The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01827
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: 4/07/2011
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Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
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General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:01827

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N ASSA U AND BAHAMA ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER V olume: 107 No.112THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 2011 PRICE 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 W EATHER BREEZY, SUNSHINE HIGH 85F LOW 74F By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter n mckenzie@tribunemedia.net TWO men appeared in court yesterday in connec t ion with a drive-by shoot ing that left one woman d ead and another seriously i njured. Police have charged C harles Pandy, 37, of Winders Terrace, and Win s ton Whylly, 27 of Deliver ance Way, with the murder of 31-year-old Carol JeanJacques. The men have also been charged with the attemptedm urder of Rosita Louiceus. According to reports Ms Jacques, her two-year-old daughter and Ms Louiceus were walking home from a prayer meeting when they stopped at a shop to buy groceries shortly after 2pm last Wednesday. As they walked home on Florville Road, off Bacardi Road, a green Honda Civic occupied by three men pulled up. The men reportedly asked the women: "Do you need a ride?" before they opened fire on the women. Ms Jacques was fatally struck in her upper chest and was still holding her daughter when she fell to the ground. Ms Louiceus was reportedly shot in the shoul der. During their arraignment before Chief Magistrate TRY OUR D OUBLE M cFISH The Tribune THEPEOPLESPAPER BIGGESTANDBEST L ATESTNEWSONWWW.TRIBUNE242.COM YOURSOURCEFOROBITUARIES N N O O B B O O D D Y Y B B U U T T N N O O B B O O D D Y Y B B E E A A T T S S T T H H E E T T R R I I B B U U N N E E I I N N S S I I D D E E T T O O D D A A Y Y C C A A R R S S ! C C A A R R S S ! C C A A R R S S ! L L O O A A D D S S O O F F J J O O B B S S A A N N D D H H E E L L P P W W A A N N T T E E D D ! T T H H E E T T R R I I B B U U N N E E S S C C L L A A S S S S I I F F I I E E D D S S T T R R A A D D E E R R Cable & Wireless in control at BTC Pair in court accused of drive-by killing CHARGED WITH MURDER: Winston Whylly, 27, of Deliverance Way (left Felip Major /Tribune staff BTC'S privatisa tion was not marketed as aggressively as it could have been, conceded former Chairman Julian Francis. Mr Francis said that in hindsight, more promotion of the benefits that pri vatisation would bring could have been put out in the public in response to the loud criticisms of the deal. "I'll tell you what probably hasn't been as aggressive as it could have been, and that has been the promotion of the process and the transaction. We realise that we've probably been less aggressive on that aspect than we could have been," said the former Central Bank Governor on SEE page 12 PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham promised party supporters at their Bamboo Town meeting Tuesday night that there will be no hand in the cookie jar when BTC is sold to the Cable and Wireless Company (CWC Drawing comparisons between his governments sale of 51 per cent to CWC, and the PLPs deal to sell 49 per cent of BTC to Bluewa ter, Mr Ingraham reminded the audience that the PLP still cannot reveal to the public who are the actual princi pals behind Bluewater. They still cant tell who all was in the BTC deal with Bluewater. They said they would never sell it to a foreign company unless there was Bahamian ownership in it. Well they were selling 49 per cent, was Bahamian own ership in that? And if so, who are they? Where are they? SEE page 10 PRIME MINIS TER: N O HAND IN THE COOKIE JAR IN SALE OF BTC BTC PRIV A TISATION COULD HAVE HAD MORE AGGRESSIVE PROMOTION JULIANFRANCIS SEE page 12 By TANEKA THOMPSON T ribune Staff Reporter t thompson@tribunemedia.net A "NEW ERA" in the Bahamas telecommunications sector is on the horizon, according to Cable and Wireless Communications which assumed control of BTC yesterday. Executives of the London-based worldwide t elecommunications company and the treasurer signed off on agreements affecting the trans f er of 51 per cent of BTC's shares to CWC at a press conference in the Cabinet Office yesterday. SEE page 12 Two charged with womans murder VICTIM: Carol Jean-Jacques

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THE Inter-Development Bank is working in tandem with the Ministry of the Environment, and Bahamas Electricity Corp oration to condition energ y efficient behaviour and conservation best practices. T he effort will involve s uch programmes as distributing energy efficient l ight bulbs to grocery s tores around the country, a nd introducing solar-powered water heaters for gen-e ral use. Demands In 2010 a $70 billion general capital increase was a pproved for the bank to h elp it meet the demands of its member countries in a number of areas, including energy conservation. We at the bank are a bsolutely delighted to be p artnering with the gove rnment of the Bahamas in t his really important initia t ive. We are committed to supporting the government of the Bahamas and the people of the Bahamas in improving your energy security, said IDB representative Astrid Wynter. Our region is very heavi ly dependent on the use of fossil fuels for our primary e nergy needs. And so this fact alone raises the question of our e nergy security. As a country, in The B ahamas and as a region on the whole, we aree xtremely vulnerable.It a lso means we divert funds and pay a lot for energy, which otherwise might be used to invest in our continuing development. We are also subject to all the f luctuations as you can see right now in the price of o il. I n 2008, the IDB researched and discovered p roven methods of reduci ng energy consumption by 1 0 per cent over the next decade within the Caribbean and LatinA merican region that would cost only $16 billion by 2018. Were the investment not to be made, it would cost the region $53 billion to meet energy demands of t he future. These efficiency mea sures will not compromise peoples comfort or eco-n omic competitiveness. With the CFL lighting, you will be assuming the same level of usage but you willh ave a 70 per cent reduction in consumption, said Ms Wynter. This is one piece of the package. There is another piece here, which is a pane l for solar heating. It conv erts solar energy to heat a water tank. There are seve ral initiatives that yield a ltogether the greater efficiency of the use of energ y. Bulbs In December 2007, the US Congress passed the Energy Independence and Security Act that phases out the use of incandescent bulbs in America starting w ith 100-watt bulbs. C ountries like Australia, New Zealand and Cuba h ave already banned the bulbs and the Bahamas is a lso preparing to follow s uit. The increase in ordin ary capital between 2012 a nd 2015, 25 per cent of t hat by 2015 is to be dedicated to lending and operations in sustainable energy, climate change initiatives, and environmental sustainability. The current proportion o f the banks portfolio dedicated to those issues is five per cent. It means we aret o go from five to 25 per c ent by 2015, and this has come based on the demand from each of the countries and the governors of theb ank, said Ms Wynter. L OCAL NEWS PAGE 2, THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 2011 THE TRIBUNE IDB turns Bahamians on to regional energy efficiency C FL LIGHTBULBS w ill be distributed to grocery stores throughout the Bahamas as a part of the commitment that the IDB has to fulfilling the US deadline to become independent of fossil fuel energy.

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By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT The Grand Bahama Shipyard is preparingto bring in more than 200 for eign workers, revealed a company official who said not enough is being done to train Bahamians on the island. Joseph Darville, director of workforce development, report ed that the company is in the process of hiring 221 foreigners because of a lack of Bahamians qualified to fill positions at the shipyard. He was very critical of the Bahamas government, blaming both the current and past administrations for not doing enough to train Bahamians tofill the positions at the shipyard. wont apologise for the fact that we have to bring (for eigners) in, but I decry the fact that at this particular stage in our development, we still have to rely upon technical people from several different countries, including Poland, Romania, Bulgaria, Peru, the Philippines, Canada, and the list of countries goes on, Mr Darville said. Speaking at BTVIs Career and Technical Education Week, Mr Darville said the shipyard employs a labour force of about 850 900. He noted that of that num ber, only 240 are Bahamians and of the 240, only about 25 perform highly technical jobs. While noting that according to the shipyards heads of agreement, 80 per cent of the labour force should have been comprised of Bahamians and only 20 per cent by foreigners instead of the reverse Mr Darville said he does not blame the company. He noted that even though Grand Bahama is touted as the countrys industrial capital, the government is doing nothing to prepare Bahamians to take on the many jobs available in the industrial sector. An executive at another major industrial company in Freeport also expressed con cerns about the lack of educated, qualified Bahamians. The Bahamas cannot continue with the current level of education and compete against the world, or even in the Caribbean. When coupled with Bahamianisation, companies that must compete in the world market are being asked to compete with one arm tied behind their back mostly at the general labour level, the executive said. Mr Darville believes that the government has dropped the ball when it comes to educating young Bahamians. Our present government and the governments in the past have not put their money where their mouths are, not at all specifically with respect as to w hat happens in Grand Bahama, he said. He noted that the govern ment collects millions every year from issuing work permits, and wonders whether the rev enue collected is governments motive for granting so many work permits. Whatever it is, weve got to get it correct. We have got to correct these particular anom alies which exist between what is said and what is actual ly a reality, Mr Darville said. He suggested that if the gov ernment selected 50 high school students per year and paid fort heir training, there would be a sufficient supply of highly qualified Bahamian workers at the shipyard, BORCO and oth er industrial companies in Grand Bahama within a decade. The shipyard, which opened in 1999, now ranks as one of the premier ship repair facilities in the world. PROSECUTORS intend to seek the death penalty fora man convicted of the murder of a young woman whose body was discovered in bushes off the Charles Saunders highway in October 2008. A jury yesterday found M ichael Beckford guilty of t he October 4, 2008 murder of 18-year-old Sheanda Newton. N ewtons body was discovered wearing only underwear, and with a gash to the neck and burn marks on thef ace. Prosecutors alleged that Beckford killed the young woman because she gave him AIDS. Beckford however denied k illing Newton, knowing her o r having AIDS. Beckford appeared visibly frustrated after the juryr eturned with the unanimous guilty verdict yesterday. Newtons family who were present at court appearedr elieved. Beckford, who was repre sented by attorney Dorsey Mcphee, will remain on remanded pending a sentencing hearing before Jus-t ice Vera Watkins. Linda Evans and Anthony Delaney were the prosecutors. LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 2011, PAGE 3 $662&,$7('(*5(( THE unlawful sex trial of Bishop Earl Randy Fraser has been adjourned to May 30, at which time his wife is expected to testify. P rosecutors have accused Fraser, 53, of a busing his position of trust by having a sexual relationship with a 16-year-old girl he had agreed to counsel. It is alleged that Fraser, pastor of Pilgrim Baptist Temple on St James Road, had a sexual relationship with the girl b etween July 2005 and February 2006. F raser has denied committing the offenses and remains on $10,000 bail. By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net A JUDGE yesterday dismissed a malicious prosecu-t ion lawsuit brought against the police force by a man who was cleared of a murder charge two years ago. Justice Stephen Isaacs ruled yesterday that given the evidence, Stephen Stubbs had not proven that the police had acted with malice or had lacked reasonable and probable cause to bring charges against him. S tubbs, alias Die, spent 17 months in prison after he w as charged in the 2007 murder of Samuel Mouche McKenzie who was gunned down in a drive by shooting. H e was one of four men to be charged in the murder and w as cleared of the charge in J anuary 2009 after a magis trate found that there was not sufficient evidence to support the charge. S tubbs sued the police force f or the $20,000 he spent in legal fees and also sought unspecified damages and aggravated damages. Stubbs turned himself in at the Central Detective Unit onD ecember 4, 2007. While t here, he alleged, Assistant Superintendent Leon Bethell and Inspector BK Bonamy Jr demanded that he confess to the death of Samuel McKenzie. S tubbs also claimed that an o fficer who he was unable to i dentify, slammed his head into a wall after he refused to confess to the murder. He also alleged that the police forced key witnesses to give statements implicating him in McKenzies murder. Justice Isaacs found that the allegation that police a ttempted to coerce any witness to implicate the plaintiff (Stubbs by the fact that no witness said they saw Stubbs shoot anyone. S tubbs alleged that police a cted maliciously because they knew he would be remanded to prison because of the nature of the offence, although they knew that the statements were false. J ustice Isaacs dismissed the a ction and awarded costs to t he defendants. Stubbs was represented by attorney Roger Gomez Jr. Gary Francis and Stacie Williams represented the prosecution. Stephen Die Stubbs lawsuit against police is dismissed STEPHEN STUBBS PROSECUTORS TO SEEK DEATH PENALTY FOR MAN CONVICTED OF MURDER GB SHIPYARD TO BRING IN MORE THAN 200 F OREIGN WORKERS A 23-YEAR-OLD Kennedy Subdivision man charged in the murder of a phone card vendor killed during a home invasion in February was arraigned inM agistrates Court yesterday. P olice have charged Ricard o Bradley Brown, 23, in the F ebruary 26 murder of Charles Chrysostome, 27. B rown, who appeared before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez yesterday, was not required to enter a plea to the charge. The case has been a djourned June 22, when p rosecutors will present a v oluntary bill of indictment. B rown was remanded to Her Majestys Prison. M AN CHARGED WITH VENDORS MURDER BISHOP FRASERS WIFE EXPECTED TO TESTIFY BISHOP Earl Randy Fraser

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EDITOR, The Tribune. IN 2011, I hope that our Police Force will be able to make significant progress in reducing crime in The Bahamas, in particular in New Providence. I remain close to the force and being privy to the commitment of its management team and members I have faith, that this could be the year for the turn around in crime. Murders are a worrying problem. This is not a preventable crime. Burglaries, break-ins, armed robberies, v ehicle thefts and stealing pose a serious challenge. These are preventable crimes, which could be reduced if our residents would take commonsense and technical precau tions to protect their assets and property. The technical resources for the protection of v ehicles and residences are available. I implore residences to seek assistance. There is also the need for more neighbourhood crime watch programmes, which are successful in those areas where they are well organised. Police Divi sional Officers must encour-a ge and assist in the formation of such groups. A holistic, comprehensive and collective onslaught in the fight against crime is making progress. It is necessary, that the stakeholders from the judiciary, prison services, the Director of Public Prosecutions Office, the Police and other law enforcement agen cies hold round table discus sions and determine scientific analysis to reduce crime. The police must continue its intensive efforts to restore faith and trust in the force. The Police Complaints Unit whose role is to monitor and investi gate criminal offences involv ing police officers, police corruption and serious miscon duct. The unit must be committed to investigating promptly and efficiently all complaints made against police officers and most importantly discussing the results of the investigation with the aggrieved. The public must be satisfied, that such matters are not swept under the rug as fre quently alleged by critics and media persons. The police must continue with aggressive investigation of complaints against police officers, intense public education on the work of the PCU to unearth rogue elements of the force. The money being spent to improve the resources is commendable. The establishment of a court to hear gun cases will be an asset. The anklets, will provide some intelligence on the movements of criminals. Cameras are expected to be a plus, but should be considered for the charge rooms and cell blocks in police stations, which was implemented in the UK to ensure that everything done in those areas is in accordance with the law. It is a form of protection for the police and the persons in custody. A primary objective of the police is to rid our streets of gunmen and firearms. Success in their efforts would reduce murders and armed robberies. Money is being spent to acquire information. The struggle is costly to taxpayers. We need other sources of funding in order to get the requisite resources to ensure there is positive results to police initiatives. The information required by the police has to come from the grassroot areas where the criminals reside and associate. The likely persons to provide information are from those areas. They are not the average good citizen, who is likely t o come forward with the information. Money is likely to motivate them to come forward. The Bahamas Chamber of Commerce could play a major role in soliciting funds from its members and business persons to supplement what is provided in the Police Criminal I ntelligence Fund. It was done here before by the bankers with great success. PAUL THOMPSON Nassau, April 1, 2011. E DITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P AGE 4, THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 2011 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. Publisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986 Advertising Manager (242 Circulation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 F reeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 AFTER 14 long years of starts, stops, demonstrations and a few hiccups, Bahamas Telecommunications Company is now a private company. The much disputed sale agreement was finally signed in the Cabinet office yesterday w ith a prediction by the new owners that a new era in the Bahamas telecommunications sector is on the horizon. Cable and Wireless Communications, a London-based worldwide communications company, now owns 51 per cent of BTC for which it paid Government $210 million in full and $14.3 million in kind and cash completion dividends from BTC. E arly this year Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham, who had said that the money was earmarked for construction of the new hospital, announced that because of the eco nomic downturn the payment would now have to go directly to the reduction of the national debt. The new owners will be protected from predators for the next three years in which time they will prepare the company with a more efficient staff and upgraded technology to face competition the first in its long history. Only three years after Alexander Graham Bell invented the telephone in 1876, tele phonic communications arrived in New Providence on a limited scale. It was from this invention that Cable Beach got its name when in 1892 an undersea cable was laidfrom Jupiter, Florida, to New Providence, surfacing at what is now Goodmans Bay. The small police barracks was constructed nearby in 1894 and had telephone contact with its stations in Grants Town and the Eastern District. In 1924 the Nassau Telephone directory measuring 8 by 41/2, less than a quarter of an inch thick with 11 pages had 584 subscribers. It looked like a gentlemans brown leather wallet. In case of a fire, Bahamians called 45, the Governors office at Government House was 1, the Attorney Generals chambers were 7, the Treasury 139 and The Tribune 260. The little book advised constant practice of eight specified rules to receive good tele phone service. The final rule was to let the telephone reflect your personality in as pleasing a manner as though you were talking face to face. The booklet closed with the warning: Do not use the telephone during lightning storms. The directory was printed by the City Press. Look at the Bahamas telephone directory today with its separate edition for the yellow pages for advertising and appreciate how far we have progressed from 1924 in the world of telecommunications. In 1938 many changes were made to the d epartment, chief of which was the switch over from the manual dial to the automated dial system. At this time it was known as the Telecommunications Department or Telecoms. Later it became The Bahamas Telecommunications Corporation and most recently, in preparation for privatisation, it was transformed from a corporation to a company The Bahamas Telecommunications Company. Over the years BTC has done well. However, the Bahamas with its limited resources has developed the company as far as it can. It now needs a strong strategic partner to give it a global footprint. The new technology is mind-boggling with the ability to switch to cellular towers from mobile phones. These cell sites are able to transmit vast amounts of data over the airwaves now almost too fast for man to assimilate. It provides instant communi cation, the results of which one can see daily on TV as the youth of backward nations demand that their governments move into the modern age. Instant telecommunications Blackberrys, iPods, Facebook and Twitter have informed them of how the rest of the world lives, and they want to join the band. BTC has posted strong revenues and profits in the past largely as a result of the very lack of competition that has led to the high fees that have kept Bahamians at the mercy of a monopoly, allowing BTC to generate strong profits despite its very high operating expenses, Mr Ingraham told the House in a Communication as the privatisation debate opened. If BTC were exposed to competition tomorrow in mobile services, it would likely not survive. There is no way it could compete with a lean and aggressive competitor entering this market with a low cost base and aggressive marketing budget. We need, he said, to give Bahamians competitive communications, but at the same time we want BTC to survive and prosper as a company preserving as many jobs as we can, to be a company that Bahamians can be proud to work for, to buy from and to have an ownership stake in. Its now time to put down the placards and help build a telecommunications network of which all Bahamians can be proud. This could be the year for crime turnaround LETTERS l etters@tribunemedia.net BTC has new owners time to move on EDITOR, The Tribune. YESTERDAYa story was aired about the refusal of employees of the Department of Social Services Pitt Road Office to serve food coupons, because of the threats received by clients and the assault of one of the staff members by a client. In reference to that report, the questions a reporter might ask if they wish to further develop that story is: 1) How many persons were served annually by the Department over the last five years? 2) How many social workers are there in the Bahamas, stipu lating the amount per island, per unit? 3) What is the ratio of case worker to client, and what is the aver age number of persons in those households? 4) In addition to case management, what other duties do social workers perform? 5) What are the academic requirements for social workers and what is the current entry level salary and how does that compare with other professions of similar academic requirements (eg teach ing, nursing, etc)? 6) Rank the Department in terms of salary against other gov ernment departments? 7) Does the staff of social services have risk allowance, hazard pay or health insurance? 8) What support programmes are there to provide assistance and support to staff members? 9) How is the staff morale at the Department and why? 10) Has the Minister held a meeting with the staff and the union to discuss staff concerns and ways to address them? 11) How is the relationship between management and its staff? 12) What efforts is the Department making to attract new social workers (especially male social workers 13) Request the latest annual reports. 14) Is security in place at all Social Services offices and what type of training have these officers had? NO NAME Nassau, April, 2011. Questions a reporter might ask

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THE Ministry of Public Works and Transport is holding a series of information meetings to advise the public about major roadworks in New Providence. During the meetings, staff of the Project Execution Unit will disseminate information specifically to business owners and residents about road closures, traffic diversions and works to be carried out. The ministry hosted an urgent meeting for business owners and residents of East Street and Robinson Road on Friday, April 1 in the conference room of the Ministry of Public Works to discuss roadworks for the junction of East Street and Robinson Road. The works include milling of the existing pavement, installation of sidewalks, street lighting, traffic signals and asphalt pavement. Motorists travelling eastbound and westbound on Robinson Road are advised to follow the diversion signs in place and use the following alternate routes: Purpose Way, Ashley Road, Palm Beach Street, Balfour Avenue, East Street, Palm Tree Avenue and Sixth Street. Motorists travelling north and southbound on East Street northbound and southbound are advised to use the following as alternate routes: Purpose Way, Sixth Street, Palm Tree Avenue, East Street, Balfour and Palm Tree Avenue. On March 25 a meeting was held at Abundant Life Church to inform residents and busi ness owners of Abundant Life and the surrounding areas of roadworks on Abundant Life Road and Soldier Road junction. Temporary road closures and traffic diversions have been implemented at this junction to accommodate installation of traffic signals, utilities and drainage facilities. Motorists travelling south from the East West Highway are advised to divert through Churchill Drive and continue on the one-lane traffic system which travels eastbound on Soldier Road. Motorists travelling westb ound on Soldier Road should use the alternate routes provided. The ministry also held an information meeting on March 10 at the Mall at Marathon for residents and business owners on Prince Charles Drive, Robinson and Marathon Roads. Road construction is presently taking place on the western side of Marathon Road facing the intersection of the highway of Robinson and Marathon Roads. A one-way system has been implemented heading north and one way heading south. The turning lane is not operational at this time. Motorists are encouraged to follow the t emporary traffic diversion signs through Claridge or Soldier Roads. When completed there will be three lanes on Marathon Road one through lane heading north, one south, and a central lane to allow a left or right turn on Marathon Road. Sidewalks, drainage infrastructure and new streetlights are also among the changes. The ministry advises the pub lic that access will be granted to residents, pedestrians and businesses affected by the road works during construction phas es. The public is asked to contact the Ministry of Public Works and Transport (Project Execution Unit) on the hotline number: 302-9700 for further information. LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 2011, PAGE 5 Ministry of Works holds meetings to inform public of road construction RESIDENTS and business owners of East Street and Robinson Road listen as staff of the Public Execution Unit of the Ministry of Public Works and Transport speak to them of upcoming road construction in these areas. Charlene Collie, engineer and public relations officer, is pictured at the head of the table addressing the meeting. CHARLENE COLLIE, project engineer and public relations officer (third f rom left), informs a member of the public about roadworks at the junction of Soldier and Abundant Life Roads. Also shown is Latoya Walker of J ose Cartellone Construcciones Civiles.

