The Tribune.
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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01835
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Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: 4/16/2011
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Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
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General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:01835

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N ASSA U AND BAHAMA ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER Gunmen kill brother of slain teenage girl V olume: 107 No.121SATURDAY, APRIL 16, 2011 PRICE 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25) W EATHER MOSTLY SUNNY HIGH 86F LOW 74F S P O R T S SPORTSSTARTSONPAGENINE Shockers are the real deal THE bullet believed intended on March 13 for Tekoyo McKinney, 27 but instead took the life of his younger sister found its target late Thursday night. McKinney was shot and killed Thursday by two men armed with handguns at Cordeaux Avenue and Minnie Street. According to police there is no suspect and the motive is unknown. They are asking the public to come forward with any information that might help them in their investigations. It is understood that McKinney was out on bail. Jeffryona Rolle, 14, whose untimely death shocked the country on March 13, was stepping from the car that her brother, Tekoyo, had just backed into their mothers driveway on Amaryllis Avenue, Garden Hill Estates No. 1, when a volley of gun fire burst from behind. She was hit, and fatally wounded, dying in hospital a short time later. Tekoyo was still at the wheel of the car. A source could not say if the police suspected at the time that her brother was the intended target and that she had been killed by mistake. However, on the street she is being referred to as a casu alty of war. In other words the bullet that took her life was not intended for her. Anyone with any informa tion that might assist investi gations should call police urgently at 911 or call Crime Stoppers anonymously on 328-TIPS (8477 Family Islanders can contact Police toll free at 1-242-300-8476 Man shot weeks after sister was murdered TRY OUR D OUBLE M cFISH The Tribune THEPEOPLESPAPER BIGGESTANDBEST L ATESTNEWSONWWW.TRIBUNE242.COM T HEBAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E GATHERROUND: Oakes Field Primary stu dents take a look at one of the displays yesterday at the schools exhi bition. The event featured work by students from different grades. Tim Clarke / Tribune staff OAKES FIELDPRIMARYSCHOOLEXHIBITION By TANEKA THOMPSON T ribune Staff Reporter t thompson@tribunemedia.net T HE Christian Council is divided over plans to c hange its constitution to allow its president to remain in office for anoth-e r consecutive term, according well-placed sources. Under the current cons titution, the president of the religious body can serve for a three year term and isr e-elected annually. After CHRISTIAN COUNCIL DIVIDED OVER A CONSECUTIVE TERM FOR PRESIDENT SEE page 11 By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net ATLANTIS guests who watched as a five-year-old girl was pulled from the swimming pool and frantic attempts were made to revive her have criticised the emergency response procedure in response to an article on Tribune242.com. Readers who witnessed the event said staff looked panicked as they tried to assist the girl who died three days after the accident, and expressed a lack of confidence in staff as lifeguards were not the first to respond to the emer gency. Certified nurse Toni Randall told the media how she was one of the first to assist the child, and upon detecting the girls pulse, administered mouth-tomouth breathing rather than CPR. But when lifeguards arrived at the scene the nurse with advanced cardiac life-support training said she was forced to step away despite having support from the childs mother, and her advice was ignored in the crucial moments she believes might have saved the childs life. Brooklyn Keelia Rattai, five, of Edmonton, Canada, was pulled from the water by a man visiting the resort at around 4pm on Monday, April 4, died at Doctors Hospital on Thursday, April 7. A father who was beside the pool with his wife and six-year-old daughter at the time reported: The staff looked panicked and unprepared to handle this type of situation. The medical staff (not including the lifeguards) were slow to arrive at the scene. He claims the lifeguards formed a barricade around the girl and a staff nurse exhibited no sense of urgency as she casually walked up to the girl car rying what appeared to be oxygen. The ambulance took around 30 minutes to arrive, he said, and someone performed CPR on Brooklyn as she was carried away on a stretcher and her mother was heard saying, youre killing my baby, as she followed behind. We will never go back to this place again, the father added. We can't imagine what the family is going through. A day has not gone by without us thinking about what happened and we are praying for the famiARCHITECT and cul tural icon Jackson Burnside was airlifted to a Florida hospital yesterday for further observation after an unexpected medical emergency. His condition was stable yesterday, although The Tribune understands he was in a coma. Family and friends are praying for his recovery, as he undergoes medical treatment. It is unclear what led to the emergency. A TL ANTIS GUES TS CRITICISE EMERGENCY RESPONSE TO FATAL ACCIDENT SEE page 11 CULTURAL ICON JACKSON BURNSIDE AIRLIFTED T O FLORIDA HOSPITAL JACKSONBURNSIDE T HEBODY i s removed from the scene on Thursday night. Felip Major /Tribune staff

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By DENISE MAYCOCK T r i b u n e F r e e p o r t R e p o r t e r dmaycock@tribunemedia.net F R E E P O R T G r a n d Ba ha ma P owe r Co mpa ny i s im proving its r e liabilit y a nd e f f i c i e n c y l e v e l h e r e o n G r a n d B a h a m a w i t h t h e i ns ta l men t of 54 r e n ta l gene rat or u n i ts. T h e u n i t s a r r i v e d o n A p r i l 1 4 an d w er e s o u r c ed fr o m A ggr ek o, a gl o bal l ead er in g e n e r a t o r r e n t a l I t r e p r e s en t s an a d d i t io n al 35 MW o f su pp lemental generation a t th e p o wer c o mp an y. A c c o r d i n g t o a p r e s s r e lease iss ue d by the P o we r C o m p a n y w h e n c o u p l e d w i t h t h e 1 0 M W u n i t s a d d e d l a s t y e a r J u n e i t w i l l a m ou n t to 45 MW of s u p p l e m e n t a l g e n e r a t i o n f o r t he is l and "T hi s ne w g en era t io n wil l i m p ro ve r eli ab il i ty for cu s t o m e r s T h e o v e r a l l e f f i c ien c y an d bet ter h eat r ate p e r f o r m a n c e o f t h e r e n t a l u n i t s a s c o m p a r e d t o t h e c o m b u s t i o n t u r b i n e s w i l l m ean a st abi l is ati on o f fue l c o st s th at t end to b e mo r e v o l a t i l e w i t h t h e u s a g e o f t he l es s eff ic ien t u ni ts th e s tat em ent s aid T h e h i g h l e v e l o f e f f i ci e n c y a l so sp e l ls g oo d n e w s f or c us to m er s o f th e G r and B aham a Pow er Com p any," s ai d Wh i tn ey H eas tie, Vi ce P r esi d en t o f G en er atio n "N ot o n ly wi ll t hey h elp p r o vid e r el iab l e p o wer s er vi ce b u t w il l lev el ou t fue l c o st s, h e ad d ed. Ra y R obinson, Ex ec utiv e C h a i r m a n o f t h e G r a n d B a h a m a P o w e r C o m p a n y s ai d th e s u p pl em en tal gen era tion is a shortte rm solut i o n i n E m e r a s c o m m i t me nt t o inc re a se t he ov era l l l evel o f r el iab i li ty. "W e realis e t h at t h e leve l o f r e l i a b i l i t y t h at t h e r e s i d e n t s o f t h i s i s l a n d h a v e b e e n e x p e r i e n c i n g i s n o wh er e n ear th e s tan dar d th at i t s ho u ld b e. Fo r t ho s e r eas o n s, I am ver y p leas ed t o p u t i n p l a c e a n i n t e r i m s o l u ti o n th at w i l l n o t o n l y p ro vid e an imm ed iate so lu ti o n f or a s i gni fi can t r ed uc t i o n i n c u s t o m e r i n t e r r u p tions, bu t will p rov id e s ome ec o no m ic an d em p lo ym en t o p p o r t u n i t i e s f o r B a h a m i an s in op er ati n g an d ma in t a i n i n g t h e a d d i t i o n a l u n i t s H e n o t e d th a t w h i l e t h e r en t al gen er a to r s w i ll he lp w i t h t h i s s u m m e r s d em an d s, pl an s are alr ead y u n d e r w a y t o b u i l d a n e w g e n e r a t i o n s t a t i o n o n G r a n d B ah am a fo r 2012. T h e p o w e r c o m p a n y s e r v e s s o m e 5 0 0 0 0 r e s i d e n t s an d co m me rc ial bu s i nes s es o n th e i s lan d S i n c e ac q u i r i n g m a jo r it y o w n e r s h i p o f G B P C l a s t D e c e m b e r h e s t a t e d t h a t Em era has bee n com mitte d to im p r o vin g r eli ab il ity fo r G B P C c u s t o m e r s a n d w i l l a n n o u n c e i n f o r m a t i o n ab o u t th e p l ant s ho r tl y. E m er a I n c. ( E MA-TS X) is a g row ing e ne rg y a nd se rv ic e s c o mpa ny w it h $ 6 3 b i ll io n in as se ts an d rev enu es o f $ 1 6 b i l l i o n T h e c o m p a n y inv e st s in e le c t ric it y g e ne ra t io n t r an s m i s s i o n a nd d i s t r i b u t i o n a s w e l l a s g a s t r a n s m i s s i o n a n d u t i l i t y en er gy s er vi ces C r e w S e c u r e s N e w R e n t a l G e n e r a t i o n U n i t s P i c t u r e d a r e c r e w m e m b e r s s e c u r i n g o n e o f t h e r e n t a l u n i t s o f g e n e r a t i o n t h a t ar r i ved o n G r and Bah am a t h i s w e e k W h e n c o u p l e d w i t h t h e 1 0 M W u n i t s ac quire d l ast ye a r June t his w i l l a m o u n t t o 4 5 M W o f s u pp l e m e n t a l g e n e r a t i o n f o r th e is l and Co m p any Exec u t i v e s e x p l a i n e d t h a t t h i s n e w g e n e r a t i o n w i l l i m p r o v e r e l i a b i l i t y f o r t h e i r c u s t o m e r s T h e o v e r a l l e f f i c ien c y an d b ett er h eat r ate p e r f o r m a n c e o f t h e r e n t a l u n i t s a s c o m p a r e d t o t h e c o m b u s t i o n t u r b i n e s w i l l m ean a st abi li s ati on o f f uel s ur char ge rates th at t en d to b e m o r e v o l a t i l e w i t h t h e u s a g e o f t h e l e s s e f f i c i e n t u n i t s ( P h o t o c o u r t e s y o f Mel i ss a Wi lk i n so n ) LOCAL NEWS P AGE 2, SA TURDA Y APRIL 16, 201 1 THE TRIBUNE Grand Bahama Power Company i n s t a l l s 5 4 r e n t a l g e n e r a t o r u n i t s T H R O U G H a l a r g e f i n a n c i a l g i f t f r o m t h e Lyfo r d Cay Fo un d ati o n to t he C o l l e g e of t he B a ha m a s E d i t h L a d y T u r n q u e s t s l o v e for exquisite cuisine will be m e m o r i a l i s e d i n a s p e c i a l en d o w m e n t t o f u n d s c h o l arships at the college. O n T hu rs da y L y f o rd Ca y F o u n d at i o n p r es i d e n t S t u a r t R a y p r e s e n t e d a $100,000 cheque to the col l e g e f o r t h e E d i t h L o u i s e L a d y T u r n q u e s t C u l i n a r y Endowment. T he e ndo wme nt wil l f und s c h o l a r s h i p s f o r f u l l t i m e c u l i n a r y s t u d e nt s e nr o l l e d a t C O B i n t h e C u l i n a r y a n d H o s p i t a l i t y M a n a g e m e n t I n s t i t u t e w i t h t h e h i g h e s t d e m o n s t r a t e d a b i l i t y a n d academic achievement. "Th e C u l in a r y an d H o s pi tali ty Man agem ent In s tit u t e i s t h e l e a d i n g i n s t i t u t i o n i n t h e C a r i bb e a n w or k i ng t o de v e lo p pro fe ssi ona l s in th e h o s p i t a l i t y i n d u s t r y a n d i t p l a ys an i m p o r t an t r o l e i n the economic development o f t h e c o u n t r y U n f o r t u nately, it has been an area w h e r e t h e r e h a s b e e n u n d e r in vestm ent in term s o f the av ai labil ity o f finan cial a i d f o r s t