The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01822
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Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: 3/31/2011
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
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General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:01822

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THE evolution of Great Exuma is just one example of how the Ingraham admin istration is transforming the infrastructure of the entire country, according to the governing FNM party. Ina statement issued yesterday, the party noted that Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham has committed to a multi-year plan to modernise Great Exuma and improve the quality of life for Exumi ans, residents and visitors. ResortAfter facilitating the opening of Sandals flagship resort at Emerald Bay and significantly expanding direct airlift from the USA and Canada, the FNM is planning for Exumas future with res idents, various stakeholders and planning experts, said the party. The planning will include environmental and social impact assessments to ensure that Great Exuma maintains its unique character and traditions with modern amenities that will augment its natural beauty. The FNM said the governments comprehensive infrastructure programme for Great Exuma includes the construction of a hospital to improve access to health care. A new port is also being planned. Once completed it will help to spur economic growth and opportunities, the party said. Prime Minister Ingraham has stated that work on the new Exuma hospital should commence this year. According to the party, a feasibility study will be undertaken for the construc tion of a bypass road, in an effort to improve road trans portation and further enhance Great Exuma as a tourism destination and attractive location for sec ond-home owners. The FNM statement said: Great Exuma has outgrown its main road in terms of its long-term development needs. These developments include Exumas growing agricultural sector. The Min ister of Agriculture and Marine Resources Larry Cartwright and the Chairman of BAIC, Mr Edison Key and their teams in the Ministry and the Corporation deserve credit for helping to facilitate the export of onions from Exuma to Canada. The party noted that in its 2002 Manifesto, the PLP made the following promises to the people of Great Exuma, all of which were broken: Amaster harbour will be fully developed to serve as a transshipment centre and Customs bonded area Facilities for mid-sized cruise ships will be built An appropriate hospital to serve the essential needs of the region will be built and staffed. Public infrastructure will be maintained and expanded. Though the PLP described the last point as a major pri ority across the country, the FNM said the Christie administration failed to keep this promise in New Provi dence and across the country, including in Great Exu ma.DirectionThe party said: Today the Bahamas and Exuma are moving in a new direction. As the prime minister pledged at the official opening of the new US Departure Terminal at the LPIA: The things we build are not ends in themselves. They are the indispensable means to improve the quality of life of the Bahamian people and residents. The new port, hospital facility and bypass road are being built to improve the quality of life of hotel employees travelling to work, mothers receiving pre-natal and neo-natal care, farmers shipping their produce, small business people seeking to expand their businesses, among others. Upgrading the basic infrastructure of the Islands of the Bahamas including that of Great Exuma is a core component of the FNMs vision and plans to diversify Family Island economies and pro mote both domestic and foreign direct investment. SEEPAGESIX LOCAL NEWS P AGE2, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011 THE TRIBUNE By CELESTE NIXON Tribune Staff Reporter cnixon@tribunemedia.net A SUPPORT group for young cancer victims is hosting an event to raise money for the upcoming Ride for Hope. Thehappy hour fundraiser, organised by Freedom Survivors, will be held at the Green Parrot Bar ad Grill on East Bay St at 5pm this Friday. All proceeds will go to cover travel expenses for participants of this years Ride for Hope, a local bikea-thon that takes place in Eleuthera and raises money for the fight against cancer. Freedom Survivors, founded in January, is a community advocacy group for adolescents and adults under the age of 40 who are affected by cancer. Recognising that many young adults throughout the Bahamas are impacted by the disease whether as a patients, survivors or caregivers the group aims to provide support and empowerment in an effort to ensure that no one feels they must suffer alone. In the future, Freedom Survivors plans to develop programmes and services such as support meetings, college awareness tours and fund raisers with the aim of building up the group and increasing its contribution to the global fight to find a cure for cancer. As an support group operating under the umbrella of the Cancer Society of the Bahamas, Freedom Survivors adheres to all the policies and procedures of the society and is committed to increasing the aware ness of and support for its initiatives. This years Ride for Hope scheduled for April 9. Young cancer victims supportgroup to raise money for Ride for Hope RIDEFORHOPE2010 SCENES FROM the Ride for Hope 2010. The bike-a-thon, held in Eleuthera, raises money for the fight against cancer. This years event will take place April 9. Photos/ Tim Aylen Great Exuma evolution example of govts infrastructure transformation

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BAHAMIANISATION has become affirmative action without quotas, according to FNM Senator Dion Foulkes. Despite the policys mandate to promote multi-faceted advancement of Bahamians ofall races, Mr Foulkes said that the initiative now closely mirrored the United States due to the historical discrimi nation of blacks in both countries. Mr Foulkes said: The US Federal Government in the 1960s and 1970s developed a policy, and in many respects made that policy law, to guarantee economic, educational, and social opportunities for minorities in the USA. Mr Foulkes added: One essential difference between affirmative action and Bahamianization was the use of quotas. Because black Bahamians are the majority in the Bahamas the question of quotas never arose. During his debate on various bills to facilitate the privatisation and sale of BTC in the Upper House yesterday, Mr Foulkes defended his par tys commitment and direct involvement in the economic, educational and social advancement of Bahamians. Mr Foulkes said: Employment opportunities have been the main focus of the Bahami anization policy, even though, it is not limited to employment. Bahamianization is more than jobs, he added. It is also about land and business ownership, about the deepening of Bahamian culture and strengthening of social cohesiveness. Lending his support to the BTC legislation, FNM Senator Dr Duane Sands said that the various bills would pro pel the country forward as able participants in the Information Age. During his contribution, Dr Sands highlighted the countrys lackluster response to globalisation in various industries throughout histo ry. Dr Sands cited the downturn of sponging, forestry operations, and pineapples, and the minimal participation in the industrial revolution. Dr Sands said: Globaliza tion, or more importantly, our response to globalization and the flexibility required to respond, has not been pretty. Dr Sands added: We have arrived at a defining moment. We have sought to keep our eyes on the real prize. We have sought to avoid repeating the hard lessons learnt. LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDA Y, MARCH 30, 2011, PAGE 3 By CELESTE NIXON Tribune Staff Reporter cnixon@tribunemedia.net FORMER MP and Cabinet minister Pierre Dupuch says Branville McCartney made the right move in resigning from the FNM. Speaking with The Tribune yesterday, Mr Dupuch said he believes Mr McCartney has acted wisely so far, but advised him to remain an independent. Mr McCartney, the MP for Bamboo Town, resigned from the governing FNM party last week, explaining that he had encountered certain challenges that contradicted his philosophy, convictions and values. It has been widely speculated that Mr McCartney is in the process of launching a third political party. Mr Dupuch, who was also a Cabinet minister in an earlier Ingraham administration before falling out with the prime minister, said: I believe more people think the same (as Mr McCartney), however they don't have the guts to do anything about it. While commending Mr McCartney for standing up for his values and personal convictions, Mr Dupuch said it he were in the MPs shoes, he wouldnt fool around with forming a new party. He said what the country needs is a new type of movement; a moderating and levelling force in politics that should be based on individuals, not parties. Mr Dupuch said that at the moment, many people are disillusioned by what is happening and the country is in the right mood for a change." He added: I have always said public opinion is to democracy like milk is to the baby if you take milk from the baby, the baby dies, if you take public opinion out of democracy, the democracy dies. Rigor mortis has begun to set in. What is required, he said, is "a halfdozen to a dozen good people who can provide a sobering force in the House of Assembly. Insisting that no constituency should be considered or labelled PLP or FNM, Mr Dupuch said if people decide to vote for Mr McCartney who has shown himself to be "intelligent, driven and has proven that he has guts" they are entitled to make that choice. People should decide whether candidates have the Bahamas at heart, not themselves, and whether they recognise right to be right and wrong to be wrong, he said. "It is time we begin looking out for the Bahamas, not the party whether the PLP or FNM." Former Cabinet Minister: Bran McCartney made right move leaving FNM FORMER Cabinet minister Pierre Dupuch and MP Branville McCartney Bahamianisation is affirmative action without quotas, says Senator SENATOR Dion Foulkes Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your stor y.

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EDITOR, The Tribune. How much further is government seemingly going to ignore the Finance Act and require all contracts over $50,000 to have to go to public tender? It is all well and good for gifts from foreign governments, however, when those are in fact repayable loans there is no doubt that whatever work is involved if over $50,000 must under the Finance Act go out to Public Tender or RFP. The Airport Gateway Project, the dual-carriageway from LPIA to the six-finger Oakes Field roundabout didnt and we will see some 200 citizens of the Peoples Republic of China working on that project. Exumas new Port and road has recently been contracted to another Peoples Republic of China Construction Company and that project will be designed, built and transferred to the government without a single Bahamian working on it. Abaco new Port and road has also been signed off on and again citizens of the Peoples Republic of China will design, build and transfer to the government when completed and not a single Bahamian will have been involved. Eleuthera Glass Window bridge will be designed-built and transferred when completed by the Peoples Republic of China to the government again not a single Bahamian will work on that. Baha Mar.....anything up to 8,500 citizens of the Peoples Republic of China will work on that project with total approval of the government. Even the Bahamian subcontractors we will see will employ foreign labour so the total jobs created for foreigners by the FNM government will exceed 10,000 plus. It amazes me that the leadership dont see that foreigners cant vote. Is there any future for a Bahamian? Really starting to doubt it. J MOORE Nassau. March 11, 2011. EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune LimitedNULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt Publisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P .O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama TELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986 Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352 WEBSITE www.tribune242.com updated daily at 2pm OUTSIDE of the House of Assembly last week, Prime Minister Ingraham promised thetwo Bahamas Telecommunications union leaders that he would meet with them on his return from Canada. He returns tomorrow from a Canadian trade mission. After the Court of Appeals March 22 ruling agreeing with Supreme Court Justice Neville Adderley that the unions had no power to block the sale of BTC, a dejected Bernard Evans left the courtroom complaining of the unfairness of the system and vowing that the unions fight was not yet over. Mr Evans is president of the Bahamas Communications and Public Officers Union (BCPOU). How union leaders, all employees of BTC, could believe that without even owning one share in the company, they could block its sale is beyond understanding. If the ruling had been in their favour it would have set a dangerous precedent for business owners in this country. Employees would have more rights than owners. Last month the Supreme Court ruled that the unions had no constitutional grounds on which to sue government. Obviously not being owners they had no legal right to bring an action in their own names. It was obvious throughout this whole exercise that the protests against the sale were PLP generated. Significant was the fact that even when BTC staff had lunch hours during their working day they did not join the demonstrators in the public square despite their union leaders desperate plea for support. Yellow shirts persons wearing them, or slinging them around their necks dominated. In the House of Assembly Prime Min ister Ingraham accused the PLP of using the BTC workers as pawns. The Prime Minister advised union leaders to engage in discussion with their new boss es. He urged union members not to be misled, pointing out that in its failed exercise the union has already incurred thousands of dollars in legal expenses. He believed the Opposition should bear some responsibility in this exercise for leading these innocent pawns astray. The most curious feature of this whole exercise is how the Opposition voted. The Christie government had championed the privatisation of BTC. So did the Ingraham government. However, when it came time for the vote, the Christie group, now in oppo sition, voted against privatisation, arguing that Bahamians should be the majority shareholders. Bluewater was to get 49 per cent of BTC with full management control and many other favourable concessions. As Mr Ingraham pointed out the very distribution of shares violated the meaning of privatisation. With 49 per cent ownership, this meant that Bluewater was a private participant in what remained a state owned company. As Mr Ingraham said, the Christie-led Opposition had violated the term privatisation. Obviously, the Opposition did not fully grasp the meaning of the privatising exercise. For it to be a private company, the majority shares had to be held by individuals of whatever nationality who were not connected to the state. As long as government held the major ity shares, it remained a state owned enterprise. Privatisation would have failed. As far as the Ingraham government was concerned the days of state control was near ing an end. Bahamians would now have more freedom of choice. There were at least two companies in the bidding process that had a mix of Bahamians. But the Christie government, which had made such a big play about Bahamianisation had rejected them as did the Ingraham government. It makes one wonder who were the Bahamians embedded in the Bluewater deal that made it so important to the Christie government. This is a question that more and more Bahamians are asking. It is now time for it to be answered. We have a deal! was the cry when three men, one of them a Bluewater representative, returned to the meeting at the Finance Ministry whose deal, what were the terms and who were the partici pants? Mr Christie has promised Bahamians that if his government is returned to power, he will undo the Cable & Wireless sale and return its control to the Bahamian people. We think that with lower telecommunications rates, more choices in technology and improved services, the Bahamian people would prefer true ownership through the shares that they will eventually hold in the company, and which, as it prospers, will pay them real dividends. The so-called ownership that the Bahamian people held in BTC was no ownership at all it was only a euphemistic, nationalistic feel good term that can be brushed aside in the same way that a Bahamian preacher some time ago dismissed principles they dont put bread on the table. Mr Christie, even as prime minister, would not undo this deal because, although possible, cost-wise it would be foolhardy and impractical. The Bahamian people would never agree to their money being spent so foolishly. Is there any future for a Bahamian? LETTERSletters@tribunemedia.net Prime Minister to meet with union leaders :$17('(;3(5,(1&(%22..((3(585*(17/<(('('%( 352),&,(17,1,&.%22.6)D[UHVXPHWR RUHPDLOWR$'0,1#+%60$5,1(&20 (;3(5,(1&(:(/'(5 $/80,1,80)$%5,&$7,21 $1',167$//(5(('(' )D[UHVXPHWR RUHPDLOWR$'0,1#+%60$5,1(&20 EDITOR, The Tribune I watched and listened to a significant portion of the debate on BTC and I must declare that in my humble opinion the PLP won the debate on the issues hands down. I came to that conclusion because I did not hear a compelling argument by any member of the FNM to justify the sale of 51 per cent of BTC to Cable and Wireless. All I heard from them were the same old arguments that C&W will reduce rates, bring more efficient services and more quickly introduce new technology. I felt as if the PLP members successfully counteracted these arguments by demonstrating that Bahamians controlling BTC have the capacity to achieve all of these objectives and more. I found the arguments by Perry Christie and Dr. Bernard Nottage regarding the dilapidated state the PLP found at BTC in 2002 and the upgraded state of BTC the FNM found in 2007 quite persuasive and winning. Moreover, the point they made that the FNM deliberately reduced the value of BTC to make it attractive to C&W was also forceful. I thought it unbelievable and disturbing that the FNM did nothing, did not even attempt to justify or explain all of the shenanigans with URCA. I would have thought that with all of the allegations of insider dealing and conflict of interest swirling around in the Bahamian society that the independent and autonomous (professionals) at URCA would have delayed their decision to approve the sale. Surely it would have been in the interest of the government if the decision had been delayed and some of the allegations clari fied. Obviously the government felt that some self imposed deadline was more important. Now that the members of parliament have spoken and their votes recorded I wish Cable and Wireless luck for as long as they remain in the Bahamas. They should keep in mind that many, many Bahamians feel as if they own and control an industry that Bahamians ought to have. The PLP won the debate; they must now win the attention and imagination of the electorate. I wonder if the PLP's threat to open a com mission of inquiry about the sale of BTC should they win the next election will be real. Mr. Christie the ball is now in your court. ERIC D. GARDNER ( And like many House of Assembly select committees, there it will die. Ed). The PLP won BTC debate now they must win imagination of electorate EDITOR, The Tribune. While all Bahamians will agree that the Bahamian judiciary is in serious need of repair, I personally believe that the court system in Harbour Island could serve as the "poster boy" for all that is wrong in the judiciary. Law schools could send students to sit in their courts (if the presiding judge will allow them) to learn what magistrates and lawyers should NOT do in court. Editorials have been written about them, many letters have appeared in the Press, and phone calls have been made to prominent politicians pleading for something to be done about the countless delays and absolute nonsense that takes up the time of the victims and witnesses resulting in the cases dragging on until, in most cases, the victims give up in frustration. Yet, nothing has been done and, in fact, it seems to be getting worse. A Louisiana Law Journal in 1842 stated: If it be admitted that the state does not prosecute vindictively, but merely to warn and hold up her punisments as a beacon to others, then it is a most important requisite, that the penalty should speedily follow the commission of crime. If in civil matters "Justice delayed is justice denied," in criminal cases tardy punishments are worse than useless. SIDNEY SWEETING, DDS Nassau, March 28, 2011. JUSTICE DELAYED IS JUSTICE DENIED

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SEVERALBahamian authors made book presentations to Education Minis ter Desmond Bannister. Pictured, from left, are: Ross Smith, superintendent in charge of high school curriculums; Dr Joan Rolle, edu cation officer, author of Mathematics in Motion; Desmond Bannister, Minis ter of Education; Milford Lockhart (Yes You Can-A Bahamian Perspective); and Tyrone Sawyer (Ventures in Verse). LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDA Y, MARCH 30, 2011, PAGE 5 7KHXEOLF:RUNHUV&RRSHUDWLYH &UHGLWQLRQ/LPLWHGLQYLWHV$OOPHPEHUVRIWKH&UHGLWQLRQWRWKH5HQDPLQJ&HUHPRQ\RIWKH&UHGLWQLRQVRIILFHEXLOGLQJWRWKH$UOLQJWRQ/LOOHU%XLOGLQJLQKRQRXURI0U$UOLQJWRQ/LOOHUDQGWKH&UHGLWQLRQV%RDUGURRPEHLQJUHQDPHGLQKRQRXURI)ULGD\WK$SULODWSPDWWKH &UHGLWQLRQVIILFH%XLOGLQJ:XOIIRDG7KH ZLOOEHWKHNH\QRWHVSHDNHU&RPHDQGEHDSDUWRIWKLVKLVWRULFRFFDVLRQ 1DVVDXf)UHHSRUWf :HEVLWHZZZSZFFXFRP POLICE are investigating three shootings which took place within hours of each other and left three men in hospital with gunshot wounds. The first occurred around 5.20pm on Monday at Fox Dale Subdivision off Bernard Road. Responding officers were told that three men were in a house when they got into an altercation. One of them produced a shotgun and fired several times, hitting a 28year-old man in the body. The victim was rushed to hospital by ambulance and is listed in stable condition. Then, just before 11pm that night, police were alerted to another shooting near the corner of Kemp and Parkgate Roads. Responding officers were told that three menwere walking on Parkgate Road when they were approached by a man armed with a handgun. The culprit fired several shots hitting one of them, a 23-year-old, twice in the stomach. The victim was rushed to hospital by ambulance, where he remains in stable condition. Then, at around 3.30am on Tuesday, police were called to the scene of a shooting in Homestead Street. According to reports, a male resident of the area was outside his home when he heard gunshots. He suddenly realised that he had been shot in the left leg. The victim was taken to hospital in a private vehicle, and is listed in stable condition. Police are investigating all three incidents. In other crime news, at around 4am on Tuesday, officers attached to Operation Rapid Strike along with officers of the Spring Break Unit executed a search warrant on a home in Maple Street, Pinewood Gardens. The officers conducted a search and recovered a quantity of a substance suspected to be marijuana. A 49-year-old man, who police believe is a Jamaican national, was taken into custody for questioning. POLICE are searching for Grand Bahamian Quentin Angelo Young in connection with an investigation into an alleged sex crime. The Grand Bahama division of the Central Detective Unit has issued an all-points bulletin for the 35-year-old who is also known as Potato Head. Young is an upholsterer by profession. Standing about 6ft 1in tall and weighing around 160-170lbs, he is of dark brown complexion and has some unusual tattoos: a Bible and praying hands on his right arm. His place of birth is Grand Bahama and his last known address was 135 Regency Park in Freeport. The CDU warned that Young should be considered armed and dangerous and should only be approached with extreme caution. Anyone with information con cerning his whereabouts is asked to call police in Grand Bahama on: 352-9774/5, 350-3107/8 or 911. Three in hospital after shootings Bahamian authors present books to Education Minister Incidents happen within hours of each other POLICE SEEK MAN IN CONNECTION WITH AN ALLEGED SEX CRIME INVESTIGATION QUENTIN ANGELO YOUNG

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LOCAL NEWS P AGE6, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011 THE TRIBUNE EXUMA Cultural diversity in the Family Islands is allowing Bahamian residents to offer tourists a variety of experiences during their visit to the islands. This, according to international residents who have chosen to make the Bahamas their home. We are being told now how much there was a demand (for something new) because everyone who comes here tells us that they have been dying to come to a place like this, said Analia Whitehead of Uruguay. I guess we were lucky to find this place and have the energy and the will to do it, no? We just thought that this community was amazing. The people are so friendly and the nature is outof this world. Mrs Whitehead, Honorary Consul of Uruguay, who has represented her country in the Bahamas since 1992, is married to a Bahamian-American who has roots in Austria. The couple have four children who were born in the Bahamas. Her husband is a local contractor and was in Exuma as a member of the administrative team that constructed the Four Seasons Hotel. She and her family have recently opened a small caf called Driftwood Caf in George Town, Exuma, across the street from the Local Government Administration complex. We started coming to George Town in 2000 when they built the Four Seasons and we always wanted to have a little place that was a little bit different that offered a little bit of differ ent foods, said Mrs Whitehead. The time was right now and we were lucky to get the right place and the last 30 days we have been very successful. We hope to make this a little centre which has little events like art shows and tea parties. Mrs Whitehead said she comes from a small Latin American country and what she likes the most about the Bahamas are the good manners and social graces displayed by Bahamians. I like when people tell you good morning and that people here care about you and are willing to help you, like when your car breaks down they go and get cables for you. People are very sweet in this community and I think its a nice way to live. The world is confused now, so if youre lucky to live in places like this, youre very fortunate, said Mrs Whitehead. Her caf offers healthy foods from Uruguay like empanadas, milanesa sandwiches, and steak sandwiches. Her partner is Bahamian and cooks some Bahamian dishes along with the inter national deli cuisine they will serve. They want to concentrate on making the caf a social centre in downtown George Town. Cultural diversity is becoming the local attraction in Exuma ANALIA WHITEHEAD Honorary Consul for Uruguay since 1992, talks about the nature of Exuma and the good manners of the people. LOCAL GOVERNMENT Administrator Ivan Ferguson sits quietly enjoying the serene atmosphere at Driftwood Caf. DRIFTWOOD CAFE is in the heart of George Town across from the seat of Local Government. A PRESENTATIONon the Caribbean Challenge Initiative a region-wide conservation project that seeks to increase marine protection and create sustainable financing for protected area networks will be made today dur ing the Rotary Club of South east Nassau's weekly meeting. The meeting starts at 1pm at East Villa Restaurant and will feature a presentation by Eleanor Phillips. Ms Phillips is the Northern Caribbean director for the Nature Conservancys Caribbean programme. She has held this position since 2003. Based in Nassau, Ms Phillips leads a multi-disciplinary team that works in partnership with government and non-governmental organisations in the Bahamas and Turks and Caicos Islands to achieve effective conservation of natural resources for those countries. She is currently leading efforts to develop a master plan for the Bahamas Protected Areas System. Prior to joining the Conser vancy, she worked for the Bahamas governments Department of Fisheries for 11 years and managed two privately-own tilapia fish farms. She is also a founding member and past pres ident of the Bahamas Orchid Society. ROTARYCLUBNEWS

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SYNDICATED cartoonist Jim Toomey, whose Sherman's Lagoon comic strip appears in more than 250 newspapers in over 30 countries, is in the Bahamas this week to push for increased shark protections. The artist will speak at several public forums and will visit with school children in Long Island and Nassau. The Bahamas has something wonderful in its waters, something very few countries have, said Mr Toomey. Because the government banned longline fishing, the shark populations off the Bahamian coast are still relatively healthy and the marine ecosystem is more intact here than almost any other place in the world. Mr Toomeys cartoon features a great white shark that lives off a fictional island in the Palauan archipelago. In the real world, the Pacific island nation of Palau established a sanctuary for these animals in 2009. More than 40 different kinds of sharks can be found in Bahamian waters, including the whale shark, the great hammerhead and even great whites. Mr Toomey is joining efforts spearheaded by the Pew Environment Group and the Bahamas National Trust (BNT) to establish specific protections for the species; none currently exist. Under Jim Toomeys direction, Sherman and his friends confront all of the damage and indignities that we heap upon the underwater environment, said Eric Carey, executive director of the BNT. Beyond the cartoon page, we need better marine protections so that the sharks can continue to keep our oceans healthy. That should start no other place but here in the Bahamas, he said. The waters of the Bahamas were once known for buried treasure and pirate ships, said Jill Hepp, manager of Global Shark Conservation for the Pew Environment Group. But living treasure can now be found swimming freely in the ocean. Over the past 20 years, shark diving has generated US $800 million for the Bahamian economy. In protecting these animals, we protect the health of our oceans and our economies. Worldwide, up to 73 million sharks are killed every year, primarily for their fins, which are valued for their use in shark-fin soup, an Asian delicacy. As a result, 30 per cent of the worlds species are threatened or near-threatened with extinction. For an additional 47 per cent, scientists lack sufficient data to properly assess their population status. The Pew Environment Group is the conservation arm of The Pew Charitable Trusts, a non-governmental organisation that works globally to establish prag matic, science-based policies that protect our oceans, preserve our wildlands and pro mote clean energy. LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDA Y, MARCH 30, 2011, PAGE 7 Shark cartoonist joins the effort to protect sharks in the Bahamas MORE THAN 40 different kinds of sharks can be found in Bahamian waters. PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti Associated Press FORMER Haitian dictator Jean-Claude Duvalier was discharged Tuesday from a hospital in the country's capital where he was examined and treated for chest pains. Duvalier, known as "Baby Doc," shuffled unsteadily out the back door of the Canape Vert Hospital in a dark blue suit, shaking hands and waving at several dozen cheering supporters, mostly older men who served in the military or government under the former "president for life." "Since Jean-Claude Duvalier left the country has lost its values," said Wilson Alba, 58, who saluted Duvalier as police officers escorted him to a waiting car. The 59-year-old ex-dictator was admitted to the hospital Wednesday after complaining of chest pains. Family friends and associates have declined to discuss details of his health condition. "They ran all sorts of tests yesterday and he's OK," said family friend Enzo Alcindor. 'Ba b y Doc' Duv alier lea v es hospital in Haiti

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LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011 THE TRIBUNE SIXTEEN-year old-aspiring Chef Dwayne Sinclair of Temple Christian High School has emerged as the winner of the 19th annual Young Chef contest sponsored by Mahatma Rice and Robin Hood Flour. Dwayne also placed second in the New Providence senior finals which is a preliminary to the All Island Finals with Minister of Education Desmond Bannister and president of the Bahamas Hotel Association Stuart Bowe attending to present the awards. In winning the 2011 overall senior championship Dwayne scored 539 points for the Best Robin Hood Flour Dish, "Sapodilla Apple Coconut Tart" and 544 points for the Best Mahatma Rice Dish, "Bahamian Crawfish Dippers." Placing second overall was Sherica Henfield of St Georges High School, Grand Bahama, with 468 points for her "Seashell Rice Pilaf" and 517 points for her "Guava Stuffed Crepe Suzette." Third place went to Abigail Ferguson of South Andros High School with 481.5 points for her "Festive Rice with Bonefish Pattie" and 492 points for her "Guava and Coconut Pudding." Anthoneah Sturrup of Anatol Rodgers High placed fourth with 432.5 points for Savoury Lobster Duff with Tomato Basil Chutney and 468 points for Tropical Rice Cheesecake Duo. In addition to medals, the National Young Senior Chef winners received cash prizes of $1,500 (first place), $750 (second place), $300 (third place) and $200 (fourth place) from Mahatma Rice and Robin Hood Flour. Also for the first time addi tional scholarship prizes were awarded to the highest placed graduating students, Anthoneah Sturrup of Anatol Rodgers High School (who also won the senior New Providence finals), and Jaquille Edgecombe of SC Boo tle High School. Munroe College awarded these two 12th grade students respectively with one full tuition fees scholarships valued at $48,000 and a half tuition fee scholarship worth $24,000. Chef Edwin Johnson, the head judge for the contest for the past 19 years, said: The competition is a great feeder programme, leading hundreds of youngsters into the culinary arts field. Im also pleased to see how the competition has grown and developed since its inception. Judges at the senior contest were Chef Johnson of Sapodillas Restaurant, Chef Don Ingraham of RIU; Chef Seanette Cooper of Sandals Resort, former educa tor and Ministry of Tourism executive Julia Burnside, manager of Test Kitchens for Mahatma Rice Debbie Jaramillo, and Chef Frank Constantino, dean of Culinary Progammes at Munroe College. In addition to providing almost $4,000 in prizes each year, the sponsors also provide trans portation to Nassau for each con testant with his or her teacher/coach, and cash stipends for teachers and contestants to assist with the purchase of supplies. Alfredo Gomez, senior business manager for Riviana Foods congratulated all of the competitors and teachers, stating that Mahatma Rice and Robin Hood Flour are pleased with the continued growth and success of the competition and pledge our continued support. Minister Bannister also praised those involved in the contest. I congratulate all the partici pants, parents and their teachers who came from throughout the Bahamas. I also would like to thank Sharon Ferguson and Kei th Parker for their continued efforts in making the competition a great success, and the sponsors Mahatma Rice and Robin Hood Flour for their con tinued support, he said. T emple Christian student crowned Senior National Champion Young Chef 2011 DWAYNE SINCLAIR of Temple Christian displays winning Young Chef Dishes. Dwayne impressed the judges with his Sapodilla Apple Coconut Tart and Bahamian Crawfish Dippers. Photo/Deanndra Ferguson, P.S. News/Features SHERICA HENFIELD of St George;s High School, Grand Bahama, placed second overall in the recent 19th Annual Young Chef contest sponsored by Mahatma Rice and Robin Hood Flour. Sher ica, is shown as she begins her Robin Hood Flour Dish Guava Stuffed Crepes Suzette. Photo/Keith Parker P.S. News/Features DWAYNE SINCLAIRS Bahamian Crawfish Dippers.

