The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01801
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Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: 2/17/2011
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
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General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:01801

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By AVA TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter aturnquest@tribunemedia.net THE NATIONAL Development Party has reaffirmed its commitment to principles, not pragmatics following Andre Rollins decision to join the Progressive Liberal Party. In response to Dr Rollins suggestion that the third party also merge with the official opposition, Renward Wells, leader of the NDP, explained that such a move would involve deep changes to its policy of supporting a true democratic process. Mr Wells said: If the PLP or the FNM were serious about democracy in this country, and democracy not stopping at the door of their political party, then there would be no need for the NDP. In an interview with The Tribune, the third party denied reports published yes terday that Dr Rollins had been forced out of the party or that he had been its leader. Mr Wells said: He felt that it was more pragmatic for him to join one of the major parties, so hes going with his pragmaticism; we are about principles and we will remain to be about these principles. He explained that since Dr Rollins resigned from the post of chairman of the partys executive steering committee in April, the partys momentum has not slowed. The party held a debate and convention in November, during which members elected a leader, deputy leader and chairman. Mr Wells said: For us this is not unexpected. He came to us, we entertained him, heard what it was he had to say, he informed us that he was resigning from the party and weve moved on. This party had long since moved on, we wish him all the best in his endeavours. Dr Rollins tendered his resignation to the party in a meeting on Tuesday night and announced his intentions to join the PLP yesterday. In a press statement, Dr Rollins invited the NDP to join the PLP, which he feels is the party that best encapsulates their principles and philosophies. Dr Rollins said: This will provide the most realistic means of translating NDP ideas into national policies and programmes that are crucial for significant future growth and development. It is my view that the Progressive Liberal Party is the only major political organisation that meets this fundamental criterion. In response to Dr Rollins suggestion, Mr Wells added: Give every member the opportunity to vote as to who should lead those parties, and the people in the constituency the right to choose who they would like to represent them. If they deepened democracy then we would know that they would be serious about the second part of our mission, which is empowering the Bahamian people. LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011 THE TRIBUNE NDP vows to stick to principles after Rollins decision to join PLP JOINING PLP: Andre Rollins

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LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDA Y, FEBRUARY 17, 2011, PAGE 3 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM THE fight to have BTC remain in Bahamian hands is a political one, and all who oppose the sale of the company to Cable and Wireless should band together, Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell told a crowd gathered at the Prince Charles Rally site during the opposition partys rally on Tuesday night. Mr Mitchell accused the FNM of proposing to sell the furniture to save the house, saying that the legacy of Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham is one of destruction. He also chided the government for attacking union leaders who are simply acting in the best interests of their members. I would advise union leaders however that this is a political battle and the forces must come together not stand apart if we are to win. All of us must stand together. There is no point in arguing that because the PLP stands with you that makes you PLP. We are fighting for the nation: not PLP or FNM, Mr Mitchell said. He said that the country is in a strange place where the leaders of the country are attacking their own citizens because those citizens dare to say they do not want BTC sold. The Minister of Labour says because the union president called for an Egypt moment, that the union president is fomenting violence. I too support an Egypt moment which had nothing to do with violence. It was a peaceful movement by people of that country to remove a dictator from office. The only violence in that campaign was violence by the state against its own people. Does the Minister of Labour propose the use of violence against his own people in Nassau? We have a history of peaceful dissent and civil disobedience in this country and it is time to employ that tool, the Fox Hill MP said. Mr Mitchell said that when a government cannot hear, it must feel the voice of the people. Recently, they published an article in the newspaper by a group calling itself Consumer Voices Bahamas. This is one of a number of FNM front organisations. They said they held a poll and most people support the FNM's decision to sell BTC and oppose the PLPs position. That poll is not worth the paper it is written on. The fact is you dont need a poll to hear the noise in the market place. People do not want BTC sold to Cable and Wireless. Which part of No does the FNM not understand? This is the same mistake they made in the referendum of 2002, Mr Mitchell said. He said that the issue is not whether BTC should be sold but to whom should the government should sell it and on what terms. WHEN the PLP government wins the next general election, it will rescue the economy from the mismanagement of the FNM, Elizabeth MP Ryan Pinder told party supporters at a rally in his constituency last night. Mr Pinder said the Bahamas is still in the worst economic slump since the 1920s, and the global recession is not solely responsible. It is the lack of vision of the present government which has made our condition even worse. Their response is to borrow, borrow and borrow some more. So much so that it will be our children who will be straddled with the task of having to repay our debt, the Elizabeth MP said He also blamed the FNM for failing to manage the crime explosion in recent years. Governments are elected to lead, particularly in the face of a monumental crisis which continues to escalate. Good governments, like the one you had under the Christie PLP administration, implement strategies to get at the root causes of delinquent behaviour. This FNM government, however, is also bankrupt on vision in this regard. We need change and we need it now, Mr Pinder said. He promised the crowd that when the PLP wins the next election, it will put in place programmes to accelerate the economic recovery of the Bahamas. He urged the people of his constituency to prepare themselves to take advantage of the upcoming opportunities. We will put in programmes that prepare you to succeed, prepare you to understand how to grow your business, prepare you to be in the best position to secure that employment opportunity. We will leverage the community efforts we developed over the last year to implement crime prevention programmes so you can be confident that Elizabeth is a safe place to live, a safe place to succeed. In this upcom ing year we will work in partnership to prepare for opportunities, said Mr Pinder. A 25-YEAR-OLDman accused of stabbing his former girlfriend on Sunday was arraigned in Magistrates Court yesterday charged with attempted murder. Devon Adderley of Rockcrusher stands accused of the attempted murder of Lashan Smith. Smith, 23, was stabbed on Sunday while stopped at the traffic lights on Jerome Avenue and Chesapeake Road. Adderley was not required to enter a plea to the charge. Prosecutor Godfrey Brennen objected to Adderley being granted bail, claiming that he had made death threats to the victim. Adderleys attorney Michael Kemp noted that Adderley has been on bail for 10 years on an armed robbery charge. Mr Kemp also told the court his client alleges that the victims sister, who is a police officer, has been harassing him. Magistrate Derrence Rolle ordered that Adder ley be fitted with an elec tronic monitoring bracelet. He was ordered to be at home by 7pm each day and to stay away from the complainant and witness es. The case was adjourned to March 15. PLP WILL RESCUE EC ONOMY FR OM FNM MISMAN A GEMENT MAN A CCUSED OF STABBING FORMER GIRLFRIEND APPEARS IN C OURT Opponents of BTC sale should band together SAMIE PETITFRERE a sixth grade student of Naomi Blatch Primary School, gets her eyes tested by Ron Redner of Roswell Rotary yesterday. Rotary Club International conducted eye examinations at the school and will be visiting more government schools this week. Photo/Tim Clarke R O T AR Y CL UB INTERN A TION AL KEEPS AN EYE ON S TUDENT S BTC FIGHT: Fred Mitchell PERRY Christie, leader of the Progressive Liberal Party, celebrated the one year anniversary of the Elizabeth constitutency by-election at a party rally last night. He praised Ryan Pinder, member of parliament for Elizabeth, for prov ing himself in his first year in office to be a winner. Make no mistake about it: Ryan has proven himself to be a key member of the new generation of future leadership that is taking shape within the PLP. I expect even greater things of this young man in the years to come. Indeed I am confident that Ryan Pinder is destined to play an important, possibly even an historic, part in the next generation of leader ship that is emerging within our great party, said Mr Christie. To Senator Dr Duane Sands, former Elizabeth candidate, he said bring it on in the next election. The result next time will be no different, except for one thing. The next time around, Ryan will beat Duane so bad, Duane will give up politics for good and return to the operating room where he belongs. PLP leader pr aises winner Ry an Pinder ELIZABETH MP: Ryan Pinder SEE page 10