u d e n t s T h e E d i t h L o u i s e L a d y T u r n q u e s t Sc hola rs h ip Fund will beg in t o r e c t i f y t hi s om i s s i o n a n d I hope t ha t t he e sta blishme nt o f t h i s f u n d w i l l m a r k t h e beginning of more scholar s hi p s i n th e c u l in ar y ar ts ," Mr Ray said. I w o u l d h a v e l o v e d t o have grown up in the Turn q u e s t f a m i l y a n d t o h a v e benefited from Lady Turn quest's wo nderful coo king. T h i s s c h o l a r s h i p f u n d w i l l e n a b l e L a d y T u r n q u e s t s extended Bahamian family to benefit from her love of food and to share that love with the millions of visitors to this wonderful country." C o ll e g e pr e si d e nt Dr Be t s y V o g e l B o z e l a u d e d t h e Foundation's commitment. "T h i s k e e n c o m m i tm e n t on the part of the Founda t i o n h a s b e e n m a t c h e d b y a n e q u a l l y p r o f o u n d m i s s i o n t o c u l t i v a t e t h e k i n d o f f r ui t ful par t n ers hi ps to achi e ve this goal," she said. "We at t he C o ll eg e of the Ba hamas h a v e be e n f o rt u na t e t o ha v e t h e s u p p o r t o f t h e L y f o r d Cay Foundation in extend ing access to higher educa ti o n t o d es e r v i n g B ah am i a n s f r o m a l l w a l k s o f l i f e ; B ah am i a n s w h o h av e c o n t i n u e d t h e c o l l e g e s t r a d i t i o n of excellence and who have used their creativity, imagi n a t i o n a n d d e t e rm i na t i on t o h e l p b u i l d a t h r i v i n g a n d resilient nation." P r e s i d e n t V o g e l B o z e a d d e d t h a t e a c h g i f t f r o m the Lyford Cay Foundation h a s s y m b o l i s e d t h e f i r m be li ef i n e duca t ion a nd c onf i d e n c e i n t h e c o l l e g e t o p r o v i d e h i g h q u a l i t y p r o grammes and leadership. As this particular endow m en t a l s o a l l o w s f o r ad d i tional parties to contribute t o t h e c a p it a l, in c re a s in g t h e potential for more scholar ships to be funded, former G o v e r n o r G e n e r a l S i r O rv il le Turnq uest v owe d t o f a i t h f u l l y p r o m o t e i t a n d g e n e r a t e s u p p o r t f o r s t u d e n t s c h o l ar s h i p s i n m em o r y o f his dear wife. M y w i f e l o v e d t h e kitchen and she was a won d e r f u l c u l i n a r y a r t i s t W e shall see to it that the coun t r y k n o w s a b o u t t hi s e n d o w me nt a n d k e e ps i t a li v e S i r Orville said. T he a n no unc e m e nt o f t he e n d o w m e n t h a p p e n e d i n t h e f o y e r o f t h e C u l i n a r y a n d H o s p i t a l i t y M a n a g e m e n t Institute. L yford Cay Foundation establishes Lady T urnquest Culinary Endowment at COB E N J O Y I N G t h e p a s t r y d e l i g h t s F o r m e r G o v e r n o r G e n e r a l S i r O r v i l le T u r n q u e s t ; G D i a n e S t e w a r t C o l l e g e C o u n c i l m e m b e r a n d M ic h e l le Fields, daughter of Sir Orville, chat with one of the culinary students whose pastry creations were on display in the foyer of the Culi nary and Hospitality Management Institute.

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EDITOR, The Tribune. L AST AUGUSTnewspap er headlines questioned the fate of two historic buildings on the Princess Margaret Hospital (PMH The two frail buildings sitn ear the Shirley Street e ntrance to the PMH, an institution struggling to meet its mandate of providing quality health care services to all residents and visitors. I n response to the headlines, the Public Health Authority (the agency thatr uns the PMH and other m edical facilities throughout T he Bahamas) touted plans for a state-of-the-art buildi ng to be located where the two old buildings now sit. The new building will pro v ide much-needed operating rooms. Months earlier, an historic building at the northwest corner of the PMH compound vanished over the course of a weekend. T he Hansard building renovation, the subject of a recent exhibition by artistA ntonius Roberts, is a similar story of neglect involving the re-purposing of a 205 y ear-old structure in historic P arliament Square. The interior of the building was com pletely gutted and is being m odernised to accommodate a courtroom and judges chambers. Sometime last year Antonius Robertsn oticed a trailer filled with old native pine that was pre v iously used as floor beams i n the Hansard building as he was driving along Bay Street. A series of telephonec alls, including one to Prime M inister Hubert Ingraham, led to the recovery of 26 pieces of the wood. Antonius used the reclaimed wood to create this powerful body of work that we can e njoy this evening and beyond. The question of how this wood could have been left as garbage or scrap c hallenges the effectiveness of institutions, agencies and the wider community in protecting our history. We dont even need to ask what hap pened to wood that was not r ecovered or how is it that the faade of the Hansard building is being modified asp art of the renovation. M ake no mistake, these buildings, and many others that sit in a state of disrepair or dereliction, house important parts of the story of The Bahamas and its people a story that has been poorly told to the young Bahamians who stand to inherit our great nation and poorly marketed to the millions of visitors that come tot he Bahamas each year for a u nique experience. The more we lose, the less we k now about our history. The more we lose, the less we are able to distinguish the Bahamas tourism product. T he 1998 legislation e nabling the establishment of the Antiquities, Monu m ents and Museums Corporation (AMMC nations principal heritage c onservation agency was a huge victory for preserva-t ionists and historians. Prio r to 1998, the Bahamas N ational Trust assumed the r ole of advocacy for the preservation of our historic a ssets. Even at that time supporters knew that ther oad ahead would be very d ifficult. AMMC purportedly maintains a register of historic resources throughout the Bahamas, and assumes somer esponsibility for the development, upkeep and promo t ion of these resources (both p ublicly and privatelyowned). The legislation and sup p orting regulations also attempt to hold private owners of historic properties to a standard of performance. Asa n acknowledgment of the increased cost of ownership associated with historic p roperties, certain financial incentives to encourage the restoration and upkeep oft hese assets were also put in p lace. More than a decade after the landmark legislation, many of our historic assets have deteriorated further, while others have been com p letely demolished. There have been a few successes during this period (the most notable being ther estoration and re-purposing of Villa Doyle as the National Art Gallery of The Bahamas). A short walk along Bay Street provides stirring evidence of the effectiveness of regulations, policies, institutions, incentives and individuals positioned to preserve and protect these assets. I would encourage a visit to any of the following properties: Buena Vista, Cascadilla, Pan American build ing, Cotton Ginny, Corner H ouse, Curry House, Collins H ouse, Sir Milo Butlers resi dence, Sunnyside, Sunningridge, Sisters of Charity Convent and Mountbatten House. The decaying conditions of all of these proper-t ies have caused some peop le to claim demolition by neglect. Others have suggested that we are victims of a collective ignorance that is also responsible for many oft he other challenges we face as a nation. Regardless of your perspective, it proba-b ly seems clear that we are a t a crossroad. H istoric preservation is tough work and often i nvolves a delicate balance of economics, politics, community interest, history, andp resent-day demands on physical spaces. There are many great examples of how cities have leveraged their historic assets to deliver significant economic benefits and attract millions of visi t ors each year. The challenge for Nassau is that few, if any, of our buildings ont heir own could be considered iconic or significant enough to make the place. R ather, the collection of our h istoric resources is where the potential lies. In my view, we have two r eal options: (1 hensive and effective historic preservation programmew ith adequate funding and resources, as well as govern m ent and community leade rship; or (2 toric assets are too burden s ome and set a course to d evelop a new modern city with a redefined vernacular. If the status quo persists, then lets at least ensure that the general public is aware of the stakes. I wish to make a special plea to members of the com munity to commit new energy to protecting our precious r esources. The efforts of Antonius Roberts with the reclaimed wood from the Hansard building and the salvaged Causarina wood from Saun d ers Beach should awaken our sensibilities and demonstrate the power of the cre a tive community. H owever, we must all be stewards of the natural and built environments entrusted to us. VAUGHN ROBERTS Managing Director Downtown Nassau Partnership Nassau, April 14, 2011. E DITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P AGE 4, SATURDAY, APRIL 16, 2011 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. Publisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday WASHINGTON With his striking choice of words, President Barack Obama clearly outlined the greatest perils for Republicans and for Democrats in the nation's high-stakes debate over spending and social programmes. Obama used vivid, populist language in a forceful speech Wednesday to denounce the GOP plan for cutting spending and revamping Medicare and Medicaid. The Republicans, he said, have concluded that "even though we can't afford to care for seniors and poor children, we can somehow afford more than $1 trillion in new tax breaks for the wealthy." But the president's language was tortured and opaque when it came to one element of his own proposal: raising taxes for certain Americans, mostly high earners. Obama said he wants "to reduce spending in the tax code." That code, he said, is "loaded up with spending on things like itemized deductions." By any measure, "spending in the tax code" is a curious phrase. It likens tax revenue to a source of money that "spends" down its total when tax cuts are enacted and conversely "reduces spending" when taxes go up, including cases in which temporary tax cuts are ended. Long gone are the days when Democrats employed frank language on taxes, as presidential nominee Walter Mondale did in 1984. "Mr. Reagan will raise taxes, and so will I," Mondale said in accepting the nomination. "He won't tell you. I just did." Obama left no doubt he believes some taxes should go up. But he couched it in careful terms designed to distance himself from proverbial "taxand-spend Democrats" almost as much as he dis tanced himself from what he suggested are heart less Republicans. Throughout his 43-minute speech, Obama portrayed himself as a fair but frugal leader willing to trim popular agencies, including the military, and to raise taxes only on wealthy people who have benefited disproportionately in recent years. It's part of a broader appeal to independent voters, who swung dramatically from Democratic candidates in 2008 to Republicans in 2010 and who hold the key to his re-election hopes next year. Americans are showing increased alarm at the fast-growing federal debt. It's coupled with concern, along with sometimes conflicting emotions and beliefs, about the nation's biggest social programmes, Medicare and Social Security. Both parties face political opportunities and risks as they confront these issues. And both parties are seeking phrases and slogans to best exploit their openings while minimizing their weakness es. House Republicans plan this week to pass an ambitious 10-year plan that would convert Medicare to a voucher