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THE Coastal Awareness Committee of The Bahamas, a group of persons from the private and public sectors with an interest in promoting the sustainable development of The Bahamas, heads to Cat Island this week to assist witha beach clean up on Saturday, April 9, in conjunction with local government, local schools and volunteers from both Nassau and Cat Island. The clean up, which will take place on two beaches on the north side of Cat Island near Arthurs Town, is the second time the National Coastal Awareness Committee has taken members from Nassau to assist with Family Island projects. The committee also assisted with cleaninga Blue Hole in Rock Sound, Eleuthera two years ago. We are really excited to be working together with the community and local government of Cat Island in a united effort to clean two areas on the island, said Earlston McPhee, Chairman of the National Coastal Awareness Committee and Director, Sustainable Development for the Ministry of Tourism. It was brought to our attention that the beaches on Cat Island were becoming dirty as a result of debris from passing ships that travel in the shipping lanes and that it was becoming a problem, said Mr McPhee. We flew to Cat Island to meet with local government and to visit the beaches in person and saw first hand the marine debris was indeed brought in by the tide from ships. Our goal this weekend is not to simply clean the beach but to document the debris and to track the source. We are also working closely with the Bahamas National Trust and a Ministry of Education representative at a school in Cat Island to establish a Discovery Club Chapter on the island so that students can learn more about their environment. Charles King, Government Administrator of Cat Island, met with members of the National Coastal Awareness Committee and took them ona tour of the beaches as well a s discussed plans for the clean up. Initiative We are happy to join forces with the National Coastal Awareness Committee in this clean up initiative and will do everything we can to assist. Our beaches continu e to be littered from outside sources, not our local community. We are looking forward to working together to help combat this increasing problem. The National Coastal Awareness Committee will be w orking with the student vol unteers from Prince Willard Dean High School in Cat Island for the clean up and many businesses and nonprofit groups from Nassau are headed to Cat Island to assist in the cleanup. Sky Bahamas, has committed a charter plane at a reduced rate to fly volunteers from Nassau to Cat Island. Other sponsors include: The Department of Environmental Health Services, The Caribbean Bottling Company producers of Coca-Cola; Dolphin Encounters Project BEACH; Organisation of American States; Inter American Corporation on Agriculture (IICA emy Discovery Club and Earth Watch Club; Colina Insurance Limited and Stuart Coves Dive. The National Coastal Awareness Committee has increased the number of activities scheduled for April which is officially National Coastal Awareness Month in The Bahamas. The public is invited to participate. The Committee will host, in collaboration with its strategic partners both in the public and private sectors, the following: national public service announcement campaigns on television and radio; a continuation of the harbour clean up on Saturday, April 23rd; erection of banners through out participating islands in The Bahamas; primary and secondary school competitions; field trips with Dolphin Encounters on Blue Lagoon Island, Dive Stuart Cove, Blackbeards Cay, the Bahamas National Trust and BREEF, have been arranged to provide students with an opportunity to learn about protecting the coasts and enjoy the marine wonders of the Bahamas. There also will be a national T-Shirt Day on Friday, April 30. As this is a national initiative, beach clean-ups and oth er coastal awareness activities are planned for the islands of Abaco, Andros, Bimini, Eleuthera, Exuma and Cat Island. L OCAL NEWS PAGE 6, THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 2011 THE TRIBUNE www.jsjohnson.com Nassau Collins Ave 397 2100 Thompson Blvd676 6300Soldier Rd North 393 6286 Family Islands Freeport 242 352 7119 Abaco 242 367 2688 Exuma 242 336 2420 National Coastal Awareness Committee heads to Cat Island NATIONAL COASTAL AWARENESS COMMITTEE TRAVELS TO CAT ISLAND: Charles King, Government Administrator of Cat Island (second from left) shows the beaches on the north side of Arthurs Town to National Coastal Awareness Committee members Stuart Cove, of Stuart Coves (far leftsecond from right and Earlston McPhee, Chairman and Sustainable Development for the Ministry of Tourism (far right Volunteers from Nassau will join locals in Cat Island for a beach clean up on Saturday, April 9. Beach clean up this Saturday

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EAGER to inspire College of The Bahamas students to think more critically about the political, economic and social state of The Bahamas and its future, leaders of the opposition National Development Party engaged young voters in a frank discussion on Thursday during the School of English Studies Free Speech platform. Political frontrunner and NDP Leader Renward Wells said the crucial question is: Where are we now as a nationand where are we headed? He implored the college students to deeply ponder this question and to also hold their leaders and those who aspire to leadership accountable. I think it is important that you ask that question and ask that question of all politicians because right now in this country that question is not being answered by the persons who happen to lead this countryThe question is where are w e now as a nation and where is it that we desire to go? Where are we in terms of the political right and the eco nomic right because that is going to give us the idea aboutif we are on the path that we should be as a nation, said Mr. Wells. He also identified the deepening of democracy and the empowerment of Bahamians through ownership of the economy as priorities for his party. The NDP has a 37-point nation al development plan that it hopes will resonate with the Bahamian electorate. The worst thing that we can do at this stage of our political development is that we are always looking for the next Messiah and not the next mes sage, said Mr Wells, an engi neer and 1986 CARIFTA bronze medalist in the 400 metres. Our politics is driven by a man and the next leaderYour future is dependent on the questions you ask and the answers you get. Mr Lynden Nairn, NDP deputy leader, also addressed the students and fielded questions on a range of matters. An accomplished financial service professional, Mr. Nairn called for revolutionary development and the kind of democracy that will allow Bahamians to thrive. To the students he said: The extent to which you remain silent is the extent to which you are not embracing democracy. I challenge everyone of you to have high regard for this democracy that we call The Bahamas and to participate. It is only through partici pation that you give meaning and expression to this democracy that we have. The reality is that in every country the young people in that country are the ones who have the power to bring about the fastest and most revolutionary changes. According to the party leaders preparing citizens of this country to become 21st century globally competitive individu als is fundamental. Students who attended the Free Speech event held in the Michael H. Eldon building asked the aspiring political leaders questions relating to the most topical national issues including crime and violence, unemployment and illegal immigration and financial services development. The plat form is one of many avenues at The College to cultivate an environment of open discussion and debate about matters regarding national develop ment. LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 2011, PAGE 7 *HQHVLV *HQHVLV NDP leaders engage COB students T HE Bahamas brand is defined largely by Nassau/Paradise Island, which has accomplished a feat unmatched by any other Caribbean destination i ncreasing visitor arrivals and s atisfaction as well as increasing room rates by more than $100 per night in a five-year span. Tourism and Aviation Vinc ent Minister VanderpoolW allace explained this a ccomplishment to more than 300 influential public relations and marketing executives visiting Nassau on Monday. The executives are all part of the Interpublic Group of Companies, a pow-e rhouse conglomerate that includes companies such asG olin Harris, Rogers and Cowan and Webershandw ick. Their clients include p rofessional athletes, actors, automobile companies and r ecord labels. Minister Vanderpool-Wall ace explained that in the late 8 0s and early 90s, the B ahamas had the reputation of being a low-end destinat ion. However, a decision was made to upgrade to a m ore upscale product. As a result, the Bahamas became known as a destination of large, luxurious resorts. He said this is largely driven by N assau/Paradise Island. Although the Bahamas has a generally positive brand i mage, tourism officials now want to make the brand m ore diverse. This will incorporate other parts of the country in how the Bahamas is seen so that customers would know about several i slands, Minister Vanderpool-Wallace said. We want to become a c loser Caribbean as far as North America is concerned, he said. So you will never say Ive been to the Bahamas. You would say Ive been to Abaco. Ive b een to Andros. Ive been t o Eleuthera. Thats a long term development plan. Minister Vanderpool-Wallace described the Bahamas aspirations as being knowna s the Greek Islands of the W estern Hemisphere. That is how we want to see ourselves understood and displayed as we go on and move away from this brand that is largely defined by large resorts and large hotels, albeit a good and positiver eputation, he said. Apart from the recognition o f the individual islands, Minister Vanderpool-Wallace p ointed out that the B ahamas is known worldwide for its beautiful beaches. T he branding specialising company, FutureBrand,w hich is also a part of the I nterpublic Group, ranks the B ahamas third in the world for beaches. NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT PARTY leader Renward Wells Minister: Nassau/Paradise Island dominates perception of Bahamas T HE BAHAMAS i nternational image will evolve to include mult iple islands, as reflected in the countrys brand identity.

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THE John Bull Group r ecently presented Ride for Hope Bahamas with a cheque for $10,000, becomi ng a Yellow Jersey sponsor o f this years race. Considered one of the m ost successful fund raising e vents in the Bahamas, The Ride for Hope has, since its inception in 2006, raised m ore than $1,000,000 for c ancer patient treatment, care, early detection, and research. A Ride for Hope represen tative said: We welcome J ohn Bull to the Ride for H ope as a Yellow Jersey Sponsor and extend a big t hank you for their great generosity. In past years John Bull has donated lovely prizes to our raffle and it is exciting to have their i nvolvement growing. The Ride for Hope 2011 is s et to take place Saturday, A pril 9th in Governors Harbour, Eleuthera. L OCAL NEWS P AGE 8, THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 2011 THE TRIBUNE COGIASORGANIC FOOD & CAFSpecializing in organic grocery. Located outside Arcade, Intl Bazaar. Tel: 352-4055 T he Bahamas Co-operative L eague Limited Scholarship Applications Invited The Bahamas Co-operative League is offering a partial two-year scholarship to the College of The Bahamas to pursue an Associate Degree in selected disciplines. The scholarship is awarded annually to a Bahamian student on the basis of academic achievement and financial need. Applications are available at The Bahamas Co-operative League office on Russell Road, Oakes Field, or from any Credit Union or Producer/Supplier Co-operative.Deadline for applications is May 31, 2011 .The Bahamas Co-operative League Limited is the Apex body for 10 Credit Unions and 4 Producer/Supplier Co-operatives throughout The Bahamas. Preferred Courses of Study:Business Management Agriculture Computer Science Marketing Accounting/Finance Banking TourismRussell Road, Oakes Field Tel: 242-302-0100 Fax: 242-328-8730 P.O. Box SS-6314 Nassau,The Bahamas APRIL 9 will be remembered for years to come. Two events embark on a journey to uplift and create a better Bahamas. It is a chance to show the Bahamas there is no DIS in our ABLE, said ABC Team member E rin Brown. Both events Ride for Hope and Marios Big O Fun Walk Skate Push event on April 9 are connected by one group, TEAM ABC disabled members by definition of determined, energetic and confident Bahamians driven to make a change today. Ride for Hope, Eleuthera, established a way for persons to donate and get involved in Cancer Research and treatment. There will be six disabled members cycling in for R4H for the first time in the history of the Bahamas. Marios Fun Run, Walk, Skate, Push, a 6.5 miles event, is in honour of Wendell Big O Ferguson. Where those who are unable to join the Ride for Hope can still donate towards the cause with a donation of $10 as your registration fee. All proceeds will be given to ABC Prosthetics and Orthotics to be used in ABCares Division. ABCares seeks to provide community involvement and social interaction along with assisting individuals with payments for physical therapy and their prosthetics and orthotics for all disabled members in the Bahamas. Team ABC is sponsored and supp orted for its participation in the Ride for Hope by Burns House Ltd; Vitamalt, The DAlbenas Agency: Campbells Soup, William R. Nash Ltd, Ambro Builders Ltd, Tonys Cabinets and Potcake Cycling Club. ABC Prosthetics and Orthotics provided all necessary maintenance and fittings for Team ABC. TeamABC set for Ride For Hope and Marios Big O event Back row L-R: Cornell Moss, Elliot Melus, Tarmina Grant, Sherryln Smith, Antonia Simmons, front L-R : Van Demerittee, Kaliesha Rolle, Shawn Thomas, Jamal Nottage PICTURED (L TO R Stephen Holowesko, co-founder, Ride for Hope Bahamas and Rick Hazlewood, corporate director, John Bull Group of Companies. JOHN BULL PARTNERS WITH RIDE FOR HOPE IN CANCER FIGHT

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ByLINDSAY THOMPSON Bahamas Information Services STUDENTS from Bahamian h igh schools debated the impact non-communicable diseases and the lack of funding for sustainable development have on small island developing states (SIDS during the 14th Model United Nations Session (MUNS Monday. Jointly sponsored by the Mini stry of Foreign Affairs and the Rotary Clubs of the Bahamas, the simulated United Nations forum was held at the Wyndham Resort and Crystal Palace Casino. The topic was: With the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development less than two years away, what are t he implications for the sustainable development paradigm given the emergency of the green economy, and how should the concerns of the SIDS feature on the agenda? Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette said it was a privilege to witness the confidence disp layed by the students as they represented both their schools and UN member countries. The MUNS is a simulation of the UN within an academic platform. The objective is to educate and in part train the participantsin matters relating to civics, issues of globalisation, communication a nd diplomacy. The students from 14 schools throughout the Bahamas and the Turks and Caicos Islands were assigned a country, where they took on the role of diplomats and participated in a simulated session of an inter-governmental organisation. The debate highl ighted the vulnerability of SIDS such as the Bahamas and its struggle to control the high prevalence of non-communicable diseases. Aquinas College emerged the winner of debate; they will accompany the Minister of For eign Affairs to the UN General Assembly in New York. St Andrews Senior High School placed second and Doris Johnson Senior High School placed third. Other participating schools were: C C Sweeting High School, R M Bailey Senior High School, Government High School, Sunland Baptist Academy, Cat Island High School, Preston Albury, Lyford Cay School, New Age Academy, St Pauls College, S C Bootle, and St Johns College. Your involvement in this p rocess signifies a healthy interest in the work of a prestigious and i nfluential multilateral institution such as the United Nations, which increasingly extends it reach to countries such as The Bahamas, Mr Symonette said. The MUNS afforded participants a greater appreciation of t he mandate of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs with respect to t he formulation, conduct and implementation of foreign poli cy in the international sphere. The Bahamas, though small in size, continues to be recognised as a valuable and responsible member of the international com munity, Mr Symonette said. The issues debated have great significance for The Bahamas, he said, namely non-communicable diseases and sustainable devel opment. Like many other nations of the world, the Bahamas continues to strive find meaningful ways to increase awareness of the necessity of early detection and prevention of non-communicable diseases. Similarly, the Bahamas as a small island state, continues to utilise its membership in regional, hemispheric and multilateral organisations by joining with like minded states to support the implementation of global initiatives that will benefit the sustaina ble development of this nation and the world at large, Mr S ymonette said. In 1942, Rotary Clubs from 21 nations organised a conference in London to develop a vision for advancing education, science and culture after World War II. And in 1945, Rotarians went to San F rancisco to help draft the UN Charter; a close relationship was b orn. Assistant District Governor, Area 2 District 7020 of Rotary International, Charles Sealy, in his message stated that the programme has become very important to Rotary Clubs in the Bahamas as it seeks to expose young people to issues facing nations, and for them to find possible solutions. Particularly valuable is under standing the impact these issues have on the Commonwealth of the Bahamas, he said. LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 2011, PAGE 9 Break away from the ordinary and discover how to experience life to the fullest. The Isuzu D-MAX is the ultimate multi-purpose pick-up truck which enables you to drive through tough roadsand load a variety of cargoes. It is specially designed to be powerful, stylish and highly functional. The Isuzu D-MAX is one toughvehicle that willnever let you down!T H E I S U Z U D M A XPOWERFUL COMFORTABLE VERSATILE T YREFLEX S T AR MO TORSCall us today for your new IsuzuD-MAX Pick-UpTruck at 325.4961Wulff Road, P.O. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas Fax: 323.4667 Model UN Session focuses on small island states STUDENTS OF AQUINAS COLLEGE, representing Japan, won the 14th Model United Nations Session debate held Monday at the Wyndham Resort and Crystal Palace Casino. STUDENTS OF DORIS JOHNSON SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL represents the Bahamas at the 14th Model United Nations Session held Monday at the Wyndham Resort and Crystal Palace Casino.

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REGULAR talk show caller and computer specialist, C Allen Johnson, said he was disappointed in Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham fora bruptly calling an end to the FNMs Bamboo Town meeting when he was about to address the audience during the question and answer peri-o d. Calling the Prime Minister a coward as he was being escorted from the meeting, Mr Johnson said he was surprised that he was physicallya ssaulted by an FNM supp orter as he was packing up h is equipment for the night. A couple of them came, wanting to shove and push me, and wanting to search my bag. I asked them if theyc ould present me with some i dentification they would be m ore than free to do so. But more than identification, they must present me with probable cause. So I was rolling up my wire, and one of them said he was going to attack me, hitm e. And I told him he is free t o do whatever he wants; Ill s ave him the trouble. Tell me where you want me to lay and you dont have to hit me. So he walked away and then he grabbed a chair to throw it. He threw the first one, I p ushed it away and it hit s omebody else in the head, a lady who was in the back of me. Then he threw the other one and in my attempt to catch the chair I knocked my finger out of whack, he said. M r Johnson said he never expected such an event to occur at the Prime Ministers meeting. Mr Ingraham says that he has a ruly group of people, so there was a certain amount of decor that I expected. I am no stranger. He said itw as not Mr Ingraham who h ad disappointed him, but it w as, it is the other group of MPs from Grand Bahama, including the former Senators who all know who I am. They also know the mannerf or which I conduct myself. They have been to hund reds of meetings with me. And they know I know the proper place, I know the proper time to ask my questions. I am not an idiot. People who know me, know Ik now how to conduct myself. I am never confrontational. The record will reflect that, he said. Mr Johnson said he was also disappointed that Mr Ingraham sought to identify him as a PLP camera man during his discussion with ther esidents of Bamboo Town w ho attended. I just wanted to find out who was the PLP who was in the room? I wanted a picture of the PLP. Thats all I wanted to ask him. Then Ih ad a couple of other quest ions concerning BTC and s ome other things. I also wanted to know if he was going to Kenyatta Gibsons area to offer his apologies. I also wanted to know if he was going toc ome to Grand Bahama and offer his apologies for the five MPs that have been missing from there. They might as well resign because their representation is missing from Grand Bahama, he said. While Mr Johnson was b eing interviewed by The T ribune at the FNMs Bamb oo Town meeting Tuesday night, a number of persons walked past, verbally assaulting him, and calling for him to leave the premises. M r Johnson said he was n ot concerned by their jeers, a s he has a sovereign right to be any where in the Bahamas at any public meeting or gathering. Unless we have now moved to a dictator state thatp eople portray that Mr Ingraham is, then until that is exercised and shown to me in the Constitution I will move freely throughout this country even if it means my life, he said. L OCAL NEWS PAGE 10, THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 2011 THE TRIBUNE S ome big mouth people gat close mouth nowadays, he laughed. Mr Ingraham told his party supporters t he PLP has good reason for their s ilence now. They said they would like to have an investigation into CWC. You know, I d ont have difficulty with that. I just have not been able to justify in my mind yet how Im going to justify taking your scarced ollars to have it. But if I change my m ind, Ill have an investigation into CWC and BTC, and BTC and Bluewater all at the same time. And if an investigation ever comes at any time, on any subject, and I am called to testify, if you see me carry a lawyerw ith me, lose all faith in me. I dont need a lawyer to tell the truth. I can speak for myself, anytime, any day, he said. The sale of 51 per cent of BTC to Cable a nd Wireless was formally finalised yes terday during an official signing ceremony at the Cabinet Office in the Churchill Building. The deal was supposed to take place on Monday, however Mr Ingrahams aid the sale hit a minor snag with the Grand Bahama Port Authority. In Freeport, Grand Bahama, Batelco has a licence from the Grand Bahama Port Authority, Mr Ingraham added. And the Port Authority is supposed to a pprove the transfer of the business in F reeport. Not in Nassau, not in Abaco, not in anyplace else. And the Port Authority sought to extract from Batelcoa fee on the business of which is carried out in Freeport, a fee that we are convinced is without merit, without justification. A fee that we find offensive, a fee we find unacceptable and a fee that we will not pay. And I am confident in my expec t ation that the matter will be resolved shortly to the satisfaction of ourselves and you the public of the Bahamas, he said. Talk show caller:PM ended meeting before I could address audience FROM page one PRIME MINISTER:NO HAND IN THE COOKIE JAR IN SALE OF BTC FROM page one H UBERTINGRAHAM