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EDITOR, The Tribune. Dr. Duane Sands will be a wonderful addition to the Senate. He is a very well trained and experienced doctor who has served his country and our people for many years including with trauma patients as Director of Accident and Emergency at PMH. Not only has he helped to save lives as a surgeon, having performed the first open heart surgery in the country, he has also been an advocate for sustainable and expanded health care for all Bahamians. He has also served as PMH's Chief of Surgery. It is so good to see highly accomplished people at the top of their fields engaged in the political process at the highest levels. It reminds me of the appointment of Vincent Vanderpool Wallace to the Ministry of Tourism. He is of course one of the best in the field of tourism in the region and perhaps around the world. Just like Mr. Vanderpool Wallace's entry into politics, Dr. Sands' appointment bodes well for our politics and should encourage others like him to make such a sac rifice and a contribution. Instead of so many people complaining from the sidelines, they should get involved and like Obama says, be the change they want to see. It's easy to complain and be cynical. It's much harder to make a difference. Our political system is as good or as broken as our efforts to get involved. Both PLPs and FNMs who have met Dr. Sands as a person, doctor or as a candidate will attest to his integrity and his care and concern for people regardless of their political beliefs. Just as he served on various public boards in the past, he is now Chairman of the Mortgage Corporation. Dr. Sands not only has a social conscience, he also has common sense in terms of getting things done. I look forward to hearing the voice of this capable and patriotic Bahamian who has a progressive spirit and is committed to the social development and welfare of our people. He has demonstrated his commitment to The Bahamas in action and in service, not just in speeches and public relations gim micks. BLS Nassau, February, 2011 EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune LimitedNULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt Publisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P .O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama WEBSITE www.tribune242.com updated daily at 2pm SHE WAS brilliant, charming, hardworking, loyal and caring. Her life was dedicated to the education of Bahamians, because as she said recently a well educated populace is the only sensible ingredient to ensure the successful development of society. Keva Marie Bethel, the only daughter of the late Hon. Sidney Eldon and his wife, Rowena (Winnie), was determined to follow in the footsteps of her brother, Michael, four years her senior. Michael was already estab lishing an outstanding scholastic record, having been accepted as a student at St Catherines College, Cambridge. In September, 1956, an age when it was not usual for girls to leave the Bahamas for studies abroad, Keva Eldon became the first Bahamian woman to enter Cambridge, reading Modern Languages at Girton College. In December 1983 she became the first woman second Bahamian principal of the College of the Bahamas. By then the College was entering its ninth year. At her installation ceremony, brother Michael, by then the first Bahamian bishop of the Anglican Diocese delivered the installation prayer. He was the founding chairman of the College of the Bahamas Council serving from 1976 to 1995. Together, brother and sister guided the college through its formative years. In August, 1995 on her 60th birthday she officially retired, but was encouraged to continue as College president on a year-to-year contract. However, in August, 1997, she announced that she would officially retire at the end of the 1998 academic year. She looked forward, she joked, to finding out how it felt to be deliciously bored. However, Dr Keva Bethel, president emeritus of the College, was too vibrant a woman to entertain boredom, not only was she active on many boards, but she and Dr Gail Saunders, former director general of Heritage, were now the Colleges first resident scholars. Dr Bethel was researching the history of Education in the Bahamas and the development of the College, and Dr Saunders was continuing her research on the history of race relations. It is understood that Dr Bethel had completed the draft for the first chapter of her book and was busy reading the College Councils min utes. They were both fascinated, said Dr Saunders, going through the pages of The Tribune and Guardian for that period. It is hoped that her daughter, Nicholette Bethel Burrows, herself an accomplished scholar, will now complete her mothers work. However, the loyalty to the very end that brother and sister had for each other, and Kevas dedication to her brother when he fell seriously ill and could no longer care for himself was not only heroic, but inspirational. Bishop Eldon retired in 1996, due to failing health, after 24 years as bishop. Six years ago he lapsed into a coma and was cared for by nurses at his sisters home. Although he knew no one, brother and sister had such an affinity of spirit that Keva felt that Michael was aware of her presence. He followed her with his eyes. He listened as she read to him daily. She discussed topics she felt would interest him and she held his hand. At times she was convinced he squeezed hers. However, doctors could see no sign of awareness. She felt he was aware at least of her. When his insurance ran out, Keva struggled financially to support him. Eventually the Anglican Diocese made arrangements with the Princess Margaret Hospital and for the last two years, he was a patient there. Every afternoon his loyal sister with the books they both enjoyed was at his side. She read to him, she talked to him and she held his hand. Late last year she told him that she would be leaving for a short while. She was not well, but she would be back. She left for MD Anderson in Texas where she was diag nosed with ovarian cancer no cure, but treatable. Her friends were amazed at how resigned she was to her fate. There was no questioning of Oh, God why me? There was nothing like that said Dr Saunders, She never complained, never questioned it, she just took it in her stride. But the spirit of brother and sister seemed to be one. When she started to fail in Doctors Hospital, so did he at Princess Margaret. He was leading the way for her to fol low. It seemed she was just hanging to life to make certain that he was safely in the arms of his Maker. He died at 12.50am, Monday, February 7. Keva seemed relieved when she was told. At about 5am on Tuesday, February 15 the same day of brother Michaels funer al at around 5am Keva Marie stepped out of her body and moved on to better things, daughter Nicolette announced to her friends. Later that day during her brothers funeral service a moment of silence was held to honour his sister. Brother and sister prelate and educator had left the Bahamian scene together. And as Governor General Sir Arthur Foulkes said of him when speaking on behalf of the Bahamian people, he could have also said of her they both understood that education was fundamental to developing the people of the country they loved. Our deepest sympathy goes out to their family. May they be consoled to know that this country has lost two leaders who have made Bahamians very proud. Duane Sands will be a good addition to the Senate LETTERSletters@tribunemedia.net A dedicated brother and sister leave scene 0U-RVHSKRPOLQVRQ EDITOR, The Tribune. I was saddened by the death of my friend, Paul Bower, and share in great measure the grief of his widow, Ericka and sons, Nigel and Bobby. I met Paul a few years after World War II. He became a special friend and our chance meetings always brightened my day. Paul served as an officer on HMS Hind, one of the Allied ships off the Normandy coast at dawn, June 6, 1944. These ships and their crews, aided by the Air Force, were in the forefront of the largest invasion in history. Under their protection but with many casualties Allied soldiers secured a bridge head. Subsequent and increasingly larger landings of men and weapons finally led to victory. Those who came after are forever grateful to those who led the way. CHESTER THOMPSON Nassau, February 10, 2011. Saddened by death of my friend Paul Bower EDITOR, The Tribune. Re: Well turn country into small Egypt. Tribune February 9, 2011. THE childish temper tantrums of trade unions may be an indication of how far a country has progressed toward national maturity. KEN W KNOWLES, MD Nassau, February 9, 2011. Trade unions and temper tantrums INSIGHTFor the stories behind the news, read Insight on Mondays

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By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net BISHOP Earl Randy Fraser said yesterday he was left feeling wounded after allegations surfaced that he had sexual relations with a young girl whom he had agreed to counsel. Fraser,who was back on the witness stand yesterday, said that after the allegations cameto light during a confrontation at his church on Palm Sunday 2006, he requested a one year leave of absence. During that time I was very wounded, wounded in spirit and emotions. I was like a bleeding shepherd. Its difficult for a bleeding shepherd to tend to his flock, Fraser said. Fraser, senior pastor at Pil grim Baptist Temple in St James Road, is accused of having sex with a 16-year-old girl between July 2005 and February 2006. Fraser described Palm Sunday 2006 as a day he will never forget. Our service was desecratedby outsiders. It was interrupted and serious allegations were hurled at me, he told the court. That morning, he said, following the 8am service, he received a voice-mail on his cellular phone. He said the person, who claimed to be an aunt of the complainant, said: Im coming up there today. According to Fraser, the woman said she was bringing the police with her. He told the court that he summoned the complainants grandmother and another aunt into his office and asked them where the complainant was. He said that the aunt told him that she was in the bathroom crying and would not come out. Fraser claimed he went to the bathroom to gether but she was not there. He told the court that he found her crying and trembling inside the car of one of the church members. Fraser said that he asked her what was going on and she said she did not know. He said that the complainants aunt and grandmother were also puzzled. Fraser went on to testify that about 15 minutes into the 11am service, two people stormed into the church. He said that the woman he identified as the complainants mother was shouting, but he could not understand what she was saying. According to Fraser, the womans brother asked, Where the pastor is? before he was removed from the sanctuary by some male congregation members. Fraser claimed that inside his office, the mother began to speak to him directly, charging him with having sex with her daughter for $30 a week. According to Fraser, the woman shouted, You going to pay my mortgage off, $40,000. He also told the court that an aunt of the complainant added that if their mother became ill, he would pay her medical expenses. Fraser claimed he just sat in the chair and said nothing. I felt very disturbed, disappointed and humiliated, he said. LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDA Y, FEBRUARY 17, 2011, PAGE 5 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM (]HNLHO Allegations left Bishop Fraser feeling wounded BISHOP Earl Randy Fraser

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LOCAL NEWS P AGE 6, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011 THE TRIBUNE T O DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM THE SECOND in a series of Consumer Voices Bahamas polls were conducted over the weekend, when CVB travelled to Aba co to ask residents how they feel about the privatisaion of BTC. The poll was conducted at Marsh Harbour, Murphy Town, Treasure Cay, Coop ers Town and Fox Town. Marlene Minus, chairperson of CVB, and two execu tive members of the group conducted the poll. The purpose was to ascer tain consumer opinions on the governments plan to privatise BTC and also to iden tify major areas of concern with regard to telecoms services. Yes or no answers were given to the following questions: Do you support the gov ernments plan to privatize BTC? Are you satisfied with the services offered by BTC? The age, gender, race, and address of the respondents was also collected. Ninety-seven persons, or 57 per cent of the 170 per sons who participated in the poll, said they support privatisation. Fifty-one persons, or 30 per cent, do not support the sale. Twenty-two individu als, or 13 per cent, are unde cided. Abaconians said BTC needs to improve customer service, and signal strength and quality, particularly in the community of Bahama Palm and the southern end of the island. There were also concerns about a shortage of phone lines in German Town and a slow response to repair requests. The first poll was conducted on January 28 on Bay Street, Nassau, and surveyed 236 individuals. The majority of those polled in New Providence also supported privatisation. The CVB said it will con tinue to hold surveys in oth er Family islands. Poll: Majority of Abaco residents back sale of BTC

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By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT The Humane Society of Grand Bahama is very disappointed that four US veterinarians have been blocked by the Department of Agriculture from assisting with a local spay/neuter clinic. Tip Burrows, managing director of HSGB, said concerns about the visiting vets and the clinic were raised by the Bahamas Veterinary Association. Although the vets are on the island, she said they are unable to do any work even after taking vacation time to attend the clinic. Four US veterinarians and four vet technicians gave up vacation time and paid their own way here to donate their time and expertise for a cause they believe strongly in, she said. The Bahamas Veterinary Association apparently feels that with three Bahamian vets now in Freeport, those vets could do thousands ofspays and neuters in a year through the Grand Bahama Port Authoritys spay/neuter voucher pro gramme, The GBPA has put a cap on the funding for spay/neuter, and the new budget would allow for a maximum of 800 spays and neuters in a years time, she said. Ms Burrows believes that 800is not enough, and esti mates that there could be more than 6,000 dogs and cats potentially breeding on the island. The Humane Societys animal shelter on Coral Road is full and the organi sation was counting on the assistance of the four vets, who along with their two local Bahamian vets, were lending their expertise to the clinic. The organisation is hopingto perform some 2,000 surgeries per year to decrease and control the unwanted animal population on the island. The four-day clinic started on Monday at Eight Mile Rock, where many persons cannot afford to have their pets spayed and neutered, thus contributing to the stray animal problem in West Grand Bahama. The Humane Society and the Kohn Foundation announced last week a field clinic at St Stephens Parish Hall. Shelter vets, Bahamians Dr Dawn Gibbs and Dr Chante Wildgoose, and four US vets, Robin Brennen, Bridget Barry, Deb Campbell and Tanya Perry were to perform the surgeries. Ms Burrows said she have tried contacting Dept of Agriculture officials concerning the decision taken regarding the US vets, but has been unable to reach anyone. AnimalsShe said the GBPA is the only Bahamian entity that has ever funded spay/neuter programmes on the island. She noted that their funding is meant for Freeport/Port area, and not meant to cover animals out side of Freeport. According to the Humane Society official, over 30 per cent of the shelter intake are animals from West Grand Bahama. You have only to drive from Eight Mile Rock to West End to see the scope of the problem. There are many animals belonging to residents of West Grand Bahama that will never be brought to Freeport for sterilisation unless the HSGB picks them up. We do not have the funding, resources or manpower to do this on a regular basis, hence the need for this clinic. This field clinic has been funded by Humane Society International, Amigos Fund, and many caring individuals, both local and abroad. We are especially grateful to Humane Society International and Amigos Fund which have both provided generous grants; we are still short of our estimated bud get, however, which is why your help is more important than ever. Our good friends at Waugh Construction are donating the venue, which is the empty storefront next to Commonwealth Bank in the Harbour West plaza, where City Market is, The entrance to the clinic will be through the gate between the back of the bank and the Texaco station, she said. LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDA Y, FEBRUARY 17, 2011, PAGE 7 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Four US vets blocked from assisting local spay/neuter clinic CARACAS, Venezuela Associated Press VENEZUELAN and French authorities have seized 3.6 metric tons of cocaine aboard a vessel in the Caribbean Sea. Venezuelan Justice Minister Tareck El Aissami says seven suspects were arrested during the anti-drug operation off Venezuela's coast. Venezuela is a major hub for gangs that smuggle Colombian cocaine to the United States and Europe. El Aissami said Wednesday that Venezuela is cooperating with foreign governments to fight drug smuggling. He called Tuesday's bust "a tough blow" to traffickers. U.S. officials have accused President Hugo Chavez's government of lax anti-drug efforts. Chavez counters that his government is doing everything possible to stem the flow of drugs through Venezuela. VENEZUEL ANS, FREN CH SEIZE HUGE DR UG HAUL