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LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011 THE TRIBUNE THEBAHAMAS VERYOWNSTREETPHILOSOPHER some 20 years as an FNM candidate and then for one term as an independent before losing his seat to Mr McCartney in 2007. "I was down there for 20 years and (as an independent) they voted me in once and after the first time they put me out. He been there for (about) five years, he ain' develop the kind of relationship with the people down there (to win on his own)," Mr Wells said. However, Mr Wells had a few kind words for his former rival. "I wish him well," he said. Mr Wells resigned from Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham's Cabinet in 1999 and then launched a failed campaign for the leadership of the FNM. Although he remained an FNM, Mr Wells became increasingly disgruntled with the party's leader. During his last year as an FNM MP, Mr Wells leveled serious charges of alleged corruption and wastage of public money against the leadership of the party. He became an independent candidate in the lead up to the 2002 election race, beating the FNM's candidate the PLP did not offer a candidate. The former attorney general also scoffed at reports that Mr McCartney has raised between $3 million to $25 million to mount a campaign under the banner of a new third party. "If you know politics in the Bahamas, you know that no one can raise that kind of money," he said. PLP Chairman Bradley Roberts was also in disbe lief over Mr McCartney's reported campaign financing. "I applaud him if he's able to raise that kind of money, that kind of money has nev er been raised to my knowledge," Mr Roberts said yesterday. "I'm sure he's causing the FNM some discontent." Both the PLP and FNM have said they will run candidates in the area against the newly independent candidate, both major parties say they expect to win. When asked to weigh in on Mr McCartney's chances as a third party candidate and the possible threat to established political parties Mr Roberts said a well-fund ed campaign does not always turn into votes at the polls. "We'll have to just wait and see. There's a lot of talk and like the old saying goes, talk is cheap but money buys land, (with that kind of money) he'll get a lot of land but will that transfer into votes? "Bahamians are known to take your money and say 'Thanks very much' and that's it. And buying votes is against the law, as an MP in Parliament for (many) years I have never been in a position where I have responded to any requests for money for votes. Buying people's votes is a form of slavery as far as I'm concerned." SEE PUSHIN DA ENVELOPE ON PAGE TWO ANDMORE NEWSONPAGE THREE At the meeting, which was scheduled to be held at Mr McCartneys home on John F Kennedy Drive, Mr Wells said that the NDP will have 14 persons present, including himself, as representative from the Bahamas Democratic Movement. Other notable young politicians are reported to be attending. Mr Wells said that his party has decided to send such a large contingent because they represent the heads of a number of their internal committees and must relate what transpired with first hand knowl edge. Actually I am taking a lot of people who support Mr McCartney so they can hear from him as to what is what, and then they can make up their minds based on what they currently believe and are willing to accept. Because at the end of the day, the others have made their position quite known, this is what it is, he must come to the NDP and they are not changing from that at all. And they have said they dont want to go. This is our position and we are not changing that, he said. Mr Wells said that based on what happens at the meeting last night he may have to work on these party members if the NDP intends to move in the direction of aligning itself with Mr McCartney. If the Bamboo Town MP were to join with the NDP and lead the organization, Mr Wells said that they will hold a convention within 30 days so that this decision can be made by their entire organization. There are even people in the NDP already who would want him (Mr McCartney) for leadership; most certainly. I believe that at the end of the day, those persons not only support Bran being the leader of the party, they support it being done the right way. I dont want people to believe that Renward Wells is a megalomaniac. I am willing of Bran being the leader in the House of Assem bly because he is the only one there. Undoubtedly I can tell you that if I run against him (for the leadership) he will more than like ly win. But this isnt about me. This is about the Bahamian people. If they believe that Bran is the best man to make that change, I will grab my shield and follow him into battle, he said. As a relatively new political organization, Mr Wells said that the NDP has already faced its share of challenges namely the departure of its former national chairman Dr Andre Rollins. However, he said that because their party is grounded in its message and principles, they have sur vived. A political party must not be about a man, it must be about the message. It cant be about the per son, it must be about the principle. You cannot have an idol, you must have an ideology. Men and women will come and go, but the truth and the message will remain. When you create parties around men, they fail; look at the CDR (Coalition for Democratic Reform). The NDP will and cannot join any institution that is built around a man, he said. declares it a no-shooting zone, they cant do anything. No-shooting zones are designated by the Bahamas National Trust and serve to create protected areas for birdsand wildlife. Speaking generally on the issue, Superintendent Paul Rolle, of Carmichael Road Police Station, explained the areas once reserved for hunting were now being developed. Supt Rolle said: Also sometimes persons were given land for one purpose but it is not being used for that purpose, instead they are building homes. So there are homes close to the areas that were reserved for hunting. According to police, the pigeon-hunting season runs from November to April. Ina letter to the Commissioner of Police dated September 24, 1984, Bishop Hart detailed his concerns that his farm was being used asa gun range. The letter read: Five men stood at the entrance of my farm and shot across it for about two hours. [Worker] is unhappy working under this condition and my children do not care to go there anymore on Saturdays because when they do, pellets are falling all over their heads. The letter continued: I beg that something be done before a fatal incident occurs. The area should be used for shooting or farming, but not both. Bishop Hart said his frustrations peaked on Monday when he discovered 19 chickens shot dead on the farmland he leases from the government. He said: The chickens are from the neighbouring farm, sometimes they get out and they wander into my farm. I counted 19, they had already started to decompose so I didnt go further back, they were scattered all over the place. Bishop Hart added: They can go out and use my trees as targets. You dont know who is out there with guns, they could be criminals. One time I met three men, all armed, I asked them to stop shooting on my property and they just looked at me, didnt say anything. Supt Rolle added: If its a private property and theyre shooting on the farm, come to us, officers will go there. We have confiscated weapons from persons that were found in those areas. FROM page one Elderly minister battles armed trespassers for 20 years BISHOP NEVILLE HART shows a bullet-ridden sign from his farm NDP leader: its time for a third party in Bahamas FROM page one Tennyson Wells: my Bran verdict I I w w a a s s d d o o w w n n t t h h e e r r e e f f o o r r 2 2 0 0 y y e e a a r r s s a a n n d d ( ( a a s s a a n n i i n n d d e e p p e e n n d d e e n n t t ) ) t t h h e e y y v v o o t t e e d d m m e e i i n n o o n n c c e e a a n n d d a a f f t t e e r r t t h h e e f f i i r r s s t t t t i i m m e e t t h h e e y y p p u u t t m m e e o o u u t t . H H e e b b e e e e n n t t h h e e r r e e f f o o r r ( ( a a b b o o u u t t ) ) f f i i v v e e y y e e a a r r s s , h h e e a a i i n n ' d d e e v v e e l l o o p p t t h h e e k k i i n n d d o o f f r r e e l l a a t t i i o o n n s s h h i i p p w w i i t t h h t t h h e e p p e e o o p p l l e e d d o o w w n n t t h h e e r r e e ( ( t t o o w w i i n n o o n n h h i i s s o o w w n n ) ) . Tennyson Wells FROM page one

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INTERNA TIONAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDA Y, MARCH 30, 2011, PAGE 11 WASHINGTON Associated Press AS THE United States and other nations build ties with rebels and political opponents trying to oust Libyan strongman Moammar Gadhafi, intelligence suggests al-Qaida and other terrorists have a small presence within the opposition group, a top military commander said Tuesday. Adm. James Stavridis, the NATO Supreme Allied Commander in Europe, told Congress that officials have seen "flickers" of possible al-Qaida and Hezbollah involvement among the rebel forces, but no evidence of significant numbers within the political opposition group's leader ship. Asked about the terrorist connection, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton told reporters in London that "we don't know as much as we would like to know" about the opposition forces. But she also said there is no informa tion about specific individuals from terror organizations that are part of the rebel force. "We're building an understanding, but at this time obviously it is, as I say, a work in progress," she said. Clinton added that inter national leaders have made no decisions about arming the rebels, but talked Tuesday about providing non-lethal assistance including funds to keep them going. Questions about who the rebels are have escalated as the U.S.-led coalition moved into its second week of attacks against Gadhafi forces, halting their progress and paving the way for the ragtag opposition to regain lost ground. At this point, Stavridis said, there is "more than a reasonable chance of Gadhafi leaving." Despite those assertions, however, Stavridis and other U.S. officials have yet to articulate an end game for the operation, despite repeated criticism from Congress that the mission has not been clearly defined. "As you look at the spectrum of how this unfolds it's premature to say what is our exit strategy," Stavridis told the Senate Armed Services Committee, adding that events are too fluid right now. In London, Clinton met with Mahmoud Jibril, a representative of the Libyan political opposition fighting Gadhafi, "to talk about the path forward." And she implored an international conference meeting on the Libya's future to band together to free the North African nation from Gadhafi's grip and persuade his loyalists to abandon the regime.SolutionShe told reporters that the U.S. is not ruling out a political solution in Libya that could include Gadhafi leav ing the country, but acknowl edged there is no timeline and it appears the Libyan leader has made no decisions about his future. A senior administration official said the U.S. will soon send an envoy to Libya to deepen relations with leaders of the rebels. But the official, who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss internal planning, said the meeting doesn't constitute formal recognition of the opposition. Eleven days into a military assault that has cost the Pentagon roughly $550 million so far, the U.S. was in the process of turning over control of the mission to NATO in the next day or two. The U.S. military, however, is likely to continue to play a significant role in the operation, including continued airstrikes, intelligence gathering, electronic warfare and aerial refueling. The military has insisted that it is not coordinating attacks with the rebels to help advance their offensive, but simply working to protect the people. But the strikes paved the way for the rebels to regain a key city over the weekend, and begin again their march west toward Gadhafi strongholds. Overnight Monday, for example, U.S. ships and submarines unleashed a barrage of 22 Tomahawk cruise missiles at Libyan missile stor age facilities in the Tripoli area, said a defense official, speaking on condition of anonymity to discuss military details. That total raised to well over 200 the number of Tomahawks launched at Libya since the Western military intervention began March 19. President Barack Obama told the American people Monday night that U.S. inter vention in Libya was neces sary to prevent a slaughter of civilians. But he also said that ousting Gadhafi militarily would be a mistake, and suggested that the diplomatic road to his removal was the path to take. Addressing officials from more than three dozen countries at the London confer ence, Clinton said military means alone won't force Gadhafi out after about 42 years in power, and that further sanctions and diplomatic pressure ought to be applied. "All of us must continue to increase the pressure on and deepen the isolation of the Gadhafi regime through other means as well," Clinton said at the London conference. "All of us seated around this table must speak with one voice in support of a transition that leads to a brighter future for Libya." Members of Congress, meanwhile, continued to express concerns about the cost of the mission. The $550 million figure on the initial U.S. costs is not complete because it does not include such money as pay for U.S. sailors, airmen and other forces who would have been deployed somewhere in the world anyway. But it is the first official figure released on the cost of setting up the no-fly zone in Libya and protecting civil ians. Of that total, about 60 percent was "for munitions, the remaining costs are for higher operating tempo" of U.S. forces and of getting them there, Cmdr. Kathleen Kesler, a Pentagon spokes woman, said Tuesday. She said officials expect to spend about $40 million over the next three weeks as U.S. forces are reduced, and then see that level of costs continue monthly as the operation goes on. Obama announced Monday that NATO would take command over the entire Libya operation on Wednes day, and Stavridis told senators the U.S. transfer of control would be in 24-48 hours. The turnover would keep Obama's pledge to get the U.S. out of the lead fast, but neither could estimate when the conflict might end. The US launches a new missile barrage at Libya A LIBYAN man inspects destroyed military vehicles that belonged to pro Gadhafi forces at the site of a NATO air strike on the outskirts of Benghazi, Libya Tuesday, March 29, 2011. International military forces are using words as well as weapons to try to weaken the grip of Libyan strongman Moammar Gadhafi and urge his troops to turn against him. (AP) SECRETARY OF STATE Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks during a news conference at the Foreign and Commonwealth office in London, Tuesday, March 29, 2011, after attending the London Conference on Libya. (AP) Top military commander says intelligence suggests al-Qaida, other terrorists have small presence within opposition group DAMASCUS, Syria Associated Press FACING an extraordinary wave of popular dissent, Syrian President Bashar Assad fired his Cabinet on Tuesday and promised to end widely despised emergency laws concessions unlikely to appease protesters demanding sweeping reforms in one of the most hard-line nations in the Middle East. The overtures, while largely symbolic, are a moment of rare compromise in the Assad family's 40 years of iron-fisted rule. They came as the government mobilized hundreds of thousands of supporters in ralliesin the capital and elsewhere, in an effort to show it has wide popular backing. Nearly every aspect of Syrian society is monitored and controlled bythe security forces, and the feared secret police crush even the smallest rumblings of opposition. Draconian laws have all but eradicated civil liberties and political freedoms. But with the protests that erupted on March 18, thousands of Syrians appear to have broken through a barrier of fear in this tightly controlled nation of 23 million. "Syria stands at a crossroads," said Aktham Nuaisse, a leading human rights activist. "Either the president takes immediate, drastic reform measures, or the country descends into one of several ugly scenarios. If he is will ing to lead Syria into a real democratic transformation, he will be met halfway by the Syrian people," Nuaisse said.ProtestThe coming days will be key to determining whether Assad's concessions will quiet the protest movement, which began after security forces arrested several teenagers who scrawled anti-government graffiti on a wall in the impoverished city of Daraa in the south. The protests spread to other provinces and the government launched a swift crackdown, killing more than 60 people since March 18, according to Human Rights Watch. However, the violence has eased in the past few days and some predict the demonstrations might quickly die out if the president's promises appear genuine. "People are tired from all this pressure and violence and I think if he (Assad) shows he's taken the people's demands seriously, they might stop," said a protester in Daraa who gave only his first name, Ibrahim, for fear of reprisals by security forces. "We're all waiting for his speech." Still, tensions remained high in Daraa, where several hundred people were still staging a sit-in Tuesday, and in the Mediterranean port of Latakia, which has a potentially volatile mix of different religious groups. Assad, who inherited power 11 years ago from his father, appears to be following the playbook of other autocratic leaders in the region who scrambled to put down popular uprisings by using both con cessions and brutal crackdowns. The formula failed in Tunisia and Egypt, where popular demands increased almost daily until people accepted nothing less than the ouster of the regime. Syria offers concessions amid wave of unrest

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INTERNA TIONAL NEWS PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011 THE TRIBUNE New Offering March 2011 Subscribe for Shares inCommonwealth Brewery LimitedInitial Public Offeringof$62,475,0007,500,000 Ordinary Shares Minimum Subscription $833.00 for 100 shares at $8.33 per share Offer OpensMonday March 21st,2011Offer ClosesFriday April 15th,2011Offering Memorandum &Subscription form available from all locations of:Royal Fidelity, RBC Royal Bank, RBC FINCO,&Fidelity Bank or downloaded from:www.royaldelity.comFinancial Advisor & Placement AgentFor further information call:1.242.356.9801Read the Offering Memorandum and consult anancial advisor before investing. TOKYO Associated Press JAPAN'Sgovernment admitted Tuesday that its safeguards were insufficient to protect a nuclear plant against the earthquake and tsunami that crippled the facility and caused it to spew radiation, and it vowed to overhaul safety standards. The struggle to contain radiation at the Fukushima Dai-ichi complex has unfolded with nearconstant missteps the latest including two workers drenched with radioactive water despite wearing supposedly waterproof suits. The March 11 tsunami that slammed into Japan's northeast, wiping out towns and killing thousands of people, knocked out power and backup systems at the coastal nuclear power plant. More than 11,000 bodies have been recovered, but officials say the final death toll is expected to exceed 18,000. Hundreds of thousands of people remain homeless, their homes and livelihoods destroyed. Damage could amount to $310 billion the most expensive natural disaster on record. The unfolding drama has drawn increasing criticism of the utility that owns the plant as well as scrutiny of Japan's preparedness for nuclear crises. "Our preparedness was not sufficient," Chief Cabinet secretary Yukio Edano told reporters. "When the current crisis is over, we must examine the accident closely and thoroughly review" the safety standards. An Associated Press investigation found that Tokyo Electric Power Co. officials had dismissed scientific evidence and geological history that indicated that a massive earthquake and subsequent tsunami was far more likely than they believed. That left the complex with nowhere near enough protection against the tsunami. The mission to stabilize the power plant has been fraught with setbacks, as emergency crews have dealt with fires, explosions and radiation scares in the frantic bid to prevent a complete meltdown. The plant has been leaking radiation that has made its way into vegetables, raw milk and tap water as far away as Tokyo. Residents within 12 miles (20 kilometers) of the plant have been ordered to leave and some nations have banned the imports of food products from the Fukushima region. Highly toxic plutonium was the latest contaminant found seeping into the soil outside the plant, TEPCO said Monday. Safety officials said the amounts did not pose a risk to humans, but the finding supports suspicions that dangerously radioactive water is leaking from damaged nuclear fuel rods. "The situation is very grave," Edano said. Workers succeeded last week in reconnecting some parts of the plant to the power grid. But as they pumped in water to cool the reactors and nuclear fuel, they discovered numerous pools of radioactive water, including in the basements of several buildings and in trenches outside. The contaminated water has been emitting four times as much radiation as the government considers safe for workers. It must be pumped out before electricity can be restored and the regular cooling systems powered up. That has left officials struggling with two crucial but contradictory efforts: pumping in water to keep the fuel rods cool and pumping out contaminated water. Officials are hoping tanks at the complex will be able to hold the water, or that new tanks can be trucked in. On Tuesday, officials from the Nuclear Safety Commission said other possibilities include digging a storage pit for the contaminated water, recycling it back into the reactors or even pumping it to an offshore tanker. The latest problem came Tuesday, when three workers trying to connect a pump outside the Unit 3 reactor were splashed by radioactive water that gushed from a pipe. Though they wore suits meant to be waterproof and protect against high levels of radi ation, nuclear safety official Hidehiko Nishiyama said the men were soaked to their underwear with the contaminated water. They quickly washed it off and were not injured, officials said. Japan: Not enough safeguards in place to protect nuke plant IN THIS photo taken Wednesday, March 16, 2011 and released by Tokyo Electric Power Co. via Kyodo News Friday, smoke billows from wrecked unit 3 at Japan's crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okumamachi, Fukushima Prefecture. Tokyo Electric Power Co. via Kyodo News /AP

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By ALISON LOWE Business Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net It wll be nigh on impossible for the Bahamas Petroleum Company (BPC) to get the go-ahead to begin oil drilling in this nation within this parliamentary term, the Minister of the Environment revealed yesterday, confirming that the Governments moratorium on drilling will not be lifted any time soon. Earl Deveauxs statement may halt the meteoric rise of BPCs share price over the last year and a half, given that it reveals the companys stated target date for oil drilling of early 2012 as rather unrealistic. BPCs share price has risen from 3.12 pence at its launch on June 17, 2010, on the Alternative Investment Mar ket (AIM), to 24 pence at press time yesterday, just shy of the high of 25.06 pence on February 4, 2011. The price level appears to have received a major boost after the company charged in a December 2010 investor presentation that it was aiming for a 2011 fourth quarter start date to drill. In several presentations to investors, BPC has called the Bahamas a giant oil province in the making, suggesting that its research has revealed that there are super giant oil fields in Bahamian waters that it can tap. Most recently, in a March investor presentation, BPC said it now expects to begin drilling in the first quarter of 2012. However, the company and its investors will have to wait somewhat longer than that, according to Mr Deveaux. Its not very likely that this legislation...well its nigh impossible for this [the passing of legislation relating to oil drilling] to be accommodated within this Parliament, said the Minister. He reiterated that the suspension of consideration of applications for licenses to explore and drill for oil, which the Government put in place in August 2010 after the Deep Water Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico threatened Bahamian waters, remains in place until such time as this nation has the most rigid protocols in place to govern SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011 THETRIBUNE $4.68 $4.51 $4.69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $5.10 $5.12 $5.11 [Learn more at royaldelity.com] Royal Fidelity Margin LoansWant To Own More Shares In...BenetsCommonwealth Brewery? OFFER VALID through April 15th,2011*SpecialtermsandconditionsapplyBAHAMASNassau:242.356.9801 Freeport:242.351.3010BARBADOSSt.Michael:246.435.1955 By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor Leading Bahamian investment analysts have raised concerns over Commonwealth Brewerys 100 per cent net income dividend payout policy, questioning whether it was sustainable and could detract from capital investment, and if it indicated Heineken saw limited long-term growth opportunities for the company. While many still rate Commonwealth Brewerys $62.5 million initial public offering (IPO) as a Buy for Bahamian investors, given the portfolio diversification provided by the vertically integrated manufacturer/brewer, most have told Tribune Business they view it largely as a dividend Concern over Brewerys 100% dividend policy Top analysts question if sustainable, given that $26m payout in 2010 was 112% of net income and 130% of operating earnings But IPO still seen as Buy, given industrial diversification and strong dividend yield Questions over growth opportunity financing Plant use at 58%, after 66% and 63% use in past two yearsSEE page 5B KEN KERR By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor Executives from a multi-billion dollar Cayman Islands developer last night arrived in Nassau for a week of meetings that not only aims to develop their existing downtown Nassau properties, but also includes talks with property owners whose real estate holdings were damaged by the recent fire that destroyed the Betty K building. Senior executives involved with the Downtown Nassau Partnership (DNP) and Bay Streets redevelopment yes terday confirmed the arrival of Dart Group representatives into Nassau, suggesting the meetings with property owners hit by the recent fire were exploratory in nature, notwithstanding the developers long-term interest in the prime waterfront property that will be freed up once the shipping companies relocate to Arawak Cay later this year. Charles Klonaris, the DNPs co-chairman, told Tribune Business: The Dart Group is coming in this evening. Theyre going to meet with all the property owners, and get a feeling for what they want to do. I understand thats going to take place this week. I dont know whats in the minds of the property owners, so this meeting will really open up the books and let us know what the views of the property owners and The Dart Group are. Vaughn Roberts, the DNPs managing director, added: I am aware a couple of people from Dart are in town this week, primarily with regard to advancing develop ment of the two properties they own at the corner of Bay Street and Parliament Streets. They own the properties there, and they have meetings lined up with the Office of the Prime Minister. He acknowledged, though, that given its interest in prime Top developer set to meet fire-hit owners n Multi-billion dollar Dart Groups officials in Nassau for meetings with Govt, property owners hit by Bay Street fire n Seeking to develop existing Bay and Parliament Street properties, too n Plans could act as catalyst to inspire other downtown Nassau businesses and real estate ownersSEE page 4B NIGH ON IMPOSSIBLE FOR OIL DRILLING NOD BEFORE NEXT ELECTIONSEE page 5B EARLDEVEAUX By ALISON LOWE Business Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net Movement through the new US Departures Terminal at the Lynden Pindling International Airport (LPIA) has been strained for some travellers by problems with the high-tech baggage security system, which aimsto link passengers to their checked-in luggage. Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD) spokesperson, Shonalee King-Johnson, said the airport operator was not aware of any major issues affecting traveller flow through the airport and on to flights to the US. However, she said passengers travelling during peak hours 12pm to 3pm are advised to arrive at the airport three, rather than the usual two hours, in advance of their flights departure to be sure of making their flights. But Airport Authority chairman, Frank Watson, said he had heard about issues at the outset of the terminals launch on March 16 relating to passengers being delayed due to baggage security issues. However, he believed this has now been resolved. A source with knowledge of the US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agencys pre-clearance operations at the airport said that department is well aware of the situation and trying to work through it. We're looking at ways to make it faster. It's just a matter of a variety of teams working together and getting used to this system and the new procedures, and we hope everyone can bear with us, the source said. Tribune Business understands that difficulties appear to be arising at the stage where airline representatives are checking in passengers with their bags. Under the new security system imple Baggage woes impact airportSEE page 8B By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The argument over whether Cable & Wireless Communications (CWC) should own 51 per cent or 49 per cent of the Bahamas Telecommunications Company (BTC) is irrelevant, a former Bahamas Chamber of Commerce president said yesterday, because either way it will still have Board and management control at the privatised carrier. Telling Tribune Business that CWC was absolutely the right partner for BTC, Dionisio DAguilar, who is 51/49 BTC debate is irrelevant Questions why the PLP getting hung up on issue DIONISIO DAGUILARSEE page 6B By ALISON LOWE Business Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net A government technical committee is reviewing five bids received for the management of New Providences government-owned landfill and garbage collection services, and for the implementation of a waste-to-energy facility to feed off it. Minister of the Environment, Earl Deveaux, said the technical review committee received the details of the bids three dealing with the management of the landfill and garbage collection services, and two with the waste-to-energy project around two weeks ago. Within ten days, that committee is anticipated to give its recom mendations on the way for ward. The bids are part of the Governments plans to privatise solid waste management, and find ways to limit the amount of waste stored at the Tonique Williams-Darling highway land fill. The two contracts were previously deemed to go hand-inhand, with any company involved in implementing a waste-to-energy, garbage recycling program at the landfill which would serve the dual pur poses of waste disposal andSEE page 4B FIVE LANDFILL BIDS IN REVIEW

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By RICHARD COULSON The recentlylaunched offering of 7.5 million shares of Commonwealth Brewery, 25 per cent of its equity capital, presents one of our largest companies as a well-run, profitable, debt-free enterprise with longestablished product lines effectively marketed to the Bahamian consumer. But a full understanding of Commonwealth Brewery was somewhat marred by a poorly organised Offering Memorandum, together with simultaneous press stories carrying improper sales talk that can only confuse potential investors.. Instead of giving a key-points summary of the companys business and finances, the Memorandum scatters them indiscriminately through the document: The informative Management Discussion and Analysis is buried after pages of boiler-plate. On its cover, the Memorandum bears the usual edict that no person has been authorised to give any informationother than through this Offering Memorandum, which did not deter Cchief executive LeRoy Archer from articulating a jumble of facts to The Tribune. The restrictive edict should be strictly obeyed in a public offering that is reviewed by unsophisticated investors. These shortcomings were mitigated by two excellent and well-attended public meetings, where speeches and a Term Sheet hit the essential highlights. But not all investors could attend these events, so lets repeat some of the fundamentals. At the offering price of $8.33 per share, the gross proceeds will be about $62.5 million. This offering is not a new issue, since the proceeds (after issue expenses) will immediately be turned over to Heineken, Commonwealth Brewerys parent company, which had previously owned the shares being offered. The offering will not result in any addition to Commonwealths shareholder capital, or any increase or dilution of pershare equity. There will be no change whatever in the companys financial resources, except that it will pay the $1.880 million issue expenses. SuccessfulThe vompany has been successful in running three vertically integrated operations: brewery production of Heineken, Kalik, Guinness and Vitamalt, Kalik being a true Bahamian beer that is beginning to catch on in the US; wholesale distribution; and retail sales through a wide network of stores that offer most of the accepted brands of beer, wines and spirits. In 2010, these three business segments generated $109 million in sales, down about 4 per cent from the two years ago, and operating income of $20 million, up about 35 per cent. The drop in sales clearly resulted from the recession and decline in tourist activity, while the impressive increase in earnings seems attributable to an aggressive cost-cutting campaign, for which management should be congratulated. The technical and marketing expertise from the worldwide Heineken group continued to make positive contributions. If, as seems likely, we have reached the bottom of the economic cycle, the drop in demand for the companys products may have levelled off and could be set to rise in 2011 and future years, with an obvious positive effect on Commonwealth Brewerys finances. The Memorandum underlines as a major risk to profitability the increasing trend of illegal imports that circumvent import duties a factor beyond the companys control that depends on more vigorous Government enforcement. Mr. Archer told the press that the brewery is operating at only 60-65 per cent of capacity. Does this startling disclosure, not found in the Memorandum, suggest problems in the production process, or rather the growth available if demand picks up? The Memorandum mentions the risk of higher duties and excise taxes, stating that $22.6 million was charged in 2010, while Mr. Archer laments that the figure was $29 million.. Whom do we believe? With regard to major competition, he tells us that he could sit down and cry at contem plating the duty-free imports enjoyed by Sands Brewery in Freeport, yet the Memorandum does not even mention that company. He also targets high electricity costs in Trinidad and Panama, where beer sells for $0.50 per bottle; the Memorandum says nothing about these markets. Mr Archer does a fine job as manager but should keep his tongue in control on investor relations. Two things are crucial to investors: dividend yield and capital appreciation. The Mem orandum tells us that the companys present policy is to distribute 100 per cent of net income as dividends, and that based on 2010 earnings this would give an attractive 7.7 per cent yield on the $8.33 offering price. Correct, but 100 per cent pay-out is pretty rare for any company and leaves no free cash flow available to cover unexpected contingencies or any desirable acquisitions. The directors are not committed to follow this policy, and can reduce the pay-out whenever they deem prudent. And, of course, earnings may decline, so the 7.7 per cent is not in any sense guaranteed. Possible capital appreciation depends first on investing at the right price, usually based on a price-to-earnings ratio (P/E). The Memorandum gives 2010 earnings per share of $0.74, but says nothing about the crucial P/E figure, which can be calculated as a reasonable 11.3X ($8.33/$0.74). This is attractive, since it is a 15 per cent discount from the average 13.3X for BISX Tier I companies. Its unfortunate that this key comparison, so significant to investors, did not appear in the Memorandum itself but was only given by Michael Anderson, president of RoyalFidelity, in his loquacious Tribune interview. Perhaps the largest risk for investors arises not from the company itself but from poor liquidity in our capital markets.. The Memorandum warns: An active secondary market may not develop for the shares. Quite true, but this statement represents an indictment of our whole inter-linked securities industry, not simply BISX, which even after 10 years struggles with low revenues, largely resulting from the Ministry of Finance endlessly delaying its trading in public bonds. Thus it cannot undertake sorely-needed publicity and investor education. For contrast, look at the highly informative website of the Jamaica Stock Exchanger, operating in a country with lower per capita wealth than the Bahamas. The indictment must also include our Securities Commission, with its lax enforcement and Government inertia in giving it more statutory powers; our institutional investors, who rarely seem to provide market support by buying undervalued securities; and our four broker/dealers members of BISX who take little interest in active market-making in listed shares, merely posting buy or sell orders. With the limited number of issuers and publicly held shares, we will never enjoy the instant trading, in both up and down markets, found in New York or London and other mature financial centres, but we must move in that direction. AskewSomething is seriously askew when the figures on the BISX website show Commonwealth Bank, possibly our strongest company, with 176,226 shares up for sale at $7, and zero shares listed for buy at any price! In any normal market, professional market makers would step in to clear this imbalance at least partially. We noted Mr Andersons quoted remarks, hopefully speculating that the size and quality of the Brewery issue will reignite interest in our stock markets. Why does not RoyalFidelity contribute to this optimism by offering to make a market in the new issue, to stand ready to buy or sell a reasonable number of shares at prices that it determines? The firm is slated to earn a fee of $1.25 million for handling this offering without taking any underwriting risk, since Government commits to buy any unsold shares. Surely a portion of this guaranteed compensation could be devoted to secondary market support, but nothing of the kind is indicated. In short, an investor will have no trouble buying a share of this successful company, but he cannot count on selling it, through Royal Fidelity or any of the other three securities firms, Colina, FamGuard or Colonial. We wonder if the Govern ment will take steps to encourage greater market liquidity for its own share offerings later this year BTC and the Arawak Cay Port Company which it clearly wants to distribute to our legendary little man, who often needs to sell in a pinch. BUSINESS PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011 THE TRIBUNE 3XUVXDQWWRWKHSURYLVLRQVRI6HFWLRQfRI7KH ,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV&RPSDQLHV$FW1RWLFHLVKHUHE\ JLYHQWKDW Df%/,6+,1*$1'%52$'&$67,1*/,1(7:2 /,0,7('LVLQGLVVROXWLRQ EfWKHGDWHRIFRPPHQFHPHQWRIWKHGLVVROXWLRQZDV )HEUXDU\ Ff7KHQDPHRIWKH/LTXLGDWRULV(':$5'%7851(5 RI(':$5'%7851(5t&23(7521$+286( )2:/(5675((72))($67%$<675((73%2; Q$66$8%$+$0$6 Sound company, but market may brew up trading issues

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BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDA Y, MARCH 30, 2011, PAGE 3B 6W$QGUHZV6FKRRO7KH,QWHUQDWLRQDO6FKRRORI7KH%DKDPDV DQDXWKRUL]HG,QWHUQDWLRQDO%DFFDODXUHDWH,%f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BUSINESS PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011 THE TRIBUNE Top developer set to meet fire-hit owners Bay Street waterfront property and the long-term development of downtown Nassau, it was natural for the Dart Group to meet with owners of the properties and real estate destroyed in the Valentines Day fire. I would think they would, since they have a long-term view of Nassau and larger opportunities further than what they have now. Theyve made several trips here over the last few years, and have walked the entire length of Bay Street, so Im sure theyre aware of the opportunities, Mr Roberts told Tribune Business. The Dart Group acquired its real estate holdings on the corner of Bay and Parliament Streets last year from Philip Hilliers Parliament Properties, in a deal that raised concerns among some Bahamian property owners and retailers in the immediate vicinity, as they feared a foreign company might move into a sector retail that was normally reserved for Bahamian ownership only. The acquisition, though, was always viewed as a foot in the door and prelude to the Dart Group taking a much bigger, and wider, strategic role in downtown Nassaus overall redevelopment, possibly developing prime waterfront real estate. The Dart Group has already done something similar in the Cayman Islands with its 500acre Camana Bay project. Mr Roberts yesterday suggested that The Dart Groups involvement in downtown Nassaus redevelopment, even if it just involved its existing properties, could be pretty significant for the overall regeneration effort by acting asa catalyst to inspire other property owners and businesses to do likewise. Noting the Governments public sector works efforts to enhance Parliament and Raw son Squares, plus upgrade infrastructure such as water and sewerage lines and road paving, Mr Roberts told Tribune Business: Its a matter of now inspiring the private property owners around new investment, a new city, and that has to be demonstrated by projects such as Graycliffs, the Klonariss and Dart, to get other properties excited as well. Graycliff has unveiled plans to move forward with the $20 million redevelopment of West Hill Street, and Mr Roberts said the priorities for this year, as far as the DNP was concerned, were too finalise the pedestrianisation of several downtown Nassau sidestreets and the conversion of the existing Straw Market site into a green space once the new building was ready. Describing these projects as significant in terms of impact, Mr Roberts said the DNP had been talking with the property owners impacted by the Valentines Day fire to develop short-term solutions that are a win-win for everybody. The DNP had helped to ensure the Bahamas Electric ity Corporation (BEC) repaired a transformer, in a bid to get companies in the area operational as rapidly as possible. Access to the exposed site was also being restricted.FROM page 1B energy generation wishing to be assured of a guaranteed amount of properly managed waste coming into their conversion facility. Speaking of the Governments desire to see the management of the landfill and related services privatised, and subject to improved efficiency, Mr Deveaux said the Government would have liked the transition to take place yesterday, adding, however, that we dont always get what we wish for.Sear chThe Government initiated a search for new management for the landfill following the major dump fire that took place in early 2010. This cre ated an environmental hazard for people living in nearby residential areas. The Government also wants to expand the lifecycle of the landfill through better management, being keenly aware of the shrinking space left at the site. Speaking of the work of the review committee, Dr Deveaux said: There are a number of issues to resolve: current staff, current equipment, the work that has to be done with respect to collection and the expertise required for management of landfill, both in terms of ongoing management as well as the expertise required to construct a new landfill cell for garbage storage, and deal with the issues of gas (created by decomposing waste). The assessment would be in terms of how much will it cost, what timeframe would be required, how it will affect employees, who offers best job security and the best service to the pub lic, and which one merges best with the longterm goal of converting the landfill to waste-toenergy. The Minister added that all of the companies who have submitted bids to manage the collection of waste and solid waste management are headed by Bahamians, while the other companies that have bid for the contract to create a waste-toenergy facility have a Bahamian input. FIVE LANDFILL BIDS IN REVIEWFROM page 1B