programme and turn Medicaid into a state block grant programme, saving the government billions of dollars. The bill would reduce tax rates for corporations and high earners, while ending some tax-avoidance loopholes. Democrats feel the GOP is overreaching, chiefly in its proposed changes to Medicare, the rapidly expanding federal health care programme for older Americans and the disabled. They think voters will recoil at the notion of higher medical costs for the elderly, especially if income tax rates are falling for high earners. Obama ripped the Republican plan. "It's a vision that says America can't afford to keep the promise we've made to care for our seniors," he said. "It ends Medicare as we know it." Republicans, meanwhile, have virtually perfected their attacks on any Democrat who suggests a tax increase of any kind. Several top Republicans criticized Obama's long and multilayered speech on that topic alone. Obama "doesn't get it," said Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour, a likely presidential candidate. "The fear of higher taxes tomorrow hurts job creation today." Numerous bipartisan and nonpartisan analysts say it is almost impossible to solve the nation's debt problem without some combination of tax increases, spending cuts and substantial changes to Medicare and Social Security. After calling for an array of spending cuts Wednesday, Obama made the case for targeted tax increases, albeit in roundabout language. Because Medicare and Social Security are popular with both parties, he said, "and because nobody wants to pay higher taxes, politicians are often eager to feed the impression that solving the problem is just a matter of eliminating waste and abuse, that tackling the deficit issue won't require tough choices." He said he would not repeat last year's decision to extend Bush-era tax cuts now scheduled to expire before 2013 for families earning more than $250,000 a year. "We cannot afford $1 trillion worth of tax cuts for every millionaire and billionaire," the president said. He renewed his call for limiting itemized deductions "for the wealthiest 2 per cent of Americans." Such deductions apply to money spent on mortgage interest payments, charitable gifts and other items. Obama described such goals as "reducing tax expenditures." "I think it was very, very smart" to use such unfamiliar and indirect language, said Matt Bennett, vice president of Third Way, a Democraticleaning think tank that praised Obama's speech. "Why not put it in those terms?" he said in an interview. "It's what the Republicans' Frank Luntz would do." Luntz is a GOP adviser known for pushing carefully crafted political terms, such as referring to levies on estates as the "death tax." Bennett said Republicans have demonized even reasonable and necessary tax increases to the point that "it's a gigantic problem" for solving the nation's fiscal woes. If a "term of art" will blunt GOP attacks, he said, it could help Obama advance his agenda and give political cover to Republican lawmakers who believe some ele ment of tax increases must be part of a deficitreduction drive. In his closest brush with an explicit call for tax increases Wednesday, Obama chas tised the most insistent Republicans. "Some will argue we shouldn't even consider ever, ever raising taxes, even if only on the wealth iest Americans," the president said. "It's just an article of faith for them. I say that at a time when the tax burden on the wealthy is at its lowest level in half a century, the most fortunate among us can afford to pay a little more." It fell far short of Mondale's candor. But it was enough to unleash a barrage of GOP criticisms, certain to resound through the fall of 2012. (This article was written by Charles Babington of the Associated Press). Who is looking after history captured in our old buildings? LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Obama tiptoes on proposed tax hikes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t&203$1< &KDPEHUV *.\PRQHWWH%XLOGLQJ 6KLUOH\WUHHW 1DVVDX%DKDPDV $WWRUQH\VIRUWKH([HFXWRUV ('1(5'259,/86RI )$55,1*+72152$'3%2;*71$66$8 %$+$0$6

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By LAMECH JOHNSON STUDENTS from the win ning group of the College of the Bahamas first ever short film festival received a bonus cash prize at the Behind the Lens Photo Exhibition on Thursday evening. After the results of the film festival were announced by Dr Earla Carey Baines, Dean of Faculty of Liberal and Fine Arts, it was announced that the filmmakers of the short Jasmines would be receiving $1,000. One of the judges, execu tive producer of Cable 12 Dr Keith Wisdom, said that it was difficult to pick a winner from the three films, Jas mines, Surprise, which came second, and John McPhee which placed third. They didnt make it easy because they were three dif ferent kinds of films, he said. The reason why Jasmines ultimately won over the other films, Dr Wisdom said, was because of its quality of story telling and its ability to draw the audience in. They were all good, but the winner was very good because of two main points. Filmmaking is all about story telling; the other thing is while youre telling a story,you have to pull us in. We have to buy your story. All of them pulled us in but when we got to Jasmines, I didnt smell any flowers, but I was almost immediately sucked in, Dr Wisdom said. Jasmines, written by Jasper Haeward and Jonathan Thompson, tells the story of a young woman who is being abused by her father. She finds comfort in the company of her best friend and fraternal twin brother, however, all is not how it seems and a tragic end awaits. wanted to allow Bahamians and COB students a chance to see into peoples lives with the social issues being addressed. So suicide came to mind because there are so many different things you can address just branching off of suicide, Mr Haeward told The Tribune. A lot of the film is taken from real life experiences, except for the end, but these are from people I know and things Ive experienced myself. Its like trying to show the public that suicide is no joke. When you hear somebody talking about how theyre going to kill themselves, like you dont know whats happening in their lives. You cant just write them off as crazy. Co-writer Mr Thompson said the short film festival was a grand experience and only one step of many in COBs future in filmmaking. When asked if the winning group would split the prize money, Mr Thompson said, There will be no splitting. The money will allow us to purchase better equipment for Filmstrip Productions. Dr Baines told the audi ence that it was extremely fitting to celebrate the work of the journalism students after the art and music majors were highlighted a week before. Today those of us who were able to make it at 12noon were fortunate to see the creative, interesting, talented work of some talented up and coming young film makers. We saw some very interesting story lines that touched our hearts, touched our minds and spoke to a Bahamian reality. And for this we are indeed proud of our students. Dr Wisdom said persons may have seen this as just three films for a film festival, but the way we (the judges saw it was as a movement that has begun. If you dont do more films, if you dont stay up more nights and continue to tell these stories, we will go on in our own bubbles, liv ing our lives as though noth ing has happened, he said. Dr Wisdom said all three films will be featured on ZNS and Cable 12. All participants received gifts of a Blackberry per group and phone cards. LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, APRIL 16, 2011, PAGE 5 (':,1()$%,2/$6$,179,/ RI&2:3(152$'3%2;1$66$8 %$+$0$6 GERMANYS Next Top Model contestants visited Grand Bahama to film a segment for the shows current cycle. Sarah Nuru, who was named Germany's Next Topmodel in 2009, was a surprise guest on the show last weekend and also served as a correspondent for the entertainment show Red!TV on Germanys ProSieben television station. Ms Nuru, who won the title at age 19, is from Munich and her parents immigrated to Germany from Ethiopia. She is the first black person to win Germany's Next Topmodel. The filming in Grand Bahama was coordinated through the Bahamas Ministry of Tourism, Film and Television Commission in Grand Bahama and assisted by a public relations coordinator from the Ministry's Tourism Office in central Europe. At Tony Macaroni's Conch Experience in Grand Bahama, Miss Nuru received a Conch 101 demonstration and learned how to remove the large ocean mollusk from its shell as well as how to prepare the authentic Bahamian dish, conch salad. By CELESTE NIXON T ribune Staff Reporter c nixon@tribunemedia.net MEMBERS of the Bahamas Red Cross Society are being trained in the new strategy for 2020 that aims to inspire, encourage, facili-t ate and promote all forms of humanitarian activities by national Red Cross Societies. Red Cross organisation developmental officer for the Caribbean Kester deV erteuil spoke to members of the Rotary Club of West Nassau on Thursday about the Red Cross' 2020 strategy. Mr Verteuil is currently i n the Bahamas to provide a training course for the B ahamas Red Cross on S trategy 2020, which is guiding the actions of the Intern ational Federation of Red Cross and Red CrescentS ocieties (IFRC o ut this decade. It defines t hree strategic goals. Mr Verteuil said the 2020 vision is the culmination of c onsultation that took place b etween 125 national Red Cross Societies around the w orld, with the aim of confronting the many challenges that face communities. The vision aims to make Red Cross Societies pro-a ctive about issues occurring a round the world, rather t han reacting to problems when they arise locally, Mr Verteuil said. He pointed to climate change, rising fuel prices,a nd the constant developm ent of technology as examp les of issues that have an impact on both a global and local level, but that many people are not knowledgeable about. According to Mr Verteuil, o ne strategic aim of vision 2020 is to build stronger national Red Cross Socie ties, enabling them to bett er take care of the underp rivileged persons who need t heir help. The ultimate goal, he said, is to save lives a nd strengthen the response to natural disasters, whenp eople are most vulnerable. A nother aim of the camp aign is to promote healthy and safe living within communities. Mr Verteuil said: "It is i mportant to bring information to people. Aim three is t o promote social inclusion and a culture of non-vio lence and peace. POLICE are looking for a 28-year-old man they want to question in con n ection with a rape. The Central Detective Unit is seeking the publics assistance in locating Har-r y Stephen Adderley who w as last known to reside on Baillou Hill Road and Newbold Street. H e has a dark brown complexion, is 5 tall, weighs about 170lbs and is of medium build. The suspect is considered armed and dangerous.A nyone with information concerning Adderleys whereabouts is asked to contact the CDU at 502/9991 or 502-9910, 911, or Crime Stoppers 328-8477. RED CROSS MEMBERS TRAIN FOR NEW STRATEGY POLICE SEEK MAN FOR QUESTIONING COB SHORT FILM FESTIVAL WINNERS RECEIVE $1,000 Germanys Next Top Model films in Grand Bahama SARAH NURU a correspondent of Red! TV in G ermany and Germany's Next Topmodel 2009, talks to her viewers about conch salad at Tony Macaroni's Conch Experience on April 9. ANTHONY HANNA also known as Tony Macaroni explains the life cycle of the conch to Germany's Next Topmodel 2009 Sarah Nuru as she holds a conch shell at Taino Beach, Grand Bahama during a filming segment for Red! TV. TONY MACARONI tourism award winner from the Bahamas and proprietor of Tony Macaroni's Conch Experience at Taino Beach in Grand Bahama, explains the use of hot sauce on conch salad, to Germany's Next Topmodel 2009 Sarah Nuru.

