning to
stabilize.
AutoNation CEO Mike
Jackson said new vehicle sales
are likely to improve due to
the "cash for clunkers" pro-
gramme designed to encour-
age consumers to replace
aging and fuel-inefficient cars
with new ones.
Jackson said the company
will increase its inventories in
"a disciplined manner" to
meet the budding demand for
new vehicles in the second
half of the year. AutoNation
has been managing its orders
for new vehicles to keep
inventory in line with weak
demand and has made about
$200 million in structural cost
reductions.
AutoNation said it earned
$36.7 million, or 21 cents a
share, in the three months
ended June 30. That's down
from $51.8 million, or 29 cents
a share, a year ago.


After adjusting for special
items, the Fort Lauderdale,
Fla.-based company said it
would have earned 29 cents
a share from continuing oper-
ations. That is five cents
above the analyst forecast of
24 cents a share, according to
a survey by Thomson
Reuters. Those estimates typ-
ically exclude one-time items.
AutoNation, which owns
about 250 new-vehicle fran-
chises in 15 states, said it
experienced losses from dis-
continued operations primar-
ily from franchise and prop-
erty impairments. As of June
30, the company said it has
sold or closed 21 locations,
including seven Chrysler deal-
erships.
Revenue fell 28.7 per cent
to $2.61 billion from $3.66 bil-
lion in the same quarter a
year ago. Analysts expected
$2.8 billion in revenue.
"Clearly our productivity
and cost-saving drive enabled
us to deliver an absolutely sol-
id profitability in the second
quarter," Jackson said in an
interview with The Associat-
ed Press. "For this tough envi-
ronment, to be able to put up
that type of number is a very
satisfying result."
Shares of AutoNation fell
62 cents, or three per cent, to
$20.01 in morning trading.


NOTICE


ESTATE OF DOROTHY FORGI: EVANS

NOTICE s hereby given that all] persons having
claims or demands against the above-naned Estaite are
requested to send the same duly certified to the
undersigned on or before 91 August 2009.

AND N'OICE is hereby also given that at the
expiration of the ime mentioned above, the assets of
the late UDOROTHY FORGIE EVANS will be
distributed among the person entitled thereto having
regard only to the claims of which the Authorized
Officer of th Etate hall then have had KNnice.


G RAIl AM, THOMSON & CO.
Atiirivfa's for the Fru-ai rs
Chambers
ashon H ouse
hileyt StrM & Vtoria Aeue
P.O. BM N272
Namau, Bahamm..








P.O. Box N-4827 Nassau, Bahamas



DIVIDEND



NOTICE


TO ALL SHAREHOLDERS


The Board of Directors of
Bahamas Waste Limited has
declared a Dividend for Ordinary
Shares, to all shareholders of record
as at August 11th, 2009
of 5C per share.


The payment will be made on
August 21st, 2009 by Colina
Financial Advisors Ltd., the
Registrar & Transfer Agent,
in the usual Manner.

David B. Donald
Corporate Secretary


Over the previous 52 weeks,
the stock traded between
$3.97 and $21.33.
Sales of new vehicles at
AutoNation stores fell 38 per
cent during the quarter, but
the company said it fared bet-
ter than its peers. Industry-
wide, new vehicle sales fell
about 40 per cent, the com-
pany said, citing data com-
piled by CNW Research.
For the quarter, the com-
pany said domestic segment
income was $26 million com-
pared with $33 million in the
year-ago period, with a 34 per
cent decline in new vehicle
sales. Income from imported
vehicles declined to $42 mil-
lion from $57 million last year,
with an 41 per cent drop in
new vehicle sales. Premium
luxury income was $43 mil-
lion compared with $52 mil-
lion a year ago, with a 34 per
cent slip in new vehicle sales.
Jackson said government
efforts to aid the industry in
its recovery are helping. The
"Cash for Clunkers" pro-
gramme brought a 36 per cent
surge of traffic and the Trea-
sury Department's pro-
gramme to ease the credit
market will improve condi-
tions.


"You were in a downward
spiral and every quarter was
worse than the quarter before
and you didn't know where
the bottom was going to be,"
Jackson said. "Clearly we
found stabilization in the sec-
ond quarter. ... and now the
industry is positioned for a
gradual recovery."
But the "Cash for Clunk-
ers" programme may be run-
ning out of money after only a
matter of days as car shop-
pers flocked to dealerships to
take advantage of the rebates.
Democrats in the House
were exploring the possibility
of votes as early as Friday on
legislation pouring an addi-
tional $2 billion into the car
purchase programme. The
Senate was not scheduled to
vote on Friday but lawmak-
ers hoped to win approval for
more funding next week.
Reps. Sander Levin, D-
Mich., and Betty Sutton, D-
Ohio, said lawmakers from
the two states were assured
by Transportation Secretary
Ray LaHood that the pro-
gramme would continue while
the Obama administration
looked for more money.
At the White House, press
secretary Robert Gibbs


NOTICE is hereby given that JEFFERY ALEXANDER
PETITFRERE JOSEPH of SHRIMP ROAD OFF
CARMICHEAL ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 28th day of July, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O.
Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.