PAGE 15

decision-making regarding applications for oil explo ration and drilling, and to manage any outcomes. Describing the formulation of regulations and legislation to formally govern oil exploration and drilling in the Bahamas as a priority, Mr Deveaux nonetheless stated it was not something the Government would wish to rush He added that any potential framework would not be finalised without significant opportunity for public input, which would prolong its implementation. We have received a good bit of information, in terms of similar legislation, from several countries of interest. Wethen have to do the work in order for me to take it [draft legislation] to my (Cabinet) colleagues for them to review. It is also something that will require broad, broad consultation with the public, so its not very likely that this legislation...well, in fact its nigh on impossible for this legislation to be accomodated within this Parliament, said the Minister. Unless an early election is called, this means that the earliest such legislation could be passed would be post-May 2012. Meanwhile, given the upheaval in the governance agenda that an election normally brings with it whether it involves a charge in the gov erning party or not even this date would likely be overly optimistic. Mr Deveaux said the Government has yet to receive an application from BPC, which holds licenses to undertake oil exploration in this nation, to drill for oil. We have not received any application for drilling and we dont anticipate any. They are aware that we are working on regulations and legislation, and that none will be accomodated during the period of the moratorium or until such time as its lifted, he added. Recent attempts to reach BPCs director and chief executive, Dr Paul Crevello, have been unsuccessful.WebsiteOn the companys website, www.bpcplc.com, the company notes in an investor pre sentation that the Bahamian government implemented a moratorium on consideration of oil exploration and drilling license applications last year. Information contained on the website notes the Governments decision to delay consideration of license applications in light of the Gulf oil spill and until appropriate new controls are put in place. BPCs non-executive chairman, Alan Burns, is quoted as describing the situation as short term and gives no indication that it could impede the companys progress in pursuing the oil bounty it suggests exists below Bahamian waters. There are exploration activities, including drilling, proceeding in adjacent Cuban waters and significant previous drilling with the company's current license areas. We believe these do not face the same geological risks as those encountered in the US Gulf of Mexico. We enjoy a good relationship with Bahamian authorities and are confident that this situation will be resolved quickly, said Mr Burns. Speaking of the Governments position yesterday, Mr Deveaux said: In broad, simple terms we have a moratorium put in place for good reason. We have an expeirence with the Deep Water Horizon oil spill and the grave concerns it represented to our country and environment, and we also know and are aware of concerns expressed by the US with regard to ongoing drilling in Cuba and the likely impact on Key West. We dont think its prudent (to lift the moratorium) unless we have the most rigid protocols in place to inform any decisions we make in that regard and to manage any outcome. BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDA Y, MARCH 30, 2011, PAGE 5B *8(5/,10(5,/,(1RI-2$1 +(,*+761$66$8%$+$0$6 '/3URSHUWLHV/WGWKH&RPSDQ\fLQYLWHVRIIHUVIRUWKHSXUFKDVH RI$//7+$7SLHFHSDUFHORUSORWRIODQGFDOOHGDQGNQRZQDV LOYHU7RSFRQWDLQLQJDFUHVRUWKHUHDERXWVVLWXDWHRQ/RQJ %D\&D\RU.DPDODPH&D\EHLQJDSULYDWHLVODQGLPPHGLDWHO\ HDVWRI%ODQNHW6RXQGRQWKH(DVWHUQFRDVWRI$QGURV,VODQGLQWKH &RPPRQZHDOWKRIWKH%DKDPDVWKHURSHUW\f7KHUHLVDIXOO\ IXUQLVKHGEHGURRPDQGEDWKURRPOX[XU\UHVLGHQFHORFDWHG RQWKHEHDFKRIWKH3URSHUW\FRQWDLQLQJDSSUR[LPDWHO\VTXDUH IHHWRIOLYLQJVSDFHDQGRIIHUVIHHWRIEHDFKIURQWDJH([FHOOHQW UHQWDOSURSHUW\ 7KH&RPSDQ\ZLOOVHOODVPRUWJDJHHXQGHUWKHSRZHURIVDOH FRQWDLQHGLQDOHJDOPRUWJDJHRIWKH3URSHUW\ 7(506 7HQSHUFHQWbfRIWKHSXUFKDVHSULFHDWWKHWLPHRIFRQWUDFWDQG WKHEDODQFHXSRQFRPSOHWLRQZLWKLQ6L[W\fGD\VRIFRQWUDFW 7KH&RPSDQ\PDNHVQRUHSUHVHQWDWLRQVRUZDUUDQWLHVZLWKUHVSHFW WRWKHVWDWHRIUHSDLURIWKHUHVLGHQFHRUWKH3URSHUW\ZKLFKLVRIIHUHG IRUVDOHDVLVZKHUHLV 7KLVVDOHLVVXEMHFWWRDUHVHUYHSULFH7KH&RPSDQ\UHVHUYHVWKH ULJKWWRUHMHFWDQ\DQGDOORIIHUV ,QWHUHVWHGSHUVRQVPD\VXEPLWZULWWHQRIIHUVDGGUHVVHGWR'/ 3URSHUWLHV/WGFR0DQDJLQJ3DUWQHU32%R[11DVVDX %DKDPDVRUGHOLYHUHGE\KDQGWR*UDKDP7KRPSVRQt&R6DVVRRQ +RXVH6KLUOH\6WUHHWDQG9LFWRULD$YHQXH1DVVDX%DKDPDVWREH UHFHLYHGQRODWHUWKDQWKHFORVHRIEXVLQHVVRQWKHWKGD\RI$SULO 127,&(2)6$/( 3XUVXDQWWRWKHSURYLVLRQVRI6HFWLRQfRI7KH ,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV&RPSDQLHV$FW1RWLFHLVKHUHE\ JLYHQWKDW Df38%/,6+,1*$1'%52$'&$67,1*21/,1(21( /,0,7('LVLQGLVVROXWLRQ EfWKHGDWHRIFRPPHQFHPHQWRIWKHGLVVROXWLRQZDV )HEUXDU\ Ff7KHQDPHRIWKH/LTXLGDWRULV(':$5'%7851(5 RI(':$5'%7851(5t&23(7521$+286( )2:/(5675((72))($67%$<675((73%2; Q$66$8%$+$0$6 play, with limited growth due to it being a mature company in a mature market. In an investment note to clients on the IPO, Kenwood Kerr, Providence Advisors chief executive, noted that Commonwealth Brewerys $26.268 million dividend payment for the now-ended 2010 financial year was equivalent to almost 112 per cent of net income, and 130 per cent of operating income. Mr Kerr described this as unsustainable, especially given that Commonwealth Brewery seemingly dipped into its retained earnings to pay the 2010 dividend to Heineken BV, these having decreased from $38.654 million at yearend 2009 to $32.845 million at December 31, 2010, a decline of 15 per cent. This likely covered the difference between $26.268 million payout and $19.216 million in net income attributable to the companys ordinary shareholders. Long-term sustainability of 100 per cent dividend payout policy is questionable, Mr Kerr wrote to his investment clients. What will be the impact of future capital works on earnings, and we note that in the latest fiscal period dividends accounted for almost 112 per cent of net earnings and as much as 130 per cent of operating earnings. This payout level/policy, especially where retained earnings are eroded, is not sustainable. In the period under review (2008-2010), dividends were paid at a rate of 72 per cent, 43.5 per cent, and 64.43 per cent, or an average of 60 per cent. We find the payout policy at 100 per cent unusual. This is indicative of the parent companys perspective on this subsidiary, and is merely recouping investment via a generous dividend policy. Another analyst, who requested anonymity, while rating the IPO as a Buy, also questioned whether the 100 per cent dividend policy was merely a way for Heineken to upstream earnings from a consistently profitable subsidiary, then deploy these funds to other coun tries where it could earn a better investment return. Acknowledging that this raised questions over whether Heineken viewed Commonwealth Brewery as having long-term growth opportunities, given its 80 per cent share of the mature Bahamian liquor market, the analyst said they were not particularly thrilled about the 100 per cent net income dividend policy. Whilst we fully understand it from Heinekens perspective, ( the attractiveness of up-streaming all surplus cash flow to a central place, and then being able to redeploy to the best opportunities globally), it may potentially mean that some growth opportunities for Commonwealth Brewery may not get funding if Heineken can get a better return elsewhere, the analyst said. Still, they acknowledged that the absence of debt would enable Commonwealth Brewery to finance growth and expansion opportunities from bank loans and other debt financing forms if it needed. Elsewhere, both Mr Kerr and his fellow analyst identified the regulatory and taxation environment facing Common wealth Brewery as concerns, given the tendency to increases taxes on alcohol products during recessions, something that was highlighted by the 2010-2011 Budget. Other potential issues were Customs Duty and Export Taxes, and the impact on the companys cost base if these were increased. Noting that Commonwealth Brewerys external market revenue has been in decline consistently for the past three years, Mr Kerr wrote: While operationally efficient, we believe that increased earnings may have resulted from cost initiatives and softer raw materials cost. This strategy would be difficult to sustain in the current cycle of rising prices in terms of commodity prices and cost of electricity. Does Commonwealth Brewery have the ability to pass on these increases to the consumers/customers? How much product pricing flexibility does Commonwealth Brewery have in a regulated market? Management admits to having cut costs to a minimum, so future top line growth must come from revenue generation. Mr Kerr said the sales declines were concerning given that demand for Commonwealth Brewerys products should be relatively inelastic, although this was probably a reflection of the broader economic environment. Praising the companys strong balance sheet and support from Heineken as 75 per cent majority shareholder, Mr Kerr said overall sales and profitability growth was linked to population and economic growth. We note that plant utilisation is currently at 58 per cent, which suggests an ability to ramp up production to meet demand should economic conditions change along with increased demand, Mr Kerr wrote. In 2008 and 2009, capacity was at 66 per cent and 63 per cent respectively. This indicates that Commonwealth Brewery cut back production to meet market demand, to keep supply levels consistent with market demand, and to preserve profitability. Meanwhile, another investment analyst, Richard Coulson, said that while Commonwealth Brewery represented a sound company and investment opportunity, investors may experience difficulty in buying and selling the shares once the stock is listed due to the inherent liquidity problems in the Bahamian capital markets. Perhaps the largest risk for investors arises not from the company itself but from poor liquidity in our capital markets.. The Memorandum warns: An active secondary market may not devel op for the shares. Quite true, but this statement represents an indictment of our whole inter-linked securities industry, not simply BISX ... Mr Coulson wrote in his column on Page 2B today. In short, an investor will have no trouble buying a share of this successful company, but he cannot count on selling it, through Royal Fidelity or any of the other three securities firms, Colina, Fam Guard or Colonial. Mr Kerr agreed, describing this as potential systemic risk post-IPO in terms of liquidity and ability to sell shares in the open market. Concer n over Br ewerys 100% dividend policyFROM page 1B NIGH ON IMPOSSIBLE F OR OIL DRILLING N OD BEF ORE NEXT ELECTIONFROM page 1B

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also Superwashs president, questioned why the opposition Progressive Liberal Party (PLP) was becoming so hung upon the 51/49 per cent ownership issue, given that Board and management control was the real key. CWC will have full control of a privatised BTCs strategy and direction, through having a majority of directors on the Board, and its day-to-day operations and management. And, despite only contemplating selling a 49 per cent stake to Bluewater Ventures, the former Progressive Liberal Party (PLP) administration would also have given its favoured partner Board and management control.SemanticsPointing to Board and management control as the real issue, and hinting that the 51 versus 49 per cent debate was merely a game of semantics, Mr DAguilar still suggested that the Government may have been better off selling the latter percentage to CWC, ifonly to quieten the noise in the marketplace. Ultimately, he said, it would have made no difference to Board and management control. Given all the hoo ha, all the negativity it would have created, I think I would have probably sold 49 per cent, Mr DAguilar told Tribune Business. Given the amount of noise made over it, you can achieve the same goal by selling them 49 per cent. At the end of the day, no foreign company wants to be in a structure where the Government is the majority shareholder. But there would have been a couple of ways to skin that cat. The Government could have sold 49 per cent to Cable & Wireless, sold 9 per cent to the Bahamian public, and left it as a minority shareholder with 42 per cent. Cable & Wireless has a 51 per cent interest, and given the noise made about it, I would probably have kept it at 49 per cent. Its not going to change anything. Management and Board control, Mr DAguilar said, was the issue at the end of the day. He added: We dont want the Government meddling in it. Thats the last thing we want. I dont know why the PLP is hung up on it [51 per cent versus 49 per cent]. I just dont see what the issue is. Whether its 51 per cent or 49 per cent, it makes no difference, with Cable & Wireless having control of the Board. They would not have entered into a scenario where they did not have control, as they would not need political meddling in the company. The $217 million ($7 million of that is Stamp Tax) sale of the 51 per cent BTC stake to CWC is scheduled to be completed by Monday, April 4, with LIME, the Caribbean subsidiary of the UK-headquartered telecoms operator, set to formally take over operational control at that time.ApprovedThe sale was approved by the House of Assembly last week, all 22 FNM MPs voting for it, with the Opposition and newly-independent MP, Branville McCartney, voting against. All legislation relevant to the sale is now being debated in the Senate, which is expected to pass the Bills on Friday, moving them up for the Governor-Generals assent and signing into law. Still, the PLP has pledged to "regain the majority shareholding of BTC and return its control to the Bahamian people" if it forms the next government, its leader, Perry Christie, claiming that the Government made a grave mistake in selling 51 per cent to CWC. "It is a mistake, because we have at this juncture a oncein-a-lifetime opportunity to transfer wealth to the Bahamian people on an unprecedented scale. The FNM, through its policy of selling BTC at a fire-sale price, has missing that opportunity. This is a sad time for the Bahamas. If this subsists and persists, the future generations of Bahamians will not forgive us nor understand how the FNM could have done this to our country," said Mr Christie at the weekend It had never been the position of the PLP to "concede total control" to foreigners, and it never will be the party's position, said Mr Christie. He acknowledged that had the Government sold 49 per cent of BTC's shares to a foreign group, that foreign party could still have ended up as the largest shareholder if the Government chose to sell more than 2 per cent of its shares to the Bahamian public. However, "collectively" the Bahamian people would still own the majority of the shares, and at "all material times" the power would be in the hands of Bahamians, he said. BUSINESS PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011 THE TRIBUNE 52wk-Hi52wk-Low Securit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.19 0.95AML Foods Limited 1.19 1.19 0.003,5000.1230.0409.73.36% 10.639.05Bahamas Property Fund 10.63 10.63 0.00 0.0130.200817.71.88% 5 .75 4.40Bank of Bahamas 5.20 5.20 0.00 0.1530.10034.01.92% 0.53 0.17Benchmark 0.18 0.18 0.00 -0.8770.000N/M0.00% 2.84 2.70Bahamas Waste 2.70 2.70 0.00 0.1680.09016.13.33% 2.20 1.96Fidelity Bank 1.96 1.96 0.00 0.0160.040122.52.04% 12.409.25Cable Bahamas 9.25 9.25 0.00 1.0500.3108.83.35% 2.85 2.35Colina Holdings 2.40 2.40 0.00 1.0310.0402.31.67% 7.00 5.80Commonwealth Bank (S1) 6.82 6.82 0.00 0.4880.26014.03.81% 2.86 1.90Consolidated Water BDRs 2.22 2.26 0.04 0.1110.04520.41.99% 2.54 1.40Doctor's Hospital 1.40 1.40 0.00 0.1070.11013.17.86% 6.30 5.22Famguard 5.22 5.22 0.00 0.3570.24014.64.60% 9.27 5.65Finco 7.50 7.50 0.00 0.6820.00011.00.00% 11.408.77FirstCaribbean Bank 9.30 9.35 0.051,1600.4940.35018.93.74% 6.00 4.57Focol (S) 5.48 5.48 0.00 0.4520.16012.12.92% 1.00 1.00Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.0000.000N/M0.00% 7.30 5.50ICD Utilities 7.30 7.30 0.00 0.0120.240608.33.29% 10.509.80J. S. Johnson 9.82 9.82 0.00 0.8590.64011.46.52% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 1.2070.2008.32.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-Low Security SymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 99.4699.46Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029) BAH29 99.460.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.000.002100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.000.003 52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Bid$ Ask$ LastPrice DailyVol EPS$ Div$ P/E Yield BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:7% Interest 7%RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)29 May 2015 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-677-BISX (2479) | FACSIMILE: 242-323-232019 October 2022 Prime + 1.75% Prime + 1.75% 6.95%20 November 2029FRIDAY, 25 MARCH 2011BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,474.46 | CHG 3.13 | %CHG 0.21 | YTD -25.05 | YTD % -1.67BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basis)Maturity 19 October 2017F INDEX: YEAR END 2008 -12.31%30 May 2013 52wk Hi 52wk Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Daily Vol EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield 10.06 5.01Bahamas Supermarkets N/A N/A 14.00 -2.9450.000N/M0.00% 0.55 0.40RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55 0.0010.000256.60.00% 41.00 29.00ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00 4.5400.0009.030.00% 0.55 0.40RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55 0.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-Low Fund Name NAVYTD%Last 12 Months %NAV 3MTH 1.51221.4076CFAL Bond Fund1.51795.51%6.90%1.498004 2.95272.8300CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.94860.04%1.45%2.918256 1.58371.5141CFAL Money Market Fund 1.58370.61%4.59%1.564030 3.20252.8522Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.7049-0.56%-15.54% 13.638813.0484Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund 13.43920.61%-0.22% 114.3684101.6693CFAL Global Bond Fund 114.36849.98%12.49%109.392860 106.552899.4177CFAL Global Equity Fund 106.55284.75%7.18%100.779540 1.14651.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.14655.20%5.20% 1.11851.0000FG Financial Growth Fund 1.11854.73%4.73% 1.14911.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund 1.14915.35%5.35% 9.74859.1005Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 19.79504.85%5.45% 11.236110.0000Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 210.6417-1.20%0.50% 10.12669.1708Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 310.12661.27%1.27% 8.45104.8105Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund Equities Sub Fund8.45100.72%9.95% BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/MNot Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/200731-Jan-11BISX Listed Mutual FundsNAV Date 30-Nov-10 31-Dec-10 31-Jan-11CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752530-Nov-10 30-Sep-10 28-Feb-11 11-Feb-11 31-Jan-11MARKET TERMS31-Dec-10 NAV 6MTH 1.475244 2.910084 1.545071 107.570619 105.776543 30-Jun-10 31-Dec-10 30-Nov-10 31-Jan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f 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWLQDFFRUGDQFHZLWK 6HFWLRQfRIWKH,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV &RPSDQLHV$FW1RRIWKH'LVVROXWLRQ RI1(8,PSRUW([SRUW/WGKDVEHHQFRPSOHWHGD &HUWLFDWHRI'LVVROXWLRQKDVEHHQLVVXHGDQGWKH &RPSDQ\KDVWKHUHIRUHEHHQVWUXFNRIIWKH5HJLVWUDU 7KHGDWHRIFRPSOHWLRQRIWKHGLVVROXWLRQZDVWKHWK GD\RIDUFK /HDQGUR(FNHU /LTXLGDWRU 127,&( ,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV&RPSDQLHV$FW 1RRI */(17+251(,17(51$7,21$//,0,7(' 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQLQDFFRUGDQFHZLWK6HFWLRQ fRIWKH,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV&RPSDQLHV $FW1RRIWKH'LVVROXWLRQRI */(17+251(,17(51$7,21$//,0,7('KDV EHHQFRPSOHWHGD&HUWLFDWHRI'LVVROXWLRQKDVEHHQ LVVXHGDQGWKH&RPSDQ\KDVWKHUHIRUHEHHQVWUXFN RIIWKH5HJLVWUDU7KHGDWHRIFRPSOHWLRQRIWKH GLVVROXWLRQZDVWKHWKGD\RIDUFK 127,&(,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV&RPSDQLHV$FW 1RRI 05/,QWHUQDWLRQDOHVRXUFHV/LPLWHG WKH&RPSDQ\f 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWLQDFFRUGDQFHZLWK 6HFWLRQfRIWKH,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV &RPSDQLHV$FW1RRIWKH'LVVROXWLRQ RI05/,QWHUQDWLRQDO5HVRXUFHV/LPLWHGKDV EHHQFRPSOHWHGD&HUWLFDWHRI'LVVROXWLRQ KDVEHHQLVVXHGDQGWKH&RPSDQ\KDVWKHUHIRUH EHHQVWUXFNRIIWKH5HJLVWHU7KHGDWHRI FRPSOHWLRQRIWKHGLVVROXWLRQZDVWKHWKGD\ RI'HFHPEHU $OUHQDR[H\ /LTXLGDWRU 51/49 BTC debate is irrelevantFROM page 1B

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BUSINESS PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011 THE TRIBUNE ANNE D'INNOCENZIO, AP Retail Writer NEW YORK Rising prices at the gas pump and in grocery aisles are starting to crimp shoppers' outlook. The Conference Board's Consumer Confidence Index fell sharply from a three-year high in February, reversing five straight months of improvement. The decline raises questions about Americans' ability and willingness to spend in coming months. The index fell more than expected to 63.4 from a revised 72.0 in February. Economists expected 65.4, according to FactSet. The drop was the steepest since the 10.1-point plunge from January 2010 to February 2010, when the U.S. stock market was hammered by worries about Greece's national debt. "Rising food and gasoline prices are starting to take their toll on the consumer psyche, and Japan's triple calamity earthquake, tsunami and nuclear disaster has been very unsettling," said Chris Christopher Jr., senior principal economist at HIS Global Insight. The index measures how Americans feel about business conditions, the job market and the next six months. It has hovered in a tight range from the high 50s to low 60s over the past year, far below the 90 that indicates a healthy economy. The index hasn't approached that level since the recession began in December 2007. A housing slump that isn't over and won't be for a while isn't helping. Home prices are falling in most major U.S. cities, and the average prices in four of them are at their lowest in 11 years, according to Standard & Poor's/Case-Shiller report released Tuesday. On Friday, the Commerce Department said new-home sales plunged in February, the third month in a row. A look at economic developments and activity in major stock markets around the world Tuesday: ___ LISBON, Portugal Rating agency Standard & Poor's has downgraded debt-stressed Portugal's credit worthiness, deepening the country's financial plight as it fights to avoid a bailout. ___ ATHENS, Greece Standard & Poors downgraded Greece's credit rating again, saying it was "highly likely" the country would need to take further bailout loans beyond the ones it already has. ___ TOKYO Japan's government vowed to overhaul nuclear safety standards once its radiation-leaking reactor complex is under control, admitting that its safeguards were insufficient to protect the plant against the March 11 tsunami. ___ LONDON European markets closed higher despite new rat ings downgrades of Portugal and Greece and more bad news from Japan. Britain's FTSE ended 0.5 percent higher at 5,932.17, Germany's DAX was down less than 0.1 percent to 6,934.44 and France's CAC-40 rose 0.3 percent to 3,987.80. ___ TOKYO In Asia, Japan's benchmark Nikkei 225 index closed down 0.2 percent at 9,459.08. China's Shanghai Composite Index slipped 0.9 percent and Hong Kong's Hang Seng index was narrowly down. South Korea's Kospi was 0.8 percent higher and Australia's S&P/ASX 200 gained 0.5 percent. ___ BERLIN A closely-watched survey shows German con sumer confidence is down amid worries about unrest in North Africa and the Mideast, and fears of inflation. ___ BERLIN Germany's inflation rate held steady at 2.1 percent in March due largely to higher oil and energy prices, an official estimate showed underlining prospects of an imminent rate hike by the European Central Bank. ___ LONDON Britain's economy shrank by half a percent in the last quarter of 2010, not quite as bad as previously thought, official statisticians said Tuesday, though their final figure did little to ease apprehension about the course of the recovery. ___ TOKYO The government says Japan's unemployment rate in February fell to 4.6 percent, the first decline in two months. ___ TAIPEI, Taiwan A senior Taiwanese official says the recent Japan earthquake may cut Taiwan's economic growth by 0.2 percentage point this year. GLOBALECONOMIC NEWSassociated press (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes) ONTHEMARKET: In this photo taken on Tuesday, March 22, 2011, an single family home is offered for sale in Los Angeles. Home prices are falling in most major U.S. cities, and now the average price in four of them are at the lowest point in 11 years. Consumer confidence down following inflation worries HOME PRICES FALLING IN MOST MAJOR US CITIES (AP Photo/Matt York) CONFIDENCEDOWN: A shopper walks through the outdoor San Tan Village Mall Monday, March 28, 2011 in Gilbert, Ariz. mented in the US terminal, a passenger's luggage is photographed and electronically tagged as belonging to them. When the passenger subsequently reaches the US Customs check point, their boarding pass is scanned and a photograph of their luggage should appear on a screen for viewing by a US officer. The passenger is then asked to identify if the bag belongs to them. However, according to a number of sources, issues have arisen whereby luggage is not being correctly attributed to particular passengers, on what anecdotal evidence suggests is a fairly frequest basis. One Bahamian businessman travelling on Thursday to Atlanta from Nassau to visit his American wife a trip he takes on average once a month said he was subject to a "scary" experience at the US CBP check point after it appeared that his airline did not take a photograph of the luggage he had checked in. The 68 year-old man said he was questioned significantly about his motivation for traveling to the US by CBP officers before being released and allowed on his way. In another instance, a woman, who wished to remain anonymous, said she was travelling to South America via the US and was pulled into a room for questioning by US CBP officers after two photographed pieces of luggage appeared when her boarding pass was scanned, as opposed to the one piece of luggage she told officers she had checked in with her airline. The woman, who was travelling to South America for a professional conference, said she was "harassed and intimidated" over the fact that an additional bag had been linked to her, being questioned about whether she was transporting drugs. She, too, was eventually allowed to leave and board her flight. Tribune Business understands that in other instances passengers have missed flights due to the prolonged experience getting through the US pre-clearance area. In a statement sent to Tribune Business by a US Embassy spokesperson, in response to queries about complaints of more frequent secondary screenings by US CBP officers in light of baggage-related issues, the embassy noted that it is an end user of NADs baggage system. The spokesperson added: While we can't comment about specifics incidences, US Customs and Border Protection is tasked with securing the borders and facilitating legitimate trade and travel. While security remains a priority, we are committed to working with the airlines, airport authority and other partners to provide passengers with the best possible travel experience. Baggage woes impact airportFROM page 1B

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N EW C YB ER C OM MU NI T Y F OR B AHA M I AN S ON LI N E A R TI ST I N DA SP OT LI GH T : B AHA M I AN TRI O BR EAK T HRU W HY GRA ND M OTH ER, WH A T B A D A CTO RS Y OU H A V E ? WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011T H E T R I B U N E S E C T I O N CBy DR ERICA MOIAH JAMES Director of NAGB Sometimes it is difficult to assess the impact of ones work when ones focus is still on the trenches. As Trans forming Spaces enters its sixth year, perhaps it is a good time for the commu nity to look up and consider the impact this event has had on raising aware ness on fine art and art spaces in New Providence. As qu i e t a s it i s k e p t T r a n s fo r m i n g S p a c e s b e c o m e a m o d e l f o r o t h e r a r t i n i t i a t i v e s b e i n g p r o p o s e d a n d n o w a f t e r s i x y e a r s o f s u c c e s s f o c u s i ng o n a Ba h a m i a n c li e n t e l e it ha s s p a wn e d a n o f fi c ia l a r t t o ur f or o u r v i s i to r s I t h a s a l s o p l a y e d a p i v o t a l r o l e i n b r o a d e n i n g t h e n u m b e r s o f B a h a m i a n s w h o p u r c h a s e a r t i n c r e a s i n g t h e a r t l i te r a cy o f o u r lo c a l po p u l a ti o n a n d i nt r o du c i ng a h o s t of a r t i s ts t o th e g e ne r a l pu b l i c. S o m ed a y T r an s f o r mi n g S pa c es w i l l b e f u l l y r ec o g n i s e d a n d s u p p or t e d a s a ho m e g r o w n e v e n t wi t h a n i n t e r n a t i o n a l a u d i e n c e a n d r e a c h I t w i ll h a p p e n b e c a u s e i n or d e r t o s u r v i v e t h i n g s m u s t c o n t i n u e t o g r o w a n d T r a n s f o r m i n g S p a c e s i s n o e x c e p ti o n It w ill happ en b ecaus e th e elem e n ts a r e i n pl a c e f o r i t t o m us h r o o m i n t o a n a r t h a p p e n i n g t h a t c a n tr u ly tr a n s f o r m t h e w a y Ba h a m i a n s s e e a n d v a l u e th e i r v is u a l a n d cu l tur a l hi s tor i e s a n d hu mb ly r e c og n i s e o u r a b i l i t y t o p r o d u c e a r t t h a t i s t r u l y c u t t i n g e d g e an d s e c o n d t o n on e I t wi l l h a p p e n be ca us e t he i n s ti t u t i o n a l s t r u c t u r e i s p r e s e n t t o b r oa de n it s o ff e r i n g s d i v e r s i f y t he a r t e x p e r i e n c e a n d e x t e n d i t s i m p a c t I t wi l l h a p p e n be ca u s e B a h a m i a n s a r e a pe op l e fr o m wh i ch th e te r m m a k e a d o l l a r o u t o f fi f t e e n c e n ts o r i g i n a t e d W e h a v e a n i n t i m a t e k no w l e d g e o f wh a t t hi s m e a ns a n d c r e a t i v i t y h a r d w o r k a n d s a c r i f i c e l i e a t t h e c o r e o f i t I t w i l l h a p p e n because we will not w a it f or it to h a p pe n We w i ll wo r k to g e t h e r t o m a k e i t h a p p e n .T R A N S F O R M I N G S P A C E S 2 0 1 1 T h e N A G B w i l l f e a t u r e a n e x h i b i t i o n o n t h e h i s t o r y o f B a h a m i a n a r t a n d o n F r i d a y A p r i l 1 t h e g a l l e r y w i l l h o s t t h e g e n e r a l p u b l i c t o a c o c k t a i l r e c e p t i o n a n d w o r l d p r e m i e r e o f t h e f i l m B r e n t M a l o n e F a t h e r o f B a h a m i a n A r t a n I s l a n d F i l m s P r o d u c t i o n R e c e p t i o n b e g i n s a t 6 3 0 p m a n d t h e s c r e e n i n g a t 7 3 0 p m G a l l e r i e s p a r t i c i p a t i n g i n t h i s y e a r t o u r i n c l u d e : : D A gu i l ar A r t F o un d at i o n D o o ng al i k S t u d io s A rt G al le ry N ew P ro vi d en c e A r t an d A n t i q u es P o p op S t u di o s, P RO G al l er y at C O B an d T h e Hu b w h o w i l l b e s ho w c as i n g ne w a nd e xc i t i ng a rt w o rk f r om mo r e t h an 5 0 ar t is t s W i t h a m o r e c o m p a c t b u s r o u t e a n d f e w e r s p a c e s t h i s y e a r p a t r o n s w i l l h a v e t h e o p p o r t u n i t y d u r i n g t h e f o u r h o u r t o u r t o s p e n d a l o n g e r t i m e a t e a c h s p a c e t o v i e w t h e a r t a s w e l l a s m e e t a n d s p e a k w i t h t h e a r t i s t s P u r c h a s e s c a n b e m a d e d u r i n g t h e t o u r a n d p a t r o n s a r e r e m i n d e d t h a t t h e y w i l l a l s o b e t r e a t e d t o a v a r i e t y o f f o o d a n d d r i n k a t e a c h s t o p T r a n s p o r t a t i o n w i l l o n c e a g a i n b e p r o v i d e d b y t h e p r o f e s s i o n a l t e a m f r o m B a h a m a s E x p e r i e n c e T o u r s t h e e v e n t s S p o n s o r w h o w i l l d r i v e p a t r o n s a l o n g w i t h a k n o w l e d g e a b l e t o u r g u i d e i n c o m f o r t a b l e a i r c o n d i t i o n e d b u s e s t o e a c h v e n u e A l l b u s e s w i l l l e a v e d a i l y f r o m t h e N A G B p r o m p t l y a t 1 0 a m o n S a t u r d a y A p r i l 2 a n d S u n d a y A p r i l 3 Introduction for Transforming Spaces 2011 Alistair Stevenson and June Collie work on a body cast. One of the casts in production. A portrait by Antonious Roberts called Damaso displayed at New Provi dence Art and Antiques. Khia Poitier prepares the plaster cast on Steven Schmid