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LOCAL NEWS P AGE 8, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011 THE TRIBUNE T O DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM BETTY K AGENCIES LTDPhone 322-2142 322-2875 322-2813Freight Warehouse: 322-8926 Fax 322-6089 NOTICE OF RELOCATION OF BETTY K AGENCIES OFFICES OPENWednesday Feb 17 at 8:00am NE corner of Victoria & Bay StreetsALL PHONE NUMBERS REMAIN THE SAME. The next Betty K sailing is arriving Thursday Feb 18 at the Arawak Cay Terminal. Regular sailings resume as follows: Nassau 2 per week as of Monday Feb 28 Abaco 1 per week as of March 1st. BETTY K AGENCIES LTD PARKING BAY STREETVICTORIAAVENUEWATERFRONT THE man entrusted with the victim and witness care programme in the courts of Eng land received special care from Bahamian friends this month, as he experienced the Bahama Host programme. Simon Deacy, the national manager of the No Witness, No Justice programme in England and Wales, got a close encounter with Bahamian cul ture as Pastor Ivan Rolle and his wife, Ruthanne, hosted him for a day. Mr Deacy, who was in Nassau as the facilitator of a witness care conference, worshiped with the Rolles at Comfort House Ministries. He also participated in a junkanoo rush and enjoyed a meal with the Rolles. The Rolles said it was a plea sure to host Mr Deacy as he worked to help Bahamians improve the care given to vic tims of crime and witnesses of the court. Mr Deacy is pictured at Com fort House Ministries and taking part in a junkanoo rush. BahamaHost is a long-stand ing project that pairs hospitable Bahamians with visitors inter ested in immersing themselves in local culture. Criminal justice expert gets taste of BahamaHost SIMON DEACY the national manager of the No Witness, No Justice programme in England and Wales, enjoys junkanoo. n INTERNATIONALNEWS NEW YORK Associated Press A SOMALIpirate who kidnapped and brutalized the captain of a U.S.-flagged merchant ship off the coast of Africa in 2009 was sentenced to more than 33 years in prison Wednesday by an emotional judge who told him he deserved a stiff punishment for leading a crew of armed bandits bent on committing "depraved acts." U.S. District Judge Loretta A. Preska choked up as she read at length from letters writ ten by Capt. Richard Phillips and traumatized sailors who were aboard the cargo vessel commandeered by Abdiwali Abdiqadir Muse. The recent spate of piracy on the Indian Ocean and else where "is not a Disneylandesque problem," she quoted Phillips as saying. "These are not Johnny Depps. They threaten seamen's lives, repeatedly. ... They deprive us of the rights that they themselves complain about." Another officer from the ship, Colin Wright, appeared in person to urge the judge to impose a lengthy term. He recalled being shot at and held at gunpoint by Muse and three other pirates. "What happened to us was terrible," said Wright, 44. "I'm not the same person I was and I never will be." Muse pleaded guilty last year to hijacking, kidnapping and hostage-taking charges. Before he was sentenced, he apolo gized to the victims, claiming he was a desperate, small-time player in a Somali piracy syndicate that has collected mil lions of dollars in ransoms. "I'm very sorry for what I did," he said through an inter preter. "I got my hands into something that was more pow erful than me." Preska imposed the maxi mum prison sentence of 33 years, nine months. She noted that prosecutors had described the pirates as experienced, coordinated and sadistic even playing Russian roulette with their hostages during the five-day siege of the Maersk Alabama. "They appeared to relish even their most depraved acts of physical and psychological violence," she said. Muse, wearing a green crewneck shirt and khaki pants, stared straight ahead and showed no emotion as the sentence was announced. The defendant's mother, speaking to The Associated Press by phone Wednesday before the sentencing from his hometown in central Somali, had predicted he would be brave. "From what I know of him, he won't cry although he is a kid because he is stronger than a crying child," she said. "In his life, he passed through a lot of hardships. ... Men are sharpened by hardship." Muse's father, Abdiqadir Muse Gedi, said he wanted U.S officials to "let him take his term in Somalia." The federal prosecution in Manhattan was part of a stepped-up effort to stem a wave of 21st century piracy by seeking justice in U.S. courts, at times using 19th century maritime laws. Late last year, a Virginia jury found five other Somali men guilty of exchanging gunfire with a U.S. Navy ship off the coast of Africa. Scholars called it the first piracy case to go to trial since the Civil War, when a New York jury deadlocked on charges against 13 Southern privateers. SOMALI PIRATE GETS MORE THAN 33 YEARS IN PRISON

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ANASTASIA Papageorge has won the 2011 New Providence Junior Champion Young Chef Contest. Anastacia impressed the judges chefs Joseph Swoboda of Sandals, Tiffany Barton of the Wyndham and Devin Johnson of the Sheraton with her tasty "Island Sea Barefoot Rice" and Bahamian Junkanoo Rush Cake. The 14-year-old ninth grade student of LW Young Junior High School, earned a total of 424.5 points with these two dishes. Jasmine Glinton of Anatol Rodgers High School placed second with 420 points with her entries, "Lobster Bisque" and "Sapodilla Coconut Cake with Fruit Filling." Peter Outten of AF Adderley Junior High School came in third with 403.5 points for "Outtens Dumpling Soup" and "Seasoned Junkanoo Rice." The contest, held at AF Adderley, is a preliminary to the 19th Annual All Island Champion Young Chef Finals, scheduled for March 16 at AF Adderley for juniors and March 17 at Government High School for seniors, with over $3,300 in scholarships available. The top two New Providence juniors move on to the National Junior Champion Young Chef competition, explained Sharon Ferguson, Ministry of Education home economics officer, who co-ordinates the event with PS Advertising and Public Relations throughout the nations schools. For the ninth year, there are cash prizes for the winners: $250 for first, $150 for second, $100 for third and $50 for fourth. National senior champion young chefs will receive $1,500, $750, $300, and $200 respectively, said Keith Parker of PS Advertising, which has been co-ordinating the event since its incep tion. The sponsors are Mahatma Rice and Robin Hood Flour. LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDA Y, FEBRUARY 17, 2011, PAGE 9 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM The Mercedes-Benz C-ClassYour most enjoyable drive ever.The Mercedes-Benz C-Class is a pleasure tobehold offering a new interpretation of driving pleasure. Its taut lines lend it an air of effortless superiority while the wide radiator grille and distinctive rear section announce a vehicle with a real presence and dynamic personality. Few cars can compete with its ability to adjust so many facets of its character from the interior to the drive technology so quickly and precisely in response toexternal conditions and your own particular needs. The key to this flexible response is the standard-fit Agility Control Package which includes selective damping. The interior offers noticeably more space and a more distinctive atmosphere tosuit your taste. As you will see, the C-Class is the perfect embodiment of the Mercedes-Benz philosophy.Tyreflex Star MotorsWulff Road, P. O. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas, Tel 242.325.4961 Fax 242.323.4667OUR PARTS DEPARTMENT IS FULLY STOCKED WITH EVERY COMPONENT NECESSARY TO ENSURE THAT YOUR MERCEDES RUNS TROUBLE FREE. TRAINED TECHNICIANS ON DUTY. Anastacia Papageorge wins Nassau s Junior Y oung Chef competition ANASTACIA PAPAGEORGE of LW Young Jr High School won the 2011 New Providence Junior Champion Young Chef Contest. Photo/Deanndra Ferguson /PS News/Features JASMINE GLINTON of Anatol Rodgers High School placed second. Photo/Deanndra Ferguson /PS News/Features