MORTON BAHAMAS LIMITED, a solar
salt operation, is seeking a Fulltime Quality
Control Supervisor required to lead and
develop its team of QC personnel in a small
yet busy environment at Inagua, The
Bahamas.

Basic Function: Incumbent is responsible
for day to day activities involving quality
control and environmental departments.
Manages to maintain and improve safe
efficient operations through training,
leadership, direction, communication and
administration of Company programs.


Visit mortonsalt.com, select careers, on our
careers page select search jobs and select
requisition 5499, to complete the process.


sought to assure consumers
that the programme is still
running and will be alive "this
weekend."
"If you were planning on
going to buy a car this week-
end, using this programme,


this programme continues to
run," Gibbs told reporters. He
would not commit to any
timeframe beyond that.
* AP Auto Writer Kimberly
Johnson in Detroit contributed
to this report


NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF Robert Douglas Erskine late of 303 East
Street on the Island of New Providence one of the Islands of The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any claim or
demand against the above Estate are required to send the same
duly certified in writing to the Undersigned on or before the 10th
day of August, A.D., 2009, after which date the Executors will
proceed to distribute the assets having regard only to the claims of
which they shall then have had notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby given that all persons indebted to the said
Estate of Robert Douglas Erskine are requested to make full
settlement on or before the date hereinbefore mentioned.

LEANDRAA. ESFAKIS
Attorney for the Executors
Chambers
P.O. Box SS-19269
No. 16 Market Street
Nassau, New Providence
The Bahamas





COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2009
IN THE SUPREME COURT COM/com/No. 000024
Commercial Division



IN THE MATTER of THE COMPANIES ACT, CH. 308
Laws of The Bahamas, 2000 Edition

AND

IN THE MATTER of R. B. INVESTMENTS LIMITED
(In Liquidation)



Pursuant to Rule 31 (3) of the Companies
(winding-up) Rules Mr. Dayrrl Butler
of Moore Stephens Butler & Taylor,
on Retirement Road, Nassau, New
Providence, The Bahamas has been
appointed as the Official Liquidator of the
above-named Company which has been
wound up by Order of the Supreme Court
dated 30th day of June, 2009.



Dated this 8th day of July, A.D., 2009.