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K ELLYS 19th Bride of the Year, banker Samantha Lamb-Turnquest, was fresh o ff the plane from the Ride f or Hope in Eleuthera last weekend where she pedalled 10 miles for a good cause,w hen she accepted her crown. Samantha CarterC artwright, Kellys 18th Bride of the Year, handed over her crown as an audi-e nce of Kellys executives, s taff and relatives looked on during a luncheon at the British ColonialHilton. T he new Bride of the Year was chosen by an independent panel of judges f rom Kellys 12 Brides of the Month for 2010 to reign over Kellys popular House and Homes Bridal Registry P rogramme for 2011. Mrs Lamb-Turnquest, Bride of the Month for Jan-u ary 2010, is a senior credit officer with the Bank of the Bahamas. Earning four pro motions in five years of banking, she hopes to keep on moving to the top positions. She attended St A ugustines College and the College of the Bahamas. S he acted in Women T alk by Michael Pintard and appeared in the movie Into the Blue. H er husband, Shavane Turnquest, proposed at the Cloisters on Paradise Island.H e is the owner of J&S S cooter Rentals. Both are Catholic and regular churchgoers. T he judges proclaimed this years Brides of the Month to be even better than usual. They were young professionals, charming and dedicated to improving their community, said photographer Vincent Vaughan, who also has served as a judge of the event for many years. Once again, the competi tion was so close the panel of judges chose a runner-up as well, Dr Danielle R H S trachan, married to Dr Drumeco Bowleg. They met in medical s chool in Trinidad. He pro p osed with a specially print ed newspaper headlined, Its about time!. K ellys financial controller Barry Packington saluted Kellys president Nancy Kelly and realtor Sara Parker f or their creation of Kellys Brides of the Month and Bride of the Year Pro gramme nearly 20 years ago. He also commended Bet ty Cooper on her recent retirement after many years of service as a bridal con sultant at Kellys. L OCAL NEWS PAGE 6, SATURDAY, APRIL 16, 2011 THE TRIBUNE Grants Town Wesley Methodist Church(Baillou Hill Rd & Chapel Street) P.O.Box CB-13046 The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427(www.gtwesley.org)SUNDAY APRIL 17TH, 2011Theme: As a wise master builder, I laid a foundation and another was building upon it."7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Sis. Rosemary Bethel 11:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Bro. Jamicko Forde 7:00 p.m.Bro. Ernest Miller/Bro. Franklyn Bethel (HC CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPELCHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS Tel: 325-2921SUNDAY, APRIL 17TH, 2011 Youths Sunday11:30 am Speaker Pastor Dexter Duvalier67th Annual United Missions Conference 7:00 pm April 17th 22ndBelievers Gospel Chapel Elizabeth Estates K ELLYS 19TH BRIDE OF YEAR Kelly's executives welcomed their new bridal royalty in style. Pictured from left are: Financial c ontroller Barry Packington; area manager of the bridal department Rochelle Hudson; human resources manager Judith Adderley; Bride of the Year 2010-11 Samantha Lamb Turnquest; Bride of the Year 2009-10 Samantha Carter-Cartwright; vice-president and managing director Greg Kelly; 2010 Bride of the Year runner-up Dr Danielle R H Strachan, and bridal manager Gwen Bayles. KELLYS 19th Bride of the Year Samantha Lamb-Turnquest and runner-up Dr Danielle R H Strachan. MINISTER of State in the Ministry of Labour and S ocial Development Lorett a Butler-Turner said the d evelopment of a local craft industry other than straw work has not yet been fully tapped into and is open to all regardless of age. Speaking at the opening of the Ministry of Labour and Social Development a nd Ministry of Education S impson Penn/Williemae Pratt Co-Education Units 11th Annual Craft Show yesterday, Mrs ButlerTurner said the schools s tudents prepared a wonderful display of talent, some of which, if chann elled in the right direction, c an take them far in life. We have in our midst some budding businesso wners and artisans, she s aid. It is my hope therefore, that students will continue to expand their talents in this regard. Mrs Butler-Turner also told the students to contin-ue along the path of selfd evelopment and self-cont rol, and continue to make progress in becoming prod uctive citizens who will m ake a positive contribu t ion to the continued development of the Bahamas. She thanked Inez John s on, the principal of the Penn/Pratt Co-educational Unit, as well as the staff for continuing the tradition of holding the annual event to showcase the many and varied talents of young pers ons who attend the unit. I appreciate the challenges you face as you seek to develop the minds of they oung persons who reside at the Simpson Penn and Willie Mae Pratt Centres and the special dedicationr equired in this unique sett ing, Mrs Butler-Turner said. It is not easy but you have accepted the challengeto help shape the lives of these young persons in becoming productive citi z ens. Ministry of Labour and Social Development officials, students from various government high schools and the Centre for the Deaf attended and participated in the opening ceremony, w hich was held under the t heme Self-Empowerment T hrough Entrepreneurs hip. P rincipal Johnson said t he two-day exhibition being held at Simpson Penn showcases the steady growth of the students skills in agriculture, culture, crafts and home econom ics. As we move forward in the 21st century we must prepare our students to face t he challenges in this large g lobal village. They must b ecome self-sufficient and skill-oriented to become marketable to they canr ealise their dreams and goals of becoming productive citizens, Ms Johnsons aid. The goal of Penn/Pratt teachers is to do whatever it takes to tap into the poten-t ial of each and every stud ent that enters this insti tution, she said. Our students worked d iligently using their hands and minds to create beautiful craft items and they have transformed ande nhanced their surroundings, Ms Johnson said. YOUNG PERSONS URGED TO DEVELOP LOCAL CRAFT INDUSTRY Kellys crowns 19th Bride of the Year M INISTER OF STATE i n t he Ministry of Labour and Social Development L oretta Butler-Turner

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FORT LAUDERDALE The presence and participation of the Bahamas at the recent Sun n Fun aviation show in Lakeland, Florida was highlighted by personal, individual presentations made to aviation greats by winners of the Bahamas Out Island Student Artistic Chocks competition. The Bahamas Out Island students, as a part of the Bahamas contingent at the show this year, participated by promoting their countrys message. The students spoke to pilots and consumers of the beauty of the unspoiled islands and cays and the simplicity of Customs and Immigration procedures, and also shared personal accounts of their individual island homes. Presentations of unique, hand-painted, general aviation chocks were made to officials and executives including, but not limited to, US Congressman Sam Graves (RMO); Sun n Fun president John Burton; Sun n Fun chairman of the board William Eickhoff; EAA president Rod Hightower; premier aviation artist Sam Lyons and the diamond groupof the world famous US Navy Blue Angels. Attired in freshly pressed, crisp, uniforms, officials said the students made quite an impression at the show. Their good will gestures, that were well received, proved that it is never too early to take an active role in the countrys business of tourism, officials said. In addition to the studen ts assistance in promoting the country, the Islands of the Bahamas booth was partnered by Fernandez Bay Village on Cat Island; Stella Maris Resort Club on Long Island; Our Lucaya Beach a nd Golf Resort on Grand Bahama, Abaco Beach Resort at Boat Harbour on Abaco, as well as Bahamas Gateway FBO's Banyan Air Service, Executive Flight Support, Odyssey Aviation and Grand Bahama Airport CompanyL td. Commenting on the success o f the Bahamas participation in this years show, chief aviation specialist Greg Rolle said: In addition to the countless pilots that we were able to speak with at our booth, the hundreds of chocks that were given away within the f irst few days of the show serve as long lasting mementos. Mr Rolle said he was glad that he and aviation manager Leonard Stuart got the opportunity to make presentations. He was also happy that he was able to assist many per-s ons who indicated planned flights to the Bahamas in the immediate future. Speaking the students experience of the event, Mr Rolle said: Watching the breathtaking maneuvers of the Blue Angels was a hit for the students, but the speedyc lean-up of the show site overnight, following a serious storm, was very impressive for our students to experience. They were able to see the show