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LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 2011, PAGE 11 THE Free National Movement Pineridge Youth Association along with the Member of Parliament Kwasi Thompson hosted a youth conclave to empower, inspire and e ngage the youth in the constituenc y. T he conclave was held at the Susan J Wallace Centre on Saturday. Young people heard messages from Norris Bain, Dudley Seide, Senator Michael Pintard, Minister of State for FinanceZ hivargo Laing and Senator Frederick McAlpine. There were also special performances from Papa Smurf, Sherrol Rahming and the Element. The theme of the conclave was Empowering, Engaging and Inspiring Youth to Succeed. Young peoplew ere reminded to believe in themselves, to trust God and to have vision and determination in order to succeed. O rganisers said the event was well attended. FNMs Pineridge Youth Association conclave

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L OCAL NEWS PAGE 12, THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 2011 THE TRIBUNE THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMASV isit our website at www.cob.edu.bs Roger Gomez in Court One, Bank Lane, the two men were not required to enter a plea to the c harge. Prosecutors intend to proceed with a voluntary bill of indictment that will be presented on June 23. Pandy has also been charged w ith the January 16 murder of Eamon Hepburn. Mr Hepburn, 21, was found at Gilbert Street West with a gunshot injury to the c hest. Pandy was not required to e nter a plea to the murder charge. Pandy was also arraigned on two counts of armed robbery along with 18-year-old Valentino Bast-i an, of Kennedy Subdivision. It is alleged that the two, being concerned together on March 29, w hile armed with a handgun, r obbed David Hanna of a silver 1997 Honda Accord valued at $3,500, an Iphone valued at $600, and Ipad valued at $1,100, a hard d rive valued at $500 and $500 c ash. P andy pleaded not guilty to a charge of receiving the vehicle. It is further alleged that on the same day the men robbed Christop her Strachan of an Apple laptop computer valued at $3,000, a cellular phone valued at $400, a Benz silver ring valued at $200, an external hard drive valued at $300 as w ell as $520 cash. A ll three men have been r emanded to Her Majestys Prison. The Government has received full payment for the transaction the $210 million purchase price and in kinda nd cash completion dividends from BTC of $14.3 million. Three years from the date of the takeover, the governm ent will begin the process o f liberalising the cellular phone market, an area in which BTC currently holds a monopoly. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said that yesterday brought an end to a l ong, arduous 14-year p rocess. "This has been a very long j ourney and at times a diffic ult journey. We never lost s ight of our commitment to i mprove the delivery of telecommunications services to the Bahamian public; a c ommitment first made by my Government in 1992. By 1998 we had accepted that in order to deliver that improved service, privatisa-t ion of Batelco and liberalization of the sector would b e necessary. "For a time we dallied with the idea of a minority p rivate sector partner. Reality dictated otherwise," he s aid, a reference to detractors who have argued that government should not have sold the majority stake of BTC to a foreign company. Privatisation is critical for t he economy's advancement and will bring vast improvements in services and lower costs to consumers, MrI ngraham added. The Bahamian people deserve and indeed, rightly demand, more minutes forl ess money, more products with better quality, excellent service and more business and profit opportunities fort hemselves. The government is com mitted to making this coun try an international business c entre of choice, committed to giving Bahamians access to the latest and best tech n ologies available in comm unications and committed to opening this economy for the further participation of progressive, innovative Bahamian entrepreneurs. The privatisation of BTC w ith the sale to CWC, our new strategic communications partner, provides this platform, and the benefits will be realised by all B ahamians." G erard Borely, chief f inancial officer of LIME, CWC's regional operations, e xtended a warm welcome to his new colleagues, explaining that BTC and the B ahamas will remain a prio rity for the new owners. They will find us a fair e mployer, one committed to c reating a working environm ent where colleagues feel engaged. We are very proud to be here, BTC and indeed the Bahamas are extremely important to Cable & Wireless Communications and o ur operations throughout the region. The completion of this t ransaction marks the beginning of a new era for BTC. O ur role is to ensure that BTC trades successfully in t his new era (of a liberal market), we will do that by focusing on the needs for o ur customers and our communities. BTC will win, and w ill only win, when our customers win," said Mr Borely. M eanwhile, newlyappointed BTC CEO Geoff H ouston, the former executive vice-president of LIME, yesterday met with BTC e mployees and is scheduled to address the media on further changes to BTC today. Kirk Griffin, who held the p ost of BTC's acting CEO a nd president, will stay on as an advisor. A new BTC board has a lso been created. It is made up of: Maria Ferere, a part ner of FT Consultants Ltd; Deidre Prescott, currentB TC Director and BTC employee; Mark Holowesko, a principal of Holowesko Capital Part n ers; Nick Cooper, corpo rate services director, Cable & Wireless Communications; David Shaw, CEO,L IME; Gerard Borely, CFO, LIME; and BTC CEO Geoff Houston. the sidelines of a press conference announcing t he close of the sale of 51 per cent of BTC to Cable & Wireless Communications. "But to tell you the truth, this is such an intricate business and had to spend so much time negotiating the details of it that sometimes there wasn't time for the same people to get involved in developing promotional mate-r ial and so on. "We also tried, we had a couple of disappointments, we had a couple of promotional firms that were engaged they just didn't rise to the occasion. We had in place a promotional strategy early on, it never really seemed to bite very well," said Mr Francis, whose tenure asB TC chairman came to a end yesterday. For the past three years, Mr Francis also served as deputy chair of BTC's privatisation committee. AGGRESSIVE PROMOTION FROM page one Two charged with womans murder FROM page one Cable & Wireless in control at BTC F ROM page one

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I NTERNATIONAL NEWS PAGE 14, THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 2011 THE TRIBUNE R BC Royal Bank (Bahamas is considering applications forwww.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean Registered trademark of Royal Bank of Canada The Lion & Globe symbol and RBC are trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada Manager, Risk Management Bahamas, Cayman and Turks & Caicos Bahamas Regional OfficeThe successful candidate should possess the following qualifications: Minimum 7 years lending experience Personal, Mortgages & Business Banking/Commercial Lending Degree in Banking, Finance, Accounting or similar Required Skills & Competencies:Communication & Coaching skillsTeam work & Co-operationD eveloping othersI mpact & InfluenceInitiativeThinking skills (analytical, breakthrough, c onceptual and strategic) Leadership skillsPersonal & business lending skills Strong risk assessment and analysis skillsP roficiency in Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, Access) Responsibilities include:Approving Risk Strategies and Transaction Requests for Consumer, Mortgages and Business Banking loans within Delegated Lending Limits using sound judgement and adherence to Policy, taking a balanced approach to asset growth and portfolio quality and meeting agreed timelines Identifying Credit Risk Issues and takes pro-active action in assisting business and risk management find resolutions Recommending course of action on specific accounts and assists business partners with action to correct unsatisfactory situationsPartnering with Area Managers, Sales Managers, Account Managers, Branch Managers and Personal Lenders in management of the assigned portfolioCoaching & Counselling business partners (including, but not limited to Account Managers, Branch Managers, and Personal Lenders) Identifying knowledge gaps and training opportunities, and works with business partners to address need, assist in developing and delivering appropriate training programs, as neededLeading and/or participating in various projects, task forces, committees and special assignments as needed A competitive compensation package (base salary & bonus) will commensurate with relevant experience and qualifications. Please apply by April 8, 2011 to: Assistant Manager, Recruitment & Employee Development Human Resources Bahamas Regional Office RBC Royal Bank (Bahamas P.O. Box N-7549 Nassau, N.P., Bahamas Via fax: (242 Via email: bahcayjp@rbc.com NEW SPECIAL!!!8MM LAMINATE FLOORING JUST $49.99 PER BOX!!!!!!T AKE ADVANTAGE OF THIS OFFER WHILE SUPPLIES LAST! Various colourscan be viewed at our website www.conetbahamas.comNASSAU LOCATIONCALL TODAY242-394-5865 By SAMANTHA CRITCHELL AP Fashion Writer NEW YORK (AP begun on a vacation at the private home of Diane von Furstenberg in the Bahamas, a style consultation from Rachel Zoe and the chance to have a custom-made Barbie in your likeness. They are among the experienceoriented auction items offered by the Council of Fashion Designers of A merica for its Fashion & Friends for Japan charity initiative. All proceeds raised through the o nline auction on Charitybuzz.com b enefit the Japan Society's Japan E arthquake Relief Fund. Other items offered include: A full day with Tory Burch s hopping in her store in the morning, lunch with the designer and nighttime tickets with backstage passes to Jay-Z and Kanye West's concert. A full wardrobe of two labels, E lizabeth and James, and The Row, b oth designed by the Olsen twins, plus a meet-and-greet with designers MaryK ate and Ashley. A fitting and custom suit from Tom Ford. A meeting with Vogue editor-inc hief Anna Wintour and invitation to attend a magazine photo shoot. A trip to Paris, Ralph Laurenstyle, including a room at the Bristol h otel, dinner at Lauren's restaurant, shopping spree at the St. Germain store, and tickets to an exhibit featuri ng the designer's vintage car collect ion. The crisis in Japan is something t hat has affected us all and as a comm unity and industry we felt a respons ibility to act," said CFDA executive d irector Steven Kolb in a statement. "This initiative hits very close to home as many members of the CFDA com-m unity have close business ties and partnerships in Japan and we view this as an extension of the work we accom plished in the 'Fashion for Haiti' ini-t iative. The response we have received has been overwhelming and we cont inue to encourage donations and supp ort." Bidding for Bahamas vacation at private home, Barbie likeness Items offered by Council of Fashion Designers of America for its Fashion& Friends for Japan charity initiative

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INTERNATIONAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 2011, PAGE 15 DAprilIs ancerControlMonth. TheCancerCentre,BahamasWillBeHostingEachYear,ThePresidentOfTheUSADeclares AprilAs CancerControlMonth EffortsAreMadeToInformPeople OnWaysToPreventCancerAndHighlight ProgressInCancerResearch.TheCancerCentre,BahamasIsThe Second SiteInTheWorldOutsideTheUntiedStatesAndNorthAmerica ToBeAccreditedByThe American CollegeOfRadiationOncology(ACRO).OurDoctorsStandCommittedAndRededicateThisCentre ToFighting ThisDisease. Hon.Prof.Dr.ArthurPorterPC,MD,MBA,FACR,FACR,FAAMA DirectorofRadiationOncology,And CEOofMcGillUniversityHealthCentre Dr.CorrineSinQueeMBBS,FAAP D irectorofPaediatricOncology ProfessorDr.KarolSikora M A,PhD.FRCR,FRCP,FFPM DirectorofMedicalOncology,And Director,CancerPartnersUK,LondonWeBring TheBestInAmericanTechnology ToYouWhere ItIsBetterInTheBahamas!GoogleUsToday!AFreePublicLecture World Renowned And OneOfBritainsForemostCancerSpecialists,Prof.Dr. KarolSikoraIsInviting TheGeneralPublicToA Free CancerLectureOnCancerControl-ARealisticChallenge.Tuesday April12th,2011@6:30 pm Call502-9610 ToRSVP ACancerClinic WithProf.Dr.KarolSikora To ProvideConsultationAnd TreatmentToPersonsWithCancerMonday,April11th,2011 ForAnAppointment Telephone:242-502-9610 ROME Associated Press A BOATcarrying as many as 300 migrants from Libya capsized in rough seas off the Italian coast early Wednesday, leaving 250 people unaccount-ed for. Survivors told of desperately trying to reach res-c ue boats as those unable to swim screamed in the darkn ess and pulled one another under the water. If the number of dead is confirmed, it would prove the deadliest crossing to Italy in recent memory, and the worst refugee disaster since a waveo f migrants began arriving on Italian shores in January foll owing popular revolts in Tunisia, Egypt and Libya. The Italian coast guard rescued 48 people Wednesday and a fishing boat picked up another three after the boat began taking on water shortly a fter 1 a.m. Survivors told The International Organization for Migration that they swam toward approaching coast guard vessels, but many others drowned because they couldn't swim or were dragged back by scream ing fellow passengers. Simona Moscarelli, the IOM's Italy representative, told Sky TG24 that many survivors had their pants torn off as they tried to swim toward rescue boats, as those left behind grabbed onto anything they could in a desperate struggle to stay afloat. The commander of a fishi ng boat that rescued three people described what he said was a terrifying scene. "What we saw was incredible: Heads were coming in and out (of the water were screaming," Francesco Rifiorito told ANSA. "We did all we could." Winds Coast guard official Pietro Carosia said the day's rescue operations, conducted by Ital ian helicopters, patrol boats and a Maltese plane, had been frustrated by strong winds and rough waters. The incident occurred about 40 miles (64.37 kilometers the coast of Lampedusa, an island closer to North Africa than mainland Italy. Carosia said the boat had sailed from Libya and likely been at sea for around two days. He said about 200 people were believed to be on board, although the IOM and survivors put the number of passengers at 300. The IOM said the migrants and asylum seekers were from Bangladesh, Chad, Ivory Coast, Nigeria, Somalia and Sudan. Among them there w ere 5 children and 40 women, of whom only two survived. Antonio Guterres, the U.N. high commissioner for refugees, said many of those on board had sought asylum in Libya, only to be forced to flee by the fighting. These people were refugees twice," he said. "I appeal to all those patrolling the Mediterranean Sea to do everything they can to help vessels in distress." Upon arriving in Lampedusa Wednesday morning, survivors were offered blankets, w arm drinks and food. Offi cials who provided first aid said many were in a state of shock and suffering from hypothermia. "One man told me he had lost his 1-year-old son," said Moscarelli of IOM. "One of the two surviving women toldm e how she had lost her husband." Immigrant boat capsizes off Italy; 250 are missing MIGRANTS ARRIVE AT THE LAMPEDUSA HARBOR southern Italy, Wednesday, April 6, 2011. Italian c oast guard officials were trying Wednesday to rescue migrants lost at sea after their boat capsized off the coast of Lampedusa, a tiny Italian island close to North Africa, officials said. (AP

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THE Coastal Awareness Committee of The Bahamas, a group of persons from the private and public sectors with an interest in promoting the sustainable development of The Bahamas, heads to Cat Island this week to assist witha beach clean up on Saturday, April 9, in conjunction with local government, local schools and volunteers from both Nassau and Cat Island. The clean up, which will take place on two beaches on the north side of Cat Island near Arthurs Town, is the second time the National Coastal Awareness Committee has taken members from Nassau to assist with Family Island projects. The committee also assisted with cleaninga Blue Hole in Rock Sound, Eleuthera two years ago. We are really excited to be working together with the community and local government of Cat Island in a united effort to clean two areas on the island, said Earlston McPhee, Chairman of the National Coastal Awareness Committee and Director, Sustainable Development for the Ministry of Tourism. It was brought to our attention that the beaches on Cat Island were becoming dirty as a result of debris from passing ships that travel in the shipping lanes and that it was becoming a problem, said Mr McPhee. We flew to Cat Island to meet with local government and to visit the beaches in person and saw first hand the marine debris was indeed brought in by the tide from ships. Our goal this weekend is not to simply clean the beach but to document the debris and to track the source. We are also working closely with the Bahamas National Trust and a Ministry of Education representative at a school in Cat Island to establish a Discovery Club Chapter on the island so that students can learn more about their environment. Charles King, Government Administrator of Cat Island, met with members of the National Coastal Awareness Committee and took them ona tour of the beaches as well a s discussed plans for the clean up. Initiative We are happy to join forces with the National Coastal Awareness Committee in this clean up initiative and will do everything we can to assist. Our beaches continu e to be littered from outside sources, not our local community. We are looking forward to working together to help combat this increasing problem. The National Coastal Awareness Committee will be w orking with the student vol unteers from Prince Willard Dean High School in Cat Island for the clean up and many businesses and nonprofit groups from Nassau are headed to Cat Island to assist in the cleanup. Sky Bahamas, has committed a charter plane at a reduced rate to fly volunteers from Nassau to Cat Island. Other sponsors include: The Department of Environmental Health Services, The Caribbean Bottling Company producers of Coca-Cola; Dolphin Encounters Project BEACH; Organisation of American States; Inter American Corporation on Agriculture (IICA emy Discovery Club and Earth Watch Club; Colina Insurance Limited and Stuart Coves Dive. The National Coastal Awareness Committee has increased the number of activities scheduled for April which is officially National Coastal Awareness Month in The Bahamas. The public is invited to participate. The Committee will host, in collaboration with its strategic partners both in the public and private sectors, the following: national public service announcement campaigns on television and radio; a continuation of the harbour clean up on Saturday, April 23rd; erection of banners through out participating islands in The Bahamas; primary and secondary school competitions; field trips with Dolphin Encounters on Blue Lagoon Island, Dive Stuart Cove, Blackbeards Cay, the Bahamas National Trust and BREEF, have been arranged to provide students with an opportunity to learn about protecting the coasts and enjoy the marine wonders of the Bahamas. There also will be a national T-Shirt Day on Friday, April 30. As this is a national initiative, beach clean-ups and oth er coastal awareness activities are planned for the islands of Abaco, Andros, Bimini, Eleuthera, Exuma and Cat Island. L OCAL NEWS PAGE 6, THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 2011 THE TRIBUNE www.jsjohnson.com Nassau Collins Ave 397 2100 Thompson Blvd676 6300Soldier Rd North 393 6286 Family Islands Freeport 242 352 7119 Abaco 242 367 2688 Exuma 242 336 2420 National Coastal Awareness Committee heads to Cat Island NATIONAL COASTAL AWARENESS COMMITTEE TRAVELS TO CAT ISLAND: Charles King, Government Administrator of Cat Island (second from left) shows the beaches on the north side of Arthurs Town to National Coastal Awareness Committee members Stuart Cove, of Stuart Coves (far leftsecond from right and Earlston McPhee, Chairman and Sustainable Development for the Ministry of Tourism (far right Volunteers from Nassau will join locals in Cat Island for a beach clean up on Saturday, April 9. Beach clean up this Saturday