SFF PG CAPITAL MARKETS

HISEffl Meanm at Wk Cop
C F A LC" :� I.-C r-" I A.A 1
FRiD.,Y5V 31 JULY 2LILI
EI ., 'LL E.H RE INl E.' C.L- E.E 1 - * - ? 4 - * .- ? . *- I V -1 " - 1:
F I UC E , *-L.-^E .,. -*' I V TD_ - ",1" I *,'r'- -1 " 1 "
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM I TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
1 81 1 28 Abaco Markets 1 39 1 39 000 0 127 0000 109 000%
11 80 1000 Bahamas Property Fund 11 00 11 00 000 0992 0200 11 1 1 82%
930 694 Bank of Bahamas 694 694 000 0244 0260 284 375%
089 063 Benchmark 063 063 000 -0877 0000 N/M 000%
349 315 Bahamas Waste 315 315 000 0078 0090 404 286%
2 37 2 14 Fidelity Bank 2 37 2 37 0 00 0 055 0 040 43 1 1 69%
1420 1018 Cable Bahamas 11 39 11 39 000 1 406 0250 81 2 19%
2 88 2 74 Colna Holdings 2 74 2 74 0 00 0 249 0 040 11 0 1 46%
7 50 5 50 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 5 62 5 71 0 09 10,750 0 419 0 360 136 6 30%
478 1 27 Consoldated Water BDRs 353 351 -002 0111 0052 316 1 48%
2 85 1 32 Doctor's Hospital 1 82 1 82 0 00 0 240 0 080 76 4 40%
8 20 660 Famguard 660 660 000 0420 0240 157 364%
12 50 10 00 Fnco 10 79 10 79 0 00 0322 0520 33 5 4 82%
11 71 10 34 FrstCanbbean Bank 1034 1034 000 0794 0350 130 338%
553 495 Focol (S) 513 513 000 0332 0150 155 292%
1 00 1 00 Focol Class B Preference 1 00 1 00 000 0000 0000 N/M 0 00%
0 45 0 30 Freeport Concrete 0 30 0 30 0 00 0 035 0 000 86 0 00%
902 550 ICLD Utilities 549 549 000 0407 0500 135 911%
1200 1039 J S Johnson 1039 1039 000 0952 0640 109 616%
1000 1000 Premier Real Estate 10 00 10 00 0 00 0 180 0 000 556 000%
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Security Symbol Last Sale Change DaIly Vol Interest Maturity
1000 00 1000 O0 Fdelity Bank Note 17 (Senres A) + FBB17 100 00 0 00 7% 19 October 2017
1000 00 1000 00 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 10000 00 Prime + 1 75% 19 October 2022
1000 00 100000 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100 0 0 00 7% 30 May 2013
1000 00 1000 00 Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100 O0 0 00 Prime + 1 75% 29 May 2015
52wk-H, 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield
14 60 14 25 Bahamas Supermarkets 7 92 8 42 14 60 -0 041 0 300 N/M 2 05%
oo8 00 600 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 4 00 625 600 0000 0480 N/M 780%
054 0 20 RND Holdings 0 35 0 40 0 35 0 001 0 000 256 6 000%
055 0 40 RND Holdings 0 45 0 55 0 55 0 002 0 000 261 90 000%
1 3860 1 3231 CFAL Bond Fund 1 3860 240 475 30-J-09
3 0351 28952 CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 28952 -1 52 -3 18 30-J-09
1 4791 1 4042 CFAL Money Market Fund 1 4791 317 533 17-Jl 09
3 6090 3 1031 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 3 1031 -8 35 -13 82 30-Jun-09
12 9801 12 3289 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 12 9801 2 87 5 79 31-May-09
101 6693 1000000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 101 6693 1 10 1 67 30- J-09
100 9600 93 1992 CFAL Global Equity Fund 96 7398 0 35 -4 18 30-Jun-09
1 0000 1 0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1 0000 00 0 00 31-Dec-07
9 4733 9 0775 Fdelty International Investment Fund 9 2765 2 00 -2 98 30-Jun-09
10622 1 0000 FG Financial Prferrd Income Fund 1 0622 2 56 6 22 30-Jun-09
1 0364 1 0000 FG Financial Growth Fund 1 0243 -0 84 2 43 30-J-09
1 0585 1 0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund 1 0585 204 5 85 30-J-09
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000 00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
52wk- H highest closing g pce In last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying prce of ColTna and Fidelity
52wkLow Lowest closing prce In last 52 ks Ask $ Seling prce of ColIna and fidelity
Previous Close -Previous days weighted price for-daly-volu e Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter prce
Today's Close Cuent day's weighted prce for daly volume Weely VOl Trading volu_,e of fthepror wee
Change -Change in closing prce fro dayto day EPS$ A company repoed earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daly Vol- Number of totaIl shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ DI idends pesh daNn tlas, 12 onths N/M N-o M geanin
P/E -Closing price divided by the last 12 month ea ngs FINDEX -The Fidelty Bahaas Stock Index January 1, 1994 = 100
S) 4 -for1 Stock Split -Eective Date 8/8/2007
TO T"RDE CALL* COLINA 242.502.7010 ROYALFIDELITY 242.356.7764 n FO CAPITAL MARKETS 242.396.-4000 I COLONIAL 242-502.7525


I


THE TRIBUNE


TU ES DAY, AU G U ST 4, 2009, PAG E 7 B




PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 4, 2009 THE TRIBUNE


Fidelity 'scales back our

expansion plans quite significantly'


FROM page 1B
non-performing loan category,
which measures loans more
than 90 days past due, Mr Sun-
derji said Fidelity Bank
(Bahamas) was at "5. some-
thing per cent", as opposed to
the industry average of 7.8 per
cent.
"Hopefully, we will remain
below the industry average
because our credit exposure has
been very conservatively
focused," he told Tribune Busi-
ness.
Some 81 per cent of Fidelity
Bank (Bahamas) loan portfo-
lio was concentrated on resi-
dential mortgages secured on
the borrowers' primary resi-
dences, something that
strengthened both the likeli-
hood of repayment and miti-
gated the bank's risk, as it had
physical assets as security.
"We want to make sure we
get back what we lend," Mr
Sunderji told Tribune Business.
Our risk is low, because our
consumer instalment loan book
is smaller at 19 per cent."
The bank had used its 2008
financial year to position itself
for loan book and profit growth
in its 2009 and 2010 financial