must, and did go on. The wining students in attendance at the show were a ccompanied by Bahamas Tourism Out Island based staff, who had served as onisland coordinators of the Chocks competition. The students were Ozeke Swain of Abaco; Denaya Rolle of Exuma; RebeccaK nowles of Eleuthera and Albert Simms of Long Island. S elected from some 20 high schools representing eight different Family Islands, the trip to Sun n Fun presented the opportunity for the winners to travel internationally. The annual Bahamas Out Island Student Artistic Chocks competition is one of a viation departments efforts to expose students to the aviation industry. Each year, winning students receive exposure at international aviation shows. In addition to providing exposure to the students, the artistic, Bahamian themedw ork generated from the programme, present a first class Bahamian souvenir. Mass produced promotional chocks by The Bahamas aviation department, are pre sented annually to hundreds of general aviation pilots who visit the islands of theB ahamas booth at major avi ation shows. The chocks are used as an advertising item. LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, APRIL 16, 2011, PAGE 7 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.190.95AML Foods Limited1.191.190.000.1230.0409.73.36% 10.639.05Bahamas Property Fund10.6310.630.000.0130.200817.71.88% 6.254.40Bank of Bahamas6.006.000.000.1530.10039.21.67% 0.530.17Benchmark0.180.180.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 2.842.70Bahamas Waste2.702.700.000.1680.09016.13.33% 2.201.96Fidelity Bank1.961.960.000.0160.040122.52.04% 12.408.69Cable Bahamas8.758.750.005001.0500.3108.33.54% 2.852.35Colina Holdings2.552.550.001.0310.0402.51.57% 7.005.80Commonwealth Bank (S1 6.936.960.0312,0000.4880.26014.33.74% 2 .861.90Consolidated Water BDRs2.022.050.030.1110.04518.52.20% 2.541.40Doctor's Hospital1.401.400.000.1070.11013.17.86% 5.994.75Famguard4.754.750.000.3570.24013.35.05% 9.105.65Finco6.786.780.000.6820.0009.90.00% 11.408.75FirstCaribbean Bank8.768.760.000.4940.35017.74.00% 6.004.57Focol (S 5.505.500.000.4520.16012.22.91% 1 .001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 7.305.50ICD Utilities7.307.300.000.0120.240608.33.29% 10.509.80J. S. Johnson9.829.820.000.8590.64011.46.52% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.001.2070.2008.32.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 99.4699.46Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029BAH2999.460.00 1 00.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +FBB13100.000.001 00.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.00 52wkHi 52wkLow Symbol Bid$ Ask$ LastPrice DailyVol EPS$ Div$ P/E Yield FINDEX: YEAR END 2008 -12.31%30 May 2013 20 November 2029FRIDAY, 15 APRIL 2011BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,436.04 | CHG 1.55 | %CHG 0.11 | YTD -63.47 | YTD % -4.23BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basis)Maturity 19 October 2017 7%RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)29 May 2015 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-677-BISX (2479) | FACSIMILE: 242-323-232019 October 2022 Prime + 1.75% Prime + 1.75% 6.95%B ISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:7% Interest 52wk Hi 52wk Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Daily Vol EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield 10.065.01Bahamas SupermarketsN/AN/A14.00-2.9450.000N/M0.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.350.400.550.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 Months %NAV 3MTH 1.54871.4525CFAL Bond Fund1.54871.48%6.06%1.526164 2.98142.8300CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.98141.15%2.40%2.947425 1.59201.5141CFAL Money Market Fund1.59201.14%4.53%1.574964 3.20252.8522Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund2.7049-0.56%-15.54% 13.638813.0484Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund13.50161.08%0.02% 115.7622101.6693CFAL Global Bond Fund115.76229.58%9.58%114.368369 111.469799.4177CFAL Global Equity Fund111.469711.32%11.32%106.552835 1.14651.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.14655.20%5.20% 1.11851.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.11854.73%4.73% 1.14911.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.14915.35%5.35% 9.99529.1005Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 19.99521.51%6.08% 11.217310.0000Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 211.21731.50%6.41% 10.42889.1708Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 310.42884.03%4.29% 8.45104.8105Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund Equities Sub Fund8.55591.88%8.41% BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/200731-Mar-11 31-Mar-11 109.392860 100.183340 31-Dec-10 31-Dec-10 NAV 6MTH 1.505557 2.918697 1.555464TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752531-Mar-11 31-Dec-10 31-Mar-11 1-Apr-11 31-Jan-11MARKET TERMS31-Dec-10 31-Mar-11CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)31-Mar-11BISX Listed Mutual FundsNAV Date 31-Mar-11 31-Dec-10 Out Island students salute Sun n Fun high flyers in Florida PRESENTATION TO BLUE ANGELS Winners of the Bahamas Aviations Departments Out Island Students Artistic Chocks Competition met and presented the US Navys Blue Angel Diamond team witha rtistic Bahamian themed general aviation chocks during the recent Sun n Fun Aviation show. Pictured a re flight demonstration squadron officers; Leonard Stuart, manager of the, Aviation Department; students Albert Simms, Rebecca Knowles, and at right, Greg Rolle, Bahamas chief aviation specialist. ARTISTIC CHOCK PRESENTATION TO RENOWNED AVIATION ARTIST Well-known aviation artist Sam Lyons was barely successful in fighting back tears when he was presented with a unique, hand painted chock from Bahamian Out Island student Ozeke Swain during the recent Sun n Fun Avi ation Show. Mr Lyons told the student that it was one of the best gifts that he had ever received and that he would cherish it because it was given to him as an artist from an artist. Pictured at the presentation are a representative of the Stella Maris Resort Long Island, Ozeke Swain, Sam Lyons and his wife, and Bahamas Aviation Department manager Leonard Stuart. Bahamas participates in aviation show KINGSTON, Jamaica Associated Press A JAMAICAN court has convicted the reputed leader of one of the country's pow erful gangs. A judge convicted Chan Tesha Miller on Friday of robbery, assault and a weapons possession. The trial that was being followed closely in a country that has long struggled with gang violence. The 31-year-old Miller is the reputed leader of the Clansman and his arrest in December had triggered protests in the Spanish Town community where the gang is a powerful presence. Miller has past brushes with the law. He was arrested in Tampa, Florida in 2006 and deported to Jamaica to face a trial in a triple murder but was found innocent. A judge acquitted him of murder again last year in a separate case. J AMAIC A CONVICTS REPUTED 'CLANSMAN' GANG LEADER CARIBBEAN NEWS

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S A T U R D A Y A P R I L 1 6 2 0 1 1 T H E T R I B U N E P A G E 9 INSIDE Bulls have high hopes for playof f run CYCLING JR TEAM OFF THE Bahamas Cycling Federation will have a fivemember team in Miami, Florida competing in a two-day meet to help groom them for future international meets. The team is comprised of Roy Colebrooke Jr., Anthony Biggie' Colebrooke, Antinece Sim mons, Justin Minns and Petron Lightbourne. Federation president Roy Colebrooke and New Providence Cycling Association's president Barron Turbo' Musgrove will travel as the manager and coach. CRICKET BAHAMAS FAILED TO QUALIFY T H E B ah a m a s m e n s n a t i o n a l c r i c k e t t ea m f a il e d t o q u a li f y f o r t h e p l a yo f f s a t t h e I n t e rn a t i o n a l Cr ic k et Co u n c i l D i vi si o n I I T o u rn a m e n t t h a t w a s p la y ed in S u r in a m A f t e r p o st i n g a 2 1 w i n l o s s r e c o rd t h e t e am e v en t u al ly l o st it s la s t t w o g a me s b y s ix w ic k e t s t o h o st S u ri n a m a n d b y 4 8 r u n s t o Be li z e T h e B a h a ma s w o n t h e i r f i r st t w o g a m es o v e r t h e T u r k s a n d Ca ic o s an d P an a m a T h e t e am c o m p r is ed o f W h it c li f f A t k i n so n J o n at h o n B a rr y, G re g o ry T ay lo r J r R y an T a p p i n J u li o J e m is o n De r ri c k G i t t en s J r A lb er t P et e r s, S h an ak a P e re ra Ha m il t o n G i ll ar d G a r y C a m p b e ll L as al le T h o m p s o n Co d y D e an A n d re w N a s h a n d R u d o l p h F o x w i ll r et u r n h o m e o n S u n d a y. SOFTBALL BGDSA ACTION THE Bahamas Gov ernment Departmental Softball Association will continue its regular season action this weekend at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex. Today's schedule North