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Bahamas. These are the papers showing the land was turned over from the Treasury to the Ministry of Housing. I dont know of any other papers that could be characterised as legitimate papers, he said. The Ministry of Housing is proceeding with plans to transform the shanty town into a new subdivision, known temporarily as Fire Trail. Two homes in the middle of planned roadways are to be demolished this week. The residents were given notice by the Ministry of Housing several weeks ago. Bishop Davis explained the churchs only involvement was to collect the money and turn it over to Ms Burns. We do mission work in that area and in our effort to help the people it came to our understanding that she owned the property. We were trying to help the residents to try to develop proper housing. We suggested since she owned the land that she make available to them portions. We were not aware of the governments plans, said Bishop Davis. Despite public animosity expressed over Haitian villages, Bishop Davis said of his churchs ministry: This is the church, the church of Jesus. Our job is to preach love; to preach salvation. Our church is filled with Haitians from top to bottom. There is no division in our church. Those who come to us are a part of us. We embrace them. These are our brothers and sisters. We carry ourselves in the church and the community in the name of Jesus to spread the message of Jesus. We are not immigration, this is the church of Jesus. Our people know my heart and our job is to lift whoever we come in contact with. We try to preach Christ with them so when they go back they can become servants of Jesus and lift their brothers and sisters. It could be that they come here to hear the message of deliverance, of liberation, to receive the message of Jesus, he said. The Ministry of Housing met with residents of the area in question and Haitian pastors early last year to inform them of the governments plans. To the best of his knowledge, Mr Rolle said Bishop Davis was not involved in any meetings. I was even amazed that someone had the nerve to charge people on the land that was published in the newspa per as belonging to the government. Since last July we have said to the residents this is the land that belongs to the Ministry of Housing and this is what we propose to do, Mr Rolle said. According to Ms Burns, the Baillou family formerly farmed the land for 30 years. They had a big beautiful farm with beautiful bananas, she said. They have been asking for payment from residents for years, with little success. There were other people round there fooling them. They said they were paying them. We asked them if those people brought any paper. We did. Last year we went there three times, she said. Earlier this week, Mr Rolle said many Haitian villages sprung up because people on these properties either worked for someone or paid someone who was a Bahamian national. He said the genesis of some villages is a Bahamian who may have farmed the land and hired one or two Haitian workers. He said the general involvement of Bahamians in the growth and development of Haitian shanty towns is always the story that is not printed, and in many cases, Bahamians are facilitators. Residents of Bois Pen, for example, the Haitian village off Joe Farrington Road, said there are at least two Bahamian landowners who manage land in the village. One is said to col lect $10-15 rent on a weekly basis from residents. Ms Burns said claims that only Haitians are being asked to pay are a lie. She said attempts to collect money from Bahamians squatting on the land have been unsuccessful. Government Yard is said to have the highest number of Bahamian residents than any shanty town in New Providence. Neither Ms Burns nor her associate, Mr Baillou, are members of Golden Gates Assembly. Bishop Davis said he did not know her and had never seen her until she brought documents to the church to show the land was owned by the person on whose behalf she acted. The church had no relationship with Ms Burns other than we understood she owned the property and we were trying to help the people, he said. Ms Burns said she approached Bishop Davis because they would listen to him. She said he was willing to help because he knew the terrible living conditions and he believed something needed to be done to help. Apparently they respect him to listen to him more than me. They did not give me the money in my hand. When I went to Bishop Davis the girl in the front desk said there is an envelope here. I said how much is it, she said I dont know. I said let me open it then, in the envelope everything came up to $1,300 with the names of those who pay. They leave it there. I know the girl is a decent girl, she wouldnt steal any money. She said she gave them a receipt, said Ms Burns. Father Vilfort Roland of the Queen of Peace Parish, a Catholic church on Fire Trail involved in Haitian ministry, questioned the Bishops involvement: Why did the Bishop come into this matter? Father Roland said the resi dents, most of whom have only paid a deposit, trusted the arrangement because of Bishop Davis involvement. After the government informed them to move, she still asked for the balance. All they have is a receipt. She says if they pay the balance she will give them the lease agreement and get a stop order on the government, Father Roland said. Mr Rolle said the ministry could not be of much assistance for the residents wanting to get their money back. Who is it that can help them? We were not involved. They know who they gave their money to and they can contact the relevant authorities to cause them to get their monies back. We are not associated with the collection of funds or monies from Haitians or anybody else, said Mr Rolle. Bishop Davis is well known for his involvement in the miracle water phenomenon of 2005. The product first came to light in a press release published by Bishop Davis that said that a man who was pronounced dead later came back to life as a result of the water with the potential to bring about miracles. The water was sold by the Singing Prophet Bishop Lawrence Rolle from Bishop Davis church. Bishop Davis was most recently in the news in 2009 denying claims that he had profited from an allegedly questionable land deal involving Crown land. According to documents, Bishop Davis church authorised Arawak Homes to create the low cost housing subdivision, Ross Davis Estates, from 3.75 acres of Crown land granted by the government to the church for $2,500. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham raised the alarm over the deal because the land had originally been granted during his former administration to build an old folks home. Former Prime Minister Perry Christie confirmed that it was he who signed off on the variation to the original Crown land grant that creat ed a housing subdivision instead of the intended old folks or community home. Bishop Davis church has been involved in missionary work in the Haitian communities neighbouring the church for 40 years. The day before the Mackey Yard fire, Bishop Davis said the church ministered in the village. We give them clothes. We employ them. We have a school here, and many of them are enrolled. We educate and provide food and help them with their docu ments. I have made many trips to Haiti so I know first hand what their life is like in Haiti and what it is like here, said Bishop Davis. LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011 THE TRIBUNE T O DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM He may be a good doctor, but he really is no politician. And when it comes to Elizabeth, Dr. Sands is a man without a future. And you can tell him, I said so! said Mr Christie. He called on the party machinery to ready itself for the upcoming general election. We need to begin now to mobilize in earnest for the next General Election. It aint long now. I expect that now that Baha Mar is beginning to roll and other projects are in the works, the Prime Minister may call an early election. We must be ready for it if he does! If he doesnt call it and instead goes deeper into his term, we will have lost nothing by having prepared for an earlier con test, said Mr Christie. But whether he calls the General Election later or sooner, either way, I am supremely confident of one thing and its this: With Gods help and yours, we will be the next Government of The Bahamas! There is no doubt in my mind about that, he said. Mr Christie said the internal bickering and back-biting must therefore stop. We need to come together in unity and in common purpose on all and in each of the constituencies. Unity must be our watchword. Common purpose must be at the core of all our preparations. There is no time to lose. We have to get ready now. There is much to be done and the time we have to do it in is dwindling fast. Mr Christie congratulated the newest cross-over PLP, Dr Andre Rollins, on joining the party. One year after being a National Development Party (NDP) candidate in the Elizabeth Constituency bye-election Mr Rollins decided to join the PLP. We welcome him in our ranks we know him to be a well trained intelligent young Bahamian with a solid vision for The Bahamas and strong ideas of how best it can be governed. We know the soul searching and analyzing that he has gone through and we are pleased that at the end of a long and thoughtful process he has chosen the PLP as his political home, said Mr Christie. I want you all to know that, as the leader of the PLP Dr. Rollins has joined us without discussing with me any preconditions or concessions of any kind. His approach pleases and impresses me and it leads me to say that I am most sincere in my belief that there is a role for Dr. Rollins in the public affairs of our country and I look forward to our holding productive discussions with him, he said. FROM page one PLP leader pr aises winner Ry an Pinder FROM page three PRAISE: Perry Christie Chur ch in shanty town r ent shock SHOCKED: Brensil Rolle

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100 new jobs during and after the refurbishment phase. While there are Exumians clamouring for jobs in housekeeping or front desk, there is a real void in skilled locals who can fill posts in pastry arts, advanced dive masters or the engineering field, said hotel manager Patrick Drake. To offset this, the property has focused on inhouse cross-training and certifying of existing staff, a process that takes months. "The greatest drawback over here is the training for a lot of the people who are homegrown," said Mr Drake. "If you have a man in the kitchen that's been there 30 years but he has nothing that shows anything any day he leaves you ... he has nothing that shows anything. If he had certification he can now go anywhere, any other country, but that is something that all the islands are very poor at doing. "Things even like diving, we have people cross-train ing because as many islands as we have, you think that it would be easy to get divers, and advanced divers. The truth is we are very, very short here. Most of the islanders don't swim at all, so I can't even get them to work in water sports. So it goes back to the point I was making about where the demand is. It's not that you don't have the labour out there but they don't have the skills for what you really need. The resort is looking for dive masters, a boat captain and first mate, a fulltime gym instructor, and pastry artists dry areas in the Exuma labour pool. The local schools must recognise the burgeoning opportunities on Exuma and prepare high school graduates with more than passing grades if they are to compete, added Mr Drake. "Why I keep stressing the point is because I want the message to get out to the school systems that we have to get people a little more trained than just hav ing gotten through school those days are now gone." LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011 THE TRIBUNE T O DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM NR36Iam no longer at Baha-Retreat Spa.Ican now be reached at 427-1054or 322-2829Agatha Aggie Almace Agatha Aggie Almace NASSAU GLASS COMPANYwill be CLOSED Saturday February 19thfor our companys in order to give our staff awell-deserved break.We will reopen on Monday February 21stWe apologise for any inconvenience causedMackey Street 393-8165 tive lifestyle. According to reports, District School Superintendent Julian Anderson, who has responsibility for WPP, confronted Deleveaux on January 4 and inquired about his post at the school. He had said Deleveaux was unable to produce paperwork, but explained he was sent to Grand Bahama by another education official and his paperwork would be coming in short order. After following up on the matter, Mr Anderson said the accused was unable to produce any paperwork. Deleveaux, of Freeport, was not represented in court by counsel. Dr Rollins said: "It is my strong conviction that it is neither wise, nor practical, to continue pursuing the development of a new political party in an environment of scarce resources and weak public demand, where prospects for success are long-term at best and with so much at stake in our nations immediate future." Dr Rollins said while he shared the idealism of many concerning the imperfections of the major parties, he appreciated the importance of prag matism in strategically solving national problems. Dr Rollins added: It is still my belief that Bahamians want to see change in our nations politics, because they realise the critical role that government must play in correcting the now regressive course of our national development. Last year, Dr Rollins was one of five candidates fighting to represent Elizabeth Estates, securing 49 votes. Shortly after the by-election, Dr Rollins was courted by Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham and former PLP first lady Dame Marguerite Pindling, who invited him to join their parties. In July, Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell expressed his desire to see Dr Rollins cross over to the PLP after his performance in the country's first political debate, a week prior to the by-election. At that time, the orthodontist maintained his mem bership in the NDP. In yesterdays statement, Dr Rollins encouraged the leadership of the NDP to consider the viability of merging with the PLP. He said: Just as I believe in our nations potential for greatness, despite our present shortcomings, I am also confident that notwithstanding the PLPs imperfections, this groundbreaking party still possesses the capacity for change. Dr Rollins added: Whatever the partys ultimate decision, they know that I shall respect their right to proceed as they deem best, yet hold out hope that we will be of one accord; but I have decided to act now to follow my convictions and to proudly join the PLP. SEE PAGE TWO FROM page one Bahamians need mor e tr aining FROM page one Andre Rollins FROM page one Man jailed for posing as teacher JAILED: Leroy Leonardo Deleveaux outside of court yesterday.

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The Ministry of Education and an American foreign disaster aid agency have embarked on a joint initiative to make school environments in the Bahamas safer. The initiative will focus on preparedness, but will also cover the steps that should be taken during and after a dangerous event on a school campus. It will cover safety issues including: natural disasters such as hurricanes and tornados violence perpetrated by students and/or parents unsafe school buildings and infrastructure Beryl Armbrister, consultant and disaster risk management specialist at the Office of US Foreign Disaster Assistance for Latin America and the Caribbean (USAID/OFDA) along with a team of officers that include: Christopher Smith, acting director of security; Sabrina Skinner, education officer; Anslo Strachan, chief school attendance officer; and Lisa Fitz-Charles, administrative officer, travelled to North Andros to host a School Safety Stakeholders Forum. Mrs Armbrister explained that a School Safety Plan is being designed by the USAID/OFDA, but that it is important to hear from all stakeholders, both in New Providence and on the family islands, in order to draft a comprehensive policy that would be relevant to their needs. She indicated that in addition to regularising how schools respond to issues of safety, the policy will also address social elements that can lead to unsafe environments. The participants, who included security officers, principals, teachers, students, and other officers in the public service, were informed of the purpose of the visit, after which they were divided into groups to discuss and find solutions to various scenarios, such as: contaminated water cholera outbreak vandalism armed suspect entering a school hostage situations hidden weapons on campus weapon use on campus during the day The feedback of all of the participants was recorded and they were urged to continue to discuss the issues raised and look at the forum as only a first step in making their schools safer. Mr Smith, who gave the vote of thanks, encouraged the participants to take responsibility for the communities in which they live, and to take disaster preparedness seriously because they do not have the all of the resources that the people who live in New Providence have. He indicated that they need to be aware of the skills people possess, and the available resources, both human and material. LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDA Y, FEBRUARY 17, 2011, PAGE 13 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM rrffnt fbrnfn rtrfntfr nnnrr Bahamas/US partner to make local schools safer SAFETY FIRST: Andros workshop participants.