years, but Mr Sunderji said
these goals had to be placed on
the backburner due to the
recession.
"We've scaled back our
expansion plans quite signifi-
cantly, and are being very selec-
tive about who we lend to," Mr
Sunderji told Tribune Business.
"Our plans are on hold for the
next 15-18 months. We expect-
ed to grow our balance sheet,
but credit demand has dropped
quite significantly and we do
not want to be seeking growth
when the quality of applicants
does not meet the standard.
We've pulled back from growth
plans. We're not seeing the
kind of credit quality we want
to see in our loan applications,
making us much more choosy
and selective."
However, Mr Sunderji said
the massive build up in com-
mercial banking sector liquidi-
ty - now understood by Tribune
Business to be just shy of $500
million - was expected to com-
pensate Fidelity Bank
(Bahamas) and other institu-
tions for the increased loan loss
provisions by enhancing inter-
est margins.
"We expect some margin
improvements," he explained.


"We expect that as the cost of
money reduces over time, due
to all the liquidity, that will help
mitigate against the increased
loan loss provisions."
Mr Sunderji said that while
Fidelity Bank (Bahamas)
expected that asset quality
would not "deteriorate as
rapidly as it has done" during
the 2009 first half, the decline
was likely to continue through
the remainder of 2009 and into
2010 before there was any
recovery. This was due to the
overall economy's weak health,
coupled with rising unemploy-
ment and reduced incomes,
making it increasingly difficult
for borrowers to repay their
loans.
"We are very focused on
expense control and expense
reduction, because the top line
is not growing. We're seeing
increased loan loss provisions,
and have to make up for this
increase by controlling the
expenses that are more con-
tainable," Mr Sunderji added.
"Risk management rather
than growth management" was
the order of the day, Mr Sun-
derji added, with both banks
and borrowers now more risk
averse.


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
PRIVATE sector credit has
shrunk by between $10-$20
million during the 2009 first
half, Tribune Business under-
stands, compared to growth
of around $200 million for the
year-before period as
Bahamian consumers reduce
their borrowing and banks cut
back on lending.
However, banking industry
sources, speaking to Tribune
Business on condition of
anonymity, said the decline
did not reflect the fact that
Bahamian consumers and
businesses were deleveraging
and reducing their debts, but
rather that they were not
doing any new borrowing.
Many were unable to
deleverage, the sources


explained, because with
incomes and salaries not rising
they simply had no funds to
allocate to increased debt ser-
vicing. Therefore, there is
unlikely to be any major
reduction in privately held
debt, which at June 30, 2009,
is understood to have been
pegged at $2.8 billion in mort-
gage loans and $2.8 billion in
consumer loans.
Meanwhile, Tribune Busi-
ness understands that total
loans in arrears - those where
payments are 30 days past due
- in June 2009 actually
dropped slightly below the 14
per cent mark they had
reached in May. However,
non-performing loans rose
slightly from 7.7 per cent to
7.8 per cent of total outstand-
ing loans.
However, commercial


banking sector liquidity and
the foreign reserves were
healthy, standing at close to
$500 million and just over
$700 million at end-July 2009.
* Tribune Business has
been told that interconnec-
tion between the Bahamas
Telecommunications Compa-
ny's (BTC) and IndiGo Net-
works fixed-line voice net-
works was "nearly back to
normal" on Friday afternoon,
following a five-day interrup-
tion caused by BTC's instal-
lation of a new switch related
to its next generation net-
work.
For five days BTC and
IndiGo customers had been
unable to connect with one
another, but Paul Hutton-
Ashkenny, IndiGo's presi-
dent, said repairs had "bro-
ken the back" of the problem.


U.P0S


'7
ItS~
:J~II'


Bahamas Technical & Vocational Institute

Call us at 502-6300 Visit wvrww~btvi.org-bs,



RegoisterofA Todaycinc

(PloiPogame 2ndYear
a. *Ofie ef ;: 2p
Ofiernrdo 2s


SEW.PRGRAMME


Infomat~ionSsemrehnlg
kir'' e I Id*d�(kr

* :1; e� mo (9si.









LlcxkaC. CI IIon N





Gex~ Comcunfc efco (p

Sokir0T6dmd igy ernialo(29n


Grand Bahama

Abaco & Exuma


when they fly during this period. r




Cormne fly yo r irdline toda 9 balamasair
bo Qi amsanr

Reservations: -.0
242-377-5505 *wo

Book Online:

www.bahamasair.com o


� 2009DAI IL


p


' August 3rd - October 30th, 2009
See Rules and Restrictions at any participating SUBWAY� Restaurants


Pu CuASE A gBWAWV wO00

FooTre omi Saow/Ou m4# Vou
COUvD SE Of/E OF TYREE W/#ERS TO 14

W# GF CERFTE & pR/A TZES

WOI 000P 00


Private credit



shrinks by



$10-$20m














SI ( I i N T


Azaria crowned Miss




Global International


.L.