Field 2 p.m. Police Interceptors vs Sandilands (II) 3:30 p.m. Defence Waves vs Finance Halth (L) 5 p.m. Defence Floaters vs CAD Nailers (I) South Field 2:15 p.m. BPSU Strikers vs Police Royals (L) 3 p.m. Customs Taxmen vs Defence Cannons (II) 4:30 p.m. Prison Reformers vs BTC Lasers (II) Sunday's schedule North Field 1 p.m. Customs Taxmen (II) vs BTC Ringers (I) 2:15 p.m. Sandilands Shredders vs Defence Cannons (II) 3:45 p.m. Police royals vs Defence Waves (L) 5 p.m. US Customs vs PH Authority (II) South Field 2:30 p.m. Police Supporters vs Finance Health (L) 4 p.m. Police Interceptors vs BTC Lasers (II) 5 p.m. Defence Floaters vs Police Chefs (I) SAILING CORRECTION OF CLASS I T w a s i n c o r r e c t l y s t a t e d o n F r i d a y s S p o r t s P a g e t h a t S i r D u r w a r d S e a Wo l f K n o w l e s w o n t h e S u n s f i s h 1 9 4 7 W o r l d C h a m p i o n s h i p t i t l e I t w a s a c t u a l l y t h e S t a r C l a s s a s c o r r e c t l y r e p o r t e d o n P a g e T w o o f t h e M a i n S e c t i o n T h e T r i b u n e a p o l o g i s e s t o K n o w l e s a n d h i s f a m i l y f o r t h e e r r o r spor ts NOTES By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net T HE R e al Dea l Sh o c ke rs p r o v e d o n ce a g a i n i n t h e N e w Providence Basketball Asso ciati on's best-of-sev en champ i o n s h i p s e r i e s a g a i n s t t h e Co m mo nwe a l th B an k G i a nt s that they are for real. Thursday night at the DW D a v i s G y m n a s i u m t h e S ho ck er s a l s o ha d a co m pl et e l i n e u p e x c e p t f o r K e v i n Coakley who had t o si t ou t a o n e g a m e s u s p e n s i o n ( a l o n g w i t h G i a n t s R e n a l d o B a i l l o u ) a n d t h e y h e l d o n f o r a n impressive 102-96 win. M o r e i m p o r t a n t l y i t p u t t h e Rea l De al i n the dri ver' s seat as they surged ahead 3-2 and c o u l d d e t h r o n e C o m m o n we a lt h Ba nk wi th a v i cto ry i n game six tonight. If n ec es s ar y ga me s ev en will be played on Tuesday. W h e n w e c o m e t h e S h o c k e r s c o m e t o w i n s a i d a j u b i l a n t R e a l D e a l c o a c h J a m e s Pr i ce L a s t y e a r i n t he c h a m p i o n s h i p t h e y o u t played us. If you noticed this year, we have our team back a n d w e r e h a r d e r t h a n w e were. "Lasario (Bones Burrows) wasn't there last year and we had some fellows who didn't want to pla y. This year, our o n l y p r o b l e m i s g e t t i n g e v e r y b o d y o u t a t t h e s a m e t i m e b e c a u s e o f w o r k c o m m i t m e n t s B u t w h e n w e h a v e e ve r y b o d y o u t w e' r e t o u gh to beat." While Coakley had to sit it out on the bench and watch h i s t e a mm a t e s g o t o w o r k P r i c e s a i d t h e y a r e l o o k i n g forward to his return tonight t o h e l p b o o s t t h e i r i n s i d e game. Th a t sh ou l d fr e e up L o re nz o Ca rt er to c o nt inu e t o do his damage on the outside. S hooting 9 -of-22 from t h e fie ld, 3 -o f7 fr o m th e t hr ee p oi n t l i ne a nd 7 o f 9 f r om t he f r e e t h r o w l i ne C a rt e r l e d t h e a t t a c k f o r t h e S h o ck e r s w i t h a g a m e h i g h 2 8 p o i n t s i n 3 8 m i n u t e s H e a l s o p u l l e d d o w n 1 3 r e b o u n d s a n d h a d t h r e e assists. B u r r o w s w h o m i s s e d g a m e s t w o a n d t h r e e h a d an ot he r do u ble -d ou b le w ith 26 points on 8-of-19 from the f i e l d a n d 1 0 o f 1 6 f r o m t h e f o u l l i n e i n 3 3 m i n u t e s H e a l s o h a d 1 3 r e b o u n d s f i v e assists and two steals. T h e S h o c k e r s a l s o g o t 1 4 p o i n t s a p i e c e f r o m S i d n e y S e a M at e' Hi llary and Barr i n g t o n C a r t e r a l o n g w i t h eight points and 14 rebounds from Ian Wire' Pinder, who had double duties that night, h a v i n g p l a y e d e a r l i e r i n a B a p t i s t S po r t s C o u nc i l s p l a y off game at the Baillou Hills Sp or tin g C omp lex f or Temple Fellowship as they avoid ed elimination. The Giants, who saw their 1 8 0 g a m e w i n n i n g s t r e a k snapped in game two, got 26 p oi nt s o n 1 2o f26 fr o m t he f i e l d a n d 2 o f 5 f r o m t h e c h a r i t y s t r i p e f r o m G a m a l i a l R o s e in 34 minutes. M a r k H a n n a a l s o h a d 2 6 p oi nt s o n 1 1o f21 fr o m t he fiel d, 3 -o f-6 fr om th e th r eep o i n t a r c h a n d 1 o f 4 f r o m t h e f o u l l i n e i n 3 9 m i n u t e s H e a l s o h a d 1 2 r e b o u n d s a n d f o u r assists. Michael Ferley' Bain con tributed 25 points with seven rebounds, six assists and five s t ea l s wh i l e Je re m y H ut ch i n s o n h a d 1 3 p o i n t s a n d 1 1 rebounds. B u t t h a n k s t o t h e S h o c k e r s i n t e r i o r d e f e n c e t h e G i a nt s sa w Ri ca rd o P i er re g o scoreless in 20 minutes as he s h o t 0 f o r 7 f r o m t h e f i e l d a n d 0-for -5 from th e thr ee-point line. Credit the Shockers' victo ry to their ability to stick to t hei r g am e pl an, accordin g to Lorenzo Carter. "W e know we had to com e o ut wi t h a l ot of in te nsi t y a nd t a k e t h e b a l l t o t h e m h e in sis t ed "I th in k th ey ar e a l i tt le bit w in ded be cause t he y a re m uch bi g g er a nd s tr on ge r Shockers prove they are the R E A L D E A L FelipŽ Major /Tribune staff T a k e s 3 2 l e a d i n b e s t o f s e v e n s e r i e s SEE page 10 UP THE COURT: Real Deal Shockers' Sidney Sea Mate' Hillary dribbles the ball through the defence of Commonwealth Bank Giants' Michael Ferley' Bain. TO THE HOOP: Real Deal Shockers' Lasario Bones' Burrows glides through the defence of the Com monwealth Bank Giants. LAY-UP: Commonwealth Bank Giants' Michael Ferley' Bain goes up for a left-handed layup over a Real Deal Shockers' defender.

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SPORTS P AGE 10, SA TURDA Y APRIL 16, 201 1 TRIBUNE SPORTS T EM P LE F el lo w sh ip st av ed o f f e l i m i n a t i o n b y p u l l i n g o f f a 4 42 9 r o u t o n T h u r s d a y o v e r C h r i s t i a n Ta be r na cl e to fo rc e a thir d de cid ing g am e i n t he B ap t i s t S p o r t s C o u n c i l 's 2 0 1 1 R e v D r D a v i d S J o h n s o n B a s k e t b a l l C l a s s m e n s p r e s i d e n t division. That game will be played on Sat urday at 4 p.m. at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex with the winner advancing to the best-of-three divi sio nal champi onship series aga i nst Macedonia. O n T h u r s d a y M a c e d o n i a c a m e f r o m b e h i n d t o k n o c k o f f L a t t e r D a y E a g l e s 4 1 3 2 c o m p l e t i n g a t w o g a m e s w e e p i n t h e i r f i r s t r o u n d p l a y o f f s A l s o o n T h u r s d a y t h e v i c e p r e s i d e n t s d i v i s i o n a l f i n a l w a s d e t e r mined. P e n n a n t w i n n i n g E v a n g e l i s t i c C e n t e r s w e p t a s i d e M a c e d o n i a N o 2 w h i l e H o p e C e n t e r w i t h t h e i r c h e e r ing squad from their youth depart ment in the stands, held off Golden G a t e s 4 2 3 9 f o r t h e i r t w o g a m e sweep. T he div is ion al fina ls will be gi n on Tuesday. Today, the first round playoffs in both the 15-and-under and 19-andu nd e r di v is i on s wil l g e t u nd e rw a y a t 10 a.m. H e r e s a s u m m a r y o f T h u r s d a y s games played: TEMPLE FELLOWSHIP 44, C H R I S T I A N T A B E R N A C L E 2 9 B ra sh a w Wh ite a nd T r e v or S m ith s cor e d 1 4 a nd 1 3 po ints r e sp ec tiv e ly to lead the divisional pennant win ners in a must win game. I a n W i r e P i n d e r h e l p e d o u t wi th six before he dashed off to the DW Davis Gymnasium to help the Real Deal Shockers take a 3-2 lead over t h e Commonwe alth Ba nk Gia nt s in the NPBA championship series. Tavares Roker had nine and Jef fery Rolle added eight in the loss. MACEDONIA 41, LATTER-DAY 32 K a r o n P r a t t c a m e u p w i t h 2 3 p o i n t s an d Ras had Kno w les h ad ei ght t o s e c u r e t h e s w e e p f o r M a c e d o n i a T i no S t r a c ha n s co r e d 1 4 a n d P e r e z T h om p s o n ha d e i g h t i n t h e l os s HOPE CENTER 42, GOLDEN GATES 39 K e n o A r c h e r s c o r e d 1 4 a n d R i c a r do S mi th h a d 1 0 i n com p le ti ng the s w e e p f o r H o p e C e n t e r m u c h t o t h e d e l i g h t o f t h e i r l a r g e g r o u p o f s p e c t a t o r s w h o b r o u g h t t h e i r y o u t h m e e t i n g t o t h e p a r k i n s u p p o r t o f t h e i r t e a m R a y n a r d M i n u s s c o r e d 1 2 a n d S t e v e n C u l m e r h a d e i g h t i n a l o s i n g e f f o r t TODAY'S SCHEDULE COURT ONE 10 a.m. Macedonia vs Agape (15-AndUnder) 11 a.m. Golden Gates vs Macedonia No.1 (19-And-Under) Noon Agape vs Christian Tabernacle (19-And-Under) 1 p.m. Latter-Day vs Temple Fellowship (15-And-Under) 2 p.m. Temple Fellowship vs LatterDay (19-And-Under) 3 p.m. Mt. Tabor vs Macedonia No.2 (19-And-Under) 4 p.m. Game three, if necessary. Temple Fellowship vs Christian Tabernacle (M). COURT TWO 10 a.m. Temple Fellowship vs LatterDay (15-And-Under) 11 a.m. Latter-Day vs Temple Fellowship (19-And-Under) Noon Macedonia No.2 vs Mt. Tabor (19-And-Under) 1 p.m. Agape vs Macedonia (15-AndUnder) 2 p.m. Macedonia No.1 vs Golden Gates (19-And-Under) 3 p.m. Christian Tabernacle vs Agape (19-And-Under) 4 p.m. Game three, if necessary. TUESDAY'S SCHEDULE COURT ONE 7 p.m. 19-And-Under. 