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LOCAL NEWS PAGE 14, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT An Emergency Water Facility that would provide fresh water in the aftermath of a hurricane or crisis was officially commissioned in Grand Bahama on Wednesday. The facility, located on Grand Bahamian Way, is equipped with a reverse osmosis plant capable of producing 6,000 gallons of water per day from sea water. The project was funded through donations totalling more $200,000 from the TK Foundation, the Bahamas Rotary Clubs of District 7020, Grand Bahama Rotary Clubs of District 6990, Rotary Clubs of District 5280, the Rotary Foundation, and the business sector. The back-to-back hurricanes that hit Grand Bahama in 2004 and left thousands without access to fresh water highlighted the need for an emergency water facility. The project was first conceived in 2006 by the TK Foundation, which approached Rotary to partner with them. Attending the commissioning were Rotary members from local clubs, the Nassau Clubs, and from Santa Monica, Los Angeles. Also present were Island Administrator Don Cornish, who has responsibility for NEMA in Freeport, and Eight Mile Rock MP Vernae Grant. The facility is built to withstand Category Five hurricanes and storm surge. It has a 60gallon water storage tank and a deep underground well with unlimited access to sea water. Waugh Construction was the contractor and project manager. Mike Stafford, assistant district governor elect for Grand Bahama Rotary Clubs District 6990, said there was tremendous support for the project locally, nationally and internationally. After the hurricanes (Frances and Jeanne) of 2004, the first people that came to help were our friends from the Rotary Clubs of Nassau who co-ordinated and provided phenomenal relief assistance. They brought over fresh water on the plane and the weight of the water prevented them bringing more food items, he said. This water facility will take that out of the equation and we will now have water right here on Grand Bahama, he said. Mr Stafford said water from the facility will only be used after a hurricane. We are not in competition with any of the water companies; it will only be used after a hurricane hits the country, he said. Mr Stafford said the facility does not use the public water supply like the other water producers on the island, so it will not be affected if the supply is cut off or if the chlorine level rises. This water facility uses sea water which is pumped from over 100ft deep and our water supply would never be out of water, he said. Lindsey Cancino of the Rotary Club of East Nassau and the former CFO of the TK Foundation, said after the devastation of the last three hurricanes to hit Grand Bahama, There was a sense of urgency to do something long term that would help if this ever happened again. Mr Cancino said the TK Foundation went about trying to establish how we would apply for a matching grant from the Rotary Foundation. I called Rotarian Barry Rassin and he told me that Myles Pritchard who is now a member of the Rotary Club of Santa Monica, California, was looking to do a water project in the Bahamas and thats how we got this started. Jillian Alexander, co-chair of Rotary District 5280WCS, said this is the largest water project Rotary has done. Her district includes eight Rotary Clubs in the California area. This is first time we have done anything this large. Typically, water projects have been catching rain water and having storage tanks with gravel in them and sandstone to make sure the water stays clean, but this is a much larger project than the typical project and serving a much larger community of 45,000 people, she said. Ms Alexander said her district was able to raise $22,000, a matching grant of $45,000 was donated by the Rotary Foundation, and $25,000 was given by District 7020 for an overall total of $95,000 from Rotary. She said the TK Foundation contributed $120,000. Administrator Don Cornish commended the TK Foundation, the Rotary Clubs and the Rotary Foundation on behalf of NEMA for their generous donation and contribution to the Grand Bahama community. We believe that there is clear need for cooperation among other organisations with the government and the private sector. NEMA has an awesome task as the governmental agency responsible for protecting the population during crises and catastrophes. We cannot do it alone, he said. Emergency W ater Facility is commissioned on GB WATER FACILITY: Move to provide fresh water in the aftermath of a hurricane.

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AMNESTY INTERNATIONALhas urged members of Trinidad and Tobagos parliament to vote against a constitutional amendment Bill that would allow executions to be resumed in the country. Under the proposed Bill, scheduled to be debated on February 18, courts across the country would be able to circumvent judicial rulings that enhanced human rights protection and resulted in a halt to executions in 1999. Authorities in the Caribbean nation claim carrying out executions is a way to tackle rising numbers of murders and deter others from committing violent crime. Trinidad and Tobago has areal problem with murder and violent crimes, but experience has shown that facili tating executions is not the solution, said Chiara Liguori, researcher on Trinidad and Tobago at Amnesty International. Hurrying executions or ignoring appeals already in progress violates defendants rights by denying them due process guaranteed under international law. The proposed Bill would allow people to be executed even if they were appealing against their sentence, which is their right. We urge Parliament not to accept the proposed Bill and instead tackle the root causes of violent crime and reform the police and justice systems. What may seem a technical change in the Constitution isin fact a matter of life and death for many people. More than 40 people are currently on death row in Trinidad and Tobago. In 1984, the United Nations Economic and Social Council said an execution should not be carried out if there is any appeal or recourse procedure pending on the case. The new Bill would cir cumvent this principle and allow for expedited executions. Currently, under a ruling by the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council, acting as the highest court in the country, any execution carried out five years after the original sentence constitutes torture, which is illegal under the countrys Constitution. The lengthy appeals process for death penalty cases means that, in practice, no executions are able to be carried out within the five year period and most sentences have been commuted to prison terms. But Amnesty International says the proposed Bill will ignore that ruling and make the constitution inconsistent with human rights. We are extremely concerned that the new Bill would allow for someone to be executed within a short period after a sentence is passed, not allowing for proper appeals and that others could be kept on death row for years on end, said Chiara Liguori. The prime minister, Kamla Persad-Bissessar, has been reported as referring to the death penalty as a weapon in (our) arsenal to fight the murder rate. She is quoted on her Facebook website as saying: The government that I have the honour to lead will ensure that this law is implemented and convicted murderers must suffer and pay the ultimate price by having the sentence of death carried out. The country is one of 93 countries in the world that retains the death penalty for ordinary crimes. Even though death sentences have continued to be handed out in Trinidad and Tobago, no executions have been carried out since 1999. CARIBBEAN NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDA Y, FEBRUARY 17, 2011, PAGE 15 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Have you heard the good news? You CAN save money!If you need a lower premium,low deductibles,generous benefits and a fast claims service,pick up the phone and ask NIBA for a great insurance deal.Its time to pay less for insuring your car! Tel.677-6422 or visit www.nibaquote.com NASSAU INSURANCE BROKERS AND AGENTS LIMITED Atlantic House,2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue P.O.Box N-7764 Nassau Tel.677-6422 www.nibaquote.com Open Saturdays10.00am2.00pm #66'06+1072$//&,9,/(59$176 7KDWVULJKWD/RDQDSSURYHGZLWKLQKRXUV 38%/,&:25.(56&2(5$7,9( &5(',7,21/,0,7(' r T rinidad and T obago urged to stop drive towards executions Amnesty wants MPs to vote against amendment Bill

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By LUDOVICO FALLA for The Nassau Institute IN AN after dinner conversation a few days ago I had to answer the assertion that the problem with capitalism is greed. My brief answer was that greed, as long as correctly defined, is a problem of human nature, not a problem of the system of social organisation adopted by society. Greed is defined by the Cambridge dictionary as a very strong wish to continuously get more of something, especially food or money. Leaving gluttony aside, the strong wish to get more money, by definition, is the wish to obtain more goods or services now or in the future, those things which money can buy. Why is greed a problem? Greed cannot be judged by a third party as only the individual can say whether the acquisition of goods and services leads him to a higher level of satisfaction or not. Therefore we know we are in the presence of greed only when the strong wish to get more goods and services is matched by signs of unhappiness. This should warn us that most of what we call greed is just a pattern of consumption that we envy or we do not agree with. Why human beings pursue the acquisition of more and better goods and services is a question for psychologists, but we can agree that it is pervasive. Will this characteristic of human nature be different under capitalism or socialism? The history of societies organised in one or the other can tell us that the strong wish to get more goods and services is as pervasive in one as in the other, but it is channeled in very different ways. Under capitalism, true capitalism, the only way to make money is to provide goods or services of such quality and price that many others are drawn to buy them and reward the supplier with profits. If this provision of goods and services is not continuously improved the profits will disappear through the forces of competition and entrepreneurship. Under socialism and crony or state capitalism the way to obtain more goods and services is to seek the political favours of those who rule. If you think greed is wrong you should try to convince those who suffer it to seek advice with a priest, a psychologist or a good friend. What is clear is that it exists both under capitalism and socialism in all its forms. Greed is not an argument to attack capitalism or even socialism for that matter. PAGE 16, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011 THE TRIBUNE T O DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Greed and social organisation OPINION W W h h y y h h u u m m a a n n b b e e i i n n g g s s p p u u r r s s u u e e t t h h e e a a c c q q u u i i s s i i t t i i o o n n o o f f m m o o r r e e a a n n d d b b e e t t t t e e r r g g o o o o d d s s a a n n d d s s e e r r v v i i c c e e s s i i s s a a q q u u e e s s t t i i o o n n f f o o r r p p s s y y c c h h o o l l o o g g i i s s t t s s , b b u u t t w w e e c c a a n n a a g g r r e e e e t t h h a a t t i i t t i i s s p p e e r r v v a a s s i i v v e e .