-. . . ;

**,T - -&


I~~: i .,1 h1b. .ib.ill
16


0.w.
. ... ... ......



or -i


Po


t


1


hit,


�. =


- b 3


BEAUTY QUEEN - Miss Global Bahamas Azaria Cleare returned home Sunday after being crowned Miss Global International during the
pageant at the RIU resort in Montego Bay, Jamaica, on Saturday. She topped second runner-up, Miss Jamaica Adrianna Bryan and Miss Nicaragua
Iris Ordenana...
(Photo by Felip6 Major/Tribune staff)


The





match




maker

By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter
amissick@tribunemedia.net
0m e k a
Moore has
dedicated
much of her time to
helping others in the
ultimate quest for love
- by providing match
maker skills to likely
candidates.
"I was really a good
match maker since
high school and
always matched up,
friends and family. In f
college I matched up
a lot of my best friends OMEKA MOORE
and people all the
time and it was always
successful so I decided to go into business for
myself. I have a degree in business and have
done two levels of psychology and also sociol-
ogy. These were my best classes. I understand
and communicate very well with people and I
match people based on personality, my own
intuition and the aura I feel surrounding you
when you come in," Mrs Moore said.
When dealing with people there will always
be challenges and Mrs Moore said she has seen
quite a few.
"I see more ups than downs. The ups are
that people are so excited about it and the fact
that they trust me so much because of my intu-
ition. The downs I would say would be the nar-
row minded people who have been burned,
people who have had bad relationships and
they come with a closed heart. However, I tell
them that I am good at this and to let me do my
job- All I request is an open mind because you
can't find love if you are not open to love,"
Mrs Moore said.
Mrs Moore said although her business is very
new, just starting in April, she has rooted her-
self in the Bahamas.
"I have been in Atlanta since 2003 and I
have been out of the Bahamas since 2000 and
I decided to come back and do something here.
The age bracket I start with 18 and up. I have
had 18 year olds coming in looking for love,"
Mrs Moore said.
Mrs Moore said since she has been here she
has had three success stories and she is excited
that Bahamians are opening up to this kind of
service- the service of finding love.
"With my expertise I feel that I can offer
them something more than they can offer them-
selves. What you might see in a relationship
might not be what your mother sees for you or
what I see for you. You might pick bad boys
and that is not what I see for you, I might see
that you need someone to give you some bal-
ance in your life. I actually want to see people
happy-this is not about money as I feel I was
born with a gift to connect people. So I feel by
me putting in my input, I can find you some-
thing better than you can choose on your own
in some cases," Mrs Moore said.
In the end, Mrs Moore said her goal is to
help people find the best quality mates out
there.
"I do a lot of research as far as their back-
ground to find out a lot more. I'm not just
matching on what you want physically, but I
base it on personality, character as well as phys-
ical appearance. It's not about finding a good
looking man because there has to be quality
and substance behind that good looking man."
To find out more about the Perfect Match,
email Mrs Moore at HYPERLINK
"mailto:aperfectmatch76@yahoo.com" aper-
fectmatch76@yahoo.com or 327-4319.


Hr 'e Tjo Yo ur Healh
JJRJJ J J
ri~o I 1f), T-q on- Eu.m1.
,I" Av m


t �'lw
' Ifee:,


Distributed by: BWA, East West Highway * 394-1759


AriZona


TI i E 41) A Y


I II I I Q)






PAGE20,GUESDYNAGUS 4,I00t9 TH TRBUN


uns ual fo fagpai.


The month of August...




GARDENER
H ot enough for you? Summer was a ,
long time coming but has made up
for lost time.
The vegetable garden is usually moribund , i ,f .
at this stage of the year unless you are fond of
okra, field beans and snake beans. Snake B
beans (also called yard-long or asparagus
beans) do best when grown on a trellis.' " 0
Although the beans can grow to over two . 1
feet they are best picked when about 12 inch- . . the beans cn
es long and before the interior bean seed- eB i
have matured.
Royal poinciana trees are still in full bloom
but are joined by yellow poinciana (Pel- .
tophorum inerme) that holds its flowers up on
stiff panicles like candles on a Christmas tree.
A whole host of flowering shrubs is at their
best right now including queen's crepe myrtle
and bridal bouquet, a long-flowering white
form of frangipani that will bloom until past
Christmas and keeps its attractive foliage year r
round.
The summer stalwarts of cosmos, vinca, ;
Mexican sunflower and marigolds are among .
the few cultivated annuals that are thriving
while gladioli, tuberose, gingers and zephyran- -
thes will perform during August.
Late mangoes are full on the trees while i .
Keitt mangoes are waiting until September or
even October to become fully ripe. When it ' "
comes to fruit, August belongs to guavas. It . . .
will soon be guava duff time. w ..r '- "' J,
The first carambolas may ripen during the P * .a ' ' ,