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UNITED NATIONS Associated Press HAITI'Soutgoing president criticized the U.N. Security C ouncil on Wednesday for being too slow to switch its peacekeeping mission in the Western hemisphere's poorest country from military operations to development and peacebuilding. In his last address to the council, Rene Preval urged theU .N.'s most powerful body to consider the effectiveness of its interventions "that have practically led to 11 years of military presence in a country that has no war." Speaking at the meeting attended by Colombia's president, former U.S. president BillC linton and nine foreign ministers from Latin America and Spain, Preval said it was "sad to note" that in a quarter of a century "I'm the only president to finish two constitutional terms and was never jailed or exiled." Preval urged the country's newly elected president, pop star Michel "Sweet Micky" M artelly, legislative leaders and the opposition to work in a spirit of peace and cooperation. But Preval focused mainly on the instability in Haiti due to the effects of "underdevelopment" and a culture of impunity dating back to the dictatorship of the Duvaliers. T he instability, he said, was compounded by deadly hurri-canes and the devastating earthquake in January 2010, which according to the government killed 316,000 people and crippled much of the country's economy. Since 1993, Preval said, the U nited Nations has had a series of peacekeeping missions in Haiti, "each time ... made necessary by instability created by the citizens themselves." Thiswas true most recently in 2004, when there was the possibility of clashes with heavily armed groups, he said. B ut he said when the dan ger of violent confrontation had passed, "peacekeeping operations did not quickly enough adapt to the new situation." "Tanks, armed vehicles and soldiers should have given way to bulldozers, engineers, more police instructors" and experts on reforming the judicial and prison systems," Preval said. When he was sworn in for a second term in May 2006, Preval said, "I emphasized this need but I was unfortunately not heard." Preval said he hoped the peacekeeping mission in Haiti would be reoriented, a view strongly backed by Colombia's President Juan Manuel Santos, whose country holds the council presidency. Santos said Colombia organized the council meeting because it wanted to renew efforts to stabilize and strengthen the rule of law in Haiti, given "the meager results achieved" so far. "We must all commit to a different vision for rebuilding Haiti," Santos said. Cuba's Foreign Minister Bruno Rodriguez criticized the U.N. peacekeeping mission in Haiti for being too involved in Haitian affairs. "Haiti does not need an occupation army," he said. "It is not, nor can it become, a United Nations protectorate." Secretary-General Ban Kimoon said rule-of-law reform must be a top priority for Haiti's next president, calling the judicial system "deeply dysfunctional" and prisons dangerously overcrowded. Haiti's economy is also "on its knees" with public institutions barely able to deliver essential services and millions of Haitians still dependent on the assistance of nongovern mental organizations to meet their basic needs, he said. "As a result, citizens have lost confidence in the state and investors remain reluctant to do business in Haiti," Ban said. Clinton, the U.N. special envoy to Haiti who also cochairs the country's Recon struction Commission, urged donors to pay the more than $5.6 billion pledged in March 2010 to rebuild Haiti, saying only 37 percent of the money has been received. Clinton said he was leaving for Haiti on Thursday to attend a commission meeting on Friday, and he predicted that if Preval's development program is implemented by the new government "you'll see a real pick-up in activity in the next few months." INTERNATIONAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 2011, PAGE 17 -RXUQDOLVP/LWHUDWXUH*U 5HOLJLRXV.QRZOHGJH%LEOH*U 0DWK*U 3K\VLFV*U $JULFXOWXUH*U 7HFKQLFDO'UDZLQJ*U $FFRXQWV&RPPHUFH(FRQRPLFV*U 3K\VLFDO(GXFDWLRQ*U SDQLVK*U *HRJUDSK\+LVWRU\*U &KHPLVWU\ %XVLQHVVWXGLHV*U +HDOWKFLHQFH*U *HQHUDOFLHQFH*U &RPSXWHUWXGLHV*U 0XVLF*U %LRORJ\*U /DQJXDJH$UWV/LWHUDWXUH*U $UW&UDIW*U )RRG 1XWULWLRQ*U &ORWKLQJ&RQVWUXFWLRQ*U 6RFLDOWXGLHV*U +RPH(FRQRPLFV*U$SSOLFDQWVPXVW$f %H D SUDFWLFLQJERUQDJDLQ&KULVWLDQZKRLV ZLOOLQJWRVXEVFULEHWRWKHWDWHPHQWRI)DLWKRI 7HPSOH&KULVWLDQFKRRO %f +DYHD%DFKHORUV'HJUHHLQ(GXFDWLRQRUKLJKHU IURPDUHFRJQL]HG&ROOHJHRUQLYHUVLW\LQWKHDUHDRI VSHFLDOL]DWLRQ &f+DYHDYDOLG7HDFKHUV&HUWLFDWHRU'LSORPD 'f+DYHDWOHDVWWZR\HDUVWHDFKLQJH[SHULHQFH,QWKH UHOHYDQWVXEMHFWDUHDZLWKH[FHOOHQWFRPPXQLFDWLRQ VNLOOV (f $SSOLFDQWVPXVWKDYHWKHDELOLW\WRSUHSDUHVWXGHQWV IRUDOOH[DPLQDWLRQVWRWKH%-&%*&6(OHYHOV )f%HZLOOLQJWRSDUWLFLSDWHLQWKHKLJKVFKRROVH[WUD FXUULFXODUSURJUDPPHV $SSOLFDWLRQPXVWEHSLFNHGXSDWWKH+LJK6FKRRO2IFH RQ6KLUOH\6WUHHWDQGEHUHWXUQHGZLWKIXOOFXUULFXOXP YLWDHUHFHQWFRORXUHGSKRWRJUDSKDQGWKUHHUHIHUHQFHV0UHLO+DPLOWRQ 7KHULQFLSDO 7HPSOH&KULVWLDQ+LJKFKRRO 3 1DVVDX%DKDPDV'HDGOLQHIRUDSSOLFDWLRQLVD\WK Outgoing Haitian president criticises UN military focus P RESIDENT o f Haiti Rene Preval speaks during a meeting of the U.N. Security Coun-c il on Haiti, W ednesday, April 6, 2011 at United Nations headquarters. (AP

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BENGHAZI, Libya Associated Press THREEdays of attacks by supporters of Libyan ruler M oammar Gadhafi have halted oil production in rebel-held fields in the country's east, a rebel spokesman said Wednesday. The rebels had just begun exporting oil again after a weekslong hiatus in an effort to raise funds for their struggle against Gadhafi, who still controls the western half of the country. The rebels have a deal to sell their oil from the port of Tobruk through the help of Qatar and use the profits to pay salaries and buy food, medicine and weapons. "I think we will not depend on oil revenues in the coming stage because our production has been affected in this crisis," rebel spokesman Abdel-Hafidh Ghoga said. Ghoga said armored vehicles attacked the rebel-held oil field of Messla on Monday and Tuesday and then a day later, the field of Sarir. While the extent of the damage remains unclear, he said that the rebels can no longer sustain the 100,000 barrels a day they had been producing. By contrast, in 2009, Libya produced 1.65 million barrels of oil per day. "Col. Gadhafi seeks to deprive us of even this by hitting the oil fields that feed this port," Ghoga said. The rebels still have about one million barrels in storage in Tobruk, he said, which is being exported through the Qatari deal. The rebels have responded to the attacks by enhancing security, Ghoga said, transferring fighters from the front line with Gadhafi's forces to protect the oil fields. "This is our wealth and we have to protect it," he said. The two fields are part of the massive Sirte Basin region, which is one of the world's largest oil fields and holds 80 percent of the country's oil reserves. Sarir field was discovered in 1961 and is the largest oil field in the country, with estimated reserves of 12 billion barrels. A pipeline carries its oil north to Tobruk. Messla, discovered in 1971 and just 25 miles (40 kilometers) north of Sarir, is estimated to hold 3 billion barrels of oil. Libya has the largest proven oil reserves in Africa, even more than Nigeria, at an estimated 46.4 billion barrels as of January 2011, according to Oil and Gas Journal. I NTERNATIONAL NEWS PAGE 18, THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 2011 THE TRIBUNE Attacks by Gadhafi forces damage rebel oil fields A LIBYAN REBEL FIGHTER monitors the skyline on top of a sand dune, near Brega, Libya Wednesday. (AP

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By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net CABLE & Wireless Communications (CWC assumed management con trol at the Bahamas Telecommunications Company (BTC after the Government settled a "hiccup" with the Grand Bahama Port Authority (GBPA licence fee the newly-privatised entity would pay in Freeport. The negotiations with the Port were settled "amica bly", according to BTC's former executive chairman Julian Francis. BTC did not give into requests by the Port to pay a larger, unspecified licensing fee an increase that the Government thought the Port had no basis to demand, he added. "I can't say that there was any precise amount [being asked for]. . The issue at the end of the day was also the principle of it. But the Port came to the point where they understood the position of the Government and accepted. We didn't expect [it], because the understanding of the license was very clear to us, so we didn't think that this was an issue. BTC is primarily licensed by URCA (the Utilities Regulation & Competition Authority) and pays fees to the Government of the Bahamas on its operations throughout the Bahamas," said Mr Francis, whose tenure ended yesterday. SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 2011 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69T he information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held r esponsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $5.23 $5.21 $5.23 By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A leading attorney has a measure of confidence that the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Developments (OECD Review of the Bahamas will show this nations regulatory environment is better than many of its member countries, despite misgivings about the leading role played by France in the exercise. Brian Moree QC, senior partner at McKinney, Ban croft & Hughes, told Tri bune Business in an exclusive interview that it was extremely important for the Bahamas to obtain a favourable OECD Peer Positive OECD review crucialfor the Bahamas Top attorney confident process will show Bahamas has better regulatory regime than many OECD states* Report will influence G-20 perception of Bahamas on tax matters, but nation has over complied in some respects with global demand SEE page 9B By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor Reducing telecommunica tions costs is vital to the Bahamian financial services i ndustrys competitiveness, a leading attorney has urged, pointing out that minimising t he overall cost base is critical to attracting financial institu tions and clients to this nation a t a time when its long-stand TELECOMS HURTS FINANCIAL SECT OR C OMPETITIVENESS SEE page 11B BRIAN MOREE By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The Government has been urged to re-create the Bahamas Electricity Corporation (BEC vate company even before the energys governing legi slation is overhauled, give n that the existing Act d eters private sector investment and renewablee nergy involvement. T he National Energy Policy Committee, in its second report to the Government, which wasr eleased last week, said the current Electricity Act 1956 was no longer suit-a ble to deal with the chal lenges of the electricity sector in the Bahamas, especially since it did notp rovide for a financially viable operation of BEC and consumer-based gen eration. H owever, the Committee recommended immedi ate action even before leg i slative amendments had b een drafted, particularly when it came to BECs corporate governance. The Government of the B ahamas should establish BEC as a private electricity company under the Compa n ies Act, their report Recreate BEC as private firm Government urged to transform Corporation into entity under Companies Act* Existing Act overhaul recommended, as barrier to private sector investment and renewable energy SEE page 7B By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The Bahamian capital markets are still far away from where we need to be, a leading i nvestment banker told Tribune Business yesterday, despite the seeming early success of the Commonwealth Brewery initial public offering (IPO had attracted $36 million in subscriptions some 57.6 per cent of the total amount soughtby Tuesday this week. M ichael Anderson, RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trusts president, told this newspaper that while the Bahamian capital markets had made a lot of headway in comparison to where they were in the mid1990s, all sector participants now needed to come together again to fix issues such as liquidity and chart a long-term direction. Expressing hope that the Commonwealth Brewery IPO, the first one in the Bahamas for 10 years, would serve as a catalyst to spark the next development phase for the Bahamian capital markets, Mr Anderson said further development r equired initiatives such as greater involvement by Gov ernment agencies and their pension funds, which were the largest sources of long-term savings capital in the Bahamas. Agreeing with investment analyst Richard Coulson on the need for market makers in the B ahamian capital markets, as a means of enhancing liquidity, Mr Anderson explained that no one would currently step up to do that given the current Capital markets far from where we need n B rewery IPO now 58% subscribed at $36m, with 125 applications being received per day n H opes offering will act as catalyst to bring all market players together to plot next growth phase n W hile markets may be coming of age, structure not conducive to market makers n B EC pension funds 10% equity restriction indicative of government thinking M ICHAEL ANDERSON SEE page 6B GOVERNMENT RESISTED PORTS BTC LICENCE FEE SEE page 10B SIGNING: LIME Chief Financcal Officer Gerard Borely signs documents yesterday during the signing at the Cabinet Office. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f B y NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor T he Government yesterday realised more than $230 m illion in gross proceeds from the Bahamas Telecommunications Companys (BTC $14.3 million in net surplus cash it received from the formerly state-owned telecommunications providers balance sheet at closing. Together with the $210 million purchase price and $7 million in Stamp Duty, the Government realised $231.3 m illion from the sale of the 51 per cent majority stake in B TC to Cable & Wireless Communications (CWC funds that will be used to pay down the $4 billion-plus n ational debt. I t is unclear what the net proceeds from the BTC sale Government gets $230m from BTC sale Surplus net cash of $14.3m boosts gross p roceeds Even with pension fund deficit coverage of $39m factored in, government set to gain net $190m plus at least SEE page 12B

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By DEIDRE M. BASTIAN T h rough typical oversight, graphic/web design mist akes can slip through the cracks during production phases, tight deadlines or p ressure. These are the t imes when visual gaffes h appen. Some slip-ups are understandable, while oth-e rs could have been prev ented. Whatever the case, there are many mistakes that can be made depending on the print or electronic side of design, while several of these mistakes crossover between both medias. M oreover, further problems c an be caused by designers transferring from a predomi nantly web design backg round to traditional print d esign. One principle we all know to be true, regardless of our chosen field, is that everyone make mistakes. Just as the sun will rise and set, this is one of lifes little i nevitabilities, and mistakes are important tools in our learning process. While there may be l essons to take away from design mistakes, the bigger picture is the impact it may have on your professional-i sm. However, the best way to learn from mistakes is real-i sing how to perform things d ifferently the next time, which eliminates substandard output. I've gathered what might b e the most popular blunders committed, so lets take a look at some of those cru c ial dos and donts, and ask yourself how many of these mistakes you suffer regularly. Colour moderation: Do not use loud and conflicting c olour schemes so harshly t hat the customers will need to wear sunglasses to browse t hrough the site. An inappropriate colour s cheme is something which I personally feel can make or break a site. Try selecting o nly two or three colours t hat evoke the mood of a b usiness. D o not underline?: Do n ot use the underline feature; it is a law. Only for hyper links on the web is this acceptable. Underlining and italicising text at the same time is the most redun dant thing you can do in life. D esigning Logos in Pho toshop: Logos are designed in vector format, so design-i ng in Illustrator is approp riate. How do I know this? Because Photoshop is a raster-based design soft w are. Scaling a huge logo in Photoshop causes pixilation and makes it more difficult e ach time clients have to res ize their logo for different p rint production. A ppropriate white spaci ng: Do not squeeze 10 pounds of potatoes into a f ive pound bag. Or, if you wear a size nine shoe, DO NOT ask the sales clerk to try a size six. Appropriate s pacing is crucial, as white s pace provides a place for the eyes to rest while the brain receives the message.I n both web and print, there should be ample space around all outer edges of the production. Concentrate on benefits rather than features: One of m y design teachers loved to s ay: Deidre, sell the sizzle not the steak. What this seemed to sugg est was that not only should I concentrate on the fea tures, but also how it makes the users life better. Generally, things always a ppear better when they are B USINESS P AGE 2B, THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 2011 THE TRIBUNE 'URQDOGDWWHUVRQFH$GYDQFHG)HUWLOLW\ 2EVWHWULFVDQG *\QHFRORJ\$QQRXQFHVLWV ORFDWLRQDWWKH 6KLUOH\WUHHWOD]D DERYHEHWWHU %RGLHV*\P7 )D[ Dont overlook the small stuff SEE page 16B THE ART OF GRAPHIX D EIDRE M.BASTIAN

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B y NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor Passing the revised Securities Industry Act will posi-t ion the Bahamas to achieve the highest level of acceptance within the global body for capital markets r egulators, the minister of state for finance said yester day, adding that it woulda lso enhance economic g rowth. E xplaining that the Bahamas would be posi-t ioned for Signatory A m embership within the International Organisationof Securities Organisations (IOSCO told a seminar for MPs and Senators on the upcoming Bill: Should we pass this l egislation, we will mode rnise our securities industry in terms of regulations. We will put ourselves in a position to achieve the highest level of acceptance within the International Securities Organisations( IOSCO) membership, Signatory A and we will, more importantly, greatly improveo ur prospects for economic growth and development,and with it increased job growth, income growth ande ntrepreneurship. N oting that the existing Act was passed in 1999, Mr Laing said: The industryh as evolved significantly since then, and internation al standards have changed since then. Indeed, theB ahamas has developed significantly since then. The economy is more dynamic, investors mores avvy and issuers more diversified. As such, the reg ulations governing the secu r ities industry have to evolve t o reflect these new realities. The seminar came on the same day as Brian Moree QC, senior partner at McK inney, Bancroft & Hughes, told Tribune Business that an inadequate regulatory framework was a key factorin the nations failure to make any significant inroads in the capital markets busi n ess. Acknowledging that the Bahamas business model has to be looked at very carefully, Mr Moree said that while private wealth management continues to b e this nations core produ ct line, we have not really b een able to make any significant inroads into the cap-i tal markets sector. This industry includes investment and hedge funds, and Mr Moree said thes trategic decisions made by r ival jurisdictions, such as the Cayman Islands, to focuson this area and commit s ubstantial resources to it, was one factor why the Bahamas had struggled to make the breakthroughh ere. However, the only investment fund area showing growth for the Bahamas wast he Specific Mandate Alternative Regulatory Test or SMART funds, which weref und products tailored to s pecific private wealth man agement audiences. Apart from that, we have b een labouring under a very i nadequate legislative framework in relation to the securities market, Mr Moree told Tribune Business. Here again is to me what is a serious problem for us. It has been commonly accept ed for many years that the Securities Industry Act is inadequate and has to be replaced, and repealed with a more modern piece of leg islation. That has been common ground for many years. We have had difficulty in addressing that problem in a reasonable period of time, and it is only now w have new legislation that is about t o be considered by Parliam ent. The fact of the matter is that as a jurisdiction it hast aken us far too long to deal with these legislative problems and that, combined with the fact the SecuritiesC ommission, in my view, is s eriously under-resourced in many areas, has made it dif ficult for us to promote ours elves as a jurisdiction suit able for major growth in capital markets. BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 2011, PAGE 3B Securities Bill to position Bahamas at highest level M INISTEROFSTATEFORFINANCE: Z hivargo Laing.

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BUSINESS P AGE 4B, THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 2011 THE TRIBUNE 7KHQHZURRPKHUDWRQDVVDX%HDFKHVRUW7KH%DKDPDVLVORRNLQJIRU'LUHFWRURI)RRGt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t$ELOLWLHV 0XVWEHDEOHWRVSHDNUHDGZULWHDQGXQGHUVWDQGWKHSULPDU\ODQJXDJHVf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t([SHULHQFH +LJKFKRRORUHTXLYDOHQWHGXFDWLRQUHTXLUHG%DFKHORUV'HJUHHSUHIHUUHG 6HYHUDO\HDUVH[SHULHQFHLQRYHUDOO)RRGt%HYHUDJHRSHUDWLRQDVZHOODVPDQDJHPHQW H[SHULHQFH&XOLQDU\VDOHVDQGVHUYLFHEDFNJURXQGUHTXLUHG4XDOLHGDSSOLFDQWVDUHLQYLWHGWRYLVLWRXUZHEVLWHRUHPDLOUHVXPHVDWVQEUMREV#VKHUDWRQFRP1 $OOLQIRUPDWLRQZLOOEHKHOGLQVWULFWHVWRIFRQGHQFH HDGOLQHIRUDOODSSOLFDQWVLV Ansbacher executive passes Series 7 exam EXAMSUCCESS: A securities administrator at Ansbacher (Bahamas passed the Series 7 exam in the US after studying with the Nassau-based Securities Training Institute (STI Attorney Michael Miller, STIs president and founder, said: We are pleased to b e able to play a role in preparing individuals to achieve this international design ation in order to become qualified to participate in the securities market in the Bahamas. Ms Chuno is pictured.

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market structure. Turning to the Commonwealth Brewery IPO, The RoyalFidelity president told Trib une Business that at end-Tuesday this week, his institution, which is acting as the placement agent, had received $36 million in committed subscriptions. We believe were going to get this thing fully subscribed based on initial indications, Mr Anderson told Tribune Business, although whether the offering was oversubscribed remained a question. Weve got some big confirmed investors in there already, but theres a bunch of institutional players out there that have not indicated what theyre going to pick up. A number of high net worth individuals who previously indicated they would subscribe for large amounts have not come in. Theyre not there yet. Mr Anderson added that RoyalFidelity was averaging 135 applications for Commonwealth Brewery shares per day coming in last week. The offering has another full week, until April 15, to run, and while traditionally IPOs are at their busiest during the final week, the 10-year hiatus in equities issues has left Mr Anderson unsure of what to expect. Given that the Government has committed to purchasing any shares not bought by the Bahamian public, the $62.5 million IPO will effectively be fully subscribed anyway, given that the Ingraham administration is likely to instruct the National Insurance Board (NIB der so that taxpayers are not directly exposed. Positive Still, Mr Anderson told Tribune Business: We remain extremely positive. Were really pleased with what weve seen in terms of investor participation so far. Its way more than what weve seen for any offering before. I still expect next week to be a busy week, and expect us to be fully subscribed on this deal. At this stage, its as much as we could expect. Looking at the wider implications for the capital markets, Mr Anderson said the ability to place an IPO some $62.5 million in size, more than ever raised before in the Bahamas, indicated an increasing maturity. If I said to people 10 years ago that wed raise $60 million in this market, everyone would have laughed and said it would be impossible, the RoyalFidelity president said, and at this stage the fact we can raise the full amount gives an indication of the market and its development over the years. Maybe its a coming of age. However, he warned: Were far away from where we need to be, and there are issues in the market that we need to fix........ There needs to be a much more co-ordinated effort between market participants to grow this business, but we have made progress. We need a concerted effort so that everyones on the same track. Im hoping it [the IPO] will serve as the catalyst for the next redevelopment phase. Just as all market participants, including institutional investors, broker/dealers and regulators, had previously come together to save the Bahamas International Securities Exchange (BISX decade, Mr Anderson again u rged that key players get together and see what happens next, particularly in fixing issues such as liquidity. What was needed, he e xplained, was a much more co-ordinated effort between players in the market, not just the broker/dealers, but the capital side of the market and the Government having a much bigger stake in the market, and all participants working together. While the Government did not have to be the key player, Mr Anderson said it would have to be a major component, given that the $1.6 billion NIB Reserve Fund represented the single largest source of pooled long-term savings in the Bahamas. Other major savings sources were also in the public sector, namely the BTC and BEC pension funds. Despite representing the greatest sources of long-term investment capital, Mr Anderson said the Government and its agencies had traditionally played an extremely small role in the capital markets, expecting that retail investors and the private sector would take the lead. BECs pension fund, for e xample, stipulated that no more than 10 per cent of assets could be invested in equities, which Mr Anderson gives an indication of where the Governments capital markets thinking currently lay. How is that going to develop the capital markets, he asked, especially in the absence of private company pension plans in the Bahamas. Such plans, he added, needed to become mandatory to create al arger pool of savings and investments in this nation. Agreeing that the Bahamian capital markets required market makers, Mr Anderson said there was no incentive for someone to do this unless the market was restructured. Cur rently, broker/dealers have to sit behind their clients and can n ot front run, meaning they would be unable to make profits from acting as market makers because they do not have privileges above other players. Still, Mr Anderson told Tribune Business: Weve made a lot of headway. Go back to the mid-1990s, and you only had five to six public companies and very little liquidity. Were light years ahead of that. Weve made huge progress. Were not where we need to be, but it doesnt mean we havent advanced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t$ELOLWLHV 0XVWEHDEOHWRVSHDNUHDGZULWHDQGXQGHUVWDQGWKHSULPDU\ODQJXDJHVf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t([SHULHQFH +LJKFKRRORUHTXLYDOHQWHGXFDWLRQUHTXLUHG%DFKHORUV'HJUHHSUHIHUUHG )RXUWRVL[\HDUVH[SHULHQFHLQ)URQWIFH+RXVHNHHSLQJ*XHVWHUYLFHVLQFOXGLQJ DWOHDVWIRXU\HDUVVXSHUYLVRU\H[SHULHQFHUHTXLUHG 4XDOLHGDSSOLFDQWVDUHLQYLWHGWRYLVLWRXUZHEVLWHRUHPDLOUHVXPHVDW VQEUMREV#VKHUDWRQFRP 1RWH$OOLQIRUPDWLRQZLOOEHKHOGLQVWULFWHVWRIFRQGHQFH 'HDGOLQHIRUDOODSSOLFDQWVLV FROM page 1B Capital markets far from where we need