8 p.m. Winner Temple Fellowship/Christian Tabernacle vs Macedonia (M). COURT TWO 7 p.m. 19-And-Under. 8 p.m. Hope Center vs Evangelistic Center (M). T emple Fellowship holds of f Christian T abernacle ANNUALLY, the Junior B a s e b a l l L e a g u e o f N a s s a u ho sts th e ir Al l-S ta r We e ke nd and Fun Day. It is a time of the season w h e r e m a n y p e o p l e c o m e o u t and enjoy watching some of t h e u p an d co m in g t al en t e d p l a y e r s i n t h e J B L N g o i n g head to head. T h i s y e a r t h e A l l S t a r g a m e s a n d m i n i c o o k o u t t a k e s p l a c e o n A p r i l 1 6 t h 2011 from 10am. The all star g a m e s w o r k v e r y w e l l a n d b r e e d c o m p e ti ti v e n e s s a m o n g the players. During regular season the p l a y e r s f r o m m a n y t e a m s p l a y against each other but the all stars allow many of them to p l a y t o g e t h e r o n t h e s a m e teams. The All Star games work b y s p l i t t i n g u p t h e b e s t 2 4 players in each division into t w o t eams o f 12. T hese t w o t e a m s a r e t i t l e d t h e P r e s i d e n t s vs. the Commissioners. Fr om Co a c h P i tc h a g e s 7 -8 throug h to s enio rs a g es 15 -20 t h e se p l ay er s w i ll gi v e t h ei r b e s t o n t h e f i e l d i n g r e a t y o u t h b a s e b a l l T h e f i r s t g a m e is scheduled for a 10am start whe re yo u will se e the Coac h Pitch Presidents vs. Commis sioners. C o a c h P i t c h p r o v es t i m e i n a n d o u t t o b e a v e r y c r u ci a l p a r t o f a y o u n g p l a y e r s g r o w t h i n b a s e b a l l a s t h e basics are carried over to the b a l l b e i n g p i t c h e d t o t h e m w h e r e a s T B a l l i t s i t s o n a Tee. Co ac h Pi tch is fo ll owe d by Mi nor ( 9-1 0 ) a nd ju nio rs (1 3 1 4 ) a t 1 2 : 3 0 p m a n d M a j o r (1 1 -1 2 ) a nd s e ni or s (1 5 -2 0 ) a t 3pm. In addition to great youth b as eb a l l w i l l b e g r e a t f o o d T h e r e w i l l b e g r i l l e d s t e a k d i n n e r s a v a i l a b l e f o r $ 1 0 Money raised from this goes t o w a r d h e l p i n g o u r p l a y e r s tr a v e l a b r o a d t o th e Ba h a m a s B a s e b a l l F e d e r a t i o n ( B B F ) N a t i o n a l s i n F r e e p o r t a n d P o n y R e g i o n a l s i n P u e r t o Rico. All-Star W eekend and Fun Day set to showcase new and upcoming talent FROM page nine Real Deal and s o it's ha rde r for them t o run with us." Ca rte r s ai d a s lo ng a s the y sti ck to the ir ga m e p la n, the y ca n ce le br a te a s c ha mp ion s. G i a n t s c o a c h P e r r y Th om ps on wa s d is a ppo in ted with th e o ffici a ting H u t c h i n s o n w h o a l o n g w i t h hi s te a m-m a te s wa s hi t wi th a cou pl e of k ey fou ls dow n the str e tch wh e n the y m ou nte d a l a t e s u r g e c o n c u r r e d w i t h T h o m p s o n W o r s e o f f i c i a t i n g i n t h e l e a g u e t h a t I e v e r e x p e r i e nce d, h e ch a rg e d. S u r e t h e S h o c k e r s p l a y e d a g r e a t g a m e a n d t h e y c a m e o u t on to p, b ut a l ot of th e fou ls tha t we r e ca ll ed cha ng e d the g a m e a r o u n d E v e n t h o u g h t h e S ho c ker s p la yed a go o d g a me we di dn t g e t t he be n e fit do wn the str e tch. T o n i g h t H u t c h i n s o n s a i d t he ir fans can e xpe c t them t o l a y i t a l l o u t o n t h e c o u r t b e c a u s e w e d o n t i n t en d t o g iv e up o u r t r o ph y j us t li k e t h a t W e r e g o i n g t o p l a y h ar d an d t r y t o f o rc e a g am e s e v e n ORLANDO, Fla. Associated Press I F T H E O r l a n d o M a g i c s 2 0 1 0 1 1 s e a s o n w e r e l i k e n e d t o a fair y tale, it wo u ld p ro b ab ly b e a m i x o f T h e W i z a r d o f O z a n d A l i c e i n W o n d e r l a n d B a c k i n D e c e m b e r t h e M a g ic' s c h am pi o ns h ip jo u r n ey was d e t ou r e d by a m a s s i v e t r a d e th at alter ed th eir r o ster Th en i n th e s ec o n d h a l f o f th e s c h ed u le, in ju r ie s in c o n s is ten c y an d o th e r g r o w i n g p a i n s l e f t a t e a m th at m a d e t h e N B A F i n a l s t wo y e a r s a g o f e e l i n g l i k e i t w a s tr u d g i n g th r o u gh s o m e s tr a n g e w o r l d S a t u r da y ni g h t f a m i l i a r i t y retu r ns as Or lan do o pen s th e p l a y o f f s a g a i n s t a n A t l a n t a team it s wept ou t o f t h e Easte r n C o n f e r e n c e s e m i f i n a l s a y e a r a g o B u t t h i s t i m e t h e M a g i c f a c e a H a w k s s q u a d t h a t h as ha d thei r nu m be r t h is s eas o n "Th ey go t a lo t o f the sam e g u y s b u t as fa r as th e wa y t h e y p lay aga in s t u s it' s a lo t d iffer e n t M a g i c c o a c h S t a n V a n Gu n d y s aid of Atlan t a, wh ich h a s b e a t e n O r l a n d o i n t h r e e o u t o f f o u r m e e t i n g s i n 2 0 1 0 1 1 Th e Haw ks jettiso n ed po in t gu ard Mik e Bib b y in favo r o f K i r k H i n r i c h i n a F e b r u a r y trade w ith W a s hin g to n. They a l s o m o v e d J a s o n C o l l i n s t o c e n t e r a n d A l H o r fo r d t o p o w er f o rward allowing Ho rf o rd a l o t m o r e f l e x i b i l i t y o n t h e o ff en s ive en d H o r f o r d i s a v e r a g i n g a car eer b es t 15.3 p o in ts o ver all a n d 1 6 3 i n t h e f o u r g a m e s a g a i ns t O rl a n do. H i nr i ch a n o f f a n d o n s t a r t e r w i t h t h e W i z a r d s h a s c l e a r l y f o u n d a g r o o v e i n t h e H a w k s l i n e u p A n d t h o u g h C o l l i n s n u m b e r s h aven 't be en g reat ( 4.5 p o in t s a n d 3 2 r e b o u n d s ) a g a i n s t Or lan d o, by guar d in g Dwigh t Ho war d h e h as allo wed H o rfo rd to avo id fo ul t r o u ble. W heth er it was th at ad ju stmen t o r n ot, Ho war d and th e Ma g ic h av e s u f fe r e d o f fe n s i v ely again s t Atlan ta. As a t eam O r land o is a vera g i n g o n l y 8 2 5 p o i n t s p e r g a m e w hi l e s ho ot i ng j us t 3 8 p er cen t o ve ra ll an d 22 p er cen t f ro m t h e 3 p o i n t l i n e T h os e are all b elo w its s ea s o n averages o f 99 .2 p o in ts, 46 per cen t fro m th e field an d 36 per cen t fro m 3. "Th at's no t u s. We want to be h i gh 90 s, l o w 1 00s, point gu ard J ameer N els o n said "If we c o u l d s c o r e 20 0, t h at wo u ld b e gr eat." Ho war d 's ind ivid u al o u tpu t h a s al s o w an ed A ft er g o i n g 1 0 fo r 20 an d sco r in g 27 p o in ts in t h e No v 8 w in ove r At lant a, h e was held b elow 50 pe rce nt s h o o t i n g i n t h e f i n a l t h r e e ga m es a n d s h o t ju s t 43 p er c en t o v e r a l l H o w a r d s a i d t u r n i n g t h a t ar ou n d isn 't a co m pl ex pr o p os i t i o n "Th e thr ee games th at th ey b eat u s in the p ac e was slo w an d we p layed t o th eir lik in g," H o w a r d s a i d I n o r d e r to b ea t th ese guy s we h ave to r un and we h ave to m o ve." H a w k s c o a c h L a r r y D r e w s aid thei r ball m ovem en t will b e p i v o t a l i n r e p l i c a t i n g t h e r egul ars easo n s u cces s. "Y o u can 't jus t s et up Y ou h a v e t o a t t a c k t h e m D r e w s aid. "Even th ou gh th ey h ave t h e m o s t p o t e n t d e f e n s i v e p l a y er in t h e leagu e do wn th er e in th e m id d le, yo u h ave to attack t he m i n t h e pa i nt Yo u c a n' t h a v e a f e a r a b o u t h i m a n d we've d o n e th at so far ." F o r t h e f i r s t t i m e i n t w o m o n th s th e M a gi c h a d 12 p l a yer s av ai la b le fo r th e ir f in a l two p r a c t i c e s t h i s w e e k a n d a r e h op i n g t o ha v e ba c k re se r v e gu a r d J. J. R ed ick. H e m issed t h e f i n a l 1 7 ga m e s w it h a lo w e r ab do m inal s t r ain an d wi ll get a fi n al e va lu a ti o n a t t h e te am s S a t u r d a y m o r n i n g s h o o t a r o u n d M a g i c l o o k i n g t o t u r n t h i n g s around against Hawks OR L A NDO M ag i c c o ac h S t an V a n Gu n d y d i sa g re es w i t h a ref e re e c al l in their loss to the Atlanta Hawks during the second half of an NBA basketball game in Atlanta Wednesday, March 30, 2011. (AP) SAN ANTONIO Associated Press C H R I S B O S H w a s n e v e r s i g n i n g w i t h S a n A n t o n i o A t l e a s t t h a t s w h a t e v e r y o n e fi g u r e d A t o n e t i m e w e h a d c e r t a i n l y c o n s i d e re d g o i n g a f t e r B o s h, S p ur s o w n e r