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T H E T R I B U N E S E C T I O N CA R T S & E N T E R T A I N M E N T02 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011By LESHAKEY element which drives the success of Bahamian trio, Breakthru is that of determination. The members told In Ya Ear that they are empowered by the thrill and enthusi asm which music gives them. The ambi tious young artists style reflects a mix of electro hip pop, pop, jazz and blues. They de fine succ e ss not as "at t ainme nt o f a m i l l i o n a i r e s s t a t u s b u t r a t h e r t he m a g n i t ud e o f c h a n g e d l i v e s a s a r e s u l t o f t h e i r w o r k Thi s e le c t r o h ip pop gr ou p c a m e t o ge t h er i n Se pt e m b er 20 1 0 f ou nde d by m al e r a ppe r s, St e v au gh n A c a pe l la H e pb ur n, A m a e le o S t a rt e z C a r e y a n d f e m a l e s i n g e r a n d s o n g w r i t e r D i a n d r a K a rm a B ro w n. T he m ot i ve be hi nd f o rm i ng t he gro up was to pro ve thro ugh thei r so ngwritin g a n d e n t e r t a i nm e n t t h a t y ou y o u r s e l f s h a pe y o ur ow n s uc c e s s w hi c h s hou ld no t c ons t r a in i t s el f t o a ge o r st at us In a ddi t i on, t he y li v e by t h e m ot t o t ha t t he ke y t o s uc c ee d ing i n li f e is t o m ov e f or w a rd w i t h out l ook in g b ac k. W h e n a s k e d a b o u t t h e n a m e o f t h e g r o u p t h e y expl ained t ha t t he nam e B re akt hru depic t s a n u ns t o p p a b l e pe r s o n a s u c h t h a t n o m a t t e r w h a t i t i s t h a t c o m e s t h e i r w a y t h e y l l b e v i c t o r i o u s Y o u s h o ul d no t b e c h a i ne d t o y o ur c i r c u m s t a nc e s b u t a l l o w y o u r i n n e r p o t e n t i a l t o s h a c k l e t h a t c h a i n f o r a p o s i t i v e a n d m e a n i n g f u l o u t c o m e t h e y e x p l a i n e d T h e ov e r a l l m e s s a g e p o r t r a y e d by t he a r t i s t s i s t o s e t g o a l s t o g e t g o l d a n d t o d r e a m b i g bu t t o m a k e t h e r e a l i t i e s e v e n b i g g e r T h e y a l s o w a n t t o e n a b l e o t h e r y o u t hs t o i d e n ti fy t hem se lves ma ke right c ho i ce s in d if f ic ult dec ision m aking a nd t o mos t im port ant ly, live t he i r dr e a m s B r e a k t h r u s a i m i s t o p o r t r a y a c e r t a i n l e v e l o f u n i q u e n e s s d i v e r s i t y a nd e n e r g y i n a l l a s p e c t s o f t he i r c a r e er T h e m o s t i m p o r t a n t s e c t i o n o f t h e m u s i c in dus t r y t ha t is l a c ki ng i n The B ah a m a s is m a r ke t i ng a nd f oc u s w i l l b e pl ac ed he a v il y on pr oduc i ng qua li t y, an d re la t a bl e m us ic f o r 'p ot e nt ia l f a n s of B r e a kt hr u , s ai d A m a e le o C a r ey T h e g r o u p r e c e n t l y c o m p l e t e d t h e i r n e w s i n g l e e nt i t le d M a ke he r sa y w hic h f e a t ur e s t a l en t e d singer a nd songw rit er, r ec ording enginee r and pr odu c i ng g en iu s Sk e t c h. A c c o rd ing t o C a r ey ,By LESHR Y A N w a s c o m p l e t e l y c o r r e c t w h e n h e n o t e d t h a t t h e r e w o u l d b e a "s h o c k i n g s u r p r i s e i n t h e r e s u l t s o n l a s t w e ek s s h o w T h e t o p 1 1 c o n t e s tan ts p e r for m ed un d e r th e M ot ow n t h e m e I t w a s q u i t e t h e l o v e f e s t f o r t h e j u d g e s w i t h t h em l o vi n g a l m o s t e ve r y p e r f o r m a n c e b u t I f e l t l i k e t h e j u d g e s w e r e n t p a y i n g m u c h a t t e n t i o n b e c a u s e ev e r yt h i n g w as n o t e v en c l o s e t o p e r f e ct B e f o r e t h e s h o w g o t o n a r o l l t h e A I t e a m g a v e u s a g l i m p s e o f M a r c A n t h o n y J L o s s t u d m u f f i n h e l p i n g t h e c o n t es t an t s c r i t i q u e t h e i r p er f o r ma n ce s i n a s m a l l r o o m I t w a s n o t a s u r p r i s e t o m e t h a t h e d i s a g r e e d w i t h s o m e o f h i s w i f e s c o m m en t s T o u gh en u p J L o N o w i t s s h o w t i me o n t h e r es u l t s s h o w a n d t h e u s u a l g r o u p p e r f o r m a n c e g o t s t a r t e d E ve r yo n e w a s f o c u s e d o n t h e c o n t e s t a n t s u n t i l s u d d e n l y o u t o f n o wh ere ca me S tevie Wo nd er hi mself s i t t i n g a n d s i n g i n g a t a p i a n o p l a t f o r m S t e v i e s t i l l g o t t h a t v o i c e I w o u l d h o p e t h o s e p o t e n t i a l i d o l h o p e f u l s w e r e t a k i n g n o t e s A n o t h e r su r p r i se c am e f o r v i e w e r s w h e n S t e v i e c a l l e d o u t S t e v e n T y l e r s n a m e a n d s t a r t e d t o s i n g a h a p p y b i r t h d a y m el o d y f o r h i m I w a s n o t a w ar e t h at i t wa s S t e ve n s b i r t h d a y I t h o u gh t t h at w a s t h e s w ee t es t t h i n g La ur e n Ala ina he ld the ca ke w hile S t ev e n c am e u p a n d u t t er e d t h e w o r d s p e ec h l e s s, H e se e me d ve r y h a p p y I m u s t s a y s i n c e t h e f u n n y a u d i t i o n s i n t h e c i t i e s t h i s r e s u l t s s h o w w as o n e o f t h e b e s t y e t T h e a u d i e n c e w a s s h o w n a c l i p o f Ja m es an d P au l a n d t h ei r l o v e f o r p r o f e s si o n al wr e st l i n g. S o o n af ter th ey w ere b o t h cal l ed to t h e s t a g e a n d R y a n s c a r e d t h e m s e n s e l es s w h e n h e t o l d t h em "Y o u r e n o t s a f e t o n i g h t Wo rr i e d a n d n e r v ous t he y s too d t h e r e i n s h o c k a n d t h e n t h e s o n g E y e o f t h e T i g e r s t a r t ed t o p l a y a n d H u l k H o g a n h i m s e l f c a m e o u t a s o l d a s t h i s g u y i s, h e i s s t i l l f i t He c a me o u t a n d t o l d t h e y gu ys h i m s el f t h at t h e y w e r e b o t h s a f e O f c o u r s e H o g a n r i p p e d o f f h i s s h i r t a n d p r e t e n d e d a s i f h e p u n c h e d R y an i n t o t h e c r o wd w h i c h w a s r e a l l y f u n n y. I t w a s a l l f u n a n d g am e s b u t a s w e a l l k n o w i t d o es n o t l a st f o r ev er o n t h e r es u l t s s h o w, so m eo n e h ad t o b e e li mi na te d by Am e ric a onc e aga in. Y e s i t w a s r e a l l y a s u r p r i s e w h e n A m er i ca v o t e d C a s ey A b r am s o f f t h e s h o w a n d t h e j u d ge s ma d e t h e d e ci s i o n t o k e ep h i m b y u s i n g t h e i r O N E A N D ON L Y s a v e ca r d A l l o f t h e 11 c o n t e s t a n t s w i l l b e g o i n g o n t h e A m e r i c an I d o l 20 1 1 l i v e t o u r I a m hap py f or t he m a l l, but t he j u d g e s m u s t h a v e b e e n s i p p i n g o n s o m et h i n g w h e n t h e y d e c i d e d t o u s e t h e s a v e ca r d s o e a r l y o n i n t h e c o m p e t i t i o n c o m e o n m a n T H I N K T h e r e i s a l o t o f t al e n t i n t h i s s e a s o n o f A I w h a t a r e t h e y g o i n g t o d o w h e n s o m e o n e r e al l y d es e r v e s t h at s a ve a n d ca n n o t g et t h e ch an c e. Th i s we ek t h e co n tes tan t s wi l l b e o n t h e s t a ge a g ai n p er f o r m i n g s o n g s u n d e r t h e t h e m e S i r E l t o n J o h n O n t h e T h u r s d a y n i g h t r e s u l t s s h o w t h e r e w i l l b e a d o u b l e e l i mi n a t i o n .t h e s o n g c a n b e v e r y c o m m e r c i a l a n d i f m a r k e t e d i n t h e r i g h t w a y c a n b e v e r y r e w a r d i n g f or t he gr ou p. It i s sc he duled t o be re lea se d A pril 2 2, 20 1 1 It w i ll a ls o be a v ai l ab le t o do w nl oa d dig i t a ll y t hr oug h i Tu ne s a nd a t on of ot h er onl in e s t or e s a s of M a y 5t h 2 01 1 F a n s c a n b e o n t h e l o o k o u t f o r t h e gr ou p' s ne w m us ic t ha t is c ur re n t ly si g ne d u n d e r a n i n d e p e n d e n t r e c o r d l a b e l Y ou ng s t a r M us ic R e c o rd in gs T he l ab e l i s currently work ing o n securin g a distribu t i o n d e a l w h i c h w o u l d m a n u f a c t u r e a n d d i s t r ibu t e B r ea k t hr u s A l bum in t e rn at ion a ll y The A lb um i s s c hedu le d to r e lea s e O c t obe r 2 0 1 1. F u t ur e p la ns in c lu de an e v e nt c a l le d 3 w a ys t o B r e ak t hr u an d a pos s ibl e c on c e rt Idol judges came to the r escue and use the save Driven By Deter mination, They ar e Br eakthru R E V I E W By NEKESA MUMBI MOODY AP Music Writer E V E N w h e n Br i tn e y Sp e a r s wa s i n th e m i d s t o f he r Ch a r l i e S h e e n e s qu e b r e a kd o w n, s h e w a s p u tt in g o u t g r oo v e s to we a r o ut th e d a n c e f l oo r ; 2 0 0 7 s B la ck o u t" i s t he be s t a lb u m s h e e v e r m a de th o ug h t h e d r a m a o f th a t ti m e o v e r s h a d o we d i t Since then, she's continued to pump out taut jams that have kept her musically relevant, even if she's turned into sort of a Howard Hughes in private. The larger-thanlife persona that morphed from jailbait to sex kitten to wild child has been rendered bland, perhaps the most dangerous thing that can happen to a pop star. The mother of two, whose personal and financial affairs are controlled by her father, is rarely heard from, and when she is, every move seems to be calculated by an army of handlers instead of determined by her own will: Any edge or personality she demonstrated seems to have been permanently dulled. Thankfully, there is one place where she still shows her spark in her music. On "Femme Fatale," the follow-up to 2008's "Circus," Spears with plenty of help from megaproducers like Dr. Luke, will.i.am, and longtime collaborator Max Martin shows that she can still give the Lady Gagas and Rihannas of the pop world a serious challenge on the dance floor. "Femme Fatale" is a nonstop party, starting off with a fun flourish with the poppy "Till the World Ends" and winding down with the dark, downbeat "Criminal." There's nothing especially original on the tracks in between, but Spears' vocals give already catchy tracks even more appeal. While she's never been on the vocal level of Beyonce or even Gaga, her voice, though thin and occasionally nasally, does have a pouty charm. On the throbbing "Inside Out," she sounds like a sexy cougar; "Trip to Your Heart," with its electronic synths, has a dreamy disco feel. The driving "Hold It Against Me" is one of the album's better tracks, though it suffered from the nonsensical, product-placement video that accompanies it. In it, Spears looks listless and off her game, and it's a reminder that she's not the Brit who wowed us just a few years ago. But when you block out the visuals and focus on the songs, Spears once again sizzles, and her flame burns as bright as ever.CHECK THIS TRACK OUT : Some of the best songs on "Femme Fatale" are on the deluxe disc: "Up N' Down" is a naughty teaser that should be the 2011 theme song for pole dancers everywhere.Britney Spears Femme Fatale shows spark C A S EY A B R A MS

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T H E T R I B U N E S E C T I O N CA R T S & E N T E R T A I N M E N T03 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011 By JEFFARAH GIBSON Tribune Features Writer T H E Y s a y F a c e b o o k h a s n o t h i n g m u c h t o o f f er an d t h e o n l y t h i n g t o d o o n T w i t t er i s p o s t p o i n t l e s s s t at u s l i k e I m e a t i n g c o r n f l a k e s Thi s bor ed om with cu rre nt s ocia l ne tw o r k i n g w e b s i t e s l e d K a s h m i r C o l e b r o o k e a n d R i c h a r d L o w e t o s t a r t a B a h a m i a n s o c i a l n e t w o r k i n g s i t e t h a t com bin es the fe atu re s of Fa ceb ook with a m i x o f T w i t t e r a n d a l i t t l e b i t o f Y o u t u b e Ye a b e y n e t i s t h e n a m e I t s a c y b e r c o m m u n i t y f o r B a h am i a n s w h e r e t h ey c a n s t a y c o n n e c t e d w i t h f r i e n d s a n d e n g a g e i n w h o l es o m e f u n I h a d a F a c e b o o k a c c o u n t a n d t o m e F ac e b o o k w a s v e r y b o r i n g. T h e r e i s n o t h i n g m u c h t o d o o n i t i t s j u s t a w a l l Y o u c a n p l ay g am e s l o o k at ot h er p e o p l e p h o t o s u p l o a d v i d e o s a s w e l l b u t t h a t s j u s t i t t h e r e i s n o t h i n g m o r e t o d o K a s h m i r s a i d S o m y f r i e n d a n d I d e c i d e d t o s t ar t t h e w eb si t e. W e t o ok so m e t h in gs f ro m F ac eb oo k an d a dd ed m uc h mo re t o i t . T h e s i t e h a s a s i m i l a r s et u p t o t h e m o s t s o c i a l n e t w o r k s s i t e s U s e r s c a n i n t e r a c t w i t h e a c h o t h e r a n d u p l o a d p i c t u r es v i d e o s T h ey c a n a l s o e n g ag e in v i deo and audio chat l isten t o musi c, u p l o a d t h e i r o w n g a m e s h av e d i s c u s s i o n s p a r t i c i p a t e i n p o l l s s h o u t o u t t o f a m i l y an d f r i e n d s an d d o a l i t t l e s h o p p i n g at t h e s a m e t i m e T h e r e i s a w h o l e l o t t h a t w e h a v e to of fe r So wh e n y ou g e t on th e we b s it e t h e r e a r e s o m u c h t h i n g s t h a t p e o p l e c an d o T h e y d o n t o n l y h a v e t o w r i t e o n o t h er p eo p l e w a l l s T h e y c a n i n v i t e o t h e r s t o p l ay 3D g a m e s w i t h t h e m a s w e l l h e t o l d T r i b u n e E n t e r t a i n m e n t One thi ng tha t s ets Y e a B ey ne t a pa rt f r o m o t h e r s o c i a l n e t w o r k i n g s i t e a r e t h e g i v e a w a y s E v e r y o n e h u n d r e d t h pe r so n th a t s ig n s u p a n d b e co me s a us e r i s a w a r d e d a t w e n t y d o l l a r p h o n e c ar d T h e p e r s o n w i t h t h e m o s t u p l o a d s t h e m o s t v i e w e d p r o f i l e a n d t h e p e r s o n w it h t he best hom emade video w ill also b e aw ar de d a t w en t y d o ll ar p ho n e c ar d a n d o t h er c o o l p r i z e s A n d t h e v i d e o w h i c h g e t s t h e m o s t v i e w s w i l l b e c o m e t h e v i d e o o f t h e w e ek F o r p o t en t i a l u s er s w h o ma y b e w o r r i e d a b o u t p r i v a c y s e t t i n g c a n b e s e t t o t h e u s e r s l i k i n g. A l o t o f p e o p l e t a l k a b o u t t h e i r s ec u r i t y o n F a c e b o o k a n d o t h e r s i t es t h e y c a n l i m i t t h e i r p r o f i l e s f o r o n l y o n e p e r s o n t o v i e w h e s ai d H e a ls o e n co ur a g e s p e r so n s h ow t he i r s u p p o r t P e o p l e s h o u l d s i g n u p a n d b e c o m e u s e r s o f Y e ab ey n e t b e c a u s e w e n ee d t he s up p or t of B ah ami an s. We pr om is e t hat t h is si t e w il l b e t h e nex t bes t t hi ng. W e a l s o e n c ou r a g e p e o pl e to s h a r e th e i r i d e a s I f t h e y h a v e a n y i d e a s o n h o w w e c a n i m p r o v e t h e s i t e t h e i r s u gg e s t i o n s a r e w el c o m e d h e s a i d .Yea BeyT H I N G S 2DO A new cyber community for Bahamians, wher e they can stay connected with friends and engage in wholesome fun N E W KID ON T HE B LOC K: T h e si te h as a s im i la r set u p to th e m ost so cia l n et w or ks s ite s U s er s c an in te r ac t wit h ea c h oth er a nd up load pict ur e s, vid eos MARCH 31 APRIL 2CALS BIG BUMPIN CIRCUS C a l s B i g B u m p i n C i r c us r e t u r n s to t h e K e n da l G L I s a a cs G y m w i th a l i n e u p o f n e w s e g m e n t s i n c l u di ng a v e n t r i l oq u i s t a c t hi g h -j um p i n g c l o w n a n d m a g i c i a n a s w e l l a s o l d f a v o u r i t e s s uc h a s t h e R ub b e r B a nd M a n a n d t he h i g h w i r e a ct B a ha m i a n t a l e n t s a l s o m a k e a p p e a r a n c e s T i m e s : 1 1 a m a nd 1 p m m a t i n e e pe r fo r m a n c e s ; 8 p m e v e n i n g p e r f or m a n ce s C o s t : $ 2 0 / m a t i n e e ; $ 2 5 / e v e ni ng g e n e r a l s e a t i n g ; $ 2 0 / e v e n i n g r i n g s i d e T i c ke ts a v a i l a b l e a t C o n l i f f e s B a k e r y B a ha m a s R e d C r o s s C a r e y s F a br i c a n d D e p a r t m e nt S to r e O r i g i n a l S w i s s S ho p T he Ju k e b ox a n d S e v e n te e n S h o p. T : 3 2 5 5 7 2 1 S e e h t t p : / / w w w c i r c u s b a h a m a s c o m .APRIL 1 FRIDAYALLIANCE FRANCAISE DES BAHAMAS MOVIE NIGHT: THE STORY OF ADELE H. The L'alliance Francaise des Bahamas hosts its monthly movie night with the screening of the film, The Story of Adele H., a 1975 French film that tells the story of the real-life Adele Hugo, daughter of Victor Hugo, whose obsessive love for a naval officer led to her downfall. 6.30pm in the Societe Generale Pri vate Banking Building. Telephone: 302-5141. Seehttp://www.afbahamas.org.APRIL 1 -2 AND APRIL 7 9PLAY PRODUCTION: THE CABINET Ward Minnis' political comedy play, The Cabinet, opens at the Dundas Centre for Performing Arts, 7pm-9pm nightly. Cost: $20/in advance; $25/at the door. Seehttp://www.cabinetplay.com.APRIL 2 -3ROTARY HORSE SHOW The Rotary Club presents its 2011 Horse Show at Camperdown Riding Club, 9am daily. Food and drinks on sale. Bring the whole family!APRIL 2 37TH ANNUAL TRANSFORMING SPACES ART TOUR T h e T r a n s f o r m i n g S p a c e s c o m m i t t e e p r e s e n t s t h e 7 t h a n n u a l T r a n s f o r m i n g S p a c e s a r t t o u r a u n i q u e e x p e r i e n c e t h a t t a k e s p a r t i c i p a n t s t o 6 d i f f e r e n t a r t s p a c e s a n d a l l o w s t h e m t o v i e w a r t p i e c e s a s w e l l a s m e e t t h e a r t i s t s S t o p s i n c l u d e D A g u i l a r A r t F o u n d a t i o n D o o n g a l i k S t u d i o s A r t G a l l e r y N e w P r o v i d e n c e A r t a n d A n t i q u e s P o p O p S t u d i o s P R O G a l l e r y a n d T h e H u b T o u r b e g i n s 1 0 a m d a i l y f r o m N a t i o n a l A r t G a l l e r y C o s t : $ 3 0 / p e r p e r s o n T e l p h o n e : 3 2 8 7 9 1 6 ( N e w P r o v i d e n c e A r t a n d A n t i q u e s ) 3 2 8 5 8 0 0 ( N a t i o n a l A r t G a l l e r y ) o r 3 9 4 1 8 8 6 ( D o o n g a l i k S t u d i o s ) S e e w w w t r a n s f o r m i n g s p a c e s b a h a m a s c o m

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Jeremy Irons stars in Showtimes The Borgias By FRAZIER MOORE AP Television Writer JEREMY IRONS couldn't resist. The role he was invited to play Rodrigo Borgia is a towering historical figure who, five centuries ago, becomes pope through whatever-it-takes scheming, then ruthlessly defends his claim to the papacy against mounting efforts to unseat him. As perhaps the Western World's biggest boss, the new Pope Alexander VI denies himself nothing, including fami ly, whose support he drafted in his rise to the top, and an additional mistress supplementing the mother of his chil dren. Thus begins the ungodly power trip that is "The Bor gias," a new Showtime drama series. Created, written and produced by Neil Jordan ("The Crying Game," ''Michael Collins"), "The Borgias" has a two-hour premiere on Sunday at 9 p.m. EDT, with seven subsequent episodes airing Sundays at 10 p.m. EDT. "The list of adjectives that were used to describe him by his contemporaries are all the colors of the rainbow," Irons says with wonder. "From charming, thoughtful, a man of God, to licentious, carnal, a murderer! And I thought, 'Well, this is fascinating.'" Particularly within the sacred walls of the Vatican, the bald ambition of the future pope is chilling to behold as the series begins in 1492 and Borgia plots his game plan as a long-shot candidate to succeed the dying Pope Innocent VIII. But perhaps the most impressive sequence in the first installment is the papal coronation. During the lavish pro cession, then the crowning, Alexander registers a mix of fierce triumph and all-consuming awe. "You go for this job, and when you get there wooooooo you're on the top of the mountain with no one around you. There's no one to call, except, you know, Him." Irons points heaven ward. "I think that's both hum bling and frightening." During that scene, a range of colors of the character play across his face as gathering evidence of his human complexi ty. That complexity is something Irons will get to explore at length. "That's the great thing about doing a series as opposed to a film," says Irons.By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net T H E R E S a n e w t w is t on a n o l d fa ir y -t a l e p la y i ng a t y ou r l o ca l c i n e p le x R e d R i d i ng H o o d fr o m T wi l i g h t d i r e c t o r C a t h e r i n e H a r d w i c k e i s th e l a te s t i n a s l e w o f H o ll y w o o d r e m a k e s o f c h i ld h o o d f a v o u r i te s R e d R i d i ng H o o d d o e s T w il i g h t b e tt e r a l t ho u g h t ha t' s l i ke s a y i n g a slap is be t ter than a punch in t he fa ce T h e f i lm ce n t r e s a r o u n d V a l e r i e ( A m a n d a S e y f r i e d ) a w i d e e y e d w il l fu l t e e n a g e r wh o l i v e s i n a n i s o la t e d v i l la g e b or d e re d b y a fo re s t. S he i s i n l o v e w it h b a d bo y w oo d cu tt er P eter (Shi loh F ernandez) w e k n ow h e is a b a d bo y fr o m th e p e r m a n e n t s n e e r o n h i s f a c e a n d p la ns t o r un a w a y wi th h i m H o w e v e r t h e r e s a c a t c h : V a l e r i e s m o t h e r h a s a r r a n g e d f o r h e r t o m a r ry He nry (Ma x Iron s), t h e v illa ge b l a c k s m i t h H e i s a b e t t e r c a t c h b e c a u s e a p p a r e n t l y b l a c k s m i t h s ma k e mo r e mo ne y th a n w oo dcu tt e r s a s h e r g o l d d i g g i n g m o t h e r ( V i r g i n ia M a d s e n ) s u cc i nc t ly pu t s it Fo r g e n e r a t io n s V a l e r i e s v i l l a g e h a s b e e n t e r r o r i s e d b y a b l o o d t h i r s t y w ol f s o b ol d l e g e n d te l l s it wo u l d s n a t c h l i t t l e c h i l d re n o u t o f t h e i r b e d s a s t h e y s l e p t R e s i d e n ts of th e v illa g e bolt th eir do ors s hut the ir w indo ws and h ole up insid e thei r h o m e s d u r i n g a f u l l m o o n w h i l e a p p e a s i n g t he wo l f wi t h a n a n i ma l s a c r i f i c e H o w e v e r t h e w o l f h a s g r o w n ti r e d o f a n i m a l f l e s h i t s e e m s and kills a huma n during a blood r e d m o on T u r ns o u t th e m e n a c e i s n o or d i n a r i l y b e a s t b u t a w e r e w o l f w h o l i v e s a m o n g th e v i l la g e r s As th e w o lf is h un t ed t h e c ast o f l ik el y c ul p ri t s e n d s u p d e a d a n d j u s t w h e n y o u t hi nk you 've got t he w ol f f i gured ou t a n ot h e r s u s pe ct i s ki l l e d of f. For m uch of the film I wa s dis t ract ed by Madsen 's fac e ( she's a g o o d l o o k i n g w o m a n w h o e i t h e r ne e d s t o l a y o ff th e B ot o x o r fa c e f i l l e r s ) a n d F e r n a n d e z s f a u x h a w k w h e r e d i d h e f i n d h a i r g e l i n m e d ie v a l ti m e s ? T h e v i l l a g e a n d s u r r o u n d i n g f o r e s t look ed m ore li ke a ch ea p ba ckl ot th a n cr e e p y wo o d s I a l s o f o un d i t odd tha t cha ra cter s s pe nt mos t of t h e i r t i m e d a n c i n g o r r o l l i n g a b o u t i n th e s n o w, w i th l ig ht co a t s o n, o b l i v io u s to t he co l d A n o t h e r p r o b l e m t h a t I h a d i s t h a t b y t h e e n d o f t h e f i l m t h e a u d i e n c e i s s u p p o s e d t o b e l i e v e t h a t V a l e r i e a n d h e r f a th e r s h a r e a c l o s e l o v i n g r e l a ti o ns h i p s o cl o s e i n f a c t th a t s he a t o n e p o i n t k i c k s h i m w h i l e h e i s l y i n g dr u n k i n th e s n o w n e x t to h i s o wn vo mi t. T he r e a re a fe w o the r plo t d e v e l o p m e n t s no t i n li n e w i t h e a r l i e r e v e n t s i n th e m o v i e W o r s t of a l l G r a n d m o t h e r s a c t i n g ( J u l i e Ch r i s ti e ) ha d me l a u g h i ng o ut l o ud d u ri n g s o me of t h e f il m s s eri o u s m om e n t s T h e r e a r e s o m e b r i g h t s p o t s i n t h e f i l m h o w e v e r S e y f r i e d i s c a p t i v a t i n g o n s c r e e n a n d h e r d o e e y e s a n d p or ce la i n s k in m a ke h e r t h e p e r f e c t fa i r y ta l e h e r o i ne H o w e v e r I wo n de r e d wh y t h e wo m a n w h o h a d h e r s ta r tu r n i n t h e o v e r l o o ke d C h lo e w o u l d w a s t e h e r t a l e n t s i n t h i s m ov ie T h e l o v e t r i a n g l e p r o v i d e s a n i nt er est in g sub pl ot S eyf ri ed an d Fe r n a n d e z h a v e g r e a t s e x u a l c h e m is t r y wh i l e th e s e x y I r o ns i s a w e l l c a s t r i v a l T h e a c t i o n s c e n e s w i t h t h e wo l f a r e e x ci t in g a n d we ll ch o r e o g r a p h e d Fo r th o s e l o o k i n g fo r a g o o d l o v e s t o r y i n t e r t w i n e d w i t h a l i t t l e a c t i o n R e d R i d i n g H o o d i s s a t i s f y i n g b r a i n c a n d y i n s p i t e o f a f e w c r i n g e w o r t h y s c e n e s T H E T R I B U N E S E C T I O N CA R T S& E N T E R T A I N M E N T05 MONDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2011SHOWING WH Y G RAN DMO T HER, WHA TB AD A C T OR SY O U HA VE!JEREMY IRONS as Rodrigo Borgia. AMAN D A SEYFRIED GA RY OLDMA N SHILO H FERN A NDEZ MAX IR ONSST ARRING RA TED: PG13RUN TIME:100 mins. 3ST ARS OUT OF4 W ARNER BROS.

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Take a good look at a large tree. Its size suggests permanence, strength, and invulnerabil ity. Yet the truth is that above ground a tree has a very thin layer between bark and core wood and this thin layer performs the life-sustaining processes that maintain the trees health and growth.Go to a s hrub a nd dig into it with y o u r t h u m b n a i l a n d y o u w i l l s e e h o w v e r y t h i n i s t h i s v i t a l c a m b i u m l a y e r w i t h i n w h i c h a t i s s u e c al l e d x yl e m m o v es w at e r a r o u n d a n d p h l o em s t o r es a n d d i s t r i b u t es foo d. R e mo v e thi s th in la y e r fro m a t r e e, a s i n g i r d l i n g a n d i t w i l l d i e B ef o r e i t d i e s i t w i l l m a k e e v e r y eff ort t o s u r vive Tissue bridg es are n e t w or k ed i f t h e re is an y c am b iu m la y e r to wor k w ith. I f y ou h a ve e v e r g i r d l e d a n u i s a n c e t re e i n a n e f f o r t t o di sp os e o f i t yo u w i ll real i se t h at i t i s n o t a s e as y a s ad ve r t i s e d This wounding or girdling of part o f a t r e e i s t h e b a s i s i r o n i c a l l y, o f p r o p ag a t i o n E v e r y t r ee a n d s h r u b h a s g r o w t h p o i n t s o r n o d e s t h a t b e l o w gr o u n d t u r n i n t o r o o t s a n d ab ove gr ou nd pro du ce bran ch es. I f a t r ee o r sh r u b i s g i r d l ed b e l o w a g r o w t h n o d e a n d s o i l i s a p p l i e d t o t h e s i t e t h e n r o o t s w i l l b e p r o duced. The process is calle d air la ye r i n g a n d a l l o w s u s t o s e l e c t a b r a n c h a n d t u r n i t i n t o a t r e e A suita ble bra nch for air la ye ring s ho u ld b e a n in c h a n d n o m o r e th a n t w o i n c h e s i n d i a m e t e r G i r d l e t h e b ra n ch hal f an in ch b e l ow a grow th n o d e u s i n g a s h a r p k n i f e G i r d l e t he branc h ag ain about an inc h fu rt h e r d o w n a n d t h e n s c r a p e a w a y a l l t h e i n t e r ve n i n g t i s s u e u n t i l t h e c o r e w o o d i s s p a rk l i n g w h i t e I n s t e a d o f s o i l i t i s b e s t t o u s e s p h a g n u m m o s s as t h e m e d i u m i n w hi c h t o de vel o p t he ro o t s. D amp e n t h e m o s s i n w a t er t h e n s q u e e z e it fairly dry. A pply it to t he wo unded ar e a a n d b i n d i t w i t h c l e a r p l as t ic s he et i ng o r al um in u m f o i l. P l asti c sh e eti ng wil l h av e to b e a tta ch ed t o p a n d b o t t o m w i t h a p p r o p r i a t e t i e s b u t f o i l c a n b e t w i s t e d i n t o p l a c e I f y o u u s e ei t h e r p l as t i c s h e et i n g o r a l u m i n u m f o i l y o u m u s t t h e n c o v e r t h e a i r l a y e r w i t h c l o t h t o produce both d a rkness one of the necessities of root p r o duct ion a n d a sh iel d a ga ins t the sun I h av e se en m a n y a t t e m p t s a t ai r l a ye r i n g f a i l b e c a u s e a l u m i n u m f o i l w a s u s e d a n d n o t s h i el d e d f r o m t h e s u n N o m a t t e r w h a t t r e e y o u a r e a i r l a y e r i n g y o u m u s t a l l o w t h r e e m o n t h s b e f o r e c h e c k i n g i t s p r o gr e s s T h i s m a k e s i t i m p o r t a n t t o e s t a b l i s h a i r l a y e r s e a r l y i n t h e g r o w i n g s ea s o n M a r c h a n d A p r i l s o tha t by Ju ly or Au gu st we ha ve a n i n d e p e n d e n t p l a n t p r o d u c e d d u r i ng t h e m o s t p r op i t i o u s mo n t h s o f t h e y e a r W h e n t h e ai r l a y er h as p l e n t y o f root s, w e must c ut t he branch away f r o m t h e p a r e n t p l a n t a n d e s t a b l i s h i t i n d e p e n d e n t l y S n i p i t a s c l o s e a s p o s s i b l e t o t h e r o o t b a l l w i t h o u t h a r m i n g t h e r o o t s W e n o w h a v e a p l a n t t h a t h a s r o o t s b u t n o t e n o u g h t o h o l d i t upr ight. T he be st ne xt step i s to use a 1 0g al l o n c o n t a i n e r w i t h a t o m a to cage in sert ed. Tw ot hir ds f il l t he c o n t a i n e r w i t h m o i s t p o t t i n g s o i l a n d l a y t h e r o o t s o f t h e a i r l a y e r o n t o p F i l l t h e p o t w i t h s o i l a n d t h e n s u p p o r t t h e p l a n t w i t h p l a s t i c ri bbon f rom one side of t he tom a t o c ag e t o t h e o t h er l o o p i n g ar o u n d t he p lant Do t his at least t hree d if f e r en t l ev e l s a n d t h i s w i l l h o l d t h e a i r l ay e r f i r m l y u p r i gh t a n d al l o w t h e r o o t s t o d e v el o p w i t h o u t w i n d s h a k i n g t h e a i r l a y e r a r o u n d a n d d i s t u r b i n g t h e m I t s h o u l d b e n o t e d t h a t a i r l a y e r e d p l a n t s d o n o t h a ve t a p r o o t s wh i c h a r e o nl y p r o d uc e d fr o m s e e dg r o w n p l a n t s A l a r g e t r e e g r o w n f r o m a i r l a ye r i n g w i l l b e v e r y s u s c e p t i b l e t o t o p p l i n g i n a h u rr i c a n e. gardenerjack@coralwave.com T H E T R I B U N E S E C T I O N CA R T S & E N T E R T A I N M E N T06 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011 Ju s t a f e w i m a g e s o f w h a t w e t h e B ah a m a s l oo ked l ike 40 ..5 0 ... 60 .. years in the past As queer as a three dollar bill... 1966 the introduction of the Bahamian Dollar. Sir Stafford Sands printed a three digit unit hoping Americans would take some home.Flash BackBY ROLAND ROSE A i r L a y e r i n g By GARDENER JACKGREEN SCENE PRODUCE: Fruit trees like this longan can easily be propagated by air layering.