YELLOW POINCIANA is a distant relative of Royal Poinciana and has a completely different way of pre-


SNAKE BEANS (asparagus beans, yard-long beans) are best picked when they are 12 inches long...


senting its flowers...

month as may the first sea grapes. Coco plums
are still plentiful.
Bananas, of course, are produced year
round but are particularly plentiful during
the summer months. The barbecue season is
also year round in The Bahamas and you
may wish to throw a few bananas or plan-
tains onto the grill, unpeeled, until the skin
blackens. The flesh turns exquisitely sweet
and can be used as a side instead of fried
plantains, or as a dessert along with ice cream.
While on the grill you may like to toast
some fresh coconut pieces. These need to be
watched carefully as they burn easily, but
toasted coconut has a distinct taste that makes
the effort worthwhile. I guarantee that chil-
dren will ensure they are all eaten.
All may seem well in our respective gardens
of Eden but August is the month when we
first start thinking seriously about hurricanes.
I suggest you take a walk around your garden
and allow your mind to fix upon a worst-case


scenario. Are there any trees near power
lines?
What damage will be done if a tree top-
ples in this direction, that direction? What
shrubs need to be pruned to allow wind to
pass through them? Which need to be pruned
for size? Which may slap against structures?
What in the garden needs anchoring down
or storing inside?
When confirmation of a threatening hurri-
cane arrives it may be too late to do much to
the garden because there are many other hur-
ricane precautions to be taken with respect to
family and home.
Professional tree trimmers will be fully
booked and your favourite factotum may be
offered a higher daily rate by someone else
and disappear. You're on your own like Pat
Boone. If we get our garden hurricane work
done during early August we can concentrate
on other matters when a storm threatens.
j.hardy@coralwave.com


PAGE 2C, TUESDAY, AUGUST 4,2009


THE TRIBUNE




TH TRIBUN


THE WEATHER REPORT
I hA I I * I' *1' A 1A


" ORLANDO
High: 92� F/33� C
Low:750�F/240 C
Q.
TAMPA
High: 930�F/340 C
Low: 77�F/250 C
Q.


-7
:.*'- ' "


'I


Mostly sunny with a Partly cloudy with a Partly sunny with a Partly sunny, a Partly sunny, a Partly sunny, a
stray shower. shower. shower or t-storm. t-storm possible. t-storm possible. t-storm possible.
High: 900 High: 910 High: 890 High: 890
Hih: 900 Low: 810 Low: 810 Low: 800 Low: 810 Low: 800

S 105 F | 86oI F | | 97-85 F | | 1 98o-87o F 99go-86OI F 100-o92o F
The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature� is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and
elevation on the human body-everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.


I. Al , . U l I


I AIuMAN AC


ABACO
High: 91� F/330 C
Low: 780�F/260 C


a WEST PALM BEACH
High: 920 F/330 C
Low: 780 F/260 C


FT. LAUDERDALE
High: 92� F/33� C L
Low:81�0F/270C


S MIAMI
High: 92� F/330 C
Low:790F/260C


KEY WEST
High: 880�F/31� C
Low: 81� F/270 C
�.


Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonight's lows.


Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Baltimore
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston, SC
Chicago
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Detroit
Honolulu
Houston


Today
High Low
F/C F/C
98/36 69/20
67/19 54/12
94/34 71/21
90/32 70/21
92/33 68/20
87/30 70/21
84/28 63/17
91/32 73/22
84/28 62/16
84/28 67/19
100/37 78/25
96/35 61/16
86/30 65/18
89/31 76/24
99/37 79/26


W High
F/C
pc 98/36
pc 67/19
pc 88/31
pc 92/33
s 90/32
s 89/31
t 76/24
t 94/34
t 83/28
t 81/27
s 101/38
t 97/36
t 84/28
s 90/32
s 99/37


Wednesday


Low
F/C
70/21
56/13
71/21
66/18
68/20
65/18
57/13
74/23
61/16
57/13
78/25
61/16
60/15
77/25
79/26