P e t er H o l t r ec e n tl y r e c a l l ed W e d i d n 't sp en t a lot of time on that. W e d id n't fe e l l i k e w e c o u l d c o m p et e A t t h e t i m e w h o d i dn t t h i n k t h a t a b o u t th e S p u r s ? Y e t o n e y e a r a f t e r S a n A n t o n i o a p p ea r ed t o b e f a d i n g N B A r o y a l ty b a r e l y m a k i n g t h e p l a y o f f s c o n s t a n t i n j u r i e s t o a n a g i n g c o r e a r o s t e r o v e r h a u l t h a t n e v e r w o r k e d o u t t h e S p u r s o p e n t h e p l a y o f f s b a c k a t o p t h e W e s t e r n C o n f e r e n c e S a n A n to n i o h o s t s M e m p h i s i n G a m e 1 o n S u n d a y a s t h e N o 1 s e ed f o r t h e fi f th ti m e i n t h e T i m D u n c an er a I t' s a 1 4y e ar s p an t h a t i n c l u d e s f o u r c h a m p io ns hi ps a nd t h e h i g he s t w i nni n g pe r c e n ta g e i n t h e N B A ( 7 0 0 ) b u t t h e t e a m a pp e are d on t he downside l ast sp ri ng a ft e r t h e w o r s t s e a s o n y e t. S i x m o n t h s l a t e r T o n y P a r k e r a r r i v e d at tra in in g c am p p r ed i cti n g th i s wo u l d b e t h e l as t s h o t f o r th e S p u r s I t w a s a n o w -o r n e v e r d e c l a r a t io n t h a t s o u n d e d a lm o s t b r u ta l l y h o n e s t a t t h e t i m e N o w i t l o o k s l i k e t h e S p u r s c o u l d h a v e m o r e c h a n c e s a h e a d o f th e m Ev e r y g a m e ev e r y p la y o ff i s s p ec ia l r i gh t n o w. I u n d er s ta n d t h a t D u n c a n s a i d F r i d a y T h i s i s t h e e n d o f m y c a r e e r th e l a s t c o u p l e o f y e ar s I m n o t t ak i n g a n y t h i n g fo r g r a n t e d E v er y y e a r w e r e g i ve n our la st cha nce (t o w i n a t it l e ). W e l l ta k e t h is a s i t i s M a y b e w e l l g e t a n o t h e r o n e M a y b e w e w o n t T h e S p u r s m a y s t a r t t h e p l a y o f f s w i t h o u t M a n u G i n o b i l i w h o s p r a i n e d h i s r i g h t e lbow i n We dnesda y' s re g ula r se a so n f i n a l e a t P h o e n i x T h e A l l S t a r i s l i s t e d a s d o u b t f u l fo r G a m e 1 b u t tw e e t e d T h u r s d a y t ha t t he pa i n w a s a l re a dy a l m os t g o n e. S p u r s c o ac h G r e gg P o p o v i c h s a i d F r i d a y t h a t G in o b i l i w i l l p l ay d u r i n g t h e Gr izz lies s eri es. It's o n e of on ly a few b um p s Sa n An ton io ( 61-21) h as face d w h i le carryi n g t he N B A's b e st recor d u n t i l t h e f i n a l w e e k a n d p o s t i n g t h e t h i r d b e s t r e g u la r s e as o n i n f r a n c h i s e h i s t o r y Spurs begin playoffs in familiar spot No. 1 CHICAGO Associated Press D O M I N A N T d u r i n g t h e r e g u l a r s e a s o n D e r r i c k R o s e a n d t h e C h i c a g o B u l l s a r e i n u n f a m i l i a r t e r r i t o r y a s t h e p l a y o ff s b e g i n E x p e c t a t i o n s a r e s o a r i n g a n d i t s n o t h a r d to s e e w h y A l l th e B u l l s d i d w a s p o s t th e b e s t r e c o r d i n t h e l e a g u e a t 6 2 2 0 a n d s e c u r e h o m e c o u r t a d v a n t a g e t h r o u g h o u t t h e p l a y o f f s T h e y m e e t t h e I n d i a n a Pa c e r s i n a fi r s t r o u n d s e r i e s s t a r t i n g S a t u r d a y a n d a n y t h i n g l e s s th a n a d e e p r u n w o u l d b e a b i g d i s a p p o i n t m e n t Th e Bu lls are heavy f avorit es thi s t i m e a f t e r b a c k t o b a c k 4 1 w i n s e a s o n s a n d fi r s t r o u n d p l a y o f f e x i t s a n d R o s e i s c u r i o u s t o s e e h o w i t a l l p l a y s o u t. H e s a i d t h e B u l l s w e r e t a k i n g a b u s i n e s s a s u s u a l a p p r o a c h a s t h e y p r e p a r e d f o r a Pa c e r s t e a m th a t w e n t 3 7 4 5 a n d c h a n g e d c o a c h e s d u r i n g t h e s e a s o n Eve r yb ody sa y s it's d iffe re nt, bu t I v e t h o u g h t a b o u t i t R o s e s a i d F r i d a y a f t e r p r a c ti c e i n D e e r f i e l d I l l I t s n o d i f f e r e n t F o r u s i t s n o d i f f e r e n t W e r e g o i n g to p r e p a r e th e s a m e w a y W e r e g o i n g t o p r a c t i c e t h e s a m e w a y ( C o a c h T o m Th i b o de au ) al w a ys s ai d at t h e b e g i n n i n g o f t h e s e a s o n t h a t w e w e r e p r a c t i c i n g t o p r e p a r e l i k e i t s t h e e n d o f t h e s e a s o n T h a t l a s e r l i k e f o c u s h e l p e d t h e B u l l s m a t c h t h e i r b e s t r e c o r d s i n c e t h e 1 9 9 7 9 8 s e a s o n, w h e n M ic h a e l J o r d a n a nd S c o t t i e P i p p e n c o m p l e t e d t h e i r s e c o n d c h a m p i o n s h i p t h r e e -p e a t N o t s i n c e t h e n h av e e x p e c t a t i o n s be e n th is hi gh W he n th e y m ad e t he p layof fs in rec ent seaso ns, th e B ull s w e r e u s u a l l y t h e u n d e r d o g j u s t l i k e t h e P a c e r s O b v i o u s l y t o w i n a g a m e o r t w o i n C h i c a g o w o u l d b e g r e a t I n d i a n a s R o y H i b b e r t s a i d T h a t s w h a t w e r e p l a n n i n g o n d o i n g I f t h e y w o n b o t h f a n s i n C h i c a g o c e r t a i n l y w o u l d b e g r o a n i n g L i t t l e w a s e x p e c t e d o f t h e B u l l s t h e p a s t t w o y e a r s w h e n t h e y w o n 4 1 g a m e s a n d b o w e d o u t i n t h e f i r s t r o u n d a g a i n s t B o s t o n a n d C l e v e l a n d b u t t h i s o f c o u r s e i s h a r d l y t h e s a m e t e a m C h i c a g o r e p l a c e d t h e f i r e d V i n n y D e l N e g r o w i t h T h i b o d e a u a l o n g t i m e N B A a s s i s t a n t a n d g u t t e d t h e r o s t e r B y t h e t i m e t h e m a k e o v e r w a s f i n i s h e d t h e B u l l s h a d a d d e d t h e l o w p o s t s c o r e r t h e y w e r e c r a v i n g i n C a r l o s B o o z e r a n d e n o u g h r o l e p l a y e r s t o g i v e t h e m one of the de epe st rota t i ons. As the w i n s m o u n t e d t h e s t i n g o f m i s s i n g o u t o n L e B r o n J a m e s D w y a n e W a d e a n d C h r i s B o s h i n f r e e a g e n c y f a d e d Wit h Ros e asse rting himse lf as an M V P c a n d i d a t e t h e B u l l s w e r e a b l e t o withs tan d l osin g Booz er a nd Joa kim N oa h fo r sig ni fica nt time be cau se o f i n j u r i e s w h i l e r e k i n d l i n g s o m e o f t h a t c h a m p i o n s h i p -e r a e x c i t e m e n t I t s t h e p l a y o f f s d u d e N o a h s a i d I t d o e s n t g e t m o r e e x c i t i n g t h a n th i s I t s t h e b i g g e s t s t a g e i n t h e w o r l d W e r e pla y ing in fro nt o f un be lie v ab le fa ns t h a t a r e g o i n g t o b e g o i n g n u t s a l l r e d I t s g o i n g t o b e b a n a n a s i n t h e r e O f c o u r s e t h e r e s a l o n g w a y to g o B ut t her e's a di f f eren t yet f am il iar v i b e I j u s t t h i n k t h e e xp e c t at i o n s a r e hig her ," v e t e ra n f o rwa rd Luol De ng s a i d B u t I r e a l l y t h i n k w e l l w e l c o m e t h a t T h r o u g h o u t t h e s e a s o n I t h o u g h t e v e r y t h i n g w e d i d w a s t o b u i l d u p to w h a t w e r e g o i n g t o d o i n t h e p l a y o f f s I r e a l l y t h i n k w e r e a l l p r e p a r e d w e l l e s p e c i a l l y wi t h t he w a y t hi s c oa ch i n g s t a ff g e t s u s r e a d y f o r g a m e s H o w i m p r e s s i v e w e r e th e B u l l s d u r i n g t h e r e g u l a r s e a s o n ? C o n s i d e r t h i s T h e y s t a r t e d 9 8 b u t s t i l l f i n i s h e d w i t h 6 2 w i n s p u t t i n g T h i b o d e a u i n a t i e w i t h P a u l W e s t p h a l o f t h e 1 9 9 2 9 3 P h o e n i x S u n s f o r t h e m o s t w i n s b y a f i r s t -y e a r c o a c h T h e i r l o n g e s t l o s i n g s t r e a k ? A whopp ing two g ames. The y did th a t f o u r t i m e s An d th e y d o m i n a t e d t h e C e n t r a l d i v i s i o n a t 1 5 1 f a l l i n g 1 1 5 1 0 8 i n o v e r t i m e a t I n d i a n a e v e n t h o u g h R o s e s c o r e d a c a r e e r h i g h 4 2 p o i n ts N o te a m h e l d o p p o n e n t s t o a l o w e r s h o o t i n g p e r c e n t a g e o r o u t r e b o u n d e d t h e m b y a w i d e r m a r g i n t h a n t h e B u l l s w h o w e r e a l s o s e c o n d t o M i a m i i n a v e r a g e s c o r i n g d i f fe r e n t i a l W e r e g o i n g t o g e t e v e r y b o d y s b e s t s h o t g u a r d R o n n i e B r e w e r s a i d "W e'r e g oin g to h av e a b ulls -ey e on o u r b a c k s a n d t h e f r o n t i f y o u w a n t t o p u t i t l i k e t h a t B u l l s f a c e s P a c e r s h o p e f o r d e e p p l a y o f f r u n 2011 NBA PLAYOFFS CHICAGO Bulls' Derrick Rose (1) drives to the basket around the Milwaukee Bucks' Andrew Bogut (6) during the first half of an NBA basketball game Saturday, March 26, 2011, in Milwaukee. (AP)


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