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u rged. This will allow redefining of the roles, functions, duties, responsibilities, authorities and powers of the various bodies in the company to reflect autonomy of the management in its d ay-to-day activities, and e nable decision-making u nder commercial criteria. Until such time as a revised company structure can be implemented, the Government of the Bahamas should provide written instructions to theB oard of Directors and set p erformance goals for BEC m anagement, which are a ligned with government objectives. It is recommended that t hese activities should start immediately, even without having a new Electricity Act in place. Urgency As for legislative reform and its urgency, the National Energy Policy Committee described the current legislation as a significant c onstraint because it did n ot promote the use of alter native, renewable energys ources. The present regulatory f ramework serves as a disincentive to private-public partnerships in the expansion or development of the Commonwealths electricity infrastructure and sustainable energy goals, the C ommittees report said. It gives exclusive rights for the generation and sale o f electricity, prohibits selfg eneration and interconnec tion to the grid, and it does not impose a requirement that a certain percentage ofe lectricity be generated from renewable sources. This framework has cre ated a regional monopoly on electricity production and distribution in the Bahamas. It presents challenges in fostering an environment of competition, efficiency and conservation that will maintain reasonable prices for reliable electricity supplies, particularly in a global envir onment of volatile oil p rices. Urging that the Act and e xisting regulatory regime b e amended, with financial incentives such as tax b reaks provided to encoura ge private sector investm ent in power generation, the report said that asm onopoly supplier BEC had n o obligation to accept power generated by the private sector. In addition, no renewable energy promotional initiatives or energy efficiency drives existed in the Bahamas, while the fact that the Government was owner, policymaker and regulator for BEC was not an appropriate governance model. Define The Electricity Act does not clearly define the regulatory tasks to be performed, nor does it clearly delineate the duties, obligations, limitations of powers for the sect or stakeholders, the report s aid. There are no drivers to i mprove efficiency, as well a s financial and technical p erformance of electricity suppliers. A revised Act, the National Energy Policy Committee said, needed to establish the Utilities Regulation & Competition Authority (URCA lator, with specific powers and duties. It also needed to set out the licensing requirements, market structure, electricity supply structure and the role of privatelyowned companies in the generation mix. BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 2011, PAGE 7B Recreate BEC as private firm FROM page 1B

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Despite Frances wellknown disapproval of international financial centres and the role they played in the global economy, Mr Moree preferred to give them the benefit of the doubt when it c ame to their lead role in performing the Bahamas Peer R eview, adding that any objective observer would conclude that, in some cases, this nation had over-com-p lied with global regulatory r equirements. I believe its extremely i mportant that we receive a favourable report, because I think that report will have great currency throughout thei nternational community, both in the perception that p eople have of the Bahamas, and in the view that many of the OECD countries have of the Bahamas in their future deliberations, Mr Moree told Tribune Business. Framework France and Jersey carried out the Bahamas PeerR eview on behalf of the 96n ation OECD Global Forum o n Transparency and E xchange of Tax Information. T his review assessed the Bahamas legislative and regu latory framework for the cooperation on, and exchange, of tax information. Asked about the implicat ions of Frances leading role, M r Moree replied: I would prefer to defer judgment in the hope and expectation that this Peer Review will clearly reflect the state of affairs ont he ground, and that is that t he regulatory environment in the Bahamas is better than in many OECD countries t hemselves today. There can be no reasona ble doubts in the minds of any objective observer that the Commonwealth of the Bahamas is fully committed to a well-regulated financials ervices industry in accordance with the highest standards of international behav-i our. Expanding on concerns raised elsewhere about the prominent French role, the leading attorney added: We all know of the general dis position of France with regard t o international financial centres, and the work of the OECD, but I prefer to give t hem the benefit of the doubt, and think they will be objec tive and fair. We will have to see what t he report says. I have a mea sure of confidence the report will be favourable because thea ctual reality is that the Bahamas has so completely and comprehensively over h auled its regulatory structure that any analysis of it will have to see that, in some cases, as a country we have not only complied, but over-complied, in regulation. The Phase One Peer Review report compiled by France and Jersey has been f orwarded to the Global Forum for dissemination to its 96 members. These count ries can then put forth their views on the report, stating whether they agree or disagree. T he Bahamas was assessed on "10 essential elements"r elative to international tax cooperation during the Phase I review. Published "If there's no issue raised b y any member within the t hree to four-week period, t hen shortly thereafter the review will be published. If issues are raised then the mat-t er is sent back, and the assessed jurisdictions get back together to work out whatever issues need to be worked o ut, Rowena Bethel, the Ministry of Finances legal adviser, told a recent conference. M s Bethel was in Paris in March representing and "defending" the Bahamas' taxi nformation exchange regime a t the Peer Review Group ( PRG) meeting. T he Peer Review Group w as set up to conduct indepth monitoring and review of the implementation of the standards of transparency and exchange of information for tax purposes. Each country, including the B ahamas, will ultimately u ndergo two phases of review. Phase I sees each country's legal and regulatory frame-w ork on tax information c ooperation assessed, while Phase II looks at the effec tiveness of the implementa tion of these laws and regula tions in facilitating tax infor mation transparency. Positive OECD review crucial for the Bahamas FROM page 1B BRIANMOREE

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"BTC pays only a very nominal fee to the Port, today, and the way the license is drafted the Gove rnment's position is that there was no basis for the Port thinking that could be c hanged, as a condition of approval. I assume that like a ny other business that operates in the Port area, the Port area is governed by the Hawksbill Creek Agree ment, and that there is a lways the opportunity for t he Port to sit down with all i ts licensees and discuss those issues. It can always c ome up". Mr Francis' comments c ame on the sidelines of a press conference in the Cabinet Office, where CWC officials and the Treasurer signed off on a Shareholders Agreement affecting the transfer of 51 per cent of B TC's shares to the worldwide telecommunications provider. At the signing, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham a nnounced that the Gove rnment had received the full $210 million purchase p rice from CWC, as well as in-kind and cash completion dividends from BTC of$14.3 million. Signing T he signing brought the 14-year privatisation process described by the nation's c hief as an "at times difficult journey" to a close and signalled a new era in Bahamian telecommunicat ions. "The Bahamian people deserve and, indeed, rightly demand, more minutes for less money, more products with better quality, excellent service and more business and profit opportunities for themselves, said Mr Ingra-h am The Government is committed to making this country an international businessc entre of choice, committed t o giving Bahamians access t o the latest and best technologies available in comm unications, and committed to opening this economy for t he further participation of p rogressive, innovative B ahamian entrepreneurs. The privatisation of BTC with the sale to CWC, our new strategic communications partner, provides this platform, and the benefits will be realised by all Bahamians. C hanges to BTC's executive management structure were also confirmed yesterday. Geoff Houston, former executive vice-president ofL IME, CWC's regional o perations, had been a ppointed as BTC's new chief executive, as revealed by Tribune Business earlier this week. Kirk Griffin, who served as BTC's acting chief execu-t ive and president until yesterday, will stay on as an a dvisor for the company. A new BTC board has been established. The three government-appointed directors are Maria Ferere, an accountant and partner of FT Consultants; Deidre P rescott, a current BTC director and employee of BTC; and Mark Holowesko,a principal of Holowesko Capital Partners. CWCs nominees are Nick Cooper, CWC's corporates ervices director; David Shaw, chief executive of LIME; Gerard Borely, chieff inancial officer of LIME; and Mr Houston. A BTC press conference is scheduled for today, w here Mr Houston is e xpected to reveal further i mpending changes to the company. B USINESS PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 2011 THE TRIBUNE RBC Royal Bank (Bahamas is presently considering applications forwww.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean Registered trademark of Royal Bank of Canada The Lion & Globe symbol and RBC are trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada Loans Collection Officer RBC Marsh Harbour, Abaco Branch The successful candidate should possess the following qualifications: 3 or more years banking experience ABIFS / AICB Diploma or degree in Banking (or related field) Previous experience in portfolio and liability administration is a requirement Key Skills Required: Strong Negotiating Skills Relationship building Good analytical skills Basic understanding of collateral security Ability to manage multiple priorities Demonstrated written and verbal communication skills Problem loan management experience Proficiency in Microsoft Office (Word/Excel/Outlook Responsibilities include: This position will have responsibility for Abaco and will be stationed in Abaco Managing and assigning delinquent loan portfolios Maximizing the recovery of outstanding and/or acknowledged client debt pertaining various lending products in order to minimize the Banks losses Effectively negotiating repayment schedules with client Acting as the Banks Agent in Small Claims Court with legal representation by the Banks attorneys Assisting with ODWO Debt Recoveries Responsible for late collection activities 31 days and over Promoting teamwork by committing to deliver a continuous high level of service to Colleagues/Partners Contributing to the Centre objectives by identifying and offering appropriate solutions with a continuous focus on effectiveness Willingness to work flexi-time A competitive compensation package (base salary & bonus) will commensurate with relevant experience and qualifications. Please apply by April 12, 2011 to: Assistant Manager, Recruitment & Employee Development Human Resources Bahamas Regional Office RBC Royal Bank (Bahamas P.O. Box N-7549 Nassau, N.P., Bahamas Via fax: (242 Via email: bahcayjp@rbc.com 5261
PAGE 27

ing attractions have largely b een marginalised. Brian Moree QC, senior partner at McKinney, Ban-c roft & Hughes, told Tribune Business that Bahamian-b ased financial services p roviders previously had no choice but to pass on the cost o f relatively high international tariffs to their clients, some-t hing that was traditionally mitigated by this nations historical bank secrecy comp etitive advantage. Eroded T hese attractions, though, h ad been eroded over the past d ecade through the initiatives o f the G-20 and their acolytes, the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECDt he Financial Action Task Force (FATF the cost of doing business withthe Bahamas was now a key factor for financial institutionsa nd high net worth clients when deciding where to place their business. The traditionally high long distance rates have repre-s ented a major wealth transfer f rom corporate Bahamas, e specially service-based businesses competing in the international economy, to househ olds enjoying free local c alls. H owever, Mr Moree sug gested this had been to the detriment of the cost base f or doing business in the B ahamas. A cknowledging that many m ight feel that international banks and financial servicesp rofessionals could afford to p ay the long-distance telecommunications tariffs, Mr Moree said: Whatever t he long distance rates are, theyve got to be paid, as you cant conduct business with out connectivity. And dont think those costs are not passed on to our customers and clients, which affects the cost base of doing business in the Bahamas, which relates directly to the cost of business and our competitiveness in the international community. That directly affects how attractive we are to the market, and then you combine t hat with some of our previo us advantages being eliminated or largely marginalised. The Bahamas had previously relied largely on strict confidentiality laws for its competitive advantage, and had been able to mitigate its high telecommunications costs because all its Caribbean-based international financial centres rivals were suffering from serious problems, all saddled with monopo lies. C ompetition, though, has been introduced in most other Caribbean markets, with the Bahamas being among the last to privatise the stateowned incumbent and being the liberalisation process. There are other factors that 10-15 years ago gave us a competitive advantage, which a re either totally eliminated or severely mitigated, Mr M oree told Tribune Business. We cannot enjoy a competitive advantage with a high cost base which is affected by, among other things, your technology platform. Certainly, the privatisation and ultimate liberalisation of the telecommunications sector is a very major factor in the cost of financial services....... The banks are not paying it. Its passed on to the c onsumer, which affects the price of doing business. When p ersons look at whether to go t o the Bahamas, Hong Kong, Jersey or Singapore, these factors come into play. And he added: When you list them all the cost of labour, the cost of technology,t he cost of service, the regul atory platform this is how people decide where to do business, and if youre going to get your share of the business, you have to be competitive in these key areas. Some of these were doing well in, some were not doing well in, and we have to identify the areas we are not doing well in and improve. Immigration is a factor as well. BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 2011, PAGE 11B :,//%(&/26(' $118$/&.7$.,1* Telecoms hurts financial sector competitiveness FROM page 1B

PAGE 28

will be, but even subtracting the $39 million that the Government will put into the Feeder Trust to cover the existing BTC employee p ension fund deficit, the I ngraham administration s eems set to earn a net $192 million from the sale. Tribune Business revealed in late January 2011 that the Government was likely to receive almost $14 millioni n net surplus cash from BTCs balance sheet at the sale closing, taking gross proceeds to around $230 million. The privatisation agreem ent with Cable & Wireless Communications (CWC provided that if there is net cash on BTC's balance sheet i n excess of $15 million when the privatisation sale is completed, the difference will be remitted to the Publ ic Treasury, giving the Gove rnment gross proceeds f rom the sale in excess of the $210 million plus $7 million Stamp Duty previously advertised. Documents buried in the p rivatisation papers tabled i n the House of Assembly showed that, at November 30, 2010, BTC had total casho n its balance sheet of $68 million, and total indebtedness (most of this coming from $36.4 million in borrowings) of $39.1 million. S ubtract the latter from t he former, and BTC's net c ash position at end-November last year was $28.9 million. With $15 million to be left on the balance sheet when C WC and the Government c losed the privatisation agreement, this meant that, if the deal had closed then,s ome $13.9 million in cash would be remitted to the Public Treasury. In fact, the Government actually realised slightly more, some $ 14.3 million, indicating that B TC has been able to i ncrease its cash resources and cash flow since then. CWC yesterday unveiled its senior executive team for BTC. As revealed by Trib une Business on Monday, G eoff Houston will become chief executive at BTC, with David Kelham taking overa s chief financial officer designate. Existing chief financial officer, Paul McLean, is understood to have been on a contract that would have b een coming to an end anyw ay. G erard Borely, chief financial officer at LIME, CWCs Caribbean regional subsidiary, told yesterdays signing ceremony: I would l ike to welcome BTC coll eagues to the Cable & Wireless Communications family. They will find us af air employer, committed to creating working environments where colleagues feel engaged. BTC, and indeed the Bahamas, will be very important to Cable & Wirel ess Communications and our operations across the region. The completion of this transaction marks the b eginning of a new era for B TC. It is, as has been said before, the first step towards liberalisation. Our experience around the world tells us that the customer will be the winner from that process. Our role is to help e nsure that BTC continues t o trade successfully in this new era. Well do that by focusing on the needs of our customers and communities. BTC will win when its customers win. David Shaw, LIMEs chief e xecutive, said in a statem ent: Today represents a f resh start for BTC, with the beginning of a new partnership....... Most importantly,w e want to welcome BTC staff to the CWC family. They have done an excellent job in difficult circums tances over the past few months and remain the lifeblood of this business. B USINESS P AGE 12B, THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 2011 THE TRIBUNE 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1 .190.95AML Foods Limited1.191.190.000.1230.0409.73.36% 10.639.05Bahamas Property Fund10.6310.630.000.0130.200817.71.88% 5 .724.40Bank of Bahamas5.305.00-0.3032,5540.1530.10032.72.00% 0.530.17Benchmark0.180.180.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 2 .842.70Bahamas Waste2.702.700.000.1680.09016.13.33% 2.201.96Fidelity Bank1.961.960.000.0160.040122.52.04% 12.408.75Cable Bahamas8.908.75-0.156,0001.0500.3108.33.54% 2 .852.35Colina Holdings2.552.550.005001.0310.0402.51.57% 7.005.80Commonwealth Bank (S1)6.436.930.5010,0000.4880.26014.23.75% 2 .861.90Consolidated Water BDRs2.152.13-0.020.1110.04519.22.11% 2.541.40Doctor's Hospital1.401.400.000.1070.11013.17.86% 6.305.22Famguard5.225.220.000.3570.24014.64.60% 9.105.65Finco7.256.78-0.473,5000.6820.0009.90.00% 11.408.75FirstCaribbean Bank9.358.76-0.593,0000.4940.35017.74.00% 6.004.57Focol (S)5.485.15-0.3312,0000.4520.16011.43.11% 1 .001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 7.305.50ICD Utilities7.307.300.000.0120.240608.33.29% 1 0.509.80J. S. Johnson9.829.820.000.8590.64011.46.52% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.001.2070.2008.32.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 9 9.4699.46Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029BAH2999.460.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +FBB13100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.00154 52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Bid$ Ask$ LastPrice DailyVol EPS$ Div$ P/E Yield FINDEX: YEAR END 2008 -12.31%3 0 May 2013 20 November 2029TUESDAY, 5 APRIL 2011B ISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,422.73 | CHG -27.54 | %CHG -1.90 | YTD -76.78 | YTD % -5.12BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basis)Maturity 19 October 2017 7 %RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)2 9 May 2015 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-677-BISX (2479) | FACSIMILE: 242-323-232019 October 2022 P rime + 1.75% Prime + 1.75% 6.95%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:7% Interest 5 2wk H i 5 2wk L ow S ymbol B id $ A sk $ L ast P rice D aily V ol E PS $ D iv $ P /E Y ield 10.065.01Bahamas SupermarketsN/AN/A14.00-2.9450.000N/M0.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.350.400.550.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 Months %NAV 3MTH 1.54101.4525CFAL Bond Fund1.54100.97%6.09%1.517907 2.95272.8300CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.94860.04%1.45%2.918256 1.58511.5141CFAL Money Market Fund1.59181.13%4.61%1.517907 3.20252.8522Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund2.7049-0.56%-15.54% 13.638813.0484Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund13.43920.61%-0.22% 115.7622101.6693CFAL Global Bond Fund115.76229.58%9.58%114.368369 111.469799.4177CFAL Global Equity Fund111.469711.32%11.32%106.552835 1.14651.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.14655.20%5.20% 1.11851.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.11854.73%4.73% 1.14911.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.14915.35%5.35% 9.74859.1005Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 19.79504.85%5.45% 11.236110.0000Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 210.6417-1.20%0.50% 10.12669.1708Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 310.12661.27%1.27% 8.45104.8105Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund Equities Sub Fund8.45100.72%9.95% BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/MNot Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/200730-Nov-10 31-Jan-11 109.392860 100.183340 31-Dec-10 31-Dec-10 NAV 6MTH 1.490421 2.910084 1.555464TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752528-Feb-11 31-Dec-10 28-Feb-11 25-Mar-11 31-Jan-11MARKET TERMS31-Dec-10 31-Jan-11CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)31-Jan-11BISX Listed Mutual FundsNAV Date 30-Nov-10 31-Dec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overnment gets $230m from BTC sale F ROM page 1B

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BARRY HATTON, Associated Press LISBON, Portugal Portugal became the third debt-stressed European country to need a bailout as the prime minister announced Wednesday his country will request international assistance to ease its rapidly worsening financial crisis. "I want to inform the Portuguese that the government decided today to ask ... for financial help, to ensure financing for our country, for our financial system and for our economy," Prime Minister Jose Socrates said in a televised evening address to the nation. Portugal has followed Greece and Ireland, other financially troubled eurozone countries, in asking for aid from Europe's bailout reserve and the International Monetary Fund. Analysts expect Portugal will need up to ?80 billion ($114.4 billion bearable for Europe's finances. A bailout had long been in the cards as Portugal, one of the 17-nation eurozone's smallest and weakest economies, has struggled for months to finance its economy amid the fear ofr eluctant investors that it won't be able to settle its debts. Socrates, cornered by his country's mounting financial difficulties, said Portugal was giving up its yearlong battle to avoid asking for a bailout fromits European partners. "This is an especially grave m oment for our country ... and things will only get worse if nothing's done," Socrates said, adding that a bailout was "the last resort." Other European countries have long urged Portugal to accept help in the hope that containing the continent's debt crisis in countries on its outer rim would spare other nations from becoming the targets of market jitters about the euro zone's fiscal soundness. Over the past year, Portugal insisted it didn't want assistance because the terms of a big loan would lock it into austerity measures for years, lowering the standard of living in what is already one of Western Europe's poorest countries. Athens and Dublin were wary of accepting accept help for the same reasons until they had no choice. Portugal's difficulties are different from those of Ireland, where banks became overleveraged during a real estate boom that went bust, and Greece, where unapparent financial commitments came to light and overwhelmed it with debt. Portugal's troubles stem from a decade of measly growth averaging 0.7 percent a year during which it amassed huge debts to finance its western European lifestyle. Portugal has gradually lost the trust of its creditors, and investors have demanded increasingly high returns for loans to Portugal that are viewed as risky. The yield on Portugal's 10year bonds, which stood at 5.8 percent a year ago, was at 8.54 percent Wednesday an intolerable level, especially for a country predicted to enter a double-dip recession this year. The government's resignation two weeks ago, leaving the country without a fully-operating administration until a June election, amplified market fears. Two rating agencies downgraded the country's bonds to one notch above junk level in recent days, triggering alarm among Portuguese and European leaders. Socrates blamed opposition parties for the bailout request because they rejected an austerity program which the European Commission and European Central Bank had endorsed. The outgoing government had introduced tax hikes and pay and welfare cuts to reduce debt and avert a bailout. Portugal managed to raise about ?1 billion ($1.43 billion sury bill sale Wednesday but investors asked for interest rates over 5 percent to part with their money. Portugal's short-term borrowing rates rose above what it would likely have to pay for bailout loans as the yield on five-year bonds on the secondary market hit 10 percent. By contrast, Irish average interest rates currently under review for a decrease are 5.8 percent for loans with longer maturities. Though analysts say Portugal probably has enough money in reserve to repay a ?4.5 billion loan that falls due later this month, they think it would be extremely difficult for it to find almost ?7 billion to roll over a bond and make interest payments in June. BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 2011, PAGE 13B ADDRESS: Portugal's Prime Minister Jose Socrates makes an address Portugal PM says his country will ask for bailout