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MANAMA, Bahrain Associated Press THEswelling protests against Bahrain's rulers gained momentum Wednesday with huge crowds calling for a sweeping political overhaul and the kingdom's stunned leaders appearing to shift tactics after attempts to crush the uprising stoked rage on the streets and sharp criticism from Western allies. The widening challenges to the Arab world's political order emboldened by the downfall of old-guard regimes in Tunisia and Egypt also flared in Libya for the first time, with riot police battling protesters marching against the 42-year rule of Moammar Gadhafi. In Yemen, the embattled president flooded the ancient capital of Sanaa with security forces to try to stamp out demonstrations that began nearly a week ago. They turned deadly Wednesday in the southern port of Aden, with two people killed in clashes with police. "It's clear now that no Arab leader can truly feel comfortable," said Ali Fakhro, a political analyst and commentator in Bahrain. "Those days have been swept away." It's also taken a big swipe at Western policy assumptions. Tiny Bahrain has an outsized importance for Washington as home of the U.S. Navy's 5th Fleet, a counterweight to Iran's military expansion in the Gulf. Yemen is a strategic battleground against Islamic militants inspired by alQaida. Even Gadhafi once an archfoe of the West has been grad ually rebuilding international ties and remains a mercurial, but well examined, factor in Mideast affairs. In many ways, Bahrain is mirroring Egypt's uprising on a small er scale and with malls and con ference centers as the backdrop instead of the faded glory of Cairo's Tahrir Square. Protesters have turned a landmark square in the capital of Manama into their base camp, which was swollen with tens of thousands of people by nightfall Wednesday. Their chants literally reverberated off the buildings and bridges. They sang the Egyptian national anthem. Their next important move takes a page directly from the Egypt unrest: calling for a major march after Friday prayers to re-energize its followers. The ruling Sunni dynasty long accused of trampling the aspirations of Bahrain's Shiite major ity has retrenched after unleashing security forces in street clashes that left at least two dead since Monday. Riot squads have hung back as the crowds took con trol of Pearl Square, dominated bya 300-foot (90-feet) monument to Bahrain's history as a pearl diving center. An emergency parliament meeting was called for Thursday, butit may only serve to show the country's divisions and reinforce its image as the most politically volatile in the Gulf. The main Shiite opposition bloc, with 18 of the 40 seats, has said it will not return to the chamber until the protest demands are met. It began Monday as a cry for the country's Sunni monarchy to loosen its grip, including handpicking most top government posts, and open more opportunities for the country's Shiites, who have long complained of being blocked from decision-making roles or key posts in the military. But the uprising's demands have steadily grown bolder. Many protesters are calling for the government to provide more jobs and better housing, free all political detainees and abolish a system that offers Bahraini citizenship to Sunnis from around the Middle East as a way to close the gap with Shiites, who account for 70 percent of the population. Many of the newly minted nationals get jobs in security forces to further cement the number of presumed loyalists protecting the ruling system. Increasingly, protesters are also chanting slogans to wipe away the entire ruling dynasty that has led Bahrain for more than 200 years and is firmly backed by the Sunni sheiks and monarchs across the Gulf. Although Bahrain is sandwiched between two of OPEC's heavyweights, Saudi Arabia and Qatar, it has limited oil resources and depends heavily on its role as a regional financial hub and playground for Saudis, who can drive over a causeway to enjoy Bahrain's Western-style bars, hotels and beaches. As night fell in the square, a Shiite imam extolled Bahrain's young people as the lions of reform. "This square is a trust in your hands and so will you whittle away this trust or keep fast?" the imam said. "So be careful and be concerned for your country and remember that the regime will try to rip this country from your hand but if we must leave it in coffins then so be it!" Across the city, a caravan of cars from government supporters waved national flags and displayed portraits of King Hamad bin Isa Al Khalifa. "Come join us!" they yelled into markets and along busy streets. "Show your loyalty." Social networking websites also were abuzz with calls to press ahead with the protests. They were matched by insults from presumed government backers calling the demonstrators traitors and agents of Shiite powerhouse Iran. Some pointed out that Iranian hard-liners have called Bahrain the Islamic Republic's "14th province" because of its Shiite links. But the head of the largest Shiite political bloc, Sheik Ali Salman, said there are no demands for an Islamic role in politics. "We are not looking for a religious government like Iran's, but we demand a civil government" that represents Shiites and Sunnis, he told a news conference. Bahrain's relative calm Wednesday was in stark contrast with other Arab political showdowns. But all share efforts to escalate protests this week. In Libya, security forces fired rubber bullets and water cannons at hundreds of marchers in Beng hazi, the second-largest city. Witnesses said some police stations were set on fire and one protester said he saw snipers on a roof of a security headquarters firing on protesters. The unrest was triggered by the temporary detention Tuesday of an activist but quickly turned into a rare public challenge to Gadhafi. Video clips posted on the Internet showed protesters carrying signs and chanting: "No God but Allah, Moammar is the enemy of Allah" and "Down, down to cor ruption and to the corrupt." Activists using Facebook and Twitter have called for nationwide demonstrations Thursday. In Yemen, meanwhile, more than 2,000 police fanned out across the capital Sanaa after six days of Egypt-style demonstrations against President Ali Abdullah Saleh, who has held power for 32 years. The police fired in the air and blocked thousands of students at Sanaa University from joining thousands of other protesters in the capital of the Arab world's most impoverished nation. In the southern port of Aden, two people were killed when police fired on protesters. A call spread via Facebook and Twitter urging Yemenis to join a series of "One Million People" rallies on Friday. Dozens of Jordanians took to the streets outside King Abullah II's palace in the sixth straight week of protests, demanding that people be allowed to elect their prime minister. Internet service in Bahrain was slow and spotty, but it appeared that authorities did not try to close it down fully. But unlike vast Cairo, Bahrain is little more than a collection of towns and villages with just 500,000 native-born citizens and nearly the same number of expatriate workers. Word spreads easily by phone and from family to family. Thousands turned out with out any special call to organize for the funeral procession of 31year-old, Fadhel al-Matrook, the second known fatality from the clashes. Later, in Pearl Square, his father Salman pleaded with protesters not to give up. "He is not only my son. He is the son of Bahrain, the son of this nation," he yelled. "His blood shouldn't be wasted." The bloodshed brought embar rassing rebukes from allies such Britain and the United States. A statement from Bahrain's interior ministry said suspects have been "placed in custody" in connection with the two protester deaths, but gave no further details. In the past week, Bahrain's rulers have tried to defuse calls for reform by promising nearly $2,700 for each family and pledg ing to loosen state controls on the media. Similar concessions have been made by leaders in the Gulf to try to pre-empt protests. In Oman, the ruling Sultan Qaboos Bin Said announced Wednesday an increase in the minimum monthly salary for private sector workers from 140 rials ($365) to 200 rials ($520). As protesters in Bahrain settled in for another night in the square, the mood was more festive than tense. People sipped tea, snacked on donated food and smoked appleand grape-flavored tobacco from water pipes. The men and women mainly sat separately the women a sea of black in their traditional dress. Some youths wore the red-and-white Bahraini flag as a cape. The leadership of the protesters is still unclear and disorganized. A few scuffles have broken out between some of the people in the main area near the speakers' platform. But many tried to downplay the idea that the revolt is primarily for Shiite rights. "The needs of the people are populist and not sectarian. We are not Shiite, Sunni or liberals," said Jassem Jawad, 23, a musician and part-time civil servant. "I am not a political man ... But I know I want a chance to pick my own prime minister. How is it fair for a prime minister to hold power for 39 years? Its ridiculous." INTERNATIONAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDA Y, FEBRUARY 17, 2011, PAGE 17 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Protest wave grows: Bahrainthen Yemen and now Libya BAHRAINIS SHOUT SLOGANS in Pearl Square, Manama, Bahrain Tuesday, Feb.15, 2011. Protesters demanding sweeping political reforms from Bahrain's rulers held their ground Wednesday in an Egypt-style occupation of the capital's landmark square. (AP)

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INTERNA TIONAL NEWS PAGE 18, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011 THE TRIBUNE T O DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM WASHINGTON Associated Press EXTREMErainstorms and snowfalls have grown substantially stronger, two studies suggest, with scientists for the first time finding the telltale fingerprints of man-made global warming on downpours that often cause deadly flooding. Two studies in Wednesday's issue of the journal Nature link heavy rains to increases in greenhouse gases more than ever before. One group of researchers looked at the strongest rain and snow events of each year from 1951 to 1999 in the Northern Hemisphere and found that the more recent storms were 7 percent wetter. That may not sound like much, but it adds up to be a substantial increase, said the report from a team of researchers from Canada and Scotland. The study did not single out specific storms but examined worst-of-each-year events all over the Northern Hemisphere. While the study ended in 1999, the close of the decade when scientists say climate change kicked into a higher gear, the events examined were similar to more recent disasters: deluges that triggered last year's deadly floods in Pakistan and in Nashville, Tennessee, and this winter's paralyzing blizzards in parts of the United States. The change in severity was most apparent in North America, but that could be because that is where the most rain gauges are, scientists said. Both studies should weaken the argument that climate change is a "victimless crime," said Myles Allen of the University of Oxford. He co-authored the second study, which connected flooding and climate change in Britain. "Extreme weather is what actually hurts people." Jonathan Overpeck, a University of Arizona climate scientist, who did not take part in either study, praised them as sensible and "particularly relevant given the array of extreme weather that we've seen this winter and stretching back over the last few years." Not all the extreme rain and snow events the scientists studied cause flooding. But since 1950, flooding has killed more than 2.3 million people, according to the World Health Organization's disaster database. The British study focused on flooding in England and Wales in autumn of 2000. The disaster cost more than $1.7 billion in insured damages and was the wettest autumn for the region in more than 230 years of record-keeping. Researchers found that global warming more than doubled the likelihood of that flood occurring. Similar studies are now under way to examine whether last year's deadly Russian heat wave and Pakistan floods which were part of the same weather event can be scientifically attributed to global warming. For years scientists, relying on basic physics and climate knowledge, have said global warming would likely cause extremes in temperatures and rainfall. But this is the first time researchers have been able to point to a demonstrable cause-and-effect by using the rigorous and scientifically accepted method of looking for the "fingerprints" of human-caused climate change. The scientists took all the information that shows an increase in extreme rain and snow events from the 1950s through the 1990s and ran dozens of computer models numerous times. They put in the effects of greenhouse gases which come from the burning of fossil fuels and then ran numerous models without those factors. Only when the greenhouse gases are factored in do the models show a similar increase to what actually happened. All other natural effects alone don't produce the jump in extreme rainfall. Essentially, the computer runs show climate change is the only way to explain what's happening. Scientists connect global warming to extreme rain IN THIS Aug. 11, 2011 file photo, Pakistani villagers wave to a helicopter approaching Ghaus Pur near Sukkur, in Pakistan's Sindh province. Extreme rainstorms and snowfalls have grown substantially stronger, two studies have suggested. (AP)