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T H E T R I B U N E S E C T I O N CA R T S & E N T E R T A I N M E N T08 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011Whether you hate her or love her she is going to make you look! Not only has Lady Gaga taken the music industry by storm but she has also become a fashion trendsetter and one of the only celebrities to keep the shock factor going. From her crazy meat dress to bird nest costume Lady Gaga sets the bar high for herself with every red carpet appearance. T h e M a n y L o o k s o fL a d y G a g a



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T HE evolution of Great E xuma is just one example of how the Ingraham admin i stration is transforming the i nfrastructure of the entire country, according to the governing FNM party. I n a statement issued yest erday, the party noted that Prime Minister Hubert Ingrah am has committed to a multi-year plan to modernise Great Exuma and improve the quality of life for Exumi a ns, residents and visitors. Resort After facilitating the opening of Sandals flagship r esort at Emerald Bay and significantly expanding direct airlift from the USA and Canada, the FNM is planning f or Exumas future with res idents, various stakeholders and planning experts, said the party. The planning will include environmental and social impact assessments to ensure that Great Exuma maintains its unique character and traditions with modern amenities that will augment its natural beauty. The FNM said the governments comprehensive infra structure programme for Great Exuma includes the construction of a hospital to i mprove access to health c are. A new port is also being p lanned. Once completed it w ill help to spur economic growth and opportunities, the party said. P rime Minister Ingraham h as stated that work on the new Exuma hospital should c ommence this year. According to the party, a feasibility study will be undertaken for the construc t ion of a bypass road, in an effort to improve road trans portation and further enhance Great Exuma as a tourism destination and attractive location for sec o nd-home owners. T he FNM statement said: Great Exuma has outgrown its main road in terms of itsl ong-term development needs. These developments i nclude Exumas growing a gricultural sector. The Min ister of Agriculture and Marine Resources LarryC artwright and the Chairman of BAIC, Mr Edison Key and their teams in the Ministry and the Corporation deserve credit for helping to facilitate the export of onions from Exuma to Canada. The party noted that in its 2002 Manifesto, the PLP made the following promises t o the people of Great Exum a, all of which were broken: A master harbour will be f ully developed to serve as a transshipment centre and Customs bonded area Facilities for mid-sized c ruise ships will be built An appropriate hospital t o serve the essential needs of the region will be built and staffed. Public infrastructure will b e maintained and expanded. Though the PLP described the last point as a major pri ority across the country, the FNM said the Christiea dministration failed to keep t his promise in New Provi dence and across the country, including in Great Exu m a. Dir ection The party said: Today the Bahamas and Exuma are moving in a new direction. As the prime minister pledged at the official opening of the new US Departure Terminal at the LPIA: The things we build are not ends in themselves. They are the indispensable means to improve the quality of life of the Bahamian people and residents. The new port, hospital facility and bypass road are being built to improve the quality of life of hotel employees travelling to work, mothers receiving pre-natal and neo-natal care, farmers shipping their produce, small business people seeking to expand their businesses, among others. Upgrading the basic infrastructure of the Islands of the Bahamas including that of Great Exuma is a core component of the FNMs vision and plans to diversify Family Island economies and pro mote both domestic and for eign direct investment. SEEPAGESIX L OCAL NEWS P AGE 2, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011 THE TRIBUNE By CELESTE NIXON Tribune Staff Reporter cnixon@tribunemedia.net A SUPPORT group for young cancer victims is hosting an event to raise moneyfor the upcoming Ride for Hope. T he happy hour fundraise r, organised by Freedom S urvivors, will be held at the Green Parrot Bar ad Grill on East Bay St at 5pm this Friday. All proceeds will go to cover travel expenses for participants of this yearsR ide for Hope, a local bikea-thon that takes place inE leuthera and raises mone y for the fight against canc er. F reedom Survivors, founded in January, is a c ommunity advocacy group for adolescents and adultsu nder the age of 40 who are a ffected by cancer. R ecognising that many y oung adults throughout the Bahamas are impacted by t he disease whether as a patients, survivors or care-g ivers the group aims to p rovide support and empowerment in an effort to ensure that no one feels they must suffer alone. In the future, Freedom Survivors plans to develop p rogrammes and services s uch as support meetings, c ollege awareness tours and fund raisers with the aim of b uilding up the group and increasing its contribution to the global fight to find ac ure for cancer. A s an support group operating under the umbrella of the Cancer Society of the B ahamas, Freedom Surv ivors adheres to all the p olicies and procedures of the society and is committ ed to increasing the aware ness of and support for its initiatives. T his years Ride for Hope s cheduled for April 9. Young cancer victims support group to raise money for Ride for Hope RIDEFORHOPE2010 S CENES FROM t he Ride for Hope 2010. The bike-a-thon, held in Eleuthera, raises money for the fight against cancer. This years event will take place April 9. P hotos/ Tim Aylen Gr eat Exuma evolution example of govts infrastructure transformation

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B AHAMIANISATION has become affirmative action without quotas, according to FNM Senator Dion Foulkes. Despite the policys man d ate to promote multi-faceted advancement of Bahamiansof all races, Mr Foulkes said that the initiative now closelym irrored the United States due to the historical discrimi nation of blacks in both count ries. Mr Foulkes said: The US Federal Government in the1 960s and 1970s developed a p olicy, and in many respects made that policy law, to guarantee economic, educational,and social opportunities for minorities in the USA. Mr Foulkes added: One essential difference between affirmative action and Bahamianization was the use of quotas. Because black Bahamians are the majority in the Bahamas the question of quotas never arose. During his debate on various bills to facilitate the privatisation and sale of BTC in the Upper House yesterday, Mr Foulkes defended his par tys commitment and direct involvement in the econom ic, educational and social advancement of Bahamians. Mr Foulkes said: Employment opportunities have been the main focus of the Bahami anization policy, even though, it is not limited to employment. Bahamianization is more than jobs, he added. It is also about land and business ownership, about the deepening of Bahamian culture and strengthening of social cohesiveness. Lending his support to the BTC legislation, FNM Senator Dr Duane Sands said that the various bills would pro pel the country forward as able participants in the Information Age. During his contribution, Dr Sands highlighted the countrys lackluster response to globalisation in various industries throughout histo ry. Dr Sands cited the downturn of sponging, forestry operations, and pineapples, and the minimal participation in the industrial revolution. Dr Sands said: Globaliza tion, or more importantly, our response to globalization and the flexibility required to r espond, has not been pretty. Dr Sands added: We have a rrived at a defining moment. W e have sought to keep our eyes on the real prize. We have sought to avoid repeat-i ng the hard lessons learnt. LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011, PAGE 3 B y CELESTE NIXON Tribune Staff Reporter cnixon@tribunemedia.net FORMER MP and Cabinet minister Pierre Dupuch says Branville McCart-n ey made the right move in resigning from the FNM. Speaking with The Tribune yesterday, Mr Dupuch said he believes Mr McCartney has acted wisely so far, but advised h im to remain an independent. M r McCartney, the MP for Bamboo Town, resigned from the governing F NM party last week, explaining that he had encountered certain challenges that contradicted his philosophy, con-v ictions and values. I t has been widely speculated that Mr McCartney is in the process of launching a third political party. M r Dupuch, who was also a Cabinet m inister in an earlier Ingraham administration before falling out with the p rime minister, said: I believe more people think the same (as Mr McCartney), however they don't have the guts to do anything about it. While commending Mr McCartney f or standing up for his values and personal convictions, Mr Dupuch said it he w ere in the MPs shoes, he wouldnt fool around with forming a new party. He said what the country needs is a n ew type of movement; a moderating and levelling force in politics that shouldb e based on individuals, not parties. M r Dupuch said that at the moment, many people are disillusioned by what is happening and the country is in the right mood for a change." H e added: I have always said public opinion is to democracy like milk is to the baby if you take milk from the baby, the baby dies, if you take public o pinion out of democracy, the democracy dies. Rigor mortis has begun to set in. W hat is required, he said, is "a halfdozen to a dozen good people who can provide a sobering force in the House of A ssembly. I nsisting that no constituency should be considered or labelled PLP or FNM, M r Dupuch said if people decide to vote f or Mr McCartney who has shown himself to be "intelligent, driven and has proven that he has guts" they are entitled to make that choice. People should decide whether candidates have the Bahamas at heart, not themselves, and whether they recogniser ight to be right and wrong to be wrong, he said. "It is time we begin looking out for t he Bahamas, not the party whether t he PLP or FNM." Former Cabinet Minister: Bran McCartney made right move leaving FNM FORMER Cabinet minister Pierre Dupuch and MP Branville McCartney Bahamianisation is affirmative action without quotas, says Senator SENATOR Dion Foulkes Shar e your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the area or have won an a war d. If so, call us on 322-1986 a nd shar e your stor y.

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E DITOR, The Tribune. How much further is government seemingly going toi gnore the Finance Act and require all contracts over $50,000 to have to go to public tender? I t is all well and good for gifts from foreign governments, however, when thosea re in fact repayable loans there is no doubt that whatever work is involved if over $50,000 must under the Finance Act go out to Public T ender or RFP. The Airport Gateway Proj ect, the dual-carriageway from LPIA to the six-finger Oakes Field roundabout didnt and we will see some 200 citizens of the Peoples R epublic of China working on that project. E xumas new Port and road h as recently been contracted to another Peoples Republic o f China Construction Company and that project will bed esigned, built and transf erred to the government w ithout a single Bahamian w orking on it. Abaco new Port and road h as also been signed off on and again citizens of the Peoples Republic of China willd esign, build and transfer to the government when completed and not a single Bahamian will have been involved. E leuthera Glass Window bridge will be designed-built a nd transferred when completed by the Peoples Republic of China to the government again not a singleB ahamian will work on that. Baha Mar.....anything up to 8,500 citizens of the Peoples Republic of China will work o n that project with total approval of the government. Even the Bahamian subc ontractors we will see will employ foreign labour so the total jobs created for foreigners by the FNM government will exceed 10,000 plus. I t amazes me that the leadership dont see that foreigne rs cant vote. Is there any future for a Bahamian? Really starting to doubt it. J MOORE Nassau. M arch 11, 2011. E DITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P AGE 4, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. Publisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986 Advertising Manager (242 W EBSITE w ww.tribune242.com updated daily at 2pm O UTSIDE of the House of Assembly last week, Prime Minister Ingraham promised t he two Bahamas Telecommunications union leaders that he would meet with them on his return from Canada. He returns tomorrow from a Canadian trade mission. After the Court of Appeals March 22 ruling agreeing with Supreme Court Justice Neville Adderley that the unions had no pow-e r to block the sale of BTC, a dejected Bernard Evans left the courtroom complaini ng of the unfairness of the system and vowing that the unions fight was not yet over. Mr Evans is president of the Bahamas Commu nications and Public Officers Union (BCPOU How union leaders, all employees of BTC, could believe that without even owning ones hare in the company, they could block its sale is beyond understanding. If the ruling h ad been in their favour it would have set a dangerous precedent for business owners in this country. Employees would have more rights than owners. Last month the Supreme Court ruled that the unions had no constitutional grounds on which to sue government. Obviously not being owners they had no legal right to bringan action in their own names. It was obvious throughout this whole exercise that the protests against the sale were PLP generated. Significant was the fact that even when BTC staff had lunch hours during their working day they did not join the demonstrators in the public square despite their union leaders desperate plea for support. Yellow shirts persons wearing them, or slinging them around their necks dominated. In the House of Assembly Prime Min ister Ingraham accused the PLP of using the BTC workers as pawns. The Prime Minister advised union leaders to engage in discussion with their new boss es. He urged union members not to be misled, pointing out that in its failed exercise the union has already incurred thousands of dollars in legal expenses. He believed the Opposition should bear some responsibility in this exercise for leading these innocent pawns astray. The most curious feature of this whole exercise is how the Opposition voted. The Christie government had championed the privatisation of BTC. So did the Ingraham government. However, when it came time for the vote, the Christie group, now in oppo sition, voted against privatisation, arguing that Bahamians should be the majority shareholders. Bluewater was to get 49 per cent of BTC with full management control and many o ther favourable concessions. As Mr Ingraham pointed out the very distribution of s hares violated the meaning of privatisation. With 49 per cent ownership, this meant that Bluewater was a private participant in what remained a state owned company. As Mr Ingraham said, the Christie-led Opposition had violated the term privatisation. Obviously, the Opposition did not fully graspt he meaning of the privatising exercise. For it to be a private company, the majority shares h ad to be held by individuals of whatever nationality who were not connected to the state. As long as government held the major ity shares, it remained a state owned enterprise. Privatisation would have failed. As far as the Ingraham government was concerned the days of state control was near i ng an end. Bahamians would now have more freedom of choice. T here were at least two companies in the bidding process that had a mix of Bahamians. But the Christie government, which had made such a big play about Bahamianisation had rejected them as did the Ingraham gov ernment. It makes one wonder who were the Bahamians embedded in the Bluewater deal that made it so important to the Christie government. This is a question that more and more Bahamians are asking. It is now time for it to be answered. We have a deal! was the cry when three men, one of them a Bluewater representative, returned to the meeting at the Finance Ministry whose deal, what were the terms and who were the partici pants? Mr Christie has promised Bahamians that if his government is returned to power, he will undo the Cable & Wireless sale and return its control to the Bahamian people. We think that with lower telecommunications rates, more choices in technology and improved services, the Bahamian people would prefer true ownership through the shares that they will eventually hold in the company, and which, as it prospers, will pay them real dividends. The so-called ownership that the Bahamian people held in BTC was no own ership at all it was only a euphemistic, nationalistic feel good term that can be brushed aside in the same way that a Bahamian preacher some time ago dismissed prin ciples they dont put bread on the table. Mr Christie, even as prime minister, would not undo this deal because, although possible, cost-wise it would be foolhardy and impractical. The Bahamian people would never agree to their money being spent so foolishly. Is there any future for a Bahamian? LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Prime Minister to meet with union leaders :$17('(;3(5,(1&(%22..((3(585*(17/<(('(' 352),&,(17,1,&.%22.6 $'0,1#+%60$5,1(&20 (;3(5,(1&(:(/'(5 $/80,1,80)$%5,&$7,21 $1',167$//(5(('(' RUHPDLOWR$'0,1#+%60$5,1(&20 EDITOR, The Tribune I watched and listened to a significant portion of the debate on BTC and I must declare thati n my humble opinion the PLP won the debate on the issues hands down. I came to that conclusion because I did not hear a compelling argument by any member of the FNM to justify the sale of 51 per cent of BTC to Cable and Wireless. All I heard from them were the sameo ld arguments that C&W will reduce rates, bring more efficient services and more quickly introduce new technology. I felt as if the PLP members successfully counteracted these arguments by demonstrating that Bahamians controlling BTC have the capacity toa chieve all of these objectives and more. I found the arguments by Perry Christie and Dr. Bernard Nottage regarding the dilapidated state the PLP found at BTC in 2002 and the upgraded state of BTC the FNM found in 2007 quite persuasive and winning. Moreover, the point they made that the FNM deliberately reduced the value of BTC to make it attractive to C&W was also forceful. I thought it unbelievable and disturbing that the FNM did nothing, did not even attempt to justify or explain all of the shenanigans with URCA. I would have thought that witha ll of the allegations of insider dealing and conflict of interest swirling around in the Bahamian society that the independent and autonomous (professionals) at URCA would have delayed their decision to approve the sale. Surely it would have been in the interesto f the government if the decision had been delayed and some of the allegations clari fied. Obviously the government felt that some self imposed deadline was more important. Now that the members of parliament have spoken and their votes recorded I wish Cable and Wireless luck for as long as they remain in the Bahamas. They should keep in mind that many, many Bahamiansf eel as if they own and control an industry that Bahamians ought to have. The PLP won the debate; they must now win the attention and imagination of the electorate. I wonder if the PLP's threat to open a com mission of inquiry about thes ale of BTC should they win the next election will be real. Mr. Christie the ball is now in your court. ERIC D. GARDNER ( And like many House of Assembly select committees, there it will die. Ed). The PLP won BTC debate now they must win imagination of electorate EDITOR, The Tribune. W hile all Bahamians will agree that the Bahamian judiciary is in serious need of repair, I personally believe that the court system in Harbour Island could serve as the "poster boy" for all that is wrong in the judiciary. Law schools could send students to sit in their courts (if the presiding judge will allow them learn what magistrates and lawyers should NOT do in court. Editorials have been written about them, many letters have appeared in the Press, and phone calls have been made to prominent politicians pleading for something to be done about the countless delays and absolute nonsense that takes up the time of the victims and witnesses resulting in the cases dragging on until, in most cases, the victims give up in frustration. Yet, nothing has been done and, in fact, it seems to be getting worse. A Louisiana Law Journal in 1842 stated: If it be admitted that the state does not prosecute vindictively, but merely to warn and hold up her punisments as a beacon to others, then it is a most important requisite, that the penalty should speedily follow the commission of crime. If in civil matters "Justice delayed is justice denied," in criminal cases tardy punishments are worse than useless. SIDNEY SWEETING, DDS Nassau, March 28, 2011. JUS TICE DELAYED IS JUSTICE DENIED

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SEVERALBahamian authors made book presentations to Education Minis ter Desmond Bannister. Pictured, from left, are: Ross Smith, superintendent in charge of high school curriculums; Dr Joan Rolle, edu cation officer, author of Mathematics in Motion; Desmond Bannister, Minis ter of Education; Milford Lockhart (Yes You Can-A Bahamian Perspective); and Tyrone Sawyer (Ventures in Verse). LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011, PAGE 5 7KHXEOLF:RUNHUV&RRSHUDWLYH &UHGLWQLRQ/LPLWHGLQYLWHV$OOPHPEHUVRIWKH&UHGLWQLRQWRWKH5HQDPLQJ&HUHPRQ\RIWKH&UHGLWQLRQVRIILFHEXLOGLQJWRWKH$UOLQJWRQ/LOOHU%XLOGLQJLQKRQRXU0U$UOLQJWRQ/LOOHU D QGWKH&UHGLWQLRQV%RDUGURRPEHLQJUHQDPHG LQKRQRXU WK DWWKH &UHGLWQLRQVIILFH%XLOGLQJ:XOIIRDG7KH ZLOOEHWKHNH\QRWHVSHDNHU&RPHDQGEHDSDUWRIWKLVKLVWRULFRFFDVLRQ :HEVLWHZZZSZFFXFRP POLICE are investigating three shootings which took place within hours of each other and left three men in hospital with gunshot wounds. T he first occurred around 5.20pm on M onday at Fox Dale Subdivision off Bernard Road. Responding officers were told that three men were in a house when they got into an altercation. One of them produced a shotgun and fired several times, hitting a 28year-old man in the body. T he victim was rushed to hospital by ambulance and is listed in stable condition. Then, just before 11pm that night, police were alerted to another shooting near the corner of Kemp and Parkgate Roads. Responding officers were told that three m en were walking on Parkgate Road when t hey were approached by a man armed w ith a handgun. T he culprit fired several shots hitting one o f them, a 23-year-old, twice in the stoma ch. The victim was rushed to hospital by ambulance, where he remains in stable condition. Then, at around 3.30am on Tuesday, police were called to the scene of a shooti ng in Homestead Street. A ccording to reports, a male resident of the area was outside his home when he heard gunshots. He suddenly realised that he had been shot in the left leg. The victim was taken to hospital in a private vehicle, and is listed in stable condition. Police are investigating all three incid ents. In other crime news, at around 4am on Tuesday, officers attached to Operation Rapid Strike along with officers of the Spring Break Unit executed a search warrant on a home in Maple Street, Pinewood G ardens. T he officers conducted a search and r ecovered a quantity of a substance susp ected to be marijuana. A 49-year-old man, who police believe is a Jamaican national, was taken into custody for questioning. POLICE are searching for Grand Bahamian Quentin Angelo Young in connection with an investigation into an alleged sex crime. The Grand Bahama division of t he Central Detective Unit has issued an all-points bulletin for the 35-year-old who is also known as Potato Head. Young is an upholsterer by profession. Standing about 6ft 1in tall and weighing around 160-170lbs, he is of dark brown complexion and has some unusual tattoos: a Bible and praying hands on his right arm. His place of birth is Grand Bahama and his last known address was 135 Regency Park in F reeport. The CDU warned that Young should be considered armed and dangerous and should only be approached with extreme caution. Anyone with information con cerning his whereabouts is asked to call police in Grand Bahama on: 352-9774/5, 350-3107/8 or 911 Three in hospital after shootings Bahamian authors present books to Education Minister Incidents happen within hours of each other POLICE SEEK MAN IN CONNECTION WITH AN ALLEGED SEX CRIME INVESTIGATION QUENTIN ANGELO YOUNG

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L OCAL NEWS P AGE 6, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011 THE TRIBUNE EXUMA Cultural d iversity in the Family I slands is allowing Bahamia n residents to offer tourists a variety of experiences during their visit to the islands. This, according to intern ational residents who have c hosen to make the Bahamas their home. We are being told now h ow much there was a d emand (for something new) because everyone who comes here tells us that they have been dying to come to a place like this, said Analia White-head of Uruguay. I guess we were lucky to find this place and have the energy and the will to do it, n o? We just thought that this community was amazi ng. The people are so friendly and the nature is o ut of this world. Mrs Whitehead, Hono rary Consul of Uruguay, who has represented her country in the Bahamas since 1992, is married to a Bahamian-American who h as roots in Austria. T he couple have four c hildren who were born in t he Bahamas. H er husband is a local c ontractor and was in Exuma as a member of the administrative team thatc onstructed the Four Sea sons Hotel. She and her family have recently opened a small caf calledD riftwood Caf in George Town, Exuma, across the street from the Local Gov-e rnment Administration c omplex. We started coming to G eorge Town in 2000 when they built the Four Seasons and we always wanted toh ave a little place that was a little bit different that offered a little bit of differ ent foods, said Mrs Whitehead. The time was right now and we were lucky to get t he right place and the last 3 0 days we have been very s uccessful. We hope to make this a l ittle centre which has little events like art shows and tea parties. Mrs Whitehead said she c omes from a small Latin American country and what she likes the most about the Bahamas are theg ood manners and social graces displayed by Bahamians. I like when people tell you good morning and t hat people here care about you and are willing to help you, like when your car b reaks down they go and g et cables for you. People are very sweet in this community and I thinki ts a nice way to live. The world is confused now, so if youre lucky to live in places like this, youre very fortunate, said Mrs Whitehead. Her caf offers healthy foods from Uruguay like e mpanadas, milanesa sandw iches, and steak sandwiches. H er partner is Bahamian a nd cooks some Bahamian dishes along with the inter national deli cuisine they will serve. T hey want to concentrate on making the caf a social centre in downtown GeorgeT own. Cultural diversity is becoming the local attraction in Exuma ANALIA WHITEHEAD Honorary C onsul for Uruguay since 1992, t alks about the nature of Exuma a nd the good manners of the people. LOCAL GOVERNMENT Administrator Ivan Ferguson sits quietly enjoying the serene atmosphere at Driftwood Caf. D RIFTWOOD CAFE i s in the heart of George Town across from the seat of Local Government. A PRESENTATIONon the Caribbean Challenge Initiative a region-wide conservation project that seeks to increase marine protection and create sustainable f inancing for protected area networks will be made today dur ing the Rotary Club of South east Nassau's weekly meeting. The meeting starts at 1pm at East Villa Restaurant and will feature a presentation by Eleanor Phillips. Ms Phillips is the Northern C aribbean director for the Nature Conservancys Caribbean programme. She has held this position since 2003. Based in Nassau, Ms Phillips leads a multi-disciplinary team that works in partnership with g overnment and non-governmental organisations in the Bahamas and Turks and Caicos Islands to achieve effective conservation of natural resources for those countries. She is currently leading efforts to develop a master plan for the Bahamas Protected Areas Sys-t em. Prior to joining the Conser vancy, she worked for the Bahamas governments Department of Fisheries for 11 years and managed two privately-own tilapia fish farms. She is also a founding member and past pres ident of the Bahamas Orchid Society. R OTARY C LUB N EWS

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SYNDICATED cartoonist Jim Toomey, whose Sherman's Lagoon comic strip appears in more than 250 newspapers in over 30 countries, is in the Bahamas this week to push for increased shark protections. The artistw ill speak at several public forums and will visit with school children in Long Island and Nassau. The Bahamas has something wonderful in its waters, something very few c ountries have, said Mr T oomey. Because the gove rnment banned longline fishing, the shark popula-t ions off the Bahamian coast a re still relatively healthy and the marine ecosystem is m ore intact here than almost any other place in the world. M r Toomeys cartoon features a great white shark t hat lives off a fictional i sland in the Palauan archi pelago. In the real world, theP acific island nation of Palau e stablished a sanctuary for t hese animals in 2009. More than 40 different kinds of sharks can be foundin Bahamian waters, including the whale shark, the great hammerhead and even great whites. Mr Toomey is joining efforts spearheaded by the Pew Environment Group and the Bahamas NationalT rust (BNT specific protections for the species; none currently exist. Under Jim Toomeys direction, Sherman and his friends confront all of the damage and indignities that we heap upon the underwat er environment, said Eric C arey, executive director of t he BNT. Beyond the cartoon p age, we need better marine p rotections so that the sharks can continue to keep our oceans healthy. That should start no other place but here in the Bahamas, he said. The waters of the B ahamas were once known for buried treasure and pirate ships, said Jill Hepp, m anager of Global Shark C onservation for the Pew E nvironment Group. But living treasure can now be found swimming freely int he ocean. Over the past 20 years, shark diving has gen erated US $800 million for the Bahamian economy. In protecting these animals, we protect the health of our oceans and our economies. W orldwide, up to 73 mill ion sharks are killed every y ear, primarily for their fins, w hich are valued for their u se in shark-fin soup, an A sian delicacy. As a result, 30 per cent of the worlds species are threatened or near-threatened with extinction. For an additional 47 per cent, scientists lack sufficient data to properly a ssess their population status. The Pew Environment G roup is the conservation a rm of The Pew Charitable T rusts, a non-governmental organisation that works globally to establish prag m atic, science-based policies that protect our oceans, pre serve our wildlands and pro mote clean energy. LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011, PAGE 7 Shark cartoonist joins the effort to protect sharks in the Bahamas MORE THAN 40 different kinds of sharks can be found in Bahamian waters. PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti Associated Press FORMERHaitian dictator Jean-Claude Duvalier was discharged Tuesday from a hospital in the country's capital where he was examined and treated for chest pains. Duvalier, known as "Baby Doc," shuffled unsteadily out the back door of the Canape Vert Hospital in a dark blue suit, shaking hands and waving at several dozen cheering supporters, mostly older men who served in the military or government under the former "president for life." "Since Jean-Claude Duvalier left the country has lost its values," said Wilson Alba, 58, who saluted Duvalier as police officers escorted him to a waiting car. The 59-year-old ex-dictator was admitted to the hospital Wednesday after complaining of chest pains. Family friends and associates have declined to discuss details of his health condition. "They ran all sorts of tests yesterday and he's OK," said family friend Enzo Alcindor. Baby Doc' Duvalier leaves hospital in Haiti

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L OCAL NEWS PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011 THE TRIBUNE SIXTEEN-year old-aspiring Chef Dwayne Sinclair of Temple Christian High School has emerged as the winner of the 19th annual Young Chef contest sponsored by Mahatma Rice and Robin Hood Flour. Dwayne also placed second in the New Providence senior finals which is a preliminary to the All Island Finals with Minister of Education Desmond Bann ister and president of the Bahamas Hotel Association Stuart Bowe attending to present the awards. In winning the 2011 overall senior championship Dwayne scored 539 points for the Best Robin Hood Flour Dish, "Sapodilla Apple Coconut Tart" a nd 544 points for the Best Mahatma Rice Dish, "Bahamian Crawfish Dippers." Placing second overall was Sherica Henfield of St Georges High School, Grand Bahama, with 468 points for her "Seashell Rice Pilaf" and 517 points for h er "Guava Stuffed Crepe Suzette." Third place went to Abigail Ferguson of South Andros High School with 481.5 points for her "Festive Rice with Bonefish Pattie" and 492 points for her "Guava and Coconut Pudding." Anthoneah Sturrup of Anat ol Rodgers High placed fourth with 432.5 points for Savoury Lobster Duff with Tomato Basil Chutney and 468 points for Tropical Rice Cheesecake Duo. In addition to medals, the National Young Senior Chef winners received cash prizes of $ 1,500 (first place), $750 (second place), $300 (third place) and $200 (fourth place Mahatma Rice and Robin Hood Flour. Also for the first time addi tional scholarship prizes were awarded to the highest placed graduating students, Anthoneah Sturrup of Anatol Rodgers High School (who also won the senior New Providence finals), and Jaquille Edgecombe of SC Boo tle High School. Munroe College awarded these two 12th grade students respectively with one full tuition fees scholarships valued at $48,000 and a half tuition fee scholarship worth $24,000. Chef Edwin Johnson, the head judge for the contest for the past 19 years, said: The competition is a great feeder programme, leading hundreds of youngsters into the culinary arts field. Im also pleased to see how the competition has grown and developed since its inception. Judges at the senior contest were Chef Johnson of Sapodillas Restaurant, Chef Don Ingraham of RIU; Chef Seanette Cooper of Sandals Resort, former educa tor and Ministry of Tourism executive Julia Burnside, manager of Test Kitchens for Mahatma Rice Debbie Jaramillo, and Chef Frank Constantino, dean of Culinary Progammes at Munroe College. In addition to providing almost $4,000 in prizes each year, the sponsors also provide trans portation to Nassau for each con testant with his or her teacher/coach, and cash stipends for teachers and contestants to assist with the purchase of supplies. Alfredo Gomez, senior business manager for Riviana Foods congratulated all of the competitors and teachers, stating that Mahatma Rice and Robin Hood Flour are pleased with the continued growth and success of the competition and pledge our continued support. Minister Bannister also praised those involved in the contest. I congratulate all the partici pants, parents and their teachers who came from throughout the Bahamas. I also would like to thank Sharon Ferguson and Kei th Parker for their continued efforts in making the competition a great success, and the sponsors Mahatma Rice and Robin Hood Flour for their con tinued support, he said. Temple Christian student crowned Senior National Champion Young Chef 2011 D WAYNE SINCLAIR o f Temple Christian displays winning Young Chef Dishes.Dwayne impressed the judges with his Sapodilla Apple Coconut Tart and Bahamian Crawfish Dippers. Photo/ Deanndra Ferguson, P.S. News/Features SHERICA HENFIELD of St George;s High School, Grand Bahama, placed second overall in the recent 19th Annual Young Chef contest sponsored by Mahatma Rice and Robin Hood Flour. Sher i ca, is shown as she begins her Robin Hood Flour Dish Guava Stuffed Crepes Suzette. P hoto/ K eith Parker P.S. News/Features DWAYNE SINCLAIRS Bahamian Crawfish Dippers.