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JULIE PACE, Associated Press WASHINGTON After weeks of intense negotiations, the United States and Colombia have reached a deal on a free trade pact that the White House says is a vital part of President Barack Obama's economic agenda. The administration said the agreement came together after the Colombians agreed to offer greater protections for workers and union leaders, an area of key concern for the U.S. It estimates final pact will boost U.S. exports to Colombia by more than $1 billion per year and could support thousands of American jobs. The deal has bipartisan support in Congress, which must approve the agreement before it can be implemented. Republican lawmakers have used the pact as a political bargaining chip, threatening to block the confirmation of a new commerce secretary and hold up final passage of another trade deal with South Korea if the administration did not finalize a pact with Colombia, as well as another pending agreement with Panama. Completing the Colombia deal could increase pressure on the Panamanian government to address outstanding issues that remain in those negotiations, administration officials said. U.S. concerns with Panama are focused on the transparency of tax laws there, though officials say Panama will likely pass a tax-information exchange agreement that could end the stalemate by the end of this month. Under the agreement with Colombia, 80 percent of consumer and industrial products the U.S. exports to Colombia will become duty-free, with the remaining tariffs phased out over the next 10 years. More than half of U.S. agriculture exports to Colombia would also become duty-free, with almost all tariffs eliminated within 15 years. Colombia is the third largest economy in Central and South America and was set to implement trade pacts with Canada and the European Union. The administration said finalizing the deal now was crucial to the U.S. keeping an economic foothold in the country. The White House said Oba ma would meet with Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos Thursday in Washington to formally approve the agreement. Utah Sen. Orrin Hatch, the top Republican on the Senate Finance Committee, welcomed the breakthrough with the Colombians, but said the deal did nothing to change his party's insistence that the administration finalize all three outstanding trade agreements before Congress approves any of the pacts. "All three agreements need to be sent up together," Hatch said. "We need to begin imple menting work on all three agreements immediately." Republicans have said they want to begin reviewing the three trade pacts by July 1. The administration has yet to send the South Korea deal to Congress, and administration officials offered no timeline Wednesday for sending the Colombia agreement. The U.S. signed the three pacts in 2007 under President George W. Bush. But the thenDemocratic-led Congress never brought the agreements up for vote, giving the Obama administration time to renegotiate areas it found objectionable. The key U.S. concerns in negotiating the Colombia pact focused on high rates of violence against Colombian labor union leaders and insufficient protections for workers' rights. Under the new agreement, the Colombian government will phase in an action plan throughout the year aimed at increasing protections for labor, including expanding the scope of existing protections to help union leaders protect labor activists and enacting tougher measures that criminalize actions limiting workers' rights, including the right to organize. Many U.S. labor organizations have opposed the deal on the basis of Colombia's treatment of unions. Daniel Kovalik,a senior lawyer for the United Steelworkers, called news of the amended Colombia pact "devastating" and said his union, as well as the AFL-CIO, would continue to oppose the deal. "This shows a total disregard for the views of labor on this," Kovalik said Wednesday. Colombia continues to be an extremely dangerous country for union organizers. According to the National Labor School, 52 union activists were murdered last year, and five have been killed so far this year. News of the deal with Colombia won praise from the business community. Tom Donohue, president of the U.S. Chamber of Com-m erce, applauded Obama and Santos for their "courage and pragmatism" in striking the accord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t$ELOLWLHV 0XVWEHDEOHWRVSHDNUHDGZULWHDQGXQGHUVWDQGWKHSULPDU\ODQJXDJHVf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t%HYHUDJH4XDOLFDWLRQVt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and Colombia reach deal on key free trade pact MEETING: President of the R epublic of Colombia Juan M anuel Santos.

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JULIE PACE, Associated Press WASHINGTON After weeks of intense negotiations, the United States and Colombia have reached a deal on a free trade pact that the White House says is a vital part of President Barack Obama's economic agenda. The administration said the agreement came together after the Colombians agreed to offer greater protections for workers and union leaders, an area of key concern for the U.S. It estimates final pact will boost U.S. exports to Colombia by more than $1 billion per year and could support thousands of American jobs. The deal has bipartisan support in Congress, which must approve the agreement before it can be implemented. Republican lawmakers have used the pact as a political bargaining chip, threatening to block the confirmation of a new commerce secretary and hold up final passage of another trade deal with South Korea if the administration did not finalize a pact with Colombia, as well as another pending agreement with Panama. Completing the Colombia deal could increase pressure on the Panamanian government to address outstanding issues that remain in those negotiations, administration officials said. U.S. concerns with Panama are focused on the transparency of tax laws there, though officials say Panama will likely pass a tax-information exchange agreement that could end the stalemate by the end of this month. Under the agreement with Colombia, 80 percent of consumer and industrial products the U.S. exports to Colombia will become duty-free, with the remaining tariffs phased out over the next 10 years. More than half of U.S. agriculture exports to Colombia would also become duty-free, with almost all tariffs eliminated within 15 years. Colombia is the third largest economy in Central and South America and was set to implement trade pacts with Canada and the European Union. The administration said finalizing the deal now was crucial to the U.S. keeping an economic foothold in the country. The White House said Oba ma would meet with Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos Thursday in Washington to formally approve the agreement. Utah Sen. Orrin Hatch, the top Republican on the Senate Finance Committee, welcomed the breakthrough with the Colombians, but said the deal did nothing to change his party's insistence that the administration finalize all three outstanding trade agreements before Congress approves any of the pacts. "All three agreements need to be sent up together," Hatch said. "We need to begin imple menting work on all three agreements immediately." Republicans have said they want to begin reviewing the three trade pacts by July 1. The administration has yet to send the South Korea deal to Congress, and administration officials offered no timeline Wednesday for sending the Colombia agreement. The U.S. signed the three pacts in 2007 under President George W. Bush. But the thenDemocratic-led Congress never brought the agreements up for vote, giving the Obama administration time to renegotiate areas it found objectionable. The key U.S. concerns in negotiating the Colombia pact focused on high rates of violence against Colombian labor union leaders and insufficient protections for workers' rights. Under the new agreement, the Colombian government will phase in an action plan throughout the year aimed at increasing protections for labor, including expanding the scope of existing protections to help union leaders protect labor activists and enacting tougher measures that criminalize actions limiting workers' rights, including the right to organize. Many U.S. labor organizations have opposed the deal on the basis of Colombia's treatment of unions. Daniel Kovalik,a senior lawyer for the United Steelworkers, called news of the amended Colombia pact "devastating" and said his union, as well as the AFL-CIO, would continue to oppose the deal. "This shows a total disregard for the views of labor on this," Kovalik said Wednesday. Colombia continues to be an extremely dangerous country for union organizers. According to the National Labor School, 52 union activists were murdered last year, and five have been killed so far this year. News of the deal with Colombia won praise from the business community. Tom Donohue, president of the U.S. Chamber of Com-m erce, applauded Obama and Santos for their "courage and pragmatism" in striking the accord. B USINESS PAGE 14B, THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 2011 THE TRIBUNE 7 KH QHZURRPKHUDWRQDVVDX%HDFKHVRUWDVVDX7KH % DKDPDVLVORRNLQJIRU&KHI'H&XLVLQH6XSSRUWDQGDVVLVWWKH([HFXWLYH&KHI2YHUVHHWKHGD\WRGD\FXOLQDU\RSHUDWLRQVRI W KH KRWHO7UDLQDQGVXSHUYLVHVWDIIDQGPRQLWRUIRRGTXDOLW\(VVHQWLDO 6HOHFWWUDLQDQGVXSHUYLVHNLWFKHQVWDIILQWKHSURSHUSUHSDUDWLRQRIPHQXLWHPVHTXLSPHQW DQG VDIHW\PHDVXUHV (YDOXDWHSHUIRUPDQFHJLYHJXLGDQFHDQGGLVFLSOLQHDVQHFHVVDU\WRSURPRWHTXDOLW\SURGXFWV 9LVXDOO\LQVSHFWVHOHFWDQGXVHRQO\WKHIUHVKHVWIUXLWVYHJHWDEOHVPHDWVVKIRZODQGRWKHU IRRGSURGXFWVRIWKHKLJKHVWVWDQGDUGLQWKHSUHSDUDWLRQRIDOOPHQXLWHPV 5HDGDQGHPSOR\PDWKVNLOOVIRUIROORZLQJUHFLSHV 3UHSDUHUHTXLVLWLRQVIRUVXSSOLHVDQGIRRGLWHPVIRUSURGXFWLRQLQZRUNVWDWLRQ 2EVHUYHSURGXFWLRQRZDQGPDNHDGMXVWPHQWVLQRUGHUWRDGKHUHWRFRQWUROSURFHGXUHVIRU FRVWDQGTXDOLW\6 NLOOVt$ELOLWLHV 0XVWEHDEOHWRVSHDNUHDGZULWHDQGXQGHUVWDQGWKHSULPDU\ODQJXDJHVf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t%HYHUDJH4XDOLFDWLRQVt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and Colombia reach deal on key free trade pact MEETING: President of the R epublic of Colombia Juan M anuel Santos.

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simpler, but it is hard to avoid wanting to add extra design elements, as every designer boasts of a swagswing. Remember the design principle KISS? Keep it simple stupid. Use text more than letters: Good typography is immutable and has been for a long time. F or example, when adding t ext, look beyond letters and words as they should be used appropriately to deliver your message. Remember that the smalle r the text, the more diffic ult for the reader to grasp your communication. O ne of the biggest mist akes that concerns me is readability. Some designers use art o ver text. paying little or no attention to legibility. If you m ake your website too difficult to understand, potent ial customers will move on to another within seconds. P ost this link ( http://goo.gl/57hn6) into y our URL window and have a good chuckle at the worlds most horrible sites. Fonts and more fonts are n ot always the answer: T he best way to illustrate to a c lient that you do not have a clue what you are doing is t o make your work seem as i f the font fairy scratched all over it. Make graphic elements and images an enhance-m ent, not a detriment, and try not to overuse fonts. Proper scanning: Line art should be scanned at 100 per c ent of the finished size at a minimum of 600 dpi and h alftones (photographs 300 dpi. When working with four-colour images, rememb er to convert all graphics to CMYK, never RGB. Save as a Photoshop EPS or T IF. Try not to use file com pression when saving your scans. Underselling design work: N ovices/young designers just starting in graphic design often undersell themselves. B ut, nevertheless, do recognise that it is easier to bring d esign costs down rather t han up. Dont sell yourself f or less than youre worth. K now your value. Spec Work: You just made a big mistake if you c onsent to your client paying after he or she decides if t hey like your work. What if the client doesnt like it? I t never pays to shoot yours elf in the foot just because you have another. Forgetting to Sign a Cont ract: N ever, never start jobs until both you and yourc lient have signed a contract. I am certain this principle is regarded as common s ense and not a design mist ake. Invest in the right tools for the job: Would you use a s crewdriver to hammer a nail? As a graphic/web designe r, it is good to use the cor rect tools to avoid a spoilt product. Producing the most beau tiful design, but aimed at thew rong target market, is unlikely to do the job. Its easy to get caught up i n designs that you like rather than what is approp riate for the business c lient. For example: A light, h umorous advert design m ay not work for a serious/expensive product or service, as it will lack the knockout factor. Every shop i s different. D ouble spacing: Y our computer is not a typewriter, s o there is no need to double s pace after a period, as the layout program will do it for you by way of automatic kerning. (Kerning is a typo-g raphic term for adjusting space between two letters toa void gaps). Dont deliver cut and p aste ads: C ertain ads are a bout as cut and paste as y ou can get, and I dont mean that in a valuable way. Theres nothing wrong, i nherently, with the concept, but considering the cost of ads, I think that businesses r eceive the short end of the stick when they receive this type of substandard output. Enclose contact/service i nformation: O ne of the most common mistakes m ade is not providing contact information. A s we are all aware, mill ions of companies are comp eting for the attention of potential customers. Sites that do not clearly outline the nature and availability of their business and services are ineffective. The mistakes often come from the little stuff that gets past the gatekeepers during production. W hile some errors might not be big ones, they do indicate that someone didnt take the time to be more careful. But dont forget that in g raphic design, some rules and principals can be broken. I n many cases, graphic/web designers or art d irectors are permitted to break rules to create a point or draw attention, depend-i ng on their dynamics. A s with clothing, not e very jacket on the rack will meet your expectations, butw e all know that youd con t inue to try others more i nteresting until you find one that fits correctly. Some mistakes in layout a nd design account for 80 per cent of pre-press costs, missed deadlines and substandard outputs. Granted some mistakes c ome with a heavy price, but theres a palpable sense that design blunders may destroy one issue but sometimes g ive rise to another. S o enhance your web/print design chances of success by keeping thesev ital principles in mind. U ntil we meet again, have fun, enjoy life and stay on t op of your game. NB: Author welcomes feedback at: deedee2111@hotmail.com B USINESS PAGE 16B, THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 2011 THE TRIBUNE Dont overlook the small stuff F ROM page 2B

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T H E T R I B U N E S E C T I O N C A R T S & E N T E R T A I N M E N T 07 WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6, 2011 NO LIMITS are words heard very often. And the students of CC Sweeting Senior High School demonstrated the true meaning of the phrase through cre ative works of art during the school's Art Exhibition and Cultural night held March 24 under the theme General Per spectives....NO LIMITS. The show featured a number of art work ranging from novice designs to skilled pieces that embodied the spirit of the aspiring artists. FelipŽ Major /T ribune staff

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R E L I G I O U S N E W S S T O R I E S A N D C H U R C H E V E N T S RELIGION S E C T I O N C PG 2 7 THURSD A Y APRIL 7 20 1 1 T H E T R I B U N E S

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The T ribune PG 28 Thursday April 7, 201 1 RELIGION THE LIVES and legacies of two of the v i ct i m s i n N a s s a u' s w o r s e a v ia t i o n tragedy in modern times will car r y on t h r o u gh a m e mo r i a li s e d h o n o ur Engineer Nathaniel W illiams and musi cian Lavard Curtis both tragically lost their lives on October 5, 2010 when a chartered flight they were on crashed into Lake Killarney shortly after takeof f from the L ynden Pindling Inter national Airport. All 9 on boar d including the p ilot wer e kill ed. Th e f light includ ed engineers all working for Music Needs Sound Pr oduction Company owned by Nat W illiams; they were on their way to San Salvador for the discover y day week end festival. Nat W illiams worked as supervising engineer for recording projects of popu l a r B ah a mi a n g os pe l r e c o r d i ng ch oi r SHABACK. Lavard also engineered for the group but more actively served as a musician for the choir playing keyboards. SHABACK in its first major concer t, since the October tragedy will be per ma nently saluting both men by naming two new foundations in their honour "It was the only natural thing for us to do!" says Director of SHABACK, Clint W atson. "W e wanted something mor e effective and tangible than just presenting a plague to his family Nat was a man whose life centered on helping others in need. He was never selfish with his knowledge, but t oo k de li gh t in t r ai n in g a ny on e wh o expressed interest. That's how Lavar d learned, so it is only fitting to keep his work alive." T he N at W i l l ia m s En g i ne e r i ng Pr ogram or NWE program will be one that serves the interest of young aspiring men in audio engineering. Y oung men will either be funded for training in the fi eld t hr ough s cho lar sh ips or w i ll be trained directly through sponsors of the program who are already engineering in the industr y According to Mr W atson, the program will also seek to provide assistance to churches who are struggling with obtain ing pr oper and adequate sound. "One of Nat's visions was to pr ovide support for churches in the Bahamas and help them upgrade their sound systems with mod er n times. It's an issue he wanted to elim i na t e out of churche s s inc e so many houses suf fer with sound systems. W e can't let that vision die." Nat' s widow Shenecia W illiams now carries on her husband's sound company She suppor ts the plans of SHABACK to keep Nat's dream alive. "I was literally thrown into the fire with the business, but I couldn't let it die with Nat. Helping people is all he was about, although it' s challenging, I can' t give up, Nat wouldn't let me do that. W e are ironing out some kinks but we believe we will get it back to where he would like it to be. That's why I s u p p o r t S H A BA C K, t h e y' v e a l wa ys been a big part of my husband's life, and anyone who will help the work he star ted to go on, I am behind them." Similarly Friday will be even mor e e m o t io n a l f o r t h e m em b e r s o f SHABACK as they establish a perma nent memorial for their musician Lavar d Curtis. The concert takes place two days after he would have celebrated his 27th birthday SHABACK will r ename one of t h ei r po p u l ar y o u t h p r o g r a ms T he Lavard Curtis T r ue V oice of the Y outh Program. "This honour is one that's dear to me," says Mr W atson. "Y outh work is something that's close to SHABACK. W e feel our music and ministry caters to building stronger youth in our countr y Lavard played a major r ole whenever it came down to putting off programs to benefit our youth. This is the perfect honour for him. That way we feel like he's always with us car r ying out this work." Lavard was very active in youth work, a s a d ea co n i n h i s ch u r ch T r i n i t y Assembly City of Praise; he worked in the youth ministry and worked as head of Crash victims to be honoured by popular gospel group at concert SEE page 31 MEMORIAL: Popular Bahamian gospel recording choir SHABACK will honour the LIVES and legacies of two of the victims in Nassau's worse aviation tragedy