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INTERNA TIONAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDA Y, FEBRUARY 17, 2011, PAGE 19 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM ROME Associated Press ITALIAN PREMIER Silvio Berlusconi showed aplomb in the face of charges that could end his political career, saying Wednesday he isn't worried about his impending prostitution trial or calls for his resignation. It was the first public comment by the 74-year-old leader since he was indicted Tuesday on charges he paid for sex with a 17-year-old Moroccan girl and then used his influence to cover it up. He spoke shortly before holding talks and a working dinner with Russian President Dmitry Medvedev, his first international meeting since the indictment. Berlusconi has denied any wrongdoing, dismissing the accusations as "groundless" and the case as a "farce" and a "shame." He has accused prosecutors of trying to topple his government. On Wednesday, the premier dodged questions about the case during a news conference on economic themes in Rome and, in contrast with recent days, did not go on the offensive to defend himself. "Out of love of my country, I won't talk about this," Berlusconi told reporters. "I can only say one thing: I'm not worried at all." Berlusconi also avoided the topic in remarks before a meeting with Medvedev, focusing instead on the close ties between Russia and Italy. "I believe that I am a point of reference for Russia within the European Union, and I have personally tended to all of the relations that the EU has and will develop with the Russian federation," Berlusconi said, emphasizing his close personal friendships with Medvedev and Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin. The prostitution trial starts April 6 before three female judges an ironic twist for the premier. Italian women staged nationwide protests last week contending that the scandal and Berlusconi's view of women is degrading to female dignity. The three judges were picked at random. The indictment marks a serious challenge to Berlusconi's grip on power at a time when the premier is weakened by an acrimonious split with an exally. It reignited calls for Berlusconi's resignation, with the opposition contending the scandal with allegations of wild parties at the premier's villas with scantily clad women has embarrassed Italy and damaged its image abroad. "A premier who is a defendant, who spends his days disputing the magistrates, is undoubtedly a man with no time to govern, and probably with no authority to do so effectively," a leading political analyst, Stefano Folli, wrote in Wednesday's financial newspaper Il Sole 24 Ore. The abuse of influence charge carries a prison sentence of four to 12 years, and if Berlusconi is sentenced to more than five years, he would be barred from ever again holding public office. The child prostitution charge carries a possible prison term of six months to three years. Even if found guilty, it is unlikely he would ever go to prison. The appeals process would take years, and in Italy people over 75 rarely serve time. Berlusconi's deepening legal woes also test his crucial alliance with the Northern League, which he relies on for a majority in parliament. While other Berlusconi allies quickly came to his defense, Northern League leaders mostly kept silent about the indictment, which observers read as a sign of unease. Berlusconi met with League leader and government minister Umberto Bossi and other party officials on Tuesday night. "We are as united as ever, and determined to continue the legislature until its natural end," Berlusconi told reporters Wednesday. Italys indicted Berlusconi says hes not worried ITALIAN PREMIER Silvio Berlusconi listens to a reporter's question during a press conference at the Chigi Premier's palace, in Rome, Wednesday, Feb. 16, 2011. (AP)

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SECTION B business@tribunemedia.net THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011 THETRIBUNE $4.68 $4.51 $4.69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $4.75 $4.77 $4.69 By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The Privy Council has upheld all bar one of the decisions made by the Bahamian courts over the long-running dispute between the two principals of the Grand Bahamabased Shoreline real estate development, finding only that the junior partner was not entitled to the sum of $250,000 derived from a Profit Sharing Agreement (PSA). The London-based court, the highest appellate court in the Bahamian Judicial system, only altered the Supreme Court and Court of Appeal rulings in one respect, deciding that at no time was there a legally binding agreement that Steven Jervis and his company, KST Investments, would pay Victor Skinner Court over turns $250k profit share fr om development SEE page 8B Privy Council upholds all other Bahamian court findings over long-running feud between principals of Shoreline real estate project Judgment provides ground for possible Customs probe over alleged Freeport bond abuses By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A looming threat to maximising recovery from the main asset available to Bahamian creditors of CLICO (Bahamas) has moved a step closer to becoming real ity, after a US court this week gave permission for develop ment of a rival plan to liquidate the Wellington Preserve real estate project. The US Bankruptcy Court for the southern district of Florida, via a February 14, 2011, ruling has given Brennan Financial, another Wellington Preserve creditor, permission to file a reorganisation/liquidation plan for the 545-acre project, which accounts for 63 per cent of CLICO (Bahamas) total assets. And, more importantly, the court has given Brennan Financial and any other interested party permission to not only develop competing liq uidaton plans, but to also solicit votes in favour of such plan. While Craig A. Tony Gomez, the Baker Tilly CLIC O REC OVER Y THREA T IS CLOSER T O BEC OMING REALIT Y Rival creditor gets court approval to develop and seek votes on competing plan to liquidate project accounting for 63% of insolvent insurer s assets CRAIG GOMEZSEE page 7B By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The imposition of 10 per cent import duty on all aircraft in the Bahamas will only serve to deter the growth of the market and development of a Bahamian aircraft registry, Sky Bahamas chairman has told Tribune Business, adding: If theyre trying to kill the private aviation industry, theyre going about it the Going the right way to destr oy aviation 10% duty on planes will only deter Bahamian aviation sector growth and set back aircraft registry says GB Chamber chief T ells government that keep chopping us at the knees for short-term goals serves no purpose Urges that Bahamas must do better, and questions what it is trying to achieve given competitive positioning K P TURNQUESTSEE page 9B By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor Almost two-thirds of Bahamian hotels, some 63 per cent, expect to incur a net loss once their audited financials for 2010 are completed, a Bahamas Hotel Association (BHA) survey has revealed, although between 60-70 per cent of resorts said key performance indicators were expected to either slightly improve or remain flat in 2011. With the BHAs 2010 review and tourism outlook survey, a copy of which has been obtained by Tribune Business, indicated some modest optimism and confidence was returning to the Bahamas main private sector industry and employer, the results also showed that out of the 30 properties polled, some 60 per cent 18 rated the strength of the tourism aspect of the economy in the Bahamas today as weak. Just 7 per cent of the Nassau/Paradise Island, Grand Bahama and Family Island properties polled rated the Bahamian tourism industry as strong, while 23 per cent and 10 per cent described its strength as moderate and extremely weak respectively. With 63 per cent of those hotels, representing 10,000 employees and almost 50 per cent of the Bahamian hotel room inventory, making a net loss for 2010 (37 per cent were in the black), the short-term outlook for the sector remains challenging, despite tentative recovery signs. On the positive side, some 60 per cent of Bahamian resorts polled had a fair outlook for tourism in 2011, with 3 per cent (just one hotel) forecasting a positive year. Yet, with 30 per cent and 3 per cent sharing a negative and extremely negative forecast, one-third of the industry (10 hotels polled) continues to remain gloomy. Forecasting key indicators for 2011, only 7 per cent of hotels surveyed by the BHA predicted that employment numbers, sales/revenues and pricing would be down significantly compared to 2010. The significantly down percentage increased for profits (17 per cent), plus capital spending and room occupancy (both 13 per cent). In the down some category, some 30 per cent of hotels predicted this would happen to their employment and revenue levels during 2011, with 13 per cent adding this would also happen to profits, capital spending and room occupancy. On a more encouraging note, Hotels: 2/3 incur net loss in 2010 Between 60-70% of properties surveyed by BHA expect flat or modest improvement in 2011, but 60% still rate tourism economy as weakSEE page 4B By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor Abaco second homeowners are up in arms after being told that at the moment they cannot obtain the promised real property tax break in return for registering their homes and agreeing to pay room tax. Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, minister of tourism and aviation, and Zhivargo Laing, minister of state for finance, could not be contacted for comment and did not return messages before press time yesterday afternoon, with a Cabinet meeting ongoing yesterday, but Internet forums and chat rooms were alive with complaints over the issue. One irate second homeown er said they had registered their home with the Ministry of Tourism as a small hotel in December 2009, in accordance with the 2009 Small Hotels Act, given that the property was rented out to other visitors. Under the Act, the homeowner said they were supposed to obtain a real property tax exemption the first $250,000 in value would be exempt, plus the 0.75 per cent on the additional value between $250,000 Second home fury over tax br eak lossSEE page 4B

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By DEIDRE M. BASTIAN Design is a universal language. It transcends all cultural and national boundaries. It is diverse and ever-changing. Despite the fact that designs can be universally appreciated, the artists behind them are all unique and talented. Have you ever asked yourself: How do I contribute to the design community? Evidently, designers from different walks of life might have similar answers to this question and yet be different. Some designers may educate those who may not yet have developed an appreciation for design and art, while others aim to improve the overall quality of design on the Internet. Moreover, some designers are content to primarily to attain a good living from their talents and nothing more. Human beings constantly wear masks to hide true feelings, thoughts and personality, and some designers wear masks of their own as well. Human nature is to wear different masks according to the role played, yet despite these our true personality still shines through. Lets take a look at several designer personality types The Pablo Picasso Designer: A perfectionist. The Pablo Picasso designer does not allow for any pixel to be out of place. Egotistical, he/she does not care about others opinions. The Pablo Picasso designer has strong beliefs which cannot be swayed by money. Their only concern is for the ingenuity of ideas. A man out to change the world of design, he does not succumb to the whims of clients, and believes it is their loss if they do not heed his advice. Believing he is a cut above the rest, he admits to only a few other designers in the world as being his peers. The Pablo Picasso designer sees himself, above all. as an artist. The Albert Einstein Designer: A smart man with excellent work ethic, the Albert Einstein designer has the motto No pain, no gain. Unafraid of ridicule, he dares to be different. Failure is the mother of all success, and the Albert Einstein designer has a never-giveup attitude. He may not get it right each time or win every competition, but he believes his hard work will eventually pay off and that he will be recognised one day for his talents and effort. His strong faith and belief enables him to patiently wait for the day. For him, the question is not if he will triumph, but when. The David Copperfield Designer: The David Copperfield designer is a great storyteller and illusionist. Capable of anything regard less of how seemingly impossible it is, he conjures the best designs for his clients. He does not come cheap and gives a cleverly constructed illusion, using his great storytelling skills. He leads clients to believe he is the only designer that can meet their needs. Behind the scenes, the client will never realise the hardworking talents that support him, as he delegates the work but claims all the credit in the end. The Captain Hook Designer: Why create when you can steal? The Captain Hook designer is cunning. He scouts for the most innovative and successful designs and makes them his own, not by blatantly duplicating but by cleverly working in his own ideas and inspiration. Craftily avoiding outright plagiarism, the Captain Hook designer hooks successful ideas to create a fresh new concept. Money being his sole interest, this designer passes off designs as new creations, and is unfazed by whether he loses clients. The Mahatma Gandhi Designer: Believing he is obliged to write wrongs, the Mahatma Gandhi designer takes it upon himself to effect change through peaceful means. He feels an obligation to improve design standards, regardless of any difficulties or opposition he might face. If he has to achieve his goal one client at a time, he will gladly do so. A forward-thinking designer who sets trends, he advocates for what he believes is necessary to improve and sustain the design industry. The Bashful Dwarf Designer: Shunning the spotlight, the Bashful Dwarf designer always feels like he could have done a better job. When praised, he is quick to share the credit with colleagues. Insecure about his talents, he is content to work behind the scenes and let others take the honour. The Bashful Dwarf designer doesnt think much of fame or fortune. He believes many other designers deserve more recognition, but remains content with his spot in life. The Ella of Frell Designer: The real Ella of Frell fell under a spell and couldnt say no to anyone. Slightly different, the Ella of Frell designer actually believes the customer is always right and goes all out to please. BUSINESS PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM COME SEE US AT THE SHERATON NASSAU BEACH RESORT Thursday, February17th: 5:00 to 8:00pm at the CanadianBoarding School Fair and Friday,February 18th: 5:30 to 8:00pm Camp Kandalore Information Evening WHAT ARE YOU UP TO THIS SUMMER? The personality behind design THE ART OFGRAPHIXDEIDRE M.BASTIAN SEE page 11B