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L OCAL NEWS P AGE 10, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011 THE TRIBUNE THEBAHAMAS VERYOWNSTREETPHILOSOPHER some 20 years as an FNM candidate and then for one term as an independent before losing his seat to Mr McCartney in 2007. "I was down there for 20 years and (as an independent) they voted me in once and after the first time they put me out. He been there for (about ain' develop the kind of relationship with the people down there (to win on his own)," Mr Wells said. However, Mr Wells had a few kind words for his for mer rival. "I wish him well," he said. Mr Wells resigned from Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham's Cabinet in 1999 and then launched a failed campaign for the leadership of the FNM. Although he remained an FNM, Mr Wells became increasingly disgruntled with the party's leader. During his last year as an FNM MP, Mr Wells leveled serious charges of alleged corruption and wastage of public money against the leadership of the party. He became an independent candidate in the lead up to the 2002 election race, beating the FNM's candidate the PLP did not offer a candidate. The former attorney gen eral also scoffed at reports that Mr McCartney has raised between $3 million to $25 million to mount a campaign under the banner of a new third party. "If you know politics in the Bahamas, you know that no one can raise that kind of money," he said. PLP Chairman Bradley Roberts was also in disbe lief over Mr McCartney's reported campaign financing. "I applaud him if he's able to raise that kind of money, that kind of money has nev er been raised to my knowledge," Mr Roberts said yesterday. "I'm sure he's caus ing the FNM some discontent." Both the PLP and FNM have said they will run candidates in the area against the newly independent candidate, both major parties say they expect to win. When asked to weigh in on Mr McCartney's chances as a third party candidate and the possible threat to established political parties Mr Roberts said a well-fund ed campaign does not always turn into votes at the polls. "We'll have to just wait and see. There's a lot of talk and like the old saying goes, talk is cheap but money buys land, (with that kind of money) he'll get a lot of land but will that transfer into votes? "Bahamians are known to take your money and say 'Thanks very much' and that's it. And buying votes is against the law, as an MP in Parliament for (many I have never been in a posi tion where I have responded to any requests for money for votes. Buying people's votes is a form of slavery as far as I'm concerned." SEE PUSHIN DA ENVELOPE ON PAGE TWO ANDMORE NEWSONPAGE THREE At the meeting, which was scheduled to be held at Mr McCartneys home on John F Kennedy Drive,M r Wells said that the NDP will have 14 persons present, including himself, as representative from the Bahamas Democratic Movement.O ther notable young politicians are reported to be attending. Mr Wells said that his party has d ecided to send such a large cont ingent because they represent the heads of a number of their internal committees and must relate what transpired with first hand knowl e dge. Actually I am taking a lot of people who support Mr McCartney so they can hear from him as to what is what, and then they canm ake up their minds based on w hat they currently believe and are willing to accept. Because at the end of the day, the others havem ade their position quite known, t his is what it is, he must come to the NDP and they are not chang ing from that at all. And they have said they dont w ant to go. This is our position and we are not changing that, he said. M r Wells said that based on what happens at the meeting last night he may have to work on these party members if the NDP intends to move in the direction of aligning itself with Mr McCartney. I f the Bamboo Town MP were t o join with the NDP and lead the organization, Mr Wells said that they will hold a convention within3 0 days so that this decision can b e made by their entire organiza tion. There are even people in the NDP already who would want him( Mr McCartney) for leadership; most certainly. I believe that at the end of the day, those persons noto nly support Bran being the leader of the party, they support it being done the right way. I dont want people to believe that Renward Wells is a megalomaniac. I am willing of Bran being the leader in the House of Assem b ly because he is the only one t here. Undoubtedly I can tell you that if I run against him (for the leadership) he will more than like l y win. But this isnt about me. This i s about the Bahamian people. If they believe that Bran is the best man to make that change, I will grab my shield and follow him intob attle, he said. As a relatively new political organization, Mr Wells said thatt he NDP has already faced its share of challenges namely the departure of its former national chairman Dr Andre Rollins. However, he said that because their party is grounded in its message and principles, they have sur v ived. A political party must not be about a man, it must be about the message. It cant be about the per s on, it must be about the princip le. You cannot have an idol, you must have an ideology. Men and women will come and go, but the truth and the message will remain.W hen you create parties around men, they fail; look at the CDR (Coalition for DemocraticR eform). The NDP will and can not join any institution that is built around a man, he said. declares it a no-shooting zone, they cant do anything. No-shooting zones are d esignated by the Bahamas National Trust and serve to create protected areas for b irds and wildlife. S peaking generally on the issue, Superintendent Paul R olle, of Carmichael Road P olice Station, explained the a reas once reserved for hunting were now being developed. S upt Rolle said: Also sometimes persons were given land for one purpose but it is not being used for that p urpose, instead they are building homes. So there are homes close to the areas that w ere reserved for hunting. A ccording to police, the p igeon-hunting season runs from November to April. I n a letter to the Comm issioner of Police dated September 24, 1984, Bishop H art detailed his concerns t hat his farm was being used a s a gun range. The letter read: Five men stood at the entranceof my farm and shot across it for about two hours. [Worke r] is unhappy working u nder this condition and my children do not care to go there anymore on Saturdaysb ecause when they do, pellets are falling all over their heads. The letter continued: I b eg that something be done before a fatal incident occurs. The area should be u sed for shooting or farmi ng, but not both. B ishop Hart said his frustrations peaked on Mondayw hen he discovered 19 c hickens shot dead on the farmland he leases from the government. He said: The chickens are from the neighbouring farm, sometimes they get out and they wander into my f arm. I counted 19, they had a lready started to decomp ose so I didnt go further back, they were scattered all over the place. Bishop Hart added: They can go out and use m y trees as targets. You d ont know who is out there with guns, they could be criminals. One time I mett hree men, all armed, I asked them to stop shooting on my property and they just looked at me, didnt say a nything. Supt Rolle added: If its a private property and t heyre shooting on the f arm, come to us, officers w ill go there. We have confiscated weapons from per-s ons that were found in t hose areas. F ROM page one Elderly minister battles armed trespassers for 20 years BISHOP NEVILLE HART shows a bullet-ridden sign from his farm NDP leader: its time for a third party in Bahamas FROM page one T ennyson Wells: my Bran verdict I I w w a a s s d d o o w w n n t t h h e e r r e e f f o o r r 2 2 0 0 y y e e a a r r s s a a n n d d ( ( a a s s a a n n i i n n d d e e p p e e n n d d e e n n t t ) ) t t h h e e y y v v o o t t e e d d m m e e i i n n o o n n c c e e a a n n d d a a f f t t e e r r t t h h e e f f i i r r s s t t t t i i m m e e t t h h e e y y p p u u t t m m e e o o u u t t . H H e e b b e e e e n n t t h h e e r r e e f f o o r r ( ( a a b b o o u u t t ) ) f f i i v v e e y y e e a a r r s s , h h e e a a i i n n ' d d e e v v e e l l o o p p t t h h e e k k i i n n d d o o f f r r e e l l a a t t i i o o n n s s h h i i p p w w i i t t h h t t h h e e p p e e o o p p l l e e d d o o w w n n t t h h e e r r e e ( ( t t o o w w i i n n o o n n h h i i s s o o w w n n ) ) . T ennyson Wells FROM page one

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INTERNATIONAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011, PAGE 11 WASHINGTON Associated Press AS THE United States and other nations build ties with rebels and political opponents trying to oust Libyan strongman Moammar Gadhafi, intelligence suggests al-Qaida and other terrorists have a small presence within the opposition group, a top mili-tary commander said Tuesday. A dm. James Stavridis, the NATO Supreme Allied Commander in Europe, told Congress that officials have seen "flickers" of possible al-Qaida and Hezbollah involvement among the rebel forces, but no evidence of significant numbers within the political o pposition group's leader ship. Asked about the terrorist connection, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton told reporters in London that "we don't know as much as we would like to know" about the opposition forces. But shea lso said there is no informa tion about specific individuals from terror organizations that are part of the rebel force. "We're building an understanding, but at this time obviously it is, as I say, a work in progress," she said. Clinton added that inter national leaders have madeno decisions about arming the rebels, but talked Tuesday about providing non-lethal assistance including funds to keep them going. Questions about who the rebels are have escalated as the U.S.-led coalition moved into its second week of attacks against Gadhafi forces, halting their progressand paving the way for the ragtag opposition to regain lost ground. At this point, Stavridis said, there is "more than a reasonable chance of Gadhafi leaving." Despite those assertions, however, Stavridis and other U.S. officials have yet to articulate an end game for the operation, despite repeated criticism from Congress that the mission has not been clearly defined. "As you look at the spectrum of how this unfolds it's premature to say what is our exit strategy," Stavridis told the Senate Armed Services Committee, adding that events are too fluid right now. In London, Clinton met with Mahmoud Jibril, a representative of the Libyan political opposition fighting Gadhafi, "to talk about the path forward." And she implored an international conference meeting on the Libya's future to band together to free the North African nation from Gadhafi's grip and persuade his loyalists to abandon the regime. Solution She told reporters that the U.S. is not ruling out a political solution in Libya that could include Gadhafi leav ing the country, but acknowl edged there is no timeline and it appears the Libyan leader has made no decisions about his future. A senior administration official said the U.S. will soon send an envoy to Libya to deepen relations with leaders of the rebels. But the official, who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss internal planning, said the meeting doesn't constitute formal recognition of the opposition. Eleven days into a military assault that has cost the Pentagon roughly $550 million so far, the U.S. was in the process of turning over control of the mission to NATO in the next day or two. The U.S. military, however, is likely to continue to play a significant role in the operation, including continued airstrikes, intelligence gathering, electronic warfare and aerial refueling. The military has insisted that it is not coordinating attacks with the rebels to help advance their offensive, but simply working to protect the people. But the strikes paved the way for the rebels to regain a key city over the weekend, and begin again their march west toward Gadhafi strongholds. Overnight Monday, for example, U.S. ships and submarines unleashed a barrage of 22 Tomahawk cruise missiles at Libyan missile stor age facilities in the Tripoli area, said a defense official, speaking on condition of anonymity to discuss military details. That total raised to well over 200 the number of Tomahawks launched at Libya since the Western military intervention began March 19. President Barack Obama told the American people Monday night that U.S. inter vention in Libya was neces sary to prevent a slaughter of civilians. But he also said that ousting Gadhafi militarily would be a mistake, and suggested that the diplomatic road to his removal was the path to take. Addressing officials from more than three dozen countries at the London confer ence, Clinton said military means alone won't force Gadhafi out after about 42 years in power, and that further sanctions and diplomatic pressure ought to be applied. All of us must continue to increase the pressure on and deepen the isolation of the Gadhafi regime through other means as well," Clinton said at the London conference. "All of us seated around this table must speak with one voice in support of at ransition that leads to a brighter future for Libya." Members of Congress, meanwhile, continued to express concerns about the cost of the mission. The $550 million figure on the initial U.S. costs is not complete because it does not include such money as payf or U.S. sailors, airmen and other forces who would have been deployed somewhere in the world anyway. But it is the first official figure released on the cost of setting up the no-fly zone in Libya and protecting civil ians. O f that total, about 60 percent was "for munitions, the remaining costs are for higher operating tempo" of U.S. forces and of getting them there, Cmdr. Kathleen Kesler, a Pentagon spokes woman, said Tuesday. She said officials expect to spend about $40 million overt he next three weeks as U.S. forces are reduced, and then see that level of costs continue monthly as the operation goes on. Obama announced Monday that NATO would take command over the entire Libya operation on Wednes d ay, and Stavridis told senators the U.S. transfer of con trol would be in 24-48 hours. The turnover would keep Obama's pledge to get the U.S. out of the lead fast, but neither could estimate when the conflict might end. The US launches a new missile barrage at Libya A LIBYAN m an inspects destroyed military vehicles that belonged to pro Gadhafi forces at the site of a N ATO air strike on the outskirts of Benghazi, Libya Tuesday, March 29, 2011. International military f orces are using words as well as weapons to try to weaken the grip of Libyan strongman Moammar Gadhafi and urge his troops to turn against him. (AP SECRETARY OF STATE Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks during a news conference at the Foreign and Commonwealth office in London, Tuesday, March 29, 2011, after attending the London Conference onL ibya. (AP Top military commander says intelligence suggests al-Qaida, other terrorists have small presence within opposition group DAMASCUS, Syria Associated Press FACING an extraordinary wave of popular dissent, Syrian President Bashar Assad fired his Cabinet on Tuesday and promised to end widely despised emergency laws concessions unlikely to appease protesters demanding sweeping reforms in one of the most hard-line nations in the Middle East. The overtures, while largely symbolic, are a moment of rare compromise in the Assad family's 40 years of iron-fisted rule. They cameas the government mobilized hundreds of thousands of supporters in rallies in the capital and elsewhere, in an effort to show it has wide popular backing. Nearly every aspect of Syrian society is monitored and controlled by the security forces, and the feared secret police crush even the smallest rumblings of opposition. Draconian laws have all but eradicated civil liberties and political freedoms. But with the protests that erupted on March 18, thousands of Syrians appear to have broken through a barrier of fear in this tightly controlled nation of 23 million. "Syria stands at a crossroads," said Aktham Nuaisse, a leading human rights activist. "Either the president takes immediate, drastic reform measures, or the country descends into one of several ugly scenarios. If he is will ing to lead Syria into a real democratic transformation, he will be met halfway by the Syrian people," Nuaisse said. Protest The coming days will be key to determining whether Assad's concessions will quiet the protest movement, which began after security forces arrested several teenagers who scrawled anti-government graffiti on a wall in the impoverished city of Daraa in the south. The protests spread to other provinces and the government launched a swift crackdown, killing more than 60 people since March 18, according to Human Rights Watch. However, the violence has eased in the past few days and some predict the demonstrations might quickly die out if the president's promises appear genuine. "People are tired from all this pressure and violence and I think if he (Assad might stop," said a protester in Daraa who gave only his first name, Ibrahim, for fear of reprisals by security forces. "We're all waiting for his speech." Still, tensions remained high in Daraa, where several hundred people were still staging a sit-in Tuesday, and in the Mediterranean port of Latakia, which has a potentially volatile mix of different religious groups. Assad, who inherited power 11 years ago from his father, appears to be following the playbook of other autocratic leaders in the regionwho scrambled to put down popular uprisings by using both con cessions and brutal crackdowns. The formula failed in Tunisia and Egypt, where popular demands increased almost daily until people accepted nothing less than the ouster of the regime. Syria offers concessions amid wave of unrest

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I NTERNATIONAL NEWS PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011 THE TRIBUNE New Offering March 2011 Subscribe for Shares inCommonwealth Brewery LimitedInitial Public Offeringof$62,475,0007,500,000 Ordinary Shares Minimum Subscription $833.00 for 100 shares at $8.33 per share Offer OpensMonday March 21st, 2011Offer ClosesFriday April 15th, 2011Offering Memorandum & Subscription form available from all locations of:Royal Fidelity, RBC Royal Bank, RBC FINCO, &Fidelity Bank or downloaded from:www.royaldelity.comFinancial Advisor & Placement AgentFor further information call:1.242.356.9801Read the Offering Memorandum and consult a nancial advisor before investing. TOKYO Associated Press JAPAN'Sgovernment admitted Tuesday that its safeguards were insufficient to protect a nuclear plant against the earthquake and tsunami that crippled the facility and caused it to spew radiation, and it vowed to overhaul safety standards. The struggle to contain radiation at the Fukushima Dai-ichi complex has unfolded with nearconstant missteps the latest including two workers drenched with radioactive water despite wearing supposedly waterproof suits. The March 11 tsunami that slammed into Japan's northeast, wiping out towns and killing thousands of people, knocked out power and backup systems at the coastal nuclear power plant. More than 11,000 bodies have been recovered, but officials say the final death toll is expected to exceed 18,000. Hundreds of thousands of people remain homeless, their homes and livelihoods destroyed. Damage could amount t o $310 billion the most expensive natural disaster on record. The unfolding drama has drawn increasing criticism of the utility that owns the plant as well as scrutiny of Japan's preparedness for nuclear crises. "Our preparedness was not sufficient," Chief Cabinet secretary Yukio Edano told reporters. "When the current crisis is over, we must examine the accident closely and thoroughly review" the safety standards. An Associated Press investigation found that Tokyo Electric Power Co. officials had dismissed scientific evidence and geological history that indicated that a massive earthquake and subsequent tsunami was far more likely than they believed. That left the complex with nowhere near enough protection against the tsunami. The mission to stabilize the power plant has been fraught with setbacks, as emergency crews have dealt with fires, explosions and radiation scares in the frantic bid to prevent a complete meltdown. The plant has been leaking radiation that has made its way into vegetables, raw milk and tap water as far away as Tokyo. Residents within 12 miles (20 kilometers) of the plant have been ordered to leave and some nations have banned the imports of food products from the Fukushima region. Highly toxic plutonium was the latest contaminant found seeping into the soil outside the plant, TEPCO said Monday. Safety officials said the amounts did not pose a risk to humans, but the finding supports suspicions that dangerously radioactive water is leaking from damaged nuclear fuel rods. "The situation is very grave," Edano said. Workers succeeded last week in reconnecting some parts of the p lant to the power grid. But as they pumped in water to cool the reactors and nuclear fuel, they discovered numerous pools of radioactive water, including in the basements of several buildings and in trenches outside. The contaminated water has been emitting four times as much radiation as the government considers safe for workers. It must be pumped out before electricity can be restored and the regular cooling systems powered up. That has left officials struggling with two crucial but contradictory efforts: pumping in water to keep the fuel rods cool and pumping out contaminated water. Officials are hoping tanks at the complex will be able to hold the water, or that new tanks can be trucked in. On Tuesday, officials from the Nuclear Safety Commission said other possibilities include digging a storage pit for the contaminated water, recycling it back into the reactors or even pumping it to an offshore tanker. The latest problem came Tuesday, when three workers trying to connect a pump outside the Unit 3 reactor were splashed by radioactive water that gushed from a pipe. Though they wore s uits meant to be waterproof and protect against high levels of radi ation, nuclear safety official Hidehiko Nishiyama said the men were soaked to their underwear with the contaminated water. They quickly washed it off and were not injured, officials said. Japan: Not enough safeguards in place to protect nuke plant I N THIS p hoto taken Wednesday, March 16, 2011 and released by Tokyo Electric Power Co. via Kyodo News Friday, smoke billows from wrecked unit 3 at Japan's crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okumamachi, Fukushima Prefecture. Tokyo Electric Power Co. via Kyodo News /AP

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B y ALISON LOWE Business Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net It wll be nigh on impossible for the Bahamas Petro leum Company (BPC t he go-ahead to begin oil drilling in this nation within this parliamentary term, the M inister of the Environment revealed yesterday, confirm ing that the Governments moratorium on drilling will n ot be lifted any time soon. Earl Deveauxs statement may halt the meteoric rise ofB PCs share price over the last year and a half, given that it reveals the companys stated target date for oil drilling o f early 2012 as rather unre alistic. BPCs share price has risen f rom 3.12 pence at its launch on June 17, 2010, on the Alternative Investment Mar ket (AIM press time yesterday, just shy of the high of 25.06 pence on February 4, 2011. The price level appears to have received a major boost after the company charged in a December 2010 investor presentation that it was aiming for a 2011 fourth quarter start date to drill. In several presentations to investors, BPC has called the Bahamas a giant oil province in the making, suggesting that its research has revealed that there are super giant oil fields in Bahamian waters that it can tap. Most recently, in a March investor presentation, BPC said it now expects to begin drilling in the first quarter of 2012. However, the company and its investors will have to wait somewhat longer than that, according to Mr Deveaux. Its not very likely that this legislation...well its nigh impossible for this [the pass ing of legislation relating to oil drilling] to be accommodated within this Parliament, said the Minister. He reiterated that the suspension of consideration of applications for licenses to explore and drill for oil, which the Government put in place in August 2010 after the Deep Water Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico threatened Bahamian waters, remains in place until such time as this nation has the most rigid protocols in place to govern SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69T he information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held r esponsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $5.10 $5.12 $5.11 [Learn more at royaldelity.com] Royal Fidelity Margin LoansWant To Own More Shares In...BenetsCommonwealth Brewery? OFFER VALID through April 15th, 2011*SpecialtermsandconditionsapplyBAHAMASNassau:242.356.9801 Freeport:242.351.3010BARBADOSSt.Michael:246.435.1955 B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor Leading Bahamian investment analysts h ave raised concerns over Commonwealth Brewerys 100 per cent net income dividend payout policy, questioning whether it was sustainable and could detract from capital investment, and if it indicated Heineken saw limited long-term growth opportunities for t he company. W hile many still rate Commonwealth Brewerys $62.5 million initial public offering (IPO an investors, given the portfolio diversification provided b y the vertically integrated manufacturer/brewer, most have told Tribune Business they view it largely as a dividend Concern over Brewerys 100% dividend policy Top analysts question if sustainable, given that $26m payout in 2010 was 112% of net income and 130% of o perating earnings But IPO still seen as Buy, given industrial diversification and strong dividend yield* Questions over growth opportunity financing Plant use at 58%, after 66% and 63% use in past two years SEE page 5B K EN KERR By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor E xecutives from a multi-billion dollar Cayman Islands d eveloper last night arrived in Nassau for a week of meetings that not only aims to develop their existing downt own Nassau properties, but a lso includes talks with property owners whose real estate h oldings were damaged by t he recent fire that destroyed the Betty K building. Senior executives involved with the Downtown Nassau P artnership (DNP Streets redevelopment yes terday confirmed the arrival o f Dart Group representatives into Nassau, suggesting the meetings with property owners hit by the recent fire were exploratory in nature, n otwithstanding the developers long-term interest in the p rime waterfront property that will be freed up once the shipping companies relocate to Arawak Cay later this year. C harles Klonaris, the D NPs co-chairman, told Tribune Business: The Dart G roup is coming in this e vening. Theyre going to meet with all the property owners, and get a feeling for what they want to do. I unders tand thats going to take place this week. I dont know whats in the m inds of the property owners, so this meeting will really open up the books and let us know what the views of the property owners and The D art Group are. Vaughn Roberts, the D NPs managing director, added: I am aware a couple of people from Dart are in town this week, primarily with r egard to advancing develop m ent of the two properties they own at the corner of Bay S treet and Parliament Streets. T hey own the properties there, and they have meetings lined up with the Office of the Prime Minister. H e acknowledged, though, that given its interest in prime Top developer set to meet fire-hit owners n Multi-billion dollar Dart Groups officials in Nassau for meetings with Govt, property owners hit by Bay Street fire n Seeking to develop existing Bay and Parliament Street properties, too n Plans could act as catalyst to inspire other downtown Nassau businesses and real estate owners SEE page 4B NIGH ON IMPOSSIBLE FOR OIL DRILLING N OD BEF ORE NEXT ELECTION SEE page 5B EARLDEVEAUX By ALISON LOWE B usiness Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net M ovement through the new US Departures Termi nal at the Lynden Pindling International Airport( LPIA) has been strained for some travellers by problems with the high-tech baggage security system, which a ims to link passengers to their checked-in luggage. Nassau Airport Develop ment Company (NAD spokesperson, Shonalee King-Johnson, said the airport operator was not aware of any major issues affect ing traveller flow through the airport and on to flights to the US. However, she said passengers travelling during peak hours 12pm to 3pm are advised to arrive at the airport three, rather than the usual two hours, in advance of their flights departure to be sureof making their flights. But Airport Authority chairman, Frank Watson, said he had heard about issues at the outset of the terminals launch on March 16 relating to passengers being delayed due to bag gage security issues. However, he believed this has now been resolved. A source with knowledge of the US Customs and Border Protection (CBP cys pre-clearance opera tions at the airport said that department is well aware of the situation and trying to work through it. We're looking at ways to make it faster. It's just a matter of a variety of teams working together and get ting used to this system and the new procedures, and we hope everyone can bear with us, the source said. Tribune Business understands that difficulties appearto be arising at the stage where airline representatives are checking in passengers with their bags. Under the new security system imple Baggage woes impact airpor t SEE page 8B B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor T he argument over whether Cable & WirelessC ommunications (CWC s hould own 51 per cent or 49 p er cent of the Bahamas Telecommunications Com pany (BTC f ormer Bahamas Chamber of Commerce president said y esterday, because either way it will still have Board a nd management control at the privatised carrier. Telling Tribune Business t hat CWC was absolutely the right partner for BTC, Dionisio DAguilar, who is 51/49 BTC debate is irrelevant Questions why the PLP getting hung up on issue D IONISIO DAGUILAR SEE page 6B By ALISON LOWE Business Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net A government technical committee is reviewing five bids received for the management of New Providences government-owned landfill and garbage collection services, and for the implementation of a waste-to-energy facility to feed off it. Minister of the Environment, Earl Deveaux, said the technical review committee received the details of the bids three dealing with the management of the landfill and garbage collection services, and two with the waste-to-energy project around two weeks ago. Within ten days, that committee is anticipated to give its recom mendations on the way for ward. The bids are part of the Governments plans to privatise solid waste management, and find ways to limit the amount of waste stored at the Tonique Williams-Darling highway land fill. The two contracts were previously deemed to go hand-inhand, with any company involved in implementing a waste-to-energy, garbage recycling program at the landfill which would serve the dual pur poses of waste disposal and SEE page 4B FIVE LANDFILL BIDS IN REVIEW

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By RICHARD COULSON T he recentlylaunched offering of 7.5 million shares of Commonwealth Brewery, 25 per cent of its equity capital, presents one of our largest companies as a well-run, profitable, debt-free enterprise with longestablished product lines effectively marketed to the Bahamian consumer. But a full understanding of Commonwealth Brewery was somewhat marred by a poorly organised Offering Memorandum, together with simultaneous press stories carrying improper sales talk that can only confuse potential investors.. Instead of giving a key-points summary of the companys business and finances, the Memorandum scatters them indiscriminately through the document: The informative Management Discussion and Analysis is buried after pages of boiler-plate. On its cover, the Memorandum bears the usual edict that no person has been authorised to give any informationother than through this Offering Memorandum, which did not deter C chief executive LeRoy Archer from articulating a jumble of facts to The Tribune. The restrictive edict should be strictly obeyed in a public offering that is reviewed by unsophisticated investors. These shortcomings were mitigated by two excellent and well-attended public meetings, where speeches and a Term Sheet hit the essential highlights. But not all investors could attend these events, so lets repeat some of the fundamentals. At the offering price of $8.33 per share, the gross proceeds will be about $62.5 million. This offering is not a new issue, since the proceeds (after issue expenses) will immediately be turned over to Heineken, Commonwealth Brewerys parent company, which had previously owned the shares being offered. The offering will not result i n any addition to Commonwealths shareholder capital, or any increase or dilution of pershare equity. There will be no change whatever in the companys financial resources, except that it will pay the $1.880 million issue expenses. Successful T he vompany has been successful in running three vertically integrated operations: brewery production of Heineken, Kalik, Guinness and Vitamalt, Kalik being a true Bahamian beer that is beginning to catch on in the US; wholesale distribution; and retail sales through a wide network of stores that offer most of the accepted brands of beer, wines and spirits. In 2010, these three business segments generated $109 million in sales, down about 4 per cent from the two years ago, and operating income of $20 million, up about 35 per cent. The drop in sales clearly resulted from the recession and decline in tourist activity, while the impressive increase in earnings seems attributable to an aggressive cost-cutting campaign, for which management should be congratulated. The technical and marketing expertise from the worldwide Heineken group continued to make positive contributions. If, as seems likely, we have reached the bottom of the economic cycle, the drop in demand for the companys products may have levelled off and could be set to rise in 2011 and future years, with an obvi ous positive effect on Commonwealth Brewerys finances. The Memorandum underlines as a major risk to profitability the increasing trend of illegal imports that circumvent import duties a factor beyond thec ompanys control that depends on more vigorous Government enforcement. Mr. Archer told the press that the brewery is operating at only 60-65 per cent of capacity. Does this startling disclosure, not found in the Memorandum, suggest problems in the production process, or rather the growth available if demand picks up? The Memorandum mentions the risk of higher duties and excise taxes, stating that $22.6 million was charged in 2010, while Mr. Archer laments that the figure was $29 million.. Whom do we believe? With regard to major competition, he tells us that he could sit down and cry at contem plating the duty-free imports enjoyed by Sands Brewery in Freeport, yet the Memorandumd oes not even mention that company. He also targets high electricity costs in Trinidad and Panama, where beer sells for $0.50 per bottle; the Memorandum says nothing about these markets. Mr Archer does a fine job as manager but should keep his tongue in control on investor relations. Two things are crucial to investors: dividend yield and capital appreciation. The Mem orandum tells us that the companys present policy is to distribute 100 per cent of net income as dividends, and that based on 2010 earnings this would give an attractive 7.7 per cent yield on the $8.33 offering price. Correct, but 100 per cent p ay-out is pretty rare for any company and leaves no free cash flow available to cover unexpected contingencies or any desirable acquisitions. The directors are not committed to follow this policy, and can reduce the pay-out whenever they deem prudent. And, of course, earnings may decline, so the 7.7 per cent is not in any sense guaranteed. Possible capital appreciation depends first on investing at the right price, usually based on a price-to-earnings ratio (P/E The Memorandum gives 2010 earnings per share of $0.74, but says nothing about the crucial P/E figure, which can be calculated as a reasonable 11.3X ($8.33/$0.74 This is attractive, since it is a 15 per cent discount from the average 13.3X for BISX Tier I companies. Its unfortunate that this key comparison, so significant to investors, did not appear in the Memorandum itself but was only given by Michael Anderson, president of RoyalFidelity, in his loquacious Tribune interview. Perhaps the largest risk for investors arises not from the company itself but from poor liquidity in our capital markets... The Memorandum warns: An active secondary marketm ay not develop for the shares. Quite true, but this statement represents an indictment of our whole inter-linked securities industry, not simply BISX, which even after 10 years struggles with low revenues, largely resulting from the Ministry of Finance endlessly delaying its trading in public bonds. T hus it cannot undertake sorely-needed publicity and investor education. For contrast, look at the highly informative website of the Jamaica Stock Exchanger, operating in a country with lower per capita wealth than the Bahamas. The indictment must also include our Securities Commission, with its lax enforcem ent and Government inertia in giving it more statutory powers; our institutional investors, who rarely seem to provide market support by buying undervalued securities; and our four broker/dealers members of BISX who take little interest in active market-making in listed shares, merely posting buyo r sell orders. With the limited number of issuers and publicly held shares, we will never enjoy the instant trading, in both up and down markets, found in New York or London and other mature financial centres, but we must move in that direction. Askew S omething is seriously askew when the figures on the BISX website show Commonwealth Bank, possibly our strongest company, with 1 76,226 shares up for sale at $7, and zero shares listed for buy at any price! In any normal market, professional market makers would step in to clear this imbalance at least partially. We noted Mr Andersons quoted remarks, hopefully speculating that the size and quality of the Brewery issue will reignite interest in our stock markets. Why does not RoyalFidelity contribute to this optimism by offering to make a market in the new issue, to stand ready to buy or sell a reasonable number of shares at prices that it determines? The firm is slated to earn a fee of $1.25 million for handling this offering without taking any underwriting risk, since Government commits to buy any unsold shares. Surely a portion of this guaranteed compensation could be devoted to secondary market support, but nothing of the kind is indicated. In short, an investor will have no trouble buying a share of this successful company, but he cannot count on selling it, through Royal Fidelity or any of the other three securities firms, Colina, FamGuard or Colonial. We wonder if the Govern ment will take steps to encourage greater market liquidity for its own share offerings later this year BTC and the Arawak Cay Port Company which it clearly wants to distribute to our legendary little man, who often needs to sell in a pinch. B USINESS P AGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011 THE TRIBUNE 3XUVXDQWWRWKHSURYLVLRQVRI6HFWLRQRI7KH ,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV&RPSDQLHV1RWLFHLVKHUHE\ JLYHQWKDW Df%/,6+,1*$1'%52$'&$67,1*/,1(7:2 /,0,7('LVLQGLVVROXWLRQ WKHGDWHRIFRPPHQFHPHQWRIWKHGLVVROXWLRQZDV 7KHQDPHRIWKH/LTXLGDWRULV(':$5'7851(5 RI (':$5'7851(53(7521$+286( )2:/(5675((7($67%$<675((73%2; Sound company, but market may brew up trading issues

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B USINESS P AGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011 THE TRIBUNE Top developer set to meet fire-hit owners Bay Street waterfront property and the long-term development of downtown Nassau, it was natural for the Dart Group to meet with owners of the properties and reale state destroyed in the Valentines Day fire. I would think they would, since they have a long-term view of Nassau and larger opportunities further than what they have now. Theyvem ade several trips here over t he last few years, and have w alked the entire length of Bay Street, so Im sure theyre a ware of the opportunities, M r Roberts told Tribune B usiness. The Dart Group acquired its real estate holdings on thec orner of Bay and Parliament Streets last year from Philip H illiers Parliament Propert ies, in a deal that raised conc erns among some Bahamian p roperty owners and retailers in the immediate vicinity, as they feared a foreign company might move into a sector retail that was normallyr eserved for Bahamian ownership only. The acquisition, though, was always viewed as a footi n the door and prelude to the Dart Group taking a much bigger, and wider, strategic role in downtown Nassaus overall redevelopment, possibly developing prime waterfront real estate.T he Dart Group has already done something similar in the Cayman Islands with its 500acre Camana Bay project. Mr Roberts yesterday suggested that The Dart Groups i nvolvement in downtown N assaus redevelopment, even i f it just involved its existing p roperties, could be pretty significant for the overall r egeneration effort by acting a s a catalyst to inspire other property owners and businesses to do likewise. Noting the Governments p ublic sector works efforts to enhance Parliament and Raw s on Squares, plus upgrade i nfrastructure such as water and sewerage lines and road p aving, Mr Roberts told Tribune Business: Its a mattero f now inspiring the private p roperty owners around new investment, a new city, and t hat has to be demonstrated by projects such as Graycliffs, the Klonariss and Dart, tog et other properties excited as well. Graycliff has unveiled plans to move forward with the $20 million redevelopment of West Hill Street, and Mr Roberts said the prioritiesf or this year, as far as the DNP was concerned, were too finalise the pedestrianisation of several downtown Nassau sidestreets and the conversion of the existing S traw Market site into a green s pace once the new building w as ready. D escribing these projects as significant in terms of i mpact, Mr Roberts said the D NP had been talking with the property owners impacted by the Valentines Day fire to develop short-term solut ions that are a win-win for everybody. T he DNP had helped to e nsure the Bahamas Electric ity Corporation (BEC r epaired a transformer, in a bid to get companies in thea rea operational as rapidly as p ossible. Access to the exposed site was also being r estricted. FROM page 1B energy generation wishing to be assured of a guaranteed amount of properly managed waste coming into their conversion facility. Speaking of the Governments desire to see the management of the landfill and related services privatised, and subject to improved efficiency, Mr Deveaux said the Government would have liked the transition to take place yesterday, adding, however, that we dont always get what we wish for. Sear ch The Government initiated a search for new management for the landfill following the major dump fire that took place in early 2010. This cre ated an environmental hazard for people living in nearby residential areas. The Government also wants to expand the lifecycle of the landfill through better management, being keenly aware of the shrinking space left at the site. Speaking of the work of the review committee, Dr Deveaux said: There area number of issues to resolve: current staff, current equipment, the work that has to be done with respect to collection and the expertise required for management of landfill, both int erms of ongoing management as well as the expertise required to construct a new landfill cell for garbage storage, and deal with the issues of gas (created by decomposing waste The assessment would be in terms of how much will it cost, what timeframe would be required, how it will affect employees, who offers best job security and the best service to the pub lic, and which one merges best with the long-t erm goal of converting the landfill to waste-toenergy. The Minister added that all of the companies who have submitted bids to manage the collection of waste and solid waste management are headed by Bahamians, while the other companies that have bid for the contract to create a waste-toenergy facility have a Bahamian input. FIVE LANDFILL BIDS IN REVIEW FROM page 1B