Indianapolis
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City
Orlando


Today
High Low
F/C F/C
88/31 69/20
90/32 71/21
96/35 73/22
106/41 80/26
98/36 74/23
86/30 64/17
92/33 73/22
96/35 77/25
92/33 79/26
78/25 60/15
94/34 72/22
94/34 77/25
87/30 77/25
100/37 74/23
92/33 75/23


FREEPORT
High: 89�F/320 C
Low: 76� F/240 C







"'_





-An


ANDROS
High: 94� F/340 C
Low: 790 F/260 C


Wednesday
W High Low
F/C F/C
t 86/30 65/18 [
t 93/33 74/23 t
t 90/32 69/20 t
pc 106/41 83/28 s
s 99/37 76/24 [
pc 86/30 64/17 [
t 89/31 73/22 t
s 96/35 76/24 t
pc 90/32 80/26 t
pc 81/27 60/15 s
t 88/31 70/21 t
t 92/33 76/24 t
pc 89/31 71/21 t
s 101/38 73/22 s
t 93/33 76/24 t


NASSAU
High: 900 F/320 C
Low:81�F/270C



�.


Today
High Low
F/C F/C
Philadelphia 92/33 72/22
Phoenix 110/43 87/30
Pittsburgh 85/29 65/18
Portland, OR 86/30 58/14
Raleigh-Durham 96/35 69/20
St. Louis 92/33 76/24
Salt Lake City 94/34 69/20
San Antonio 99/37 77/25
San Diego 78/25 69/20
San Francisco 72/22 58/14
Seattle 78/25 56/13
Tallahassee 94/34 72/22
Tampa 93/33 77/25
Tucson 104/40 80/26
Washington, DC 94/34 73/22


ELEUTH
High: 910 F
Low: 790 F,









GREAT EXUMVA
High: 870�F/31� C
Low:780F/260C

.;.......*


Wednesday
W High Low W
F/C F/C
s 90/32 70/21 t
s 112/44 87/30 s
t 82/27 60/15 t
pc 83/28 59/15 pc
s 94/34 68/20 t
t 93/33 74/23 t
pc 95/35 68/20 pc
s 98/36 76/24 s
pc 77/25 66/18 pc
pc 72/22 58/14 pc
s 77/25 58/14 pc
t 94/34 72/22 t
t 92/33 76/24 t
pc 104/40 81/27 s
s 94/34 72/22 t


Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday
Temperature
High ........................... .................. 93� F/34� C
Low .................... ...................... 82� F/280 C
Norm al high ................................... 890 F/31� C
Norm al low ...................................... 76� F/24� C
Last year's high ............................... 92� F/33� C
Last year's low ............................... 730 F/23� C


I IDf INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

M - (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS


O1 2 31415 617 89110 1
LOW MODERATE HIGH V. HIGH EXT

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexm number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection.



High Ht.(ft.) Low Ht.(ft.)
Today 7:28 a.m. 2.4 1:27 a.m. 0.3
7:54 p.m. 2.9 1:25 p.m. 0.3
Wednesday8:08 a.m. 2.5 2:05 a.m. 0.3
8:31 p.m. 2.9 2:07 p.m. 0.3
Thursday 8:46 a.m. 2.6 2:41 a.m. 0.2
9:06 p.m. 2.8 2:47 p.m. 0.3
Friday 9:22 a.m. 2.7 3:15 a.m. 0.2
9:40 p.m. 2.8 3:25 p.m. 0.3


Precipitation Sunrise ...... 6:39 a.m. Moonrise . . .. 7:07 p.m.
As of 2 p.m. yesterday .............................. 0.01" Sunset . . . . . . 7:53 p.m. Moonset . . . . . 5:19 a.m.
Year to date .................. ....................... 20.79" Full Last New First
Norm al year to date .................................... 25.51" .

AccuWeather.com . . "
Forecasts and graphics provided by .
ERA AccuWeather, Inc. @2009 Aug. 5 Aug. 13 Aug. 20 Aug. 27
/330 C
/260 C


CAT ISLAND
High:870F/310 C
Low: 740 F/230 C


SAN SALVADOR
High: 90*�F/32* C
Low: 77*�F/25* C


LONG ISLAND
High: 900�F/320 C
Low: 780 F/260 C


F


MAYAGUANA
High: 890�F/320 C
.ow: 75� F/240 C



" -'*


CROOKED ISLAND/ACKLINS
RAGGED ISLAND High:91�F/330 C
Low: 770 F/25� C
High: 900�F/320 C
Low: 730�F/230 C

GREAT INAGUA
High: 93� F/340 C
Low: 770�F/250 C


I WRDCTE I


WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: E at 6-12 Knots 1-3 Feet 5-10 Miles 86� F
Wednesday: SE at 6-12 Knots 1-3 Feet 5-10 Miles 86� F
FREEPORT Today: ESE at 6-12 Knots 1-3 Feet 5-10 Miles 850 F
Wednesday: SSE at 6-12 Knots 6-12 Feet 5-10 Miles 850 F
ABACO Today: SE at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet 5-10 Miles 850 F
Wednesday: SE at 7-14 Knots 2-3 Feet 5-10 Miles 850 F


Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace


%Y, AUGUST 4TH 2009, PAGETC]


I ramVINSI'losw I


U.S. CITIES I


Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Paris
Prague
Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei
Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg


High
F/C
88/31
73/22
88/31
95/35
58/14
89/31
86/30
81/27
93/33
82/27
87/30
73/22
81/27
66/18
77/25
93/33
65/18
101/38
96/35
55/12
90/32
81/27
87/30
73/22
66/18
79/26
77/25
74/23
90/32
73/22
95/35
111/43
91/32
88/31
67/19
89/31
71/21
73/22
97/36
82/27
77/25
107/41
84/28
68/20
73/22
75/23
99/37
72/22
79/26
72/22
73/22
104/40
82/27
89/31
70/21
87/30
59/15
86/30
68/20
84/28
75/23
66/18
93/33
82/27
82/27
90/32
72/22
77/25
75/23
68/20


I


I


I


I


. . .. ........


Today
Low W
F/C
79/26 t
61/16 pc
61/16 s
77/25 s
47/8 pc
77/25 sh
77/25 sh
69/20 s
75/23 pc
80/26 s
65/18 c
55/12 c
75/23 sh
45/7 pc
59/15 pc
64/17 t
46/7 pc
76/24 s
87/30 t
44/6 r
73/22 t
72/22 t
69/20 s
59/15 sh
52/11 pc
57/13 pc
54/12 s
59/15 pc
73/22 t
54/12 pc
82/27 r
85/29 s
75/23 s
64/17 s
45/7 s
79/26 pc
60/15 s
59/15 r
63/17 s
77/25 r
51/10 t
76/24 s
64/17 t
54/12 r
52/11 sh
54/12 r
82/27 pc
58/14 c
64/17 pc
54/12 r
65/18 c
78/25 s
63/17 pc
80/26 sh
37/2 s
74/23 pc
39/3 pc
74/23 pc
54/12 c
73/22 pc
54/12 pc
48/8 pc
84/28 t
75/23 pc
57/13 t
64/17 s
60/15 s
64/17 t
57/13 c
49/9 pc


Wednesday
High Low W
F/C F/C
87/30 80/26 s
77/25 61/16 pc
91/32 61/16 s
93/33 75/23 s
59/15 47/8 s
91/32 77/25 t
87/30 77/25 s
80/26 67/19 s
90/32 73/22 pc
84/28 78/25 s
88/31 67/19 t
77/25 57/13 s
82/27 75/23 t
67/19 46/7 sh
82/27 61/16 pc
90/32 63/17 t
63/17 49/9 c
102/38 75/23 s
95/35 87/30 r
59/15 46/7 c
91/32 72/22 sh
83/28 72/22 t
85/29 70/21 s
77/25 60/15 s
64/17 50/10 sh
83/28 59/15 s
82/27 57/13 s
74/23 59/15 s
88/31 73/22 r
75/23 59/15 pc
93/33 82/27 r
109/42 85/29 s
90/32 75/23 s
89/31 64/17 s
66/18 46/7 s
89/31 79/26 r
72/22 59/15 s
75/23 59/15 sh
97/36 66/18 s
83/28 77/25 t
75/23 52/11 t
107/41 75/23 s
75/23 57/13 pc
68/20 52/11 pc
78/25 50/10 s
77/25 53/11 c
97/36 83/28 pc
73/22 59/15 pc
86/30 66/18 pc
79/26 56/13 c
80/26 71/21 pc
104/40 79/26 s
86/30 65/18 s
89/31 79/26 sh
69/20 33/0 s
86/30 74/23 t
55/12 37/2 pc
86/30 74/23 sh
77/25 61/16 s
81/27 75/23 sh
76/24 57/13 pc
66/18 46/7 s
91/32 86/30 t
82/27 77/25 sh
75/23 54/12 s
95/35 64/17 s
74/23 58/14 s
76/24 67/19 c
72/22 55/12 sh
70/21 52/11 pc


.....li


lit-
-Oak-
-7777Z




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2011 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated May 24, 2011 - Version 3.0.0 - mvs