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The T ribune Thursday April 7, 201 1 PG 29 RELIGION By ALESHA CADET T ribune Features Reporter THE ME M B E RS of G rac e a nd Pea ce W esle ya n C hurch ha ve organ ised a one o f a kind extra vag anz a th at offers w hole som e, C hristian ente rtainm ent tar g e t i n g th e y ou n g an d no t s o y ou n g a li ke t h r ough out the isla nd o f Na ss a u. T h e G r ace a nd P ea ce W e s l e y a n C h u r c h is a Soc ie ty of the Fre e Method ist C h u r c h of N orth Am eric a. Grac e and P eac e b elie ve s s tron gly in fun dame ntal C hristia n princ ipl es and m orals an d wa s f ounde d w ith the pu r p ose of ra ising the s t a n d a r d of Ch r is t i an l i vi ng i n t h e B a hama s. The c hurc h enjo ys a r e v e re n t t houg htful w ors h ip, w here on e ca n listen f or the stil l sma ll voi ce o f the C r e a t o r a nd me mbers and foll owe rs ma y esc ape t o the refug e of tranq uility from a w eek o f c onfusion The ev ent w ill tak e plac e in the f orm o f a "D r i ve-Thru" w hic h c aters sole ly to ve hic ula r tra ffic on th e grou nds of Grac e an d Pea ce c hurch T w yn am H eig hts. It is sc hedul ed to b e h eld for te n n ights, starting April 10 1 9, betw ee n the hours of 8 pm 10 pm. A c c o r ding to m embe rs th e festivi ties w ill de pic t the li fe and m inistry of J esus displ aye d in a va r i ety o f dif f e r e nt sce nes for p ublic v iew in g a nd e njoy me nt. It is inte nde d to inspire rene we d int erest a nd me ani ngful re flec tion on th e imp ac t th at C hrist ha d on peo ple of hi s time an d how Hi s life d eat h a nd r e s u r r e cti on impa cts our live s toda y T h e r e w ill be im agi nativ e, a r ti s ti c, c reat ive d esign s a nd dec orativ e show p iec es w ith many d if f e r en t the mes, displ aye d und er nume r o us te nts and pre s e nted b y many publi c and pri vate p ar t i c i p a t i n g sc hools throug hout Na ss a u, to c aptu r e a vi ew ing au dien ce w hile prom oting a nd foste r i ng a grea ter aw aren ess o f J esus C hrist." T h e ca s h priz es are be ing a wa r d ed to sc hool s for be st ef f o r ts d isplay ed. The f irs t pla ce priz e win ner w ill rec ei ve a total of $ 70 0, t he s e co nd p l ace p r ize w il l re ce ive $5 00 an d the list goe s on." Goi ng fur t h e r in k eep ing u p wi th the c ha lle nge i s sue d by th e Roy al B ah ama s P olic e Fo r c e for the inv olv eme nt of all a spec ts of soc iety in the m assive c rime f ight, G r a ce a nd Pea ce W esle ya n Chu r c h w ishe s to ac ce pt t he baton by of f e r i n g w hol esome Christia n ente r ta inme nt and a c tiviti es ge ared tow ards fa milie s, c lubs, c h u r c h grou ps and th e w ider c ommu nity a like partic ula r l y in the E astern d istrict. T h e r e w ill a lso b e a brie f ope ning c erem ony wi th a r i bbon cu tting that is set to k ic k off the e ve nt on Su nday April, 1 0, s t a r ting at 7: 30 pm at the ga tes o f Gra ce & P eac e c hurc h. The Mini s te r for Y o u t h S p o r ts an d C ulture, C harle s Mayn ard a s w e ll as th e Direc tor for Art and De sign in th e M i ni s tr y of Edu ca ti on P am el a C h a n d l e r wi ll be in a tten danc e. Polic e p r e senc e to e nsure patron s fee l a g r e a t e r sense of safety an d s ec ur i t y t h r oug hout the ev ent ha s a lso bee n a r r a n g e d W h i l e G r ace a nd Pea ce r e m a i n s a sma ll c hur c h in the ea s te rn d is t r i ct of Na s s au w e b el ie ve ou r em b r ace of c o m m u n i t y o u t r ea ch h as to be eve n m ore far r ea ch ing' thu s we a r e r e q u i r e d to partne r with the com munity to prom ote a nd foste r a grea ter a wa r e ness o f C hrist in all of ou r liv es." T he ev en t is s po n s or e d b y P ai nt Su pp lie rs L T D, Benn iga n' s Ma ll at Marath on an d KTH Phy siothe r a py E ast B ay Shop ping C ente r A Drive-Thru to remember Rev Henley B Perr y By P ASTOR T ONY A COLEBROOK H e a v e n l y D o v e P r a y e r a n d D e l i v e r a n c e M i n i s t r y 2 CHRONIC LES 7 v s. 1 4 If my pe ople who ar e ca ll e d by my na me w i ll h umble t h ems elve s a nd pr ay an d s eek my fa ce a nd t u r n fro m the i r wi c ke d way s, the n I wil l hea r f r om he av en, an d wil l for give the ir s i n a nd hea l t h eir lan d." T o be h umble mean s to be lo w me ek or p o o r W e a s p eop l e ha ve s tra yed f r om the t r ue a nd li v ing God. M a tt h ew 22 vs 3 7 sa ys "Th ou s ha l l lov e the Lor d thy God wi th all t h y h ear t an d wit h all thy s ou l a nd wi th all t h y mind ." Th i s is the f ir st c omman dmen t and t h e gr e ates t c omma ndme nt. T h e r e hav e be en idols p l a ce d befo re God f o r e xamp le home s, c ar s, mon ey a nd d r e s s i n g the v er y bes t. Go d i s l o okin g f o r a h umble s ou l wh o will se rv e h i m in s pir it a nd in t r uth. God has t a ug ht us the way t o k ee p his c om m and me nt s and w al k i n hi s wa ys ( D e u t e r ono my 28 V5. 15 2 0) Re bellion a nd s t iff -ne ck is t h i s ge ner ation who will d es tro y t h ems elve s b ec aus e o f the l a ck of be i n g o bed ient. Le t u s loo k a r o u n d at the home s a nd m a r riag es that h ave be en o r daine d by God. Sa tan is o ut t o des tr o y I f we a s Chr i s tians c an only se e the impor t a n c e of be ing our br othe rs a nd sis t e rs k ee per t h en we will und er stan d. De str uc t ion up on t h e ho mes ma rr iag es and childr en Ps alm 52 v s. 1 a nd Ps alm 50 v s. 15 23 "Why do y ou bo as t in ev i l 0 mi g hty man ?" The g ood nes s of God en dur es c on t in ually T h e r e is no limit a ti o n o f t ime pr o s t r a t i n g b e f o r e t h e L or d, no dis t a nc e in pra ye r or se ekin g the fac e o f the Lor d. Le t us als o look at the bo ok o f Joe l. The boo k of Jo el in a nuts hell t e ll s us th at J oe l p r op hes ies a ft e r a loc ust plag ue s dev as tates the l a nd. He war ns I sr ae l to re pen t le st s omethin g wo rs e wil t h app en to the na ti o n. Th e t h eme of t h e boo k i s the da y of the L o r d is ne ar "God is c alling the n ati o n to Rep en t a nc e an d fas t ing (J oe l 2 vs 1 -2) The tru mpet w as us ed p rimar ily fo r r e l i gi ous purpos es t o cal l the c o ngr e g a t i o n toge ther for me etings to alar m the pe ople to the se riou sn es s o f th e c ris i s that wa s u po n them. In tho se d ay s the c us t o mar y way a Je w s howe d his g rief was t o te ar h i s outer ga rmen t Th is e xter nal s ign c ou l d be me an i n gles s un les s the he ar t is b ro ken in r e p e n t a n c e an d c ontr i tion ( Ps alm 51 /Joe l 2 vs 13) Let u s look a t Jo el 2 vs 15 -17. The s umm a r y of this is t h e whole na t io n n eed s to as s emble in r ep enta nce in or der t o i mp l o re God s me r c y The b i b l ic al me anin g for the w o r d r epe ntan ce is a tur ning fr om sin to G od (De ut e ron om y 30 vs. 12 and 2 C h r on icles 6 VS 2 6-27 ). A p er so n may be s o r ry for his sin, be caus e of his con sequ enc es bu t s til l h ave no de sir e to c ha nge an d tur n to God. Repe ntan ce is the fir st step o f r e c e i v i n g the ano inti n g n o ma t ter wh at lev el y ou s tan d as a Chr istian. Y e t e ven in this the c hur c h is to bla me. In our ea ge rn es s to s av e p eop le, ho w man y p eop l e ha ve we le ad t o t h e L or d withou t teac hing the m wh at it m e an s to r epe nt? H o w ma ny chu rch es h ave sh ed on e an gui sh ed t ear ove r t he i r si ns an d ar e o f fen ded a t the con ce pts. Hav e we for g o t t e n to p re ac h tha t our for give ne ss whic h we r ec eive so ligh t ly was pur c has ed by J es us Chri st t hrough an agoni s i ng an d l onel y de ath on the c ro ss ? A ll men ne ed to r e p e n t A call to r epentance

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MEDIT A TION Having a for m of godliness, but denying the power thereof: From such turn away 2 T imothy 3:5. I W AS in the food store and I had on T shirt of the local church that I attend. A lady stopped me to tell me that it was a good church. She went on to tell me that the people who work in the office ar e v e r y good people. She ex p lained t hat even though she was not apar t of the con gr egation, she r eceived lifechanging help from the office staff. I in tur n said to her that ministr y is not limited to a local assembly but indeed the body of Christ. I told her that it was about the Kingdom of God. Even though we worship in differ ent congregations we are still our broth er's keeper W e can not just go to church for the sake of warming the pews. W e have been going to church for years and yet there is no evidence of change in some of our lives. The sad part about this, is we don't think that this is a problem. How can any one of us be saved, sanctified, and filled with the Holy Ghost and there is no change in our lives? W e work in our varies auxiliaries or ministries and in most cases it is the same ole, same ole. I won der when we will get tried of that? This woman was blessed because the people who helped her excised Kingdom principles. They did not limit themselves or God to a congregation. Rather they followed the instructions that are in the Bible. One can only hope that we have gotten beyond the point of OUR congr egations and can extend an arm of help to those in need of it. Seeing this lady's gratitude made me wonder if I help others out of my r each or my sphere of influence. W e shouldn't just look out for those people who ar e of con cern to us but to as many people as possi ble. Another example is seeing others in need and doing nothing (especially if you have the means to help) to assist them that says we attend church because it is a ritual and we don't apply the word of God to our lives. Let me share with you the method I use to extend grace and mercy to others. Whatever situation, I just put myself in that situation and the same understanding and grace I would want t h at s wh at I s h o u l d gi v e t o o t he r s Agreed or not the only way we seem to c o m p r e he nd an yt h in g i s wh en it hi t s home or close to home. I salute those churches and ministries who go out of their way to help those in need. I believe there is a special blessing for you. When we can go beyond what is in our ar ms reach in anything but espe cially helping others it speaks volumes for the God that we serve and the world will know that we are His disciples. More than anything let's be apar t of God's Kingdom rather than just being a member of a congregation. The T ribune PG 30 Thursday April 7, 201 1 RELIGION In the church, but not in the Kingdom! ALLISON MILLER F OR T O O lo ng f am il y me mb er s ha ve b ee n t ho ug ht of b y t he ch u r ch as po t en t i a l i n d i v i d u a l r e c r u i t s V e r y l i t t l e t h ou gh t ha s be en giv en t o e van ge li s in g o r nu r t ur i ng t h e f ami l y as a un i t. T h e e mp ha s is h as b ee n up o n th e in d iv id ua l. T he a pp r oa ch o ver l o ok s t h e f a ct t ha t t h e p r i mar y i ns t r u ct io n an d s t r en gt h f or t h e C hr i s t ia n l i fe s t em s n ot f r o m th e c h u r ch b ut f r o m t he f am il y A s ur v ey o f t h e Su n d ay S cho o l p up i ls in a l ar g e c h u r ch r eve al ed t ha t no t o ne ch il d fr o m a n un ch ur c he d h o me" l as t ed t hr o u g h t h e e nt ir e s er i es o f th e d ep ar t m e n t a l p r o gr am me s f r o m th e pr i m ar y t o yo ut h S o m e w h e r e a lo ng th e wa y eve r y on e of t h es e ch il dr e n be cam e S u nd ay Sc ho ol d r o p o u t s S u c h a s t a r t l i n g s t a t i s t i c s t r on gl y em ph as i s ed t h e ov er w h e l m i n g in f lu en ce o f t he h om e. I f th e ch ur ch i s to di s ci pl e t he in di vi d ual f am il y me mb er it m u s t d o e v e r y t h i n g p o s s i b l e t o C hr i s ti an i ze th e f am il y as a wh o le T h e r e ar e ma ny wa ys in wh ic h th e c h u r che s o f o ur n at io n ca n in co r po r at e a f o cus on t h e f a mi ly u ni t in t o it s p r o g r am s an d a ct iv it i es T h e i m po r t anc e o f t o g e t h e r ne s s of t he f am i ly i s mu ch b e t t er d e m o n s t r a t e d t h an v er b a l i s e d T h e pr a ct ice o f a pa s t or me et in g th e n ee ds o f h is ow n f am il y s pe ak s mu ch m o r e lo ud l y th an an y s em in ar on th e s u b j e c t H e r e a r e s o m e w ays t ha t t he f am il y u n it c an b e s t r e s s ed b y p r ac ti ca l d em on s t r at i on i n ou r chu r c h e s : (A) Encourage families periodically to sit together during worship ser vices. (B)Invite ladies to attend special men' s meetings and vice-versa. (C) Allow wives or husbands of boar d members to attend certain board meet ings or functions. (D) Sponsor a "family of the month". (E) Sponsor periodic family retr eats or camps. (F) Promote an annual "family week" to focus on the importance of the home. (G) Plan recr eational and social activi ties in which the family can participate together Remember that the family is our greatest asset, let us guard it carefully BISHOP V G CLARKE Jesus is the One THE Q UES TI ON p u t b y Jo h n t h e Bapt iser is a l egi tim ate o ne: "Ar e you the on e w h o is t o come?" (Mt 11: 3b). I t is sti ll a c entral q ues ti o n i n t he m inds of those who cont inue t o search for a Chri st ian s o l uti on wi thout havi ng been able t o make a f i r m commi tm ent to Jesus Chr ist Th e Je ws h ad b e e n lo o k in g fo r t h e Messi ah f or centuri es. T hei r p ol it ic al si tuati on was r ather gri m under the rul e of the Roman E mpir e. T hey could be f orced to c a r ry heavy armour f o r a mi le by any sol d i e r and vari ou s other indigni ti es and dangers could land a per son i n a dis tr e s s i n g p r edicam ent wi thout wa rning. T heir ec o nomi c dil emm a w as compl icat e d b y h e av y ta x a tio n wh ic h c o ul d b e i n c r eased by the tax coll ect or f or p er sonal gain. In the rel igi ous arena, the average person was heavi ly burdened w it h a ser ies of se emingl y u nf orgivabl e sins w hich had esc alat ed beyond the T en C ommandment s t o almos t si x hundred or more. Spir it uall y t h e r e w as a d e sperate need for a Mess iah to set them f ree fr o m this o ppr essi ve exist ence. The Messi ah was expect ed to be a gr e a t m i l i t a r y l ead e r who w ould l iber ate t hem f r om their enemi es. H is Ki ngdo m w ou l d usher in a r eign of pros p er it y and peace He w as t h e ano i nted O ne who w ou l d r e e s t a b li sh Mount Z ion as a Hol y Ci ty o n a Holy Hil l T h i s Redeem er would bri ng di vine favour and j oy f or e v e r What they seemed to get w hen hi s l if e w as over w as: a c r u c i f i e d cri minal ; an it inerant preac h er and h ea ler dep endent o n t he goo dw il l of his f oll owers ; and a radical rabbi clai mi ng to be the Son of God. J oh n died bef ore t h e cruci fi xion, but even in t his ear ly s tage of the L or d s m ini s t r y John knew t h at the st ory was unf olding in a dif f e r ent w ay than he had imagi ned. F or those who exper ienced His touch, or h e a r d a t ransf ormi n g word, He li berated them from a s ick or narr ow worl d-vi ew an d sel f-i mage. N ew l if e had com e wi th en l i gh t enment, i n s pirat ion, and l o vi ng for g i v e n e s s They had been healed i n bod y mind, spir it emoti ons, rel ati onships and more. If w e accept t h at Jes us C hris t i s the One w ho w as to come, w ho came, and who wi ll come a gain, then we have acc ess t o t he very sam e bl essi ngs. O u r oneness i n Hi m has i nd ee d broken do w n every barri er bet ween t h e ages, races s exes, clas ses, nati onali ti es and every ot h er group who meet i n genuine C hris ti an f ell owshi p and communi ty Let i t not be t h at w e fi nd oursel ves in heaven surr o unded by all the beauti full y w rapped and unopened boxes of bl essi ngs t h a t h ad been s et aside for us if onl y w e had bel ieved or asked. When you read H o l y S c r i p t u r e expect God t o set your h ea rt on f i r e. When y o u rec eive t h e s acrament of Hol y C ommunion ant ici pate the pow er and g l o r y of God f il li ng your bei ng, even as the holy w ater mi ngled wi th the content s o f the C up Jesus is t he One and t here is no ot her t o come. Bel ieve i n Hi m today an d be sav ed E m p h a s i s o n t h e f a m i l y u n i t REV ANGELA C BOSFIELD P ALA CIOUS

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RELIGION The T ribune Thursday April 7, 201 1 PG 31 the Sound and T echnical Department, training young men in the church how to become an effective audio techni cian. Y outh Director at the church, Simone Bridgewater says the honour in Lavard's name is "phenomenal!" "I s at f o r m a n y we ek s f o l lo w in g h i s death and wondered what would be t he b est way fo r u s t o r e m e m b e r Lavar d. When this opportunity was br ought up, it was like an automatic t h i n g f o r al l t h e y ou t h l ea d er s Everyone knows the impact he made in such a short time. He was like none other He had a unique way of being funny serious, smart, witty ster n yet lovable all the same time." She's not alone in her views, "I feel our youth program will move beyond being a good program to a sensational one, because we have renamed it. It's like it will be taking on a new identity new str ength and new vigour", claims SHABACK's r oad manager Rayneth Dar ling. T here are som e honou rs y o u b es t o w b ut it n ev er h as an impact, you just feel differ ent about this one. It's like both programs ar e about to shift and take-off like never b e f o r e. T a k e i t f r o m m e, s ay s Darling, "you will hear in the futur e, just how successful both pr ograms ar e once the renaming takes place. I can't wait!" S HA B A CK 's co n ce r t i s c al l ed "Overcome by W orship!" Mr W atson says he got the inspiration to name Friday's celebration this theme, after considering all the group has gone through since October to now "W e made it only because we knew how to connect with God and bond even closer as a group. W e've never had such a dif ficult period in our 15 years of existence. Even after Lavar d and Nat's deaths, we went thr ough other issues that tested our str ength, but at no point did we waiver or give up. It was really our worship and con nection to God and each other that br ought us through. So now rather than just singing about it, we can say we've lived it!" According to W atson, the group's style has changed and so has its focus shifted as well. He says Friday's con cert is more than just singing, it will be an experience second to none. Other a r t i s t s w il l be jo i ni n g S HA B AC K i n cl u d i ng T h e T a b e r n a cl e C on c er t C h o i r Ch r i s t ia n M a s s iv e, M in i s t er Nadene Moss who will be debuting p ubli cly her n ew s ingl e A ri se and Shine. Also scheduled to appear is The Final Hour Mass Choir Golden Gates Ministries Praise T eam, New G ener at ion and yo ung Kar r i n g t o n McKenzie. One of the highlights of evening is the debut single of a new Bahamian collaboration between SHABACK & The Singing Bishop Lawr ence Rolle called "Money Cometh." The song was written originally by Bishop Rolle and r evamped by SHABACK. It's a testimony that Bahamians ar e coming out of a recessionary period and mov ing now into an economic boom. The dynamic duo combination will be the big finale at the event. The concer t takes place at 7.30pm Friday at the National Centr e for the Per forming Arts, Shirley Street. Crash victims to be honour ed FROM page 28 Nat Williams Lavard Curtis

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The T ribune PG 32 Thursday April 7, 201 1 RELIGION AFTER months of planning the dream i s no w a r e a l i t y St P et er s A n gl ica n Parish held its installation of officers for its newly for med branch of the Anglican Church W omen on Mothering Sunday with a special Eucharistic celebration. Under clear blue skies with the spring w af t i ng th r o u gh t he ai r l a di es c am e dr essed to impress. It was after a seven year dr ought that this vibrant organiza t i on i s p o is e d t o s o a r l i ke a go ld e n phoenix. The processional hymn was the theme song for the ACW or ganization, T ake My Life and Let It Be' the melodious and adept playing of the parish' s or ganist, Carnetha Knowles gave the service an exquisite flair T h e f i r s t le s s o n wa s t a k en f r o m Proverbs chapter 31 verses 10-20 which w as r e a d b y P r e s i d en t o f t h e n e wl y formed group, Grace Deal. The Psalm was led by Deloris Miller assistant tr eas ur er and the Epistle was r ead by Flor et Adderley secretary of the group. The go spel was t aken fr om Lu ke' s gosp el chapter 1 verses 26 to 38. The preacher and celebrant was Fr Ch es t er Bu r to n, re ct or of St P et er s Parish, North Long Island. He focused on Acts chapter 1 verse 8 "But you will receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you; and will be my witnesses in Jerusalem in all Judea an d S amari a an d to the end s of t he earth." He told the ladies they ar e all witness es wherever they may be or whoever they may go. A witness is someone who stands and defends on one' s behalf. Jesus would have been talking to his disciples just befor e his ascension into Heaven. The witnesses who were present would have to exhibit some crucial qualities. First, he r eminded the ladies that they have to be credible witnesses in season and out of season realising that they ar e a l wa ys be i n g w at c he d an d e va l ua t e d because their walk must match their talk. Second, he encouraged the ladies to embrace and espouse the tenets and pr e c ep t s i n t h e p r i n ci p le s t h at go v er n Anglican Chur ch W omen thr oughout the Anglican Diocese in The Bahamas and the T urks and Caicos Island. Finally Fr Burton said that the ladies should have a willing heart, mind and soul when God, their Rector or Chur ch calls on them to render any altruistic s e r v i ce I n es s en ce wh en t h e a ng e l Gabriel appeared to the V irgin Mar y her words to his request were "Here I am, the servant of the Lord; let it be to me accor ding to your wor d." Fr Burton suggested that this glorious and glamorous moment in the parish' s life, be used to uplift and inspire women t h r o ug h o ut t h e co mm u n i t y o f No r t h Long Island. He encouraged the ladies to find time to establish a mentoring pr ogram with the young ladies of the parish' s youth group which would enable them to touch more lives. The ACW ladies can caucus with the youngsters to teach and train them in etiquette, crafts and culi nary matters. In attendance was Police Inspector H a r c o u r t S tr a ch an P os t M is t r e s s f o r Long Island Ms. Shane Dames, Senior Nursing Officer Inez Spence, and Chief Councilor Ian Knowles. The Rector expr essed heartfelt thanks to Deborah Ferguson, President of the Anglican Church W omen Council who r esides in Nassau who took time out her busy schedule to visit and meet with the ladies in the formation stages. Fr Bur ton added that he felt pr oud to stand and have his name etched in the history books of St Peter s Parish at the revit alisat ion of th is vibr ant ener g e t i c body of ladies. Following the Mass, r efreshments wer e s e r ve d T h e n ew ly i n s t a l le d o f f i c e r s i ncl u de : P r es i de n tGr a ce D ea l, V i c e Pr esidentCarnetha Knowles, SecretaryF l o r e t A d d er l ey As s is t a nt S ecr e t a r y J o an Kn o wl e s T r e a s u r e r D es i r e e H a r d in g, A ss i s ta nt T r e a s u r e r D el or is Miller and ChaplainMuriel Baker President Hildred Knowles, President of St Paul' s ACW spoke in glowing terms of the won der fu l achievem ent o f th e cadre of ladies with the re-establishment of their organization. St. Peter's Anglican Parish, North Long Island installs ACW officers CEREMONY : Officers of the newly formed St Peter' s Anglican Church ACW were installed at the weekend.