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decision-making regarding a pplications for oil explo ration and drilling, and to manage any outcomes. Describing the formulation of regulations and legislation t o formally govern oil exploration and drilling in the B ahamas as a priority, Mr Deveaux nonetheless stated i t was not something the Government would wish to rush He added that any potential framework would not be finalised without significant opportunity for public input, which would prolong its implementation. We have received a good bit of information, in termsof similar legislation, from several countries of interest.We then have to do the work in order for me to take it [draft legislation] to my (Cabinet) colleagues for them to review. It is also somethingthat will require broad, broad consultation with the public, so its not very likely that this legislation...well, in fact its nigh on impossible for this legislation to be accomodated within this Parliament, said the Minister. Unless an early election is called, this means that the earliest such legislation could be passed would be post-May 2012. Meanwhile, given the upheaval in the governanceagenda that an election nor mally brings with it whether it involves a charge in the gov erning party or not even this date would likely be overly optimistic. Mr Deveaux said the Government has yet to receive an application from BPC, which holds licenses to undertake oil exploration in this nation, to drill for oil. We have not received any application for drilling and we dont anticipate any. They are aware that we are working on regulations and legislation, and that none will be accomodated during the period ofthe moratorium or until such time as its lifted, he added. R ecent attempts to reach B PCs director and chief executive, Dr Paul Crevello, have been unsuccessful. Website On the companys website, www.bpcplc.com, the company notes in an investor pre sentation that the Bahamian government implemented a moratorium on consideration of oil exploration and drilling license applications last year. Information contained on the website notes the Governments decision to delay consideration of license applications in light of the Gulf oil spill and until appropriate new controls are put in place. BPCs non-executive chairman, Alan Burns, is quoted as describing the situation as short term and gives no indication that it could impede the companys progress in pursuing the oil bounty it suggests exists below Bahamian waters. There are exploration activities, including drilling, proceeding in adjacent Cuban w aters and significant previous drilling with the compa ny's current license areas. We b elieve these do not face the same geological risks as those e ncountered in the US Gulf of Mexico. We enjoy a good relationship with Bahamian authorities and are confident t hat this situation will be r esolved quickly, said Mr Burns. S peaking of the Governments position yesterday, Mr Deveaux said: In broad, simple terms we have a morato rium put in place for good reason. We have an expeirence with the Deep Water Horizon oil spill and the grave concerns it represented to our country and environment, and we also know and are aware of concerns expressed by the US with regard to ongoing drilling in Cuba and the likely impact on Key West. We dont think its prudent (to lift the moratorium) unless we have the most rigid protocols in place to inform any decisions we make in that regard and to manage any outcome. BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011, PAGE 5B *8(5/,10(5,/,(1RI-2$1 + (,*+761$66$8%$+$0$6 '/3URSHUWLHV/WG&RPSDQ\fLQYLWHVRIIHUVIRUWKHSXUFKDVH RI$//7+$7SLHFHSDUFHORUSORWRIODQGFDOOHGDQGNQRZQDV LOYHU7RSFRQWDLQLQJDFUHVRUWKHUHDERXWVVLWXDWHRQ/RQJ %D\&D\RU.DPDODPH&D\EHLQJDSULYDWHLVODQGLPPHGLDWHO\ HDVWRI%ODQNHW6RXQGRQWKH(DVWHUQFRDVWRI$QGURV,VODQGLQWKH &RPPRQZHDOWKRIWKH%DKDPDVWKHURSHUW\f7KHUHLVDIXOO\ IXUQLVKHGEHGURRPDQGEDWKURRPOX[XU\UHVLGHQFHORFDWHG RQWKHEHDFKRIWKH3URSHUW\FRQWDLQLQJDSSUR[LPDWHO\VTXDUH IHHWRIOLYLQJVSDFHDQGRIIHUVIHHWRIEHDFKIURQWDJH([FHOOHQW UHQWDOSURSHUW\ 7KH&RPSDQ\ZLOOVHOODVPRUWJDJHHXQGHUWKHSRZHURIVDOH FRQWDLQHGLQDOHJDOPRUWJDJHRIWKH3URSHUW\ 7(506 7HQSHUFHQWRIWKHSXUFKDVHSULFHDWWKHWLPHRIFRQWUDFWDQG WKHEDODQFHXSRQFRPSOHWLRQZLWKLQ6L[W\GD\VRIFRQWUDFW 7KH&RPSDQ\PDNHVQRUHSUHVHQWDWLRQVRUZDUUDQWLHVZLWKUHVSHFW WRWKHVWDWHRIUHSDLURIWKHUHVLGHQFHRUWKH3URSHUW\ZKLFKLVRIIHUHG IRUVDOHDVLVZKHUH 7KLVVDOHLVVXEMHFWWRDUHVHUYHSULFH7KH&RPSDQ\UHVHUYHVWKH ULJKWWRUHMHFWDQ\DQGDOORIIHUV ,QWHUHVWHGSHUVRQVPD\VXEPLWZULWWHQRIIHUVDGGUHVVHGWR'/ 3URSHUWLHVFR0DQDJLQJ3DUWQHU32%R[1DVVDX %DKDPDVRUGHOLYHUHGE\KDQGWR*UDKDP7KRPSVRQt6DVVRRQ +RXVH6KLUOH\6WUHHWDQG9LFWRULD$YHQXH1DVVDX%DKDPDVWREH UHFHLYHGQRODWHUWKDQWKHFORVHRIEXVLQHVVRQWKHWKGD\RI$SULO 127,&(2)6$/( 3XUVXDQWWRWKHSURYLVLRQVRI6HFWLRQRI7KH ,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV&RPSDQLHV1RWLFHLVKHUHE\ JLYHQWKDW 38%/,6+,1*$1'%52$'&$67,1*21/,1(21( /,0,7('LVLQGLVVROXWLRQ WKHGDWHRIFRPPHQFHPHQWRIWKHGLVVROXWLRQZDV 7KHQDPHRIWKH/LTXLGDWRULV(':$5'7851(5 RI (':$5'7851(53(7521$+286( )2:/(5675((7($67%$<675((73%2; play, with limited growth due to it being a mature company in a mature market. In an investment note to clients on the I PO, Kenwood Kerr, Providence Advis ors chief executive, noted that Commonwealth Brewerys $26.268 million dividend payment for the now-ended 2010 financial year was equivalent to almost 112 per cent of net income, and 130 per cent of operating income. M r Kerr described this as unsustainable, especially given that Commonwealth Brewery seemingly dipped into its retained earnings to pay the 2010 dividend to Heineken BV, these having decreased from $38.654 million at yeare nd 2009 to $32.845 million at December 31, 2010, a decline of 15 per cent. This likely covered the difference between$ 26.268 million payout and $19.216 million in net income attributable to the companys ordinary shareholders. Long-term sustainability of 100 per cent dividend payout policy is questionable, Mr Kerr wrote to his investment clients. What will be the impact of future capital works on earnings, and we note that in the latest fiscal period dividends accounted for almost 112 per cent of net earnings and as much as 130 per cent of operating earnings. This payout level/policy, especially w here retained earnings are eroded, is not sustainable. In the period under review (2008-2010 at a rate of 72 per cent, 43.5 per cent, and 64.43 per cent, or an average of 60 per cent. We find the payout policy at 100 p er cent unusual. This is indicative of t he parent companys perspective on this subsidiary, and is merely recouping investment via a generous dividend pol-i cy. Another analyst, who requested anonymity, while rating the IPO as a Buy, also questioned whether the 100p er cent dividend policy was merely a way for Heineken to upstream earnings from a consistently profitable subsidiary, t hen deploy these funds to other coun tries where it could earn a better investment return. Acknowledging that this raised questions over whether Heineken viewed Commonwealth Brewery as hav-i ng long-term growth opportunities, give n its 80 per cent share of the mature Bahamian liquor market, the analyst said they were not particularly thrilled about the 100 per cent net income dividend policy. Whilst we fully understand it from H einekens perspective, ( the attractiven ess of up-streaming all surplus cash flow t o a central place, and then being able to redeploy to the best opportunities globally), it may potentially mean that some growth opportunities for Commonwealth Brewery may not get funding if Heineken can get a better return elsewhere, thea nalyst said. S till, they acknowledged that the a bsence of debt would enable Commonw ealth Brewery to finance growth and expansion opportunities from bank loansa nd other debt financing forms if it neede d. E lsewhere, both Mr Kerr and his fell ow analyst identified the regulatory and t axation environment facing Common wealth Brewery as concerns, given the t endency to increases taxes on alcohol p roducts during recessions, something t hat was highlighted by the 2010-2011 B udget. Other potential issues were Cust oms Duty and Export Taxes, and the i mpact on the companys cost base if these were increased. Noting that Commonwealth Brewerys external market revenue has been in decline consistently for the past three years, Mr Kerr wrote: While operationally efficient, we believe that increased earnings may have resulted from cost initiatives and softer raw mate-r ials cost. This strategy would be difficult to s ustain in the current cycle of rising prices in terms of commodity prices and cost of electricity. Does Commonwealth Brewery have the ability to pass on these increases to the consumers/customers? How much product pricing flexibility d oes Commonwealth Brewery have in a regulated market? Management admits t o having cut costs to a minimum, so future top line growth must come from revenue generation. Mr Kerr said the sales declines were c oncerning given that demand for Commonwealth Brewerys products should be relatively inelastic, although this was probably a reflection of the broader economic environment. Praising the companys strong balance sheet and support from Heineken as 75 per cent majority shareholder, Mr Kerrs aid overall sales and profitability growth was linked to population and economic g rowth. We note that plant utilisation is currently at 58 per cent, which suggests an ability to ramp up production to meet demand should economic conditions change along with increased demand, M r Kerr wrote. In 2008 and 2009, capacity was at 66 per cent and 63 per cent respectively. This indicates that Com-m onwealth Brewery cut back production to meet market demand, to keep supply levels consistent with market demand, and to preserve profitability. Meanwhile, another investment analyst, Richard Coulson, said that while C ommonwealth Brewery represented a s ound company and investment opportunity, investors may experience difficulty in buying and selling the shareso nce the stock is listed due to the inherent liquidity problems in the Bahamian capital markets. Perhaps the largest risk for investors a rises not from the company itself but f rom poor liquidity in our capital markets.. The Memorandum warns: An a ctive secondary market may not devel op for the shares. Quite true, but this statement represents an indictment of o ur whole inter-linked securities industry, not simply BISX ... Mr Coulson w rote in his column on Page 2B today. In short, an investor will have no trouble buying a share of this successful company, but he cannot count on selling it,t hrough Royal Fidelity or any of the other three securities firms, Colina, Fam Guard or Colonial. M r Kerr agreed, describing this as potential systemic risk post-IPO in terms of liquidity and ability to sell sharesi n the open market. Concern over Brewerys 100% dividend policy FROM page 1B NIGH ON IMPOSSIBLE FOR OIL DRILLING NOD BEFORE NEXT ELECTION FROM page 1B

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also Superwashs president, questioned why the opposition Progressive Liberal Party (PLPu on the 51/49 per cent ownership issue, given that Board and management control was the real key. CWC will have full control of a privatised BTCs strategyand direction, through having a majority of directors on the Board, and its day-to-day operations and management. And, despite only contemplating selling a 49 per cent stake to Bluewater Ventures, the former Progressive Libe ral Party (PLP tion would also have given its favoured partner Board and management control. Semantics Pointing to Board and management control as the real issue, and hinting that the 51 versus 49 per cent debate was merely a game of semantics, M r DAguilar still suggested t hat the Government may have been better off selling the latter percentage to CWC, i f only to quieten the noise in t he marketplace. Ultimately, he said, it would have made no difference to Board and management control. Given all the hoo ha, all t he negativity it would have c reated, I think I would have p robably sold 49 per cent, Mr DAguilar told Tribune Business. Given the amount of noise made over it, you can achieve the same goal by selli ng them 49 per cent. At the end of the day, no f oreign company wants to be in a structure where the Government is the majority shareholder. But there would have been a couple of ways to skin that cat. The Government could have sold 49 per cent t o Cable & Wireless, sold 9 p er cent to the Bahamian public, and left it as a minority shareholder with 42 per cent. Cable & Wireless has a 51 p er cent interest, and given t he noise made about it, I w ould probably have kept it at 49 per cent. Its not going to change anything. Management and Board control, Mr DAguilar said, w as the issue at the end of t he day. He added: We d ont want the Government meddling in it. Thats the last thing we want. I dont know why the PLP is hung up on it [51 per cent versus 49 per cent]. I just dont see what the issue is. W hether its 51 per cent or 49 per cent, it makes no difference, with Cable & Wireless having control of the Board. T hey would not have entered into a scenario where they did not have control, as they would not need political meddling in the company. The $217 million ($7 million of that is Stamp Tax) sale of the 51 per cent BTC stake to CWC is scheduled to be completed by Monday, April4 with LIME, the Caribbean s ubsidiary of the UK-headquartered telecoms operator, set to formally take over oper-a tional control at that time. Approved The sale was approved by the House of Assembly last week, all 22 FNM MPs voting for it, with the Opposition and newly-independent MP,B ranville McCartney, voting against. All legislation relevant to the sale is now being d ebated in the Senate, which is expected to pass the Bills on Friday, moving them up for the Governor-Generals assent and signing into law. Still, the PLP has pledged to "regain the majority shareholding of BTC and return its control to the Bahamian people" if it forms the next government, its leader, Perry Christie, claiming that the G overnment made a grave m istake in selling 51 per cent to CWC. "It is a mistake, because we have at this juncture a oncein-a-lifetime opportunity to t ransfer wealth to the B ahamian people on an u nprecedented scale. The FNM, through its policy of selling BTC at a fire-sale price, has missing that opportunity. This is a sad time for t he Bahamas. If this subsists a nd persists, the future gene rations of Bahamians will not forgive us nor understand how the FNM could have done this to our country," said Mr Christie at the weekend It had never been the posit ion of the PLP to "concede t otal control" to foreigners, a nd it never will be the party's position, said Mr Christie. He acknowledged that had theG overnment sold 49 per cent of BTC's shares to a foreign group, that foreign partyc ould still have ended up as t he largest shareholder if the Government chose to sell more than 2 per cent of its s hares to the Bahamian pub lic. However, "collectively" the B ahamian people would still o wn the majority of the shares, and at "all material times" the power would be in the hands of Bahamians, he said. B USINESS P AGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011 THE TRIBUNE 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.190.95AML Foods Limited1.191.190.003,5000.1230.0409.73.36% 10.639.05Bahamas Property Fund10.6310.630.000.0130.200817.71.88% 5 .754.40Bank of Bahamas5.205.200.000.1530.10034.01.92% 0.530.17Benchmark0.180.180.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 2.842.70Bahamas Waste2.702.700.000.1680.09016.13.33% 2.201.96Fidelity Bank1.961.960.000.0160.040122.52.04% 12.409.25Cable Bahamas9.259.250.001.0500.3108.83.35% 2.852.35Colina Holdings2.402.400.001.0310.0402.31.67% 7.005.80Commonwealth Bank (S1)6.826.820.000.4880.26014.03.81% 2.861.90Consolidated Water BDRs2.222.260.040.1110.04520.41.99% 2.541.40Doctor's Hospital1.401.400.000.1070.11013.17.86% 6.305.22Famguard5.225.220.000.3570.24014.64.60% 9.275.65Finco7.507.500.000.6820.00011.00.00% 11.408.77FirstCaribbean Bank9.309.350.051,1600.4940.35018.93.74% 6.004.57Focol (S)5.485.480.000.4520.16012.12.92%1 .001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 7.305.50ICD Utilities7.307.300.000.0120.240608.33.29% 10.509.80J. S. Johnson9.829.820.000.8590.64011.46.52% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.001.2070.2008.32.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 99.4699.46Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029BAH2999.460.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +FBB13100.000.002100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.003 52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Bid$ Ask$ LastPrice DailyVol EPS$ Div$ P/E Yield BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:7 % Interest 7%RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)29 May 2015 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-677-BISX (2479) | FACSIMILE: 242-323-232019 October 2022 Prime + 1.75% Prime + 1.75% 6.95%20 November 2029FRIDAY, 25 MARCH 2011BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,474.46 | CHG 3.13 | %CHG 0.21 | YTD -25.05 | YTD % -1.67BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basis)Maturity 1 9 October 2017F INDEX: YEAR END 2008 -12.31%30 May 2013 52wk Hi 52wk Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Daily Vol EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield 10.065.01Bahamas SupermarketsN/AN/A14.00-2.9450.000N/M0.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.350.400.550.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 Months %NAV 3MTH 1.51221.4076CFAL Bond Fund1.51795.51%6.90%1.498004 2.95272.8300CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.94860.04%1.45%2.918256 1.58371.5141CFAL Money Market Fund1.58370.61%4.59%1.564030 3.20252.8522Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund2.7049-0.56%-15.54% 13.638813.0484Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund13.43920.61%-0.22% 114.3684101.6693CFAL Global Bond Fund114.36849.98%12.49%109.392860 106.552899.4177CFAL Global Equity Fund106.55284.75%7.18%100.779540 1.14651.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.14655.20%5.20% 1.11851.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.11854.73%4.73% 1.14911.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.14915.35%5.35% 9.74859.1005Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 19.79504.85%5.45% 11.236110.0000Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 210.6417-1.20%0.50% 10.12669.1708Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 310.12661.27%1.27% 8.45104.8105Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund Equities Sub Fund8.45100.72%9.95% BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/MNot Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/200731-Jan-11BISX Listed Mutual FundsNAV Date 30-Nov-10 31-Dec-10 31-Jan-11CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752530-Nov-10 30-Sep-10 28-Feb-11 11-Feb-11 31-Jan-11MARKET TERMS31-Dec-10 NAV 6MTH 1.475244 2.910084 1.545071 107.570619 105.776543 30-Jun-10 31-Dec-10 30-Nov-10 31-Jan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f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f 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWLQDFFRUGDQFHZLWK 6HFWLRQRIWKH,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV &RPSDQLHVRIWKH'LVVROXWLRQ RI05/,QWHUQDWLRQDO5HVRXUFHV/LPLWHGKDV EHHQFRPSOHWHG&HUWLFDWHRI'LVVROXWLRQ KDVEHHQLVVXHGDQGWKH&RPSDQ\KDVWKHUHIRUH EHHQVWUXFNRIWKH5HJLVWHU7KHGDWHRI FRPSOHWLRQRIWKHGLVVROXWLRQZDVWKHWKGD\ RI'HFHPEHU $OUHQDR[H\ /LTXLGDWRU 51/49 BTC debate is irrelevant FROM page 1B

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B USINESS PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011 THE TRIBUNE ANNE D'INNOCENZIO, AP Retail Writer NEW YORK Rising prices at the gas pump and in grocery aisles are starting to crimp shoppers' outlook. The Conference Board's Consumer Confidence Index fell sharply from a three-year high in February, reversing five straight months of improvement. The decline raises questions about Americans' ability and willingness to spend in coming months. The index fell more than expected to 63.4 from a revised 72.0 in February. Economists expected 65.4, according to FactSet. The drop was the steepest since the 10.1-point plunge from January 2010 to February 2010, when the U.S. stock market was hammered by worries about Greece's national debt. "Rising food and gasoline prices are starting to take their toll on the consumer psyche, a nd Japan's triple calamity earthquake, tsunami and nuclear disaster has been very unsettling," said Chris Christopher Jr., senior principal economist at HIS Global Insight. T he index measures how Americans feel about business conditions, the job market and the next six months. It has hovered in a tight range from the high 50s to low 60s over the past year, far below the 90 that indicates a healthy economy. The index h asn't approached that level since the recession began in December 2007. A housing slump that isn't over and won't be for a while isn't helping. Home prices are falling in most major U.S. cities, and the average prices in four of them are at their lowest in 11 years, according to Standard & Poor's/Case-Shiller report released Tuesday. On Friday, the Commerce Department said new-home sales plunged i n February, the third month in a row. A look at economic developments and activity in major stock markets around the world Tuesday: ___ LISBON, Portugal Rating agency Standard & Poor's has downgraded debt-stressed Portugal's credit worthiness, deepening the country's financial plight as it fights to avoid a bailout. ___ ATHENS, Greece Standard & Poors downgraded Greece's credit rating again, saying it was "highly likely" the country would need to take further bailout loans beyond the ones it already has. ___ TOKYO Japan's government vowed to overhaul nuclear safety standards once its radiation-leaking reactor complex is under control, admitting that its safeguards were insufficient to protect the plant against the March 11 tsunami. ___ LONDON European markets closed higher despite new rat ings downgrades of Portugal and Greece and more bad news from Japan. Britain's FTSE ended 0.5 percent higher at 5,932.17, Germany's DAX was down less than 0.1 percent to 6,934.44 and France's CAC-40 rose 0.3 percent to 3,987.80. ___ TOKYO In Asia, Japan's benchmark Nikkei 225 index closed down 0.2 percent at 9,459.08. China's Shanghai Composite Index slipped 0.9 percent and Hong Kong's Hang Seng index was narrowly down. South Korea's Kospi was 0.8 percent higher and Australia's S&P/ASX 200 gained 0.5 percent. ___ BERLIN A closely-watched survey shows German con sumer confidence is down amid worries about unrest in North Africa and the Mideast, and fears of inflation. ___ BERLIN Germany's inflation rate held steady at 2.1 percent in March due largely to higher oil and energy prices, an official estimate showed underlining prospects of an imminent rate hike by the European Central Bank. ___ LONDON Britain's economy shrank by half a percent in the last quarter of 2010, not quite as bad as previously thought, official statisticians said Tuesday, though their final figure did little to ease apprehension about the course of the recovery. ___ TOKYO The government says Japan's unemployment rate in February fell to 4.6 percent, the first decline in two months. ___ TAIPEI, Taiwan A senior Taiwanese official says the recent Japan earthquake may cut Taiwan's economic growth by 0.2 per centage point this year. GLOB AL ECONOMIC NEWS associated press (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes ONTHEMARKET: In this photo taken on Tuesday, March 22, 2011, a n single family home is offered for sale in Los Angeles. Home prices are falling in most major U.S. cities, and now the average price in four of them are at the lowest point in 11 years. Consumer confidence down following inflation worries HOME PRICES FALLING IN MOST MAJOR US CITIES (AP Photo/Matt York CONFIDENCEDOWN: A shopper walks through the outdoor San Tan Village Mall Monday, March 28, 2011 in Gilbert, Ariz. m ented in the US terminal, a passenger's luggage is photographed and electronically tagged as belonging to them. W hen the passenger subsequently reaches the US Customs check point, their boarding pass is scanned and a photograph of their luggage should appear on a screen for viewing by a US officer. The passenger is then asked to identify if the bag belongs to them. H owever, according to a number of sources, issues have arisen whereby luggage is not being correctly attributed to particular passengers, on what anecdotal evidence suggests is a fairly frequest basis. One Bahamian businessman travelling on Thursday to Atlanta from Nassau to visit his American wife a trip he takes on average once a month said he was subject to a" scary" experience at the US CBP check point after it appeared that his airline did not take a photograph of the luggage he had checked in. The 68 year-old man said he was questioned significantly about his motivation for traveling to the US by CBP officers before being released and allowed on his way. In another instance, a woman, who wished to remain anonym ous, said she was travelling to South America via the US and was pulled into a room for questioning by US CBP officers a fter two photographed pieces of luggage appeared when her boarding pass was scanned, as opposed to the one piece of l uggage she told officers she had checked in with her airline. T he woman, who was travelling to South America for a professional conference, said she was "harassed and intimidated" o ver the fact that an additional bag had been linked to her, being questioned about whether she was transporting drugs. She, too, was eventually allowed to leave and board her flight. Tribune Business understands that in other instances pass engers have missed flights due to the prolonged experience getting through the US pre-clearance area. In a statement sent to Tribune Business by a US Embassy spokesperson, in response to queries about complaints of more frequent secondary screenings by US CBP officers in light of baggage-related issues, the embassy noted that it is an end u ser of NADs baggage system. T he spokesperson added: While we can't comment about specifics incidences, US Customs and Border Protection is tasked with securing the borders and facilitating legitimatet rade and travel. While security remains a priority, we are committed to working with the airlines, airport authority and other partners t o provide passengers with the best possible travel experie nce. Baggage woes impact airport FROM page 1B

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N EW C YB ER C OM MU NI T Y F OR B AHA M I AN S ON LI N E A R TI ST I N DA SP OT LI GH T : B AHA M I AN TRI O BR EAK T HRU W HY GRA ND M OTH ER, WH A T B A D A CTO RS Y OU H A V E ? WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011 T H E T R I B U N E S E C T I O N C By DR ERICA MOIAH JAMES Director of NAGB S ometimes it is difficult to assess the impact of one's work when one's focus is still on the trenches. As Trans forming Spaces enters its sixth year, perhaps it is a good time for the commu nity to look up and consider the impact this event has had on raising aware ness on fine art and art spaces in New Providence. As qu i e t a s it i s k e p t T r a n s fo r m i n g S p a c e s b e c o m e a m o d e l f o r o t h e r a r t i n i t i a t i v e s b e i n g p r o p o s e d a n d n o w a f t e r s i x y e a r s o f s u c c e s s f o c u s i ng o n a Ba h a m i a n c li e n t e l e it ha s s p a wn e d a n o f fi c ia l a r t t o ur f or o u r v i s i to r s I t h a s a l s o p l a y e d a p i v o t a l r o l e i n b r o a d e n i n g t h e n u m b e r s o f B a h a m i a n s w h o p u r c h a s e a r t i n c r e a s i n g t h e a r t l i te r a cy o f o u r lo c a l po p u l a ti o n a n d i nt r o du c i ng a h o s t of a r t i s ts t o th e g e ne r a l pu b l i c. S o m ed a y T r an s f o r mi n g S pa c es w i l l b e f u l l y r ec o g n i s e d a n d s u p p or t e d a s a ho m e g r o w n e v e n t wi t h a n i n t e r n a t i o n a l a u d i e n c e a n d r e a c h I t w i ll h a p p e n b e c a u s e i n or d e r t o s u r v i v e t h i n g s m u s t c o n t i n u e t o g r o w a n d T r a n s f o r m i n g S p a c e s i s n o e x c e p ti o n It w ill happ en b ecaus e th e elem e n ts a r e i n pl a c e f o r i t t o m us h r o o m i n t o a n a r t h a p p e n i n g t h a t c a n tr u ly tr a n s f o r m t h e w a y Ba h a m i a n s s e e a n d v a l u e th e i r v is u a l a n d cu l tur a l hi s tor i e s a n d hu mb ly r e c og n i s e o u r a b i l i t y t o p r o d u c e a r t t h a t i s t r u l y c u t t i n g e d g e an d s e c o n d t o n on e I t wi l l h a p p e n be ca us e t he i n s ti t u t i o n a l s t r u c t u r e i s p r e s e n t t o b r oa de n it s o ff e r i n g s d i v e r s i f y t he a r t e x p e r i e n c e a n d e x t e n d i t s i m p a c t I t wi l l h a p p e n be ca u s e B a h a m i a n s a r e a pe op l e fr o m wh i ch th e te r m m a k e a d o l l a r o u t o f fi f t e e n c e n ts o r i g i n a t e d W e h a v e a n i n t i m a t e k no w l e d g e o f wh a t t hi s m e a ns a n d c r e a t i v i t y h a r d w o r k a n d s a c r i f i c e l i e a t t h e c o r e o f i t I t w i l l h a p p e n because we will not w a it f or it to h a p pe n We w i ll wo r k to g e t h e r t o m a k e i t h a p p e n T R A N S F O R M I N G S P A C E S 2 0 1 1 T h e N A G B w i l l f e a t u r e a n e x h i b i t i o n o n t h e h i s t o r y o f B a h a m i a n a r t a n d o n F r i d a y A p r i l 1 t h e g a l l e r y w i l l h o s t t h e g e n e r a l p u b l i c t o a c o c k t a i l r e c e p t i o n a n d w o r l d p r e m i e r e o f t h e f i l m B r e n t M a l o n e F a t h e r o f B a h a m i a n A r t a n I s l a n d F i l m s P r o d u c t i o n R e c e p t i o n b e g i n s a t 6 3 0 p m a n d t h e s c r e e n i n g a t 7 3 0 p m G a l l e r i e s p a r t i c i p a t i n g i n t h i s y e a r t o u r i n c l u d e : : D A gu i l ar A r t F o un d at i o n D o o ng al i k S t u d io s A rt G al le ry N ew P ro vi d en c e A r t an d A n t i q u es P o p op S t u di o s, P RO G al l er y at C O B an d T h e Hu b w h o w i l l b e s ho w c as i n g ne w a nd e xc i t i ng a rt w o rk f r om mo r e t h an 5 0 ar t is t s W i t h a m o r e c o m p a c t b u s r o u t e a n d f e w e r s p a c e s t h i s y e a r p a t r o n s w i l l h a v e t h e o p p o r t u n i t y d u r i n g t h e f o u r h o u r t o u r t o s p e n d a l o n g e r t i m e a t e a c h s p a c e t o v i e w t h e a r t a s w e l l a s m e e t a n d s p e a k w i t h t h e a r t i s t s P u r c h a s e s c a n b e m a d e d u r i n g t h e t o u r a n d p a t r o n s a r e r e m i n d e d t h a t t h e y w i l l a l s o b e t r e a t e d t o a v a r i e t y o f f o o d a n d d r i n k a t e a c h s t o p T r a n s p o r t a t i o n w i l l o n c e a g a i n b e p r o v i d e d b y t h e p r o f e s s i o n a l t e a m f r o m B a h a m a s E x p e r i e n c e T o u r s t h e e v e n t s S p o n s o r w h o w i l l d r i v e p a t r o n s a l o n g w i t h a k n o w l e d g e a b l e t o u r g u i d e i n c o m f o r t a b l e a i r c o n d i t i o n e d b u s e s t o e a c h v e n u e A l l b u s e s w i l l l e a v e d a i l y f r o m t h e N A G B p r o m p t l y a t 1 0 a m o n S a t u r d a y A p r i l 2 a n d S u n d a y A p r i l 3 Introduction for Transforming Spaces 2011 Alistair Stevenson and June Collie work on a body cast. One of the casts in production. A portrait by Antonious Roberts called Damaso displayed at New Provi dence Art and Antiques. Khia Poitier prepares the plaster cast on Steven Schmid