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I T came right down to the wire as Temple Fellowship, Evangelistic Center, Agape Full Gospel andM acedonia all clinched their divisional pennants and the playoff pictures were all cleared up. I t was the Baptist Sports Councils end of the regular season on Saturday for the 2011 Rev. Dr. David S.J ohnson Basketball Classic at the Baillou Hills Sport ing Complex. N ow the focus switches t o the All-Star Classic that will take place on Saturday at the DW Davis Gymnasium before the best-ofthree first round playoffs kick off on Saturday, April 16, back at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex. Defending champions Temple Fellowship emained the only undefeated team, winning the mens president pennant with a 5-0 record after they won over Latter-Day Eagles. As for their divisional playoffs, Temple Fellow ship (5-0 fourth place Christian Tabernacle (3-2 third place Latter-Day (32) will go up against second place Macedonia (3-2 Evangelistic Center was declared the winner of the mens vice president division, although Hope Center gave them a push right to the end when they prevailed, winning a double header, 41-39 over Mace donia No.2 and 41-36 over Good Samaritan. In their divisional play off, Evangelistic Center (51) will take on fourth place Macedonia No.2 (3-3 while second place Hope Center (5-1 with third place Golden Gates No.2 (4-2 The surprise of the day came in the 19-and-under president division when Agape Full Gospel stunned Golden Gates 5445 to finish as the pennant winners. It was the first loss of the season for Golden Gates. In their playoff match-up, Agape Full Gospel (4-1 face fourth place Christian THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 2011 THETRIBUNE SECTIONE PAGE 8E Blazers make playoffs By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net M onths of speculation gave way to the 2011 Carifta Track and Field Championships finally finding a home in Jamaica, now the Bahamas nears final preparation for its version of the team selected to compete at the 40th edition of the games in Montego Bay. The BAAAs will host the Carifta Trials this weekend at Thomas A. Robinson, beginning Friday April 8th at 5pm and continuing Saturday April 6th at 3pm. A series of head-to-head matchups between the top junior track and field athletes will be the deciding factor in determining the 70 member team to compete against the top teams in the region April 23-25. Alpheus Finlayson, BAAAs Public Relations Officer. said the organization expects a number of exciting performances from the country's top competitors on the heels of the Scotiabank High School Nationals. "There is a whole lot of excitement already in the Thomas A Robinson Stadium. So far this season we have had all sorts of records broken and signific ant performances throughout the Bahamas. We have a number of quaifications in a number of events but in any event there can only be two participants so we are down to the last minutes and the question is who will make the bahamas' 2011 Carifta games team that will travel to Montego Bay," he said, "Even though you make the standard you could be left behind unless you beat the other person that also makes the standard so we look forward to a very exciting Carifta Trials this weekend." Over 40 athletes have surpassed Carifta qualifying standards in a number of events, but BAAA executives suggest t hey plan to field a full 40 member team BAAA raffling two tickets to Montego Bay this weekend, gate prizes to keep the fans in tune and excited about thee ntire thing. Star Trackers coach, David Charlton, has been named the Head Coach of this year's Carifta team. "We have seen some outstanding performances thus far. The athletes have all shown their talents throughout the year and especially at Nationals but we expect them to take it up a level and compete even harder because it is now do or die time. They know that this weekend it is gameday. Show up and perform and you go, you don't perform, you dont go," he said, "We will carry a full team, we will carry a strong team. To get it all started we have to get through Carifta excitement grows By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net THE Commonwealth Bank Giants kept their unblemished record intact as they knocked off the Real Deal Shockers 110-102 to snatch a 1-0 lead in their New Providence Basket ball Associations best-of-seven championship series. A large crowd of spectators showed up at the DW Davis Gymnasium as the league switched from the CI Gibson Gymnasium for the rematch of last years series when the Giants prevailed in five games. But based on the way they played in Tuesdays opener, Mark Hanna said theyre not going to change anything as they head into game two tonight at 8 p.m. It was a very physical and rough game tonight, said Hanna about Tuesdays open er. The Shockers is a very good team. They have experi enced players and they are going to come out and they are going to fight hard. But we are the Giants. We know how to win. Weve been together for a long while. We have a game plan and were going to stick with it. We want to win another title, but we also want to try to go unde feated in doing so. As head coach Perry Thompson had indicated in a pre-game interview, his Giants are known for their slow start and that was the case Tuesday night as they fell behind 28-24 at the end of the first quarter to coach James Prices Shockers. But the Giants managed to turn the heat up in the second quarter and they surged ahead 57-52 at the half. They extended their lead to 88-62 at the end of the third. In the fourth, the Giants actually led by 20 and it appeared as if they were going to blow out the Shockers like they did in their 45-point mas sacre over the Y-Care Wreckers in the opener of their semifinal final. But the Shock ers, who had to go four games to advance to the final against the Mailboat Cybots in their semis, found a way to get under 10 in the final two minutes. That was when the experience of the Giants took over and Commonwealth Bank went on to secure the win as their awesome starting line-up played right to the end. And as expected, all five players scored in double fig ures for the Giants. Gamalial Rose led the attack with a game high 26 points, 12 rebounds, a team high five assists and three steals; Hanna finished with 25 points, five rebounds and three steals; Michael Ferley Bain had 20 points, four rebound, four assist and two steals; Ricardo Pierre scored 17 points and Jeremy Trials set for this weekend S EE page 2E GIANTS TOPPLE SHOCKERS TO KEEP THEIR RECORD INTACT 2011 REV. DR. DAVID S. JOHNSON BASKETBALL CLASSIC DIVISIONAL PENNANTS DECIDED SEE page 2E SEE page 2E FAR REACHING: Commonwealth B ank Giants Adrian Miller drives to the basket over the defense of Real Deal Shockers Barry Carter. LOFTY AMBITION: Corey Walkes from Macedonia Baptist goes up for a lay-up against Hope Center in the Baptist Sports Council's 2011 Rev. Dr. David S. Johnson Basketball Classic on Saturday at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex. Hope Center won the game 41-39. n MORE PHOTOS ON PAGE 2E T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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S PORTS PAGE 2E, THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 2011 TRIBUNE SPORTS Tabernacle (2-3 ond place Golden Gates (41) will meet third place Macedonia (2-3 Macedonia No.2 outs cored Mt. Nebo 59-55 to secure the 19-and-under vice president pennant. F or their playoffs, Macedonia No.2 (4-1 f ourth place Mt. Tabor (2-3 a nd second place LatterDay (4-1 Temple Fellowship (3-2 T he other divisional pennant and playoff was decide d the previous Saturday. Defending champions Macedonia (5-1 p ennant and will take on fourth place Agape Full Gospel (3-3 place Temple Fellowship (51) meets third place LatterD ay (4-2 While the teams will have a week to get ready for the post-season, the BSC will take a break this weekend f or its All-Star classic on Saturday at the DW Davis G ymnasium. The day will begin with the 15-and-under game at 10 a.m. That will be f ollowed by the ladies game and then the 19-and-under contest. The coaches will take on the executives before the three-point s hooting and slam dunk contests are held. T he day will close out with the mens All-Star. Hutchinson helped out with 15 points and a game high 14 rebounds. The Shockers also had five players in double figures, led by Lasario Bones Burrows with 21 points and seven rebounds. Ian Wire Pinder came off the bench late and had 15 points and 11 rebounds; Lavardo Hepburn had 14; Lorenzo Carter 13 points and Sidney Hillary contributed 10. Barrington Carter added nine points and six rebounds. Lorenzo Carter, in trying to explain what went wrong, noted: I felt we fell down in stopping the ball. The Giants pushed the ball at us and we didnt step up to stop the initial drib bler and they got numbers and as a result of that, they got the easy fast break baskets. Carter, however, said tonight they will have to stop the ball and get at least five men on the glass because theyre big, they rebounding and theyre pushing the ball on the fast Break. So we have to go inside and control the boards. But Hanna said if the Shockers dont make the adjustments, they are going to be in trouble. As a team, the Shockers out-rebounded the Giants 47-43, so that wasn't exactly the prob lem. The Giants and the Shockers were basical ly even 37-94 (GShockers field; 6-of-20 (GiantsShockers from the three-point arch and 30-of-40 (Giants and 23-of-30 (Shockers so that wasn't the problem either. Commonwealth Bank out-played the Real Deal in all of the little areas that doesn't show up on the stat sheet, like playing together as a cohensive unit, whether or not they were down or in control of the lead. FINALTEAMSTANDINGS H eres a look at the final team standings going into the playoffs: Teams W L Pct. GB M ens President Division Y-Temple Fellowship501,000X-Macedonia32.6002X -Latter-Day32.6002 X -Christian Tabernacle32.6002 Golden Gates No.114.2004 Church of Nazarene05.0005 Mens Vice President Division Y-Evangelistic Center51.833-X -Hope Center51.833X-Golden Gates No.242.66611/2 X-Macedonia No.233.5002 First Baptist33.50021/2 Good Samaritan15.1664 F aith United06.0005 1 9-And-Under President Division Y-Agape Full Gospel41.800X-Golden Gates41.800X-Macedonia23.4002 X-Christian Tabernacle23.4002 G ood Samaritan23.4002 St. Johns 14.2003 1 9-And-Under Vice President Division Y-Macedonia No.241.800X -Latter-Day 4 1.800X-Temple Fellowship32.6001 X-Mt. Tabor 2 3 .4001 ? Mt. Nebo14.2003 M t. Pleasant Green05.0004 15-And-Under Division Y-Macedonia 51.833X-Temple Fellowship51.833X-Latter-Day 42.6661 X -Agape Full Gospel33.5002 S t. Johns 3 3 .5002 Christian Tabernacle15.1664 St. Pauls 06.0005 Y -denotes pennant winners. X-denotes playoff teams. F ROM page 1E DIVISIONAL PENNANTS CLINCHED, PLAYOFFPICTURESCLEARED UP the trials first. This will begin the process of selecting our team so come out and lend your support to your loved ones vying for a sport on this year's track and field team." Meet Chairman, Harrison Petty anticipates the large turnout of athletes vying for limited spots will create the type of spirited competition which should set the pace for action in Montego Bay. "This weekend is about the Carifta Trials. The reality is we have registered for the Carifta trials, 340 athletes registered to compete, but at the end of the day only 70 athletes will be chosen to rep the Bahamas," he said, "There are very large contingents from Grand Bahama, Abaco throughout the Bahamas. This weekend will be very fierce comp from our own standards. We have over 40 athletes that have passed standards but this weekend is important because there must be head to head competition and that is how we will begin to select the team." Several headlining athletes which have already surpassed qualifying standards in their specific events have looked ahead to earning a berth on the team this weekend and also foreshadowed their Carifta expectations. One of the most anticipated events will be the under 20 Boys 400m, featuring Stephen New bold, O'Jay Ferguson and Andre Wells vying for the top spot. In the Under 20 girls 200m, Anthonique Stra chan and Shaunae Miller will rematch one of the top races of the High School Nationals. FROM page 1E FROM page 1E Carifta trials this weekend GIANTS TOPPLE SHOCKERS TO KEEP THEIR RECORD INTACT PHOTOS: Tim Clarke /Tribune staff

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SPORTS T RIBUNE SPORTS THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 2011, PAGE 3E WOULD YOU LIKE TO TAKE PART? Telephone Nassau 326-8191 or Freeport 351-3960PARTNER CHARITIES:The Cancer Society of The Bahamas,The Bahamas Diabetic AssociationApril 16 Montagu Beach,Nassau April 30 Jasmine Corporate Center,FreeportAtlantic Medical Colonial Group International is rated A-(Excellentby AM Best. Funwalk 2011. Every Funwalk step you take is a gift! 2011 ATLANTIC MEDICAL INSURANCE CO.LTD.Atlantic House,2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue,P.O.Box SS-5915,Nassau Tel.326-8191 Suite 5,Jasmine Corporate Center,East Sunrise Highway,P.O.Box F-42655,Freeport Tel.351-3960 www.cgigroup.bmA member of Colonial Group International:Insurance,Health,Pensions,Life By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net Over the past few appearances in international tourna ments, the Bahamas' Senior Mens National Cricket teamh as fluctuated between divi sions. The team now finds itself once again competing in theICC Americas Division 2, and in preparation for its Champi onships over the next two weeks. The team leaves on Friday April 8, 2011 for Panama to compete in the ICC Americas Division 2 Championship and returns home April 17th, 2011. The Bahamas spent much of 2010 in Division 2 but used a decisive home field advantageto advance to Division 1 last February. On the final day of the 2010 ICC Pepsi Americas D2 Tourn ament held in the Bahamas at Haynes Oval, the Bahamas fell victim to Suriname, and suffered their first loss by a mere three wickets. By virtue of the best run rate, the Bahamas was declared the tournament winner and have advanced to the Americas D1 Tournament Bermuda. In the more advanced division, the Bahamas found itself struggling to contend against some of the more formidable competitors in a regionally ele vated level of cricket competition, and now face a demotion. With an advancement to D1, the Bahamas went winless in their introduction to league play and fared just slightly better in the Twenty20 champi onships. The team went 0-4 in league play, but tied in their final match to gain a single point in the final points standings. With the tie, Argentina finished fourth in the tournament and the Bahamas finished sixth and were once again relegated to Division II. The Bahamas also finished in the eighth and final spot at the Pepsi ICC World Cricket League Division 8 in Kuwait. Teams in the 2011 D2 tournament are, the Bahamas, Brazil, Belize, Panama,Turks and Caicos, and the host coun try Suriname. The Tournament is a T20 with the semi finals and finals 50 overs. Team Members: Whitcliff Atkinson Jonathon Barry Gregory Taylor Jr. Ryan Tappin Juio Jemison Derrick Gittens Jr. Albert Peters Shanaka Perera Hamilton Gillard Gary Campbell Lasalle Thompson Cody Dean Andrew Nash Rudolph Fox ICC AMERICAS DIVISION 2 SURINAME, 2011 OFFICIAL TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE Panama v Belize Bahamas v Brazil Day 2 Panama v Turks & Caicos Day 3 11-Apr-11 14:30 Turks & Caicos v Bahamas 14:30 10:00 Brazil v Turks & Caicos Belize v Bahamas Suriname v Panama Bahamas v Panama Turks & Caicos v Suriname Brazil v Belize Tuesday April 12, 2011 RAIN/ REST DAY Sunday Day 4 13-Apr-11 Day 1 Suriname v Brazil 10-Apr-11 Suriname v Belize *** Schedule Subject to Change *** Friday April 15, 2011 OFFI CIAL DEPARTURE DATE Wednesday Bahamas v Suriname 14:30 1st v 2nd (50 over Playoff 5th v 6th (50 over Exhibition Day 5 10:00 Panama v Brazil 10:00 3rd v 4th (50 over Exhibition) 14-Apr-11 14:30 Belize v Turks & Caicos April 8 15 Match Friday, April 8, 2011OFFICIAL ARRIVAL DATESCHEDULE T20 Senior Mens National Cricket team set to leave for Panama for championship By RENALDO DORSETT S ports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net As the title sponsor of the BAAAs National High School Track and Field Championships, Scotiabank Bahamas rewarded the top performers of the meet for their outstanding performances. St. Augustine's College sprinter A nthonique Strachan and Teleos Academy jumper Latario Minns were lauded with awards from Scotiabank executives including a commorative trophy and an Apple iPad. Barry Malcolm, Managing Director of Scotiabank Bahamas, said the honored athletes were examples of the expanding level of talent among Bahamian youth, a group which Scotiabank looks to lend assistance toward development. "I was able to catch a part of the championships and i was stunned at the depth of the talent at all levels. It is great to see young talent to show. I must say how pleased Scotiabank is to be apart of supporting the development of young people in the country supporting the movement of our young athletes on the world stage," he said, "Scotiabank has a Bright Futures pro-gram a program that really focuses on the development of young people. We feel that young people are the future of the community we feel that an invest in young people serves the country for a long term. Programs are principally focus on supporting activities and the development of young people both academically and athletically." Strachan found herself in unique company when she won the under-20 girls' 200m on the final day of competition at the National High School Track and Field Championships. The 16-year-old 10th grader of St Augustine's College inked her name into the record books as she erased 'Golden Girl' Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie's 200 mark of 23.68 seconds when she was a stu dent of St Andrew's High School in 1994. In the process, Strachan's time of 23.17 equalled the world junior leading time which was also done by Grand Bahamian native Tynia Gaiter, who attends high school in Orlando. The previous best time was 23.22 by Allison Peter of the British Virgin Islands at a meet in Orlando. As a result of her performance, Strachan was named the Scotiabank's Female Most Outstanding Athlete as both she and her Big Red Machine teammate Shaunae Miller, second in 23.70, dipped under the qualifying standards for the World Youth Championships, Junior Pan American Games and the Carifta Games. Minns, soared to a record-breaking performance in the triple jump with a leap of 16.55 metres or 54-feet, 3 3/4-inches, to beat out his twin brother, Lathone Minns (15.73m or 51-7 1/4 for the three summer meets. Alpheus Finalyson, BAAAs Public Relations Officer, "This was one of the most competitive National High School Championships we have had in recent memory," he said, "We had 25 records broken and that is a whole lot in any one meet, so it speaks to the efforts of all the participants and in particular, these two outstanding athletes honored here today." Scotiabank rewards top track performers By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net A leading member of corporate Bahamas has partnered with a history making civic organization to host a fundraising event in honor of a pair of iconic figures and Mario's Bowling and Entertainment Palace will host the 1st Annual Mario and Wendell "Big O" Ferguson Fun, Run, Walk, Saturday April 9th. All proceeds from the event will be donated to ABC Prosthetics and Orthotics of Nassau. The 6.5 mile route begins at Mario's Bowling and Entertainment Palace at 6am, onto West Bay St and will return to Mario's to end the event Odette Carey, Sales and Marketing Manager for Mario's said staging the event was a "no brainier" for the company to commemorate two important figures to the organizations and to give to a worthy cause. "We just wanted to commemorate them by hosting this event a nd also giving back to the community by partnering with ABC prosthetics. We decided to combine Mario and Big O moreso because of the personal relationship Mario had with Big O. Big O was actually Mario's personal trainer when he was in track and field so we just thought it would be a good idea to bring the two names together. Of course each of them has their own fan base so we just thought it would be a good combination to get the crowd out. Carey said Mario's was eager to team with ABC when they learned of the organization and looks forward to a successful event on the weekend. "We just found out about the organization when Erin Brown came to us seeking sponsorship with the 'Ride For Hope' She explained to us what her organization was about and we felt it was something that definitely required more public attention and we just thought it would be a good idea to team up with them and help to aid in whatever they are trying to accomplish," she said, "Weh ave been planning this event for the past few months we have also partnered with Bahamas roadmasters. They gave us expert advice on how to go about it and we really feel like we will look forward to a great event on Saturday." Miller, the deceased son of former Cabinet Minister Leslie Miller had the Entertainment Palace named in his honor, while Ferguson, a stalwart of the physical fitness community succumbed to sarcoma cancer in May last year. There is a $10 application fee for each participant while a num ber off medals and special prizes will be awarded. Prosthetics Erin Brown, a 30-year-old bone cancer survivor and amputee, explained that support of the event for everyone affected by a need for prosthetics. The relationship between ABC and Mario's was actually in the making before the idea came about for the walk-a-thon. Even before I received the prosthetic leg I was always visible around the establishment bowling with my son, so when it came time for us to do business together they were very open and receptive. Perhaps more important than raising funds is raising awareness of the profile of amputees and if we at ABC Cares can be used as an example of what can be achieved then that itself is a great honor." Brown, a former collegiate athlete in track and field, volleyball and swimming, who lost her leg to the same form of cancer which afflicted Ferguson, has had the use of a prosthetic leg for seven months and became the first Bahamian female amputee to participate in a Marathon as the first member of the history making Marathon Bahamas relay team. Ms Brown said: "It is important for people affected. Whether you're a survivor, whether you're a relative, everyone is affected when one person is affected by cancer. We need support, we need awareness out there, we need that encouragement because the rough days are here every day and we have to push through it because if you decide not to push through it you're going to fall," she said, "We want people using prosthetics and amputees in gen eral to know that you dont have to be a shut in, you don't have to remove yourself from society. You can do the same activities and enjoy the same lifestyle as you did before with the proper support and commitment from yourself and those around you. We just want to be the building blocks in providing that support." ABC Prosthetics & Orthotics of Nassau offers a full-service clinic to the residents of the Bahamas. The provide care for children and adults requiring care for amputation, injury, stroke, diabetes, trauma, and post-operative needs. Brown and her organization seek to gather funds to compete in the "Ride for Hope," also scheduled for April 9th in Eleuthera. According to its website Ride for Hope Bahamas, a registered Charity in The Commonwealth of The Bahamas, was formally constituted in 2009. It was established for the purpose of raising money to support initiatives related to health, wellness and human development in The Bahamas. Ride for Hopes designated focus is cancer. The organizations flagship fund raiser is The Ride for Hope now a six year old bike-a-thon held each Spring on the island of Eleuthera. Every dollar raised by participants is applied to program support. FUNDRAISING EVENT TO HONOUR ICONIC FIGURES HONOURED: Latario Minns accepts award from Barry Malcolm


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