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T H E T R I B U N E S E C T I O N C A R T S & E N T E R T A I N M E N T 02 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011 By LESH A KEY element which drives the success of Bahamian trio, Breakthru' is that of determination. The members told In Ya Ear that they are empowered by the thrill and enthusi asm which music gives them. The ambi tious young artists style reflects a mix of electro hip pop, pop, jazz and blues. They de fine succ e ss not as "at t ainme nt o f a m i l l i o n a i r e s s t a t u s b u t r a t h e r t he m a g n i t ud e o f c h a n g e d l i v e s a s a r e s u l t o f t h e i r w o r k Thi s e le c t r o h ip pop gr ou p c a m e t o ge t h er i n Se pt e m b er 20 1 0 f ou nde d by m al e r a ppe r s, St e v au gh n A c a pe l la H e pb ur n, A m a e le o S t a rt e z C a r e y a n d f e m a l e s i n g e r a n d s o n g w r i t e r D i a n d r a K a rm a' B ro w n. T he m ot i ve be hi nd f o rm i ng t he gro up was to pro ve thro ugh thei r so ngwritin g a n d e n t e r t a i nm e n t t h a t y ou y o u r s e l f s h a pe y o ur ow n s uc c e s s w hi c h s hou ld no t c ons t r a in i t s el f t o a ge o r st at us In a ddi t i on, t he y li v e by t h e m ot t o t ha t t he ke y t o s uc c ee d ing i n li f e is t o m ov e f or w a rd w i t h out l ook in g b ac k. W h e n a s k e d a b o u t t h e n a m e o f t h e g r o u p t h e y expl ained t ha t t he nam e B re akt hru depic t s a n u ns t o p p a b l e pe r s o n a s u c h t h a t n o m a t t e r w h a t i t i s t h a t c o m e s t h e i r w a y t h e y l l b e v i c t o r i o u s Y o u s h o ul d no t b e c h a i ne d t o y o ur c i r c u m s t a nc e s b u t a l l o w y o u r i n n e r p o t e n t i a l t o s h a c k l e t h a t c h a i n f o r a p o s i t i v e a n d m e a n i n g f u l o u t c o m e t h e y e x p l a i n e d T h e ov e r a l l m e s s a g e p o r t r a y e d by t he a r t i s t s i s t o s e t g o a l s t o g e t g o l d a n d t o d r e a m b i g bu t t o m a k e t h e r e a l i t i e s e v e n b i g g e r T h e y a l s o w a n t t o e n a b l e o t h e r y o u t hs t o i d e n ti fy t hem se lves ma ke right c ho i ce s in d if f ic ult dec ision m aking a nd t o mos t im port ant ly, live t he i r dr e a m s B r e a k t h r u s a i m i s t o p o r t r a y a c e r t a i n l e v e l o f u n i q u e n e s s d i v e r s i t y a nd e n e r g y i n a l l a s p e c t s o f t he i r c a r e er T h e m o s t i m p o r t a n t s e c t i o n o f t h e m u s i c in dus t r y t ha t is l a c ki ng i n The B ah a m a s is m a r ke t i ng a nd f oc u s w i l l b e pl ac ed he a v il y on pr oduc i ng qua li t y, an d re la t a bl e m us ic f o r 'p ot e nt ia l f a n s of B r e a kt hr u ," s ai d A m a e le o C a r ey T h e g r o u p r e c e n t l y c o m p l e t e d t h e i r n e w s i n g l e e nt i t le d M a ke he r sa y w hic h f e a t ur e s t a l en t e d singer a nd songw rit er, r ec ording enginee r and pr odu c i ng g en iu s Sk e t c h. A c c o rd ing t o C a r ey By LESH R Y A N w a s c o m p l e t e l y c o r r e c t w h e n h e n o t e d t h a t t h e r e w o u l d b e a "s h o c k i n g s u r p r i s e i n t h e r e s u l t s o n l a s t w e ek s s h o w T h e t o p 1 1 c o n t e s tan ts p e r for m ed un d e r th e M ot ow n t h e m e I t w a s q u i t e t h e l o v e f e s t f o r t h e j u d g e s w i t h t h em l o vi n g a l m o s t e ve r y p e r f o r m a n c e b u t I f e l t l i k e t h e j u d g e s w e r e n t p a y i n g m u c h a t t e n t i o n b e c a u s e ev e r yt h i n g w as n o t e v en c l o s e t o p e r f e ct B e f o r e t h e s h o w g o t o n a r o l l t h e A I t e a m g a v e u s a g l i m p s e o f M a r c A n t h o n y J L o s s t u d m u f f i n h e l p i n g t h e c o n t es t an t s c r i t i q u e t h e i r p er f o r ma n ce s i n a s m a l l r o o m I t w a s n o t a s u r p r i s e t o m e t h a t h e d i s a g r e e d w i t h s o m e o f h i s w i f e s c o m m en t s T o u gh en u p J L o N o w i t s s h o w t i me o n t h e r es u l t s s h o w a n d t h e u s u a l g r o u p p e r f o r m a n c e g o t s t a r t e d E ve r yo n e w a s f o c u s e d o n t h e c o n t e s t a n t s u n t i l s u d d e n l y o u t o f n o wh ere ca me S tevie Wo nd er hi mself s i t t i n g a n d s i n g i n g a t a p i a n o p l a t f o r m S t e v i e s t i l l g o t t h a t v o i c e I w o u l d h o p e t h o s e p o t e n t i a l i d o l h o p e f u l s w e r e t a k i n g n o t e s A n o t h e r su r p r i se c am e f o r v i e w e r s w h e n S t e v i e c a l l e d o u t S t e v e n T y l e r s n a m e a n d s t a r t e d t o s i n g a h a p p y b i r t h d a y m el o d y f o r h i m I w a s n o t a w ar e t h at i t wa s S t e ve n s b i r t h d a y I t h o u gh t t h at w a s t h e s w ee t es t t h i n g La ur e n Ala ina he ld the ca ke w hile S t ev e n c am e u p a n d u t t er e d t h e w o r d s p e ec h l e s s, H e se e me d ve r y h a p p y I m u s t s a y s i n c e t h e f u n n y a u d i t i o n s i n t h e c i t i e s t h i s r e s u l t s s h o w w as o n e o f t h e b e s t y e t T h e a u d i e n c e w a s s h o w n a c l i p o f Ja m es an d P au l a n d t h ei r l o v e f o r p r o f e s si o n al wr e st l i n g. S o o n af ter th ey w ere b o t h cal l ed to t h e s t a g e a n d R y a n s c a r e d t h e m s e n s e l es s w h e n h e t o l d t h em "Y o u r e n o t s a f e t o n i g h t Wo rr i e d a n d n e r v ous t he y s too d t h e r e i n s h o c k a n d t h e n t h e s o n g E y e o f t h e T i g e r s t a r t ed t o p l a y a n d H u l k H o g a n h i m s e l f c a m e o u t a s o l d a s t h i s g u y i s, h e i s s t i l l f i t He c a me o u t a n d t o l d t h e y gu ys h i m s el f t h at t h e y w e r e b o t h s a f e O f c o u r s e H o g a n r i p p e d o f f h i s s h i r t a n d p r e t e n d e d a s i f h e p u n c h e d R y an i n t o t h e c r o wd w h i c h w a s r e a l l y f u n n y. I t w a s a l l f u n a n d g am e s b u t a s w e a l l k n o w i t d o es n o t l a st f o r ev er o n t h e r es u l t s s h o w, so m eo n e h ad t o b e e li mi na te d by Am e ric a onc e ag a in. Y e s i t w a s r e a l l y a s u r p r i s e w h e n A m er i ca v o t e d C a s ey A b r am s o f f t h e s h o w a n d t h e j u d ge s ma d e t h e d e ci s i o n t o k e ep h i m b y u s i n g t h e i r O N E A N D ON L Y s a v e ca r d A l l o f t h e 11 c o n t e s t a n t s w i l l b e g o i n g o n t h e A m e r i c an I d o l 20 1 1 l i v e t o u r I a m hap py f or t he m a l l, but t he j u d g e s m u s t h a v e b e e n s i p p i n g o n s o m et h i n g w h e n t h e y d e c i d e d t o u s e t h e s a v e ca r d s o e a r l y o n i n t h e c o m p e t i t i o n c o m e o n m a n T H I N K T h e r e i s a l o t o f t al e n t i n t h i s s e a s o n o f A I w h a t a r e t h e y g o i n g t o d o w h e n s o m e o n e r e al l y d es e r v e s t h at s a ve a n d ca n n o t g et t h e ch an c e. Th i s we ek t h e co n tes tan t s wi l l b e o n t h e s t a ge a g ai n p er f o r m i n g s o n g s u n d e r t h e t h e m e S i r E l t o n J o h n O n t h e T h u r s d a y n i g h t r e s u l t s s h o w t h e r e w i l l b e a d o u b l e e l i mi n a t i o n t h e s o n g c a n b e v e r y c o m m e r c i a l a n d i f m a r k e t e d i n t h e r i g h t w a y c a n b e v e r y r e w a r d i n g f or t he gr ou p. It i s sc he duled t o be re lea se d A pril 2 2, 20 1 1 It w i ll a ls o be a v ai l ab le t o do w nl oa d dig i t a ll y t hr oug h i Tu ne s a nd a t on of ot h er onl in e s t or e s a s of M a y 5t h 2 01 1 F a n s c a n b e o n t h e l o o k o u t f o r t h e gr ou p' s ne w m us ic t ha t is c ur re n t ly si g ne d u n d e r a n i n d e p e n d e n t r e c o r d l a b e l Y ou ng s t a r M us ic R e c o rd in gs T he l ab e l i s currently work ing o n securin g a distribu t i o n d e a l w h i c h w o u l d m a n u f a c t u r e a n d d i s t r ibu t e B r ea k t hr u' s A l bum in t e rn at ion a ll y The A lb um i s s c hedu le d to r e lea s e O c t obe r 2 0 1 1. F u t ur e p la ns in c lu de an e v e nt c a l le d 3 w a ys t o B r e ak t hr u' an d a pos s ibl e c on c e rt Idol judges came to the r escue and use the save Driven By Deter mination, They ar e Br eakthru R E V I E W By NEKESA MUMBI MOODY AP Music Writer E V E N w h e n Br i tn e y Sp e a r s wa s i n th e m i d s t o f he r Ch a r l i e S h e e n e s qu e b r e a kd o w n, s h e w a s p u tt in g o u t g r oo v e s to we a r o ut th e d a n c e f l oo r ; 2 0 0 7 s B la ck o u t" i s t he be s t a lb u m s h e e v e r m a de th o ug h t h e d r a m a o f th a t ti m e o v e r s h a d o we d i t Since then, she's continued to pump out taut jams that have kept her musically relevant, even if she's turned into sort of a Howard Hughes in private. The larger-thanlife persona that morphed from jailbait to sex kitten to wild child has been rendered bland, perhaps the most dangerous thing that can happen to a pop star. The mother of two, whose personal and financial affairs are controlled by her father, is rarely heard from, and when she is, every move seems to be calculated by an army of handlers instead of determined by her own will: Any edge or personality she demonstrated seems to have been permanently dulled. Thankfully, there is one place where she still shows her spark in her music. On "Femme Fatale," the follow-up to 2008's "Circus," Spears with plenty of help from megaproducers like Dr. Luke, will.i.am, and longtime collaborator Max Martin shows that she can still give the Lady Gagas and Rihannas of the pop world a serious challenge on the dance floor. "Femme Fatale" is a nonstop party, starting off with a fun flourish with the poppy "Till the World Ends" and winding down with the dark, downbeat "Criminal." There's nothing especially original on the tracks in between, but Spears' vocals give already catchy tracks even more appeal. While she's never been on the vocal level of Beyonce or even Gaga, her voice, though thin and occasionally nasally, does have a pouty charm. On the throbbing "Inside Out," she sounds like a sexy cougar; "Trip to Your Heart," with its electronic synths, has a dreamy disco feel. The driving "Hold It Against Me" is one of the album's better tracks, though it suffered from the nonsensical, product-placement video that accompanies it. In it, Spears looks listless and off her game, and it's a reminder that she's not the Brit who wowed us just a few years ago. But when you block out the visuals and focus on the songs, Spears once again sizzles, and her flame burns as bright as ever. CHECK THIS TRACK OUT : Some of the best songs on "Femme Fatale" are on the deluxe disc: "Up N' Down" is a naughty teaser that should be the 2011 theme song for pole dancers everywhere. Britney Spears' Femme Fatale' shows spark C A S EY A B R A MS

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T H E T R I B U N E S E C T I O N C A R T S & E N T E R T A I N M E N T 03 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011 By JEFFARAH GIBSON Tribune Features Writer T H E Y s a y F a c e b o o k h a s n o t h i n g m u c h t o o f f er an d t h e o n l y t h i n g t o d o o n T w i t t er i s p o s t p o i n t l e s s s t at u s l i k e I m e a t i n g c o r n f l a k e s Thi s bor ed om with cu rre nt s ocia l ne tw o r k i n g w e b s i t e s l e d K a s h m i r C o l e b r o o k e a n d R i c h a r d L o w e t o s t a r t a B a h a m i a n s o c i a l n e t w o r k i n g s i t e t h a t com bin es the fe atu re s of Fa ceb ook with a m i x o f T w i t t e r a n d a l i t t l e b i t o f Y o u t u b e Ye a b e y n e t i s t h e n a m e I t s a c y b e r c o m m u n i t y f o r B a h am i a n s w h e r e t h ey c a n s t a y c o n n e c t e d w i t h f r i e n d s a n d e n g a g e i n w h o l es o m e f u n I h a d a F a c e b o o k a c c o u n t a n d t o m e F ac e b o o k w a s v e r y b o r i n g. T h e r e i s n o t h i n g m u c h t o d o o n i t i t s j u s t a w a l l Y o u c a n p l ay g am e s l o o k at ot h er p e o p l e p h o t o s u p l o a d v i d e o s a s w e l l b u t t h a t s j u s t i t t h e r e i s n o t h i n g m o r e t o d o K a s h m i r s a i d S o m y f r i e n d a n d I d e c i d e d t o s t ar t t h e w eb si t e. W e t o ok so m e t h in gs f ro m F ac eb oo k an d a dd ed m uc h mo re t o i t ." T h e s i t e h a s a s i m i l a r s et u p t o t h e m o s t s o c i a l n e t w o r k s s i t e s U s e r s c a n i n t e r a c t w i t h e a c h o t h e r a n d u p l o a d p i c t u r es v i d e o s T h ey c a n a l s o e n g ag e in v i deo and audio chat l isten t o musi c, u p l o a d t h e i r o w n g a m e s h av e d i s c u s s i o n s p a r t i c i p a t e i n p o l l s s h o u t o u t t o f a m i l y an d f r i e n d s an d d o a l i t t l e s h o p p i n g at t h e s a m e t i m e T h e r e i s a w h o l e l o t t h a t w e h a v e to of fe r So wh e n y ou g e t on th e we b s it e t h e r e a r e s o m u c h t h i n g s t h a t p e o p l e c an d o T h e y d o n t o n l y h a v e t o w r i t e o n o t h er p eo p l e w a l l s T h e y c a n i n v i t e o t h e r s t o p l ay 3D g a m e s w i t h t h e m a s w e l l h e t o l d T r i b u n e E n t e r t a i n m e n t One thi ng tha t s ets Y e a B ey ne t a pa rt f r o m o t h e r s o c i a l n e t w o r k i n g s i t e a r e t h e g i v e a w a y s E v e r y o n e h u n d r e d t h pe r so n th a t s ig n s u p a n d b e co me s a us e r i s a w a r d e d a t w e n t y d o l l a r p h o n e c ar d T h e p e r s o n w i t h t h e m o s t u p l o a d s t h e m o s t v i e w e d p r o f i l e a n d t h e p e r s o n w it h t he best hom emade video w ill also b e aw ar de d a t w en t y d o ll ar p ho n e c ar d a n d o t h er c o o l p r i z e s A n d t h e v i d e o w h i c h g e t s t h e m o s t v i e w s w i l l b e c o m e t h e v i d e o o f t h e w e ek F o r p o t en t i a l u s er s w h o ma y b e w o r r i e d a b o u t p r i v a c y s e t t i n g c a n b e s e t t o t h e u s e r s l i k i n g. A l o t o f p e o p l e t a l k a b o u t t h e i r s ec u r i t y o n F a c e b o o k a n d o t h e r s i t es t h e y c a n l i m i t t h e i r p r o f i l e s f o r o n l y o n e p e r s o n t o v i e w h e s ai d H e a ls o e n co ur a g e s p e r so n s h ow t he i r s u p p o r t "P e o p l e s h o u l d s i g n u p a n d b e c o m e u s e r s o f Y e ab ey n e t b e c a u s e w e n ee d t he s up p or t of B ah ami an s. We pr om is e t hat t h is si t e w il l b e t h e nex t bes t t hi ng. W e a l s o e n c ou r a g e p e o pl e to s h a r e th e i r i d e a s I f t h e y h a v e a n y i d e a s o n h o w w e c a n i m p r o v e t h e s i t e t h e i r s u gg e s t i o n s a r e w el c o m e d h e s a i d Yea Bey T H I N G S 2 DO A new cyber community for Bahamians, wher e they can stay connected with friends and engage in wholesome fun N E W KID ON T HE B LOC K: T h e si te h as a s im i la r set u p to th e m ost so cia l n et w or ks s ite s U s er s c an in te r ac t wit h ea c h oth er a nd up load pict ur e s, vid eos MARCH 31 APRIL 2 CAL'S BIG BUMPIN' CIRCUS C a l s B i g B u m p i n C i r c us r e t u r n s to t h e K e n da l G L I s a a cs G y m w i th a l i n e u p o f n e w s e g m e n t s i n c l u di ng a v e n t r i l oq u i s t a c t hi g h -j um p i n g c l o w n a n d m a g i c i a n a s w e l l a s o l d f a v o u r i t e s s uc h a s t h e R ub b e r B a nd M a n a n d t he h i g h w i r e a ct B a ha m i a n t a l e n t s a l s o m a k e a p p e a r a n c e s T i m e s : 1 1 a m a nd 1 p m m a t i n e e pe r fo r m a n c e s ; 8 p m e v e n i n g p e r f or m a n ce s C o s t : $ 2 0 / m a t i n e e ; $ 2 5 / e v e ni ng g e n e r a l s e a t i n g ; $ 2 0 / e v e n i n g r i n g s i d e T i c ke ts a v a i l a b l e a t C o n l i f f e s B a k e r y B a ha m a s R e d C r o s s C a r e y s F a br i c a n d D e p a r t m e nt S to r e O r i g i n a l S w i s s S ho p T he Ju k e b ox a n d S e v e n te e n S h o p. T : 3 2 5 5 7 2 1 S e e h t t p : / / w w w c i r c u s b a h a m a s c o m APRIL 1 FRIDAY ALLIANCE FRANCAISE DES BAHAMAS MOVIE NIGHT: "THE STORY OF ADELE H." The L'alliance Francaise des Bahamas hosts its monthly movie night with the screening of the film, "The Story of Adele H.", a 1975 French film that tells the story of the real-life Adele Hugo, daughter of Victor Hugo, whose obsessive love for a naval officer led to her downfall. 6.30pm in the Societe Generale Pri vate Banking Building. Telephone: 302-5141. Seehttp://www.afbahamas.org. APRIL 1 -2 AND APRIL 7 9 PLAY PRODUCTION: "THE CABINET" Ward Minnis' political comedy play, "The Cabinet", opens at the Dundas Centre for Performing Arts, 7pm-9pm nightly. Cost: $20/in advance; $25/at the door. Seehttp://www.cabinetplay.com. APRIL 2 -3 ROTARY HORSE SHOW The Rotary Club presents its 2011 Horse Show at Camperdown Riding Club, 9am daily. Food and drinks on sale. Bring the whole family! APRIL 2 3 7TH ANNUAL "TRANSFORMING SPACES" ART TOUR T h e T r a n s f o r m i n g S p a c e s c o m m i t t e e p r e s e n t s t h e 7 t h a n n u a l T r a n s f o r m i n g S p a c e s a r t t o u r a u n i q u e e x p e r i e n c e t h a t t a k e s p a r t i c i p a n t s t o 6 d i f f e r e n t a r t s p a c e s a n d a l l o w s t h e m t o v i e w a r t p i e c e s a s w e l l a s m e e t t h e a r t i s t s S t o p s i n c l u d e D A g u i l a r A r t F o u n d a t i o n D o o n g a l i k S t u d i o s A r t G a l l e r y N e w P r o v i d e n c e A r t a n d A n t i q u e s P o p O p S t u d i o s P R O G a l l e r y a n d T h e H u b T o u r b e g i n s 1 0 a m d a i l y f r o m N a t i o n a l A r t G a l l e r y C o s t : $ 3 0 / p e r p e r s o n T e l p h o n e : 3 2 8 7 9 1 6 ( N e w P r o v i d e n c e A r t a n d A n t i q u e s ) 3 2 8 5 8 0 0 ( N a t i o n a l A r t G a l l e r y ) o r 3 9 4 1 8 8 6 ( D o o n g a l i k S t u d i o s ) S e e w w w t r a n s f o r m i n g s p a c e s b a h a m a s c o m

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Jeremy Irons stars in Showtime's The Borgias' By FRAZIER MOORE AP Television Writer JEREMY IRONS couldn't resist. The role he was invited to play Rodrigo Borgia is a towering historical figure who, five centuries ago, becomes pope through whatever-it-takes scheming, then ruthlessly defends his claim to the papacy against mounting efforts to unseat him. As perhaps the Western World's biggest boss, the new Pope Alexander VI denies himself nothing, including fami ly, whose support he drafted in his rise to the top, and an additional mistress supplementing the mother of his chil dren. Thus begins the ungodly power trip that is "The Bor gias," a new Showtime drama series. Created, written and produced by Neil Jordan ("The Crying Game," ''Michael Collins"), "The Borgias" has a two-hour premiere on Sunday at 9 p.m. EDT, with seven subsequent episodes airing Sundays at 10 p.m. EDT. "The list of adjectives that were used to describe him by his contemporaries are all the colors of the rainbow," Irons says with wonder. "From charming, thoughtful, a man of God, to licentious, carnal, a murderer! And I thought, 'Well, this is fascinating.'" Particularly within the sacred walls of the Vatican, the bald ambition of the future pope is chilling to behold as the series begins in 1492 and Borgia plots his game plan as a long-shot candidate to succeed the dying Pope Innocent VIII. But perhaps the most impressive sequence in the first installment is the papal coronation. During the lavish pro cession, then the crowning, Alexander registers a mix of fierce triumph and all-consuming awe. "You go for this job, and when you get there wooooooo you're on the top of the mountain with no one around you. There's no one to call, except, you know, Him." Irons points heaven ward. "I think that's both hum bling and frightening." During that scene, a range of colors of the character play across his face as gathering evidence of his human complexi ty. That complexity is something Irons will get to explore at length. "That's the great thing about doing a series as opposed to a film," says Irons. By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net T H E R E S a n e w t w is t on a n o l d fa ir y -t a l e p la y i ng a t y ou r l o ca l c i n e p le x R e d R i d i ng H o o d fr o m T wi l i g h t d i r e c t o r C a t h e r i n e H a r d w i c k e i s th e l a te s t i n a s l e w o f H o ll y w o o d r e m a k e s o f c h i ld h o o d f a v o u r i te s R e d R i d i ng H o o d d o e s T w il i g h t b e tt e r a l t ho u g h t ha t' s l i ke s a y i n g a slap is be t ter than a punch in t he fa ce T h e f i lm ce n t r e s a r o u n d V a l e r i e ( A m a n d a S e y f r i e d ) a w i d e e y e d w il l fu l t e e n a g e r wh o l i v e s i n a n i s o la t e d v i l la g e b or d e re d b y a fo re s t. S he i s i n l o v e w it h b a d bo y w oo d cu tt er P eter (Shi loh F ernandez) w e k n ow h e is a b a d bo y fr o m th e p e r m a n e n t s n e e r o n h i s f a c e a n d p la ns t o r un a w a y wi th h i m H o w e v e r t h e r e s a c a t c h : V a l e r i e s m o t h e r h a s a r r a n g e d f o r h e r t o m a r ry He nry (Ma x Iron s), t h e v illa ge b l a c k s m i t h H e i s a b e t t e r c a t c h b e c a u s e a p p a r e n t l y b l a c k s m i t h s ma k e mo r e mo ne y th a n w oo dcu tt e r s a s h e r g o l d d i g g i n g m o t h e r ( V i r g i n ia M a d s e n ) s u cc i nc t ly pu t s it Fo r g e n e r a t io n s V a l e r i e s v i l l a g e h a s b e e n t e r r o r i s e d b y a b l o o d t h i r s t y w ol f s o b ol d l e g e n d te l l s it wo u l d s n a t c h l i t t l e c h i l d re n o u t o f t h e i r b e d s a s t h e y s l e p t R e s i d e n ts of th e v illa g e bolt th eir do ors s hut the ir w indo ws and h ole up insid e thei r h o m e s d u r i n g a f u l l m o o n w h i l e a p p e a s i n g t he wo l f wi t h a n a n i ma l s a c r i f i c e H o w e v e r t h e w o l f h a s g r o w n ti r e d o f a n i m a l f l e s h i t s e e m s and kills a huma n during a blood r e d m o on T u r ns o u t th e m e n a c e i s n o or d i n a r i l y b e a s t b u t a w e r e w o l f w h o l i v e s a m o n g th e v i l la g e r s As th e w o lf is h un t ed t h e c ast o f l ik el y c ul p ri t s e n d s u p d e a d a n d j u s t w h e n y o u t hi nk you 've got t he w ol f f i gured ou t a n ot h e r s u s pe ct i s ki l l e d of f. For m uch of the film I wa s dis t ract ed by Madsen 's fac e ( she's a g o o d l o o k i n g w o m a n w h o e i t h e r ne e d s t o l a y o ff th e B ot o x o r fa c e f i l l e r s ) a n d F e r n a n d e z s f a u x h a w k w h e r e d i d h e f i n d h a i r g e l i n m e d ie v a l ti m e s ? T h e v i l l a g e a n d s u r r o u n d i n g f o r e s t look ed m ore li ke a ch ea p ba ckl ot th a n cr e e p y wo o d s I a l s o f o un d i t odd tha t cha ra cter s s pe nt mos t of t h e i r t i m e d a n c i n g o r r o l l i n g a b o u t i n th e s n o w, w i th l ig ht co a t s o n, o b l i v io u s to t he co l d A n o t h e r p r o b l e m t h a t I h a d i s t h a t b y t h e e n d o f t h e f i l m t h e a u d i e n c e i s s u p p o s e d t o b e l i e v e t h a t V a l e r i e a n d h e r f a th e r s h a r e a c l o s e l o v i n g r e l a ti o ns h i p s o cl o s e i n f a c t th a t s he a t o n e p o i n t k i c k s h i m w h i l e h e i s l y i n g dr u n k i n th e s n o w n e x t to h i s o wn vo mi t. T he r e a re a fe w o the r plo t d e v e l o p m e n t s no t i n li n e w i t h e a r l i e r e v e n t s i n th e m o v i e W o r s t of a l l G r a n d m o t h e r s a c t i n g ( J u l i e Ch r i s ti e ) ha d me l a u g h i ng o ut l o ud d u ri n g s o me of t h e f il m s s eri o u s m om e n t s T h e r e a r e s o m e b r i g h t s p o t s i n t h e f i l m h o w e v e r S e y f r i e d i s c a p t i v a t i n g o n s c r e e n a n d h e r d o e e y e s a n d p or ce la i n s k in m a ke h e r t h e p e r f e c t fa i r y ta l e h e r o i ne H o w e v e r I wo n de r e d wh y t h e wo m a n w h o h a d h e r s ta r tu r n i n t h e o v e r l o o ke d C h lo e w o u l d w a s t e h e r t a l e n t s i n t h i s m ov ie T h e l o v e t r i a n g l e p r o v i d e s a n i nt er est in g sub pl ot S eyf ri ed an d Fe r n a n d e z h a v e g r e a t s e x u a l c h e m is t r y wh i l e th e s e x y I r o ns i s a w e l l c a s t r i v a l T h e a c t i o n s c e n e s w i t h t h e wo l f a r e e x ci t in g a n d we ll ch o r e o g r a p h e d Fo r th o s e l o o k i n g fo r a g o o d l o v e s t o r y i n t e r t w i n e d w i t h a l i t t l e a c t i o n R e d R i d i n g H o o d i s s a t i s f y i n g b r a i n c a n d y i n s p i t e o f a f e w c r i n g e w o r t h y s c e n e s T H E T R I B U N E S E C T I O N C A R T S & E N T E R T A I N M E N T 05 MONDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2011 SHOWING WH Y G RAN DMO T HER, WHA T B AD A C T OR S Y O U HA VE! JEREMY IRONS as Rodrigo Borgia. AMAN D A SEYFRIED GA RY OLDMA N SHILO H FERN A NDEZ MAX IR ONS ST ARRING RA TED: PG13 RUN TIME: 100 mins. 3 ST ARS OUT OF 4 W ARNER BROS.

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T ake a good look at a large tree. Its size suggests permanence, strength, and invulnerabil ity. Yet the truth is that above ground a tree has a very thin layer between bark and core wood and this thin layer performs the life-sustaining processes that maintain the tree's health and growth. Go to a s hrub a nd dig into it with y o u r t h u m b n a i l a n d y o u w i l l s e e h o w v e r y t h i n i s t h i s v i t a l c a m b i u m l a y e r w i t h i n w h i c h a t i s s u e c al l e d x yl e m m o v es w at e r a r o u n d a n d p h l o em s t o r es a n d d i s t r i b u t es foo d. R e mo v e thi s th in la y e r fro m a t r e e, a s i n g i r d l i n g a n d i t w i l l d i e B ef o r e i t d i e s i t w i l l m a k e e v e r y eff ort t o s u r vive Tissue bridg es are n e t w or k ed i f t h e re is an y c am b iu m la y e r to wor k w ith. I f y ou h a ve e v e r g i r d l e d a n u i s a n c e t re e i n a n e f f o r t t o di sp os e o f i t yo u w i ll real i se t h at i t i s n o t a s e as y a s ad ve r t i s e d This wounding or girdling of part o f a t r e e i s t h e b a s i s i r o n i c a l l y, o f p r o p ag a t i o n E v e r y t r ee a n d s h r u b h a s g r o w t h p o i n t s o r n o d e s t h a t b e l o w gr o u n d t u r n i n t o r o o t s a n d ab ove gr ou nd pro du ce bran ch es. I f a t r ee o r sh r u b i s g i r d l ed b e l o w a g r o w t h n o d e a n d s o i l i s a p p l i e d t o t h e s i t e t h e n r o o t s w i l l b e p r o duced. The proces s is calle d air la ye r i n g a n d a l l o w s u s t o s e l e c t a b r a n c h a n d t u r n i t i n t o a t r e e A suita ble bra nch for air la ye ring s ho u ld b e a n in c h a n d n o m o r e th a n t w o i n c h e s i n d i a m e t e r G i r d l e t h e b ra n ch hal f an in ch b e l ow a grow th n o d e u s i n g a s h a r p k n i f e G i r d l e t he branc h ag ain about an inc h fu rt h e r d o w n a n d t h e n s c r a p e a w a y a l l t h e i n t e r ve n i n g t i s s u e u n t i l t h e c o r e w o o d i s s p a rk l i n g w h i t e I n s t e a d o f s o i l i t i s b e s t t o u s e s p h a g n u m m o s s as t h e m e d i u m i n w hi c h t o de vel o p t he ro o t s. D amp e n t h e m o s s i n w a t er t h e n s q u e e z e it fairly dry. A pply it to t he wo unded ar e a a n d b i n d i t w i t h c l e a r p l as t ic s he et i ng o r al um in u m f o i l. P l asti c sh e eti ng wil l h av e to b e a tta ch ed t o p a n d b o t t o m w i t h a p p r o p r i a t e t i e s b u t f o i l c a n b e t w i s t e d i n t o p l a c e I f y o u u s e ei t h e r p l as t i c s h e et i n g o r a l u m i n u m f o i l y o u m u s t t h e n c o v e r t h e a i r l a y e r w i t h c l o t h t o produce both d a rkness one of the necessities of root p r o duct ion a n d a sh iel d a ga ins t the sun I h av e se en m a n y a t t e m p t s a t ai r l a ye r i n g f a i l b e c a u s e a l u m i n u m f o i l w a s u s e d a n d n o t s h i el d e d f r o m t h e s u n N o m a t t e r w h a t t r e e y o u a r e a i r l a y e r i n g y o u m u s t a l l o w t h r e e m o n t h s b e f o r e c h e c k i n g i t s p r o gr e s s T h i s m a k e s i t i m p o r t a n t t o e s t a b l i s h a i r l a y e r s e a r l y i n t h e g r o w i n g s ea s o n M a r c h a n d A p r i l s o tha t by Ju ly or Au gu st we ha ve a n i n d e p e n d e n t p l a n t p r o d u c e d d u r i ng t h e m o s t p r op i t i o u s mo n t h s o f t h e y e a r W h e n t h e ai r l a y er h as p l e n t y o f root s, w e must c ut t he branch away f r o m t h e p a r e n t p l a n t a n d e s t a b l i s h i t i n d e p e n d e n t l y S n i p i t a s c l o s e a s p o s s i b l e t o t h e r o o t b a l l w i t h o u t h a r m i n g t h e r o o t s W e n o w h a v e a p l a n t t h a t h a s r o o t s b u t n o t e n o u g h t o h o l d i t upr ight. T he be st ne xt step i s to use a 1 0g al l o n c o n t a i n e r w i t h a t o m a to cage in sert ed. Tw ot hir ds f il l t he c o n t a i n e r w i t h m o i s t p o t t i n g s o i l a n d l a y t h e r o o t s o f t h e a i r l a y e r o n t o p F i l l t h e p o t w i t h s o i l a n d t h e n s u p p o r t t h e p l a n t w i t h p l a s t i c ri bbon f rom one side of t he tom a t o c ag e t o t h e o t h er l o o p i n g ar o u n d t he p lant Do t his at least t hree d if f e r en t l ev e l s a n d t h i s w i l l h o l d t h e a i r l ay e r f i r m l y u p r i gh t a n d al l o w t h e r o o t s t o d e v el o p w i t h o u t w i n d s h a k i n g t h e a i r l a y e r a r o u n d a n d d i s t u r b i n g t h e m I t s h o u l d b e n o t e d t h a t a i r l a y e r e d p l a n t s d o n o t h a ve t a p r o o t s wh i c h a r e o nl y p r o d uc e d fr o m s e e dg r o w n p l a n t s A l a r g e t r e e g r o w n f r o m a i r l a ye r i n g w i l l b e v e r y s u s c e p t i b l e t o t o p p l i n g i n a h u rr i c a n e. gardenerjack@coralwave.com T H E T R I B U N E S E C T I O N C A R T S & E N T E R T A I N M E N T 06 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011 J u s t a f e w i m a g e s o f w h a t w e t h e B ah a m a s l oo ked l ike 40 ..5 0 ... 60 .. years in the past As queer as a three dollar bill... 1966 the introduction of the Bahamian Dollar. Sir Stafford Sands printed a three digit unit hoping Americans would take some home. Flash Back BY ROLAND ROSE A i r L a y e r i n g By GARDENER JACK GREEN SCENE PRODUCE: Fruit trees like this longan can easily be propagated by air layering.

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T H E T R I B U N E S E C T I O N C A R T S & E N T E R T A I N M E N T 08 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011 Whether you hate her or love her she is going to make you look! Not only has Lady Gaga taken the music industry by storm but she has also become a fashion trendsetter and one of the only celebrities to keep the shock factor going. From her crazy meat dress to bird nest costume Lady Gaga sets the bar high for herself with every red carpet appearance. T h e M a n y L o o k s o f L a d y G a g a


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