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By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor Emeras talks with the Government over a potential management contract to run the Bahamas Electricity Corporation (BEC) are still a workin progress a senior executive with the Canadian utility giant has revealed, with the two sides exploring several scenarios to determine the right first step. Confirming Emeras continuing interest in becoming involved with BEC, Ray Robinson, executive chairman of Grand Bahama Power Company, in which the Canadian power giant holds a controlling 80.4 per cent interest, said the company was committed to doing the right thing when it came to the 100 per cent state-owned power provider. Thats still a work in progress, Mr Robinson said of talks with the Government. Discussions are still ongoing. We continue to state our interest in the Bahamas and BEC, and doing the right thing for the Government, BECand its customers. Were looking at not one scenario but two or three other scenarios to see what is the first right step. Emera was contracted by the Government last year to conduct a 60-day review of BEC and make recommendations for getting it back on a sound financial footing, and its interest has progressed from there. The Government, though, with its attention focused on the Bahamas Telecommunications Company (BTC), has kept a low profile where the BEC talks are concerned, no doubt wanting to avoid more potential union unrest given the situation surrounding its first privatisation. Speaking on Emera's preliminary BEC findings, Earl Deveaux, minister of the environment, told Tribune Business last year: "Emera was able to greatly enhance our understanding of BEC's energy production, and its challenges in regard to a number of things fuel sources, generating mix, options for leveraging the purchase of fuel supplies. "There are a lot of early options for remediation that we think will greatly assist in bringing BEC's generating capacity and operating systems under better control." Tribune Business reported in December how the Government had received a proposal from Emera for improving BEC's operational efficiency, and perhaps eventually taking over managerial control or acquiring the stateowned power supplier. A source with knowledge of BEC's operations told Tribune Business that while such discussions remained "very, very preliminary", a formal proposal was received "around a month ago". "The Government sent back some comments and they responded, but it has not progressed very far since then. The Prime Minister needed to have some input but he has been fairly consumed with BTC, the source said. Asked why Emera was so interested in the Bahamas, Mr Robinson told Tribune Business: We can see the potential here. Its proximity to the US, and theres a lot of opportunity, we believe, for interconnection between some of the islands. We like the business climate in the Bahamas and, relatively speaking, throughout the Caribbean. Theyre [the Bahamas] close to North America, so theyre not as anxious about doing business with organisations from North America. There is a natural relationship between the Bahamas and Canada, and specifically eastern Canada. A lot of relationships are pre-existing. A lot of Bahamians are schooled in Nova Scotia, so that area is not foreign to the Bahamas. So that helps to form relationships and do business together. BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDA Y, FEBRUARY 17, 2011, PAGE 3B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM .,1*6:$<$&$'(0<&+2/$56+,3 $11281&(0(17.LQJVZD\$FDGHP\DOHDGLQJ%DKDPLDQ.fVFKRROZLWKD UHSXWDWLRQIRUH[FHOOHQFHLQDFDGHPLFVDWKOHWLFVDQGWKHDUWVD FRPPLWPHQWWR&KULVWLDQYDOXHVDQGDVWURQJWUDGLWLRQRISXEOLF VHUYLFHLVLQYLWLQJSXEOLFVFKRROVWXGHQWVHQWHULQJ*UDGHLQ 6HSWHPEHUWRDSSO\IRU WZRf SUHVWLJLRXV\HDUVFKRODUVKLSV$fKH*UDFHDWKDP.HPSFKRODUVKLS1DPHGLQKRQRXURI.LQJVZD\VIRXQGHU0UV*UDFH7DWKDP.HPS7KLV VFKRODUVKLSLVIRUDZHOOURXQGHGVWXGHQWZLWKSURYHQVWURQJDFDGHPLF SHUIRUPDQFH%f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fDFDGHPLF\HDUV*UDGHVDQGWR GDWHf7UDQVFULSWVZLOORQO\EHFRQVLGHUHGYDOLGLIWKH\DUHVXEPLWWHGLQ \RXUVFKRROVVHDOHGHQYHORS 1RWH 6KRUWOLVWHGFDQGLGDWHVZLOOEHLQYLWHGWRVLWWKHVFKRODUVKLS H[DPLQDWLRQDQGDSSHDUDWDQLQWHUYLHZ'HDGOLQH&RPSOHWHDSSOLFDWLRQSDFNDJHVKRXOGEHUHFHLYHG E\SPDWWKH+LJK6FKRRO'HVNLQWKH$GPLQLVWUDWLRQ %XLOGLQJE\DUFK WK (QWHUWREH7UDLQHGLQWKH.LQJV:D\([LWWREHWKH 'LIIHUHQFH CUSTOMER NOTICEScotiabank (Bahamas) Limited is pleased to advise that with recent enhancements to our service network all Merchant Customers have been upgraded to the Scotiabank VX510 POS terminals for credit card processing services. These new terminals provide enhanced levels of security and ensure easy upload of the newest operation features offered by Credit Card Companies and facilitate ongoing upgrades for the processing of transactions. All new features being rolled out by the Credit Card Companies will be fully functional on these new terminals. Some of Scotiabanks card services are available exclusively on these new terminals (ie.Debit/Credit cards).These services on the Scotia Network are no longer available through the Tripoint Terminals. Your current Merchant Services Agreement with Scotiabank remains unchanged. Should you have any questions/concerns regarding the new terminals and the features we invite you to contact us at 242-356-1647 or by email at bsbsc.merchantsupport@scotiabank.com. Emera eyes island interconnect goal Talks over BEC still a work in progress, with government and Canadian firm eyeing two or three other scenarios to see what is the first right step RAY ROBINSON

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between 60-70 per cent of Bahamian resorts forecast that these six key indicators would either be flat with 2010 levels or up some. Only 3 per cent (one hotel) predicted that revenues, capital spending and room occupancy would be up significantly in 2011 compared to 2010. Apart from the recession, the Bahamian hotel industry also blamed high airfares and high operating costs for their current performance, together with the Bahamas being a high cost destination. Comparing 2010 with 2009, 33 per cent of Bahamian hotels surveyed said revenues and profits were down significantly compared to 2009. Another 37 per cent fell into this category on capital spending, with 27 per cent and 20 per cent seeing significantly down room occupancy and pricing. With most staffing cuts in the sector taking place at end-2008, employment was only significantly down for 10 per cent of properties in 2010. Again, the Bahamian hotel industry fell either into the down some or same up some categories when comparing 2010 to 2009. Between 40-57 per cent fell into the latter two categories combined for all six key financial performance indicators, while between 33 per cent to 17 per cent were in the down some category. Very few were up significantly in 2010. All this confirms a Bahamian hotel industry that is far from being out of the woods, and it is far from adding new jobs to replace the employees shed in late 2008 and early 2009. Asked to state the three most important factors impacting their business today in priority order, the obvious number one was the worldwide recession and sluggish US economy. Close behind, though, were airlift issues availability, reliability, high cost and the high cost of doing business in the Bahamas, especially cost and reliability of electricity, telecommunications, group insurance and National Insurance Board (NIB) increases. Asked to set out the most important issues for the BHA, Promotion Boards and Ministry of Tourism to work on, the hotels said these were airlift, marketing to generate increased better promotion of the islands, and reduced utility, licensing, tax and duty costs. With 84 per cent of those polled participating in the Ministry of Tourisms Companion Fly Free initiative, some 32 per cent described it as very effective and 32 per cent as effective, with just 8 per cent saying it made no impact and 28 per cent saying it was minimally effective. Some 80 per cent of Bahamian hotels said they would participate in a similar initiative, with only 10 per cent saying they would not either because they were not wholesaler driven or because it was ineffective or not cost-effective. The remaining 10 per cent added that they would participate with conditions, namely ensuring island-specific benefits, a better understanding of how to increase value to our hotel, and without the 2 per cent tax increase. And, to prepare for Baha Mars new room inventory in 2014, the hotels urged enhanced marketing and training initiatives, plus improved product development that focused on downtown Nassaus rehabilitation, better taxi standards, safety and security, traffic control and airport development. BUSINESS PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Hotels: 2/3 incur net loss in 2010FROM page 1B and $500,000. This was intended to compensate for the 6 per cent room tax paid to the Government on rentals, which increased to 10 per cent in the 2010-2011 Budget. We collected and paid the hotel tax all year, the homeowner said. Last week we got our property tax bill with no exemptions. Today, I spoke with a fine lady in Nassau at the Ministry of Tourism who tells me that there have been legislative glitches in the Small Hotels Act and that the Ministry of Finance is granting no second homeowners the reduced property tax incentive at the moment. She also said that the Small Hotels Act is currently under revision. The homeowner added: The official whom I spoke with in the Marsh Harbour tax office seemed uniformed about these proceedings and told me I must be in residence at my house in Abaco for four months a year to qualify for the tax reduction. Nothing in the law as I read it says anything about four months or more of residency per year to qualify. The woman at the Department of Tourism agrees. She says there is no such residency requirement for the tax incentive. Similar issues were raised in a letter posted on the Internet by well-known Great Guana Cay resident, Troy Albury. He said: Foreign owners of second homes in Guana Cay all went over to the office in Marsh Harbour to the real property tax office and signed up for this program received a tax No. and started collecting and remitting the taxes when there were rentals. It was a hassle to do so as the office in Marsh Harbour will not take cash or personal cheques, so a bank draft had to be purchased, but many went ahead with the program as they thought it was the right thing to do and they hoped the revenue would be used to improve the islands. Also, since they were promised a break on their property taxes, they felt it was something in it for them Well, now to their surprise, they receive their tax bills and are informed by the new tax officer that there have been some glitches in the system and there will be no tax break. They have to pay their full tax bill and now, all of a sudden, there is a four-month minimum that you must live in your house in order to get the tax discount. This was never discussed in the original discussions or anywhere in the information that was circulated. Many of them feel cheated and would never have signed up for the program if they knew they would not receive any benefit. Mr Albury added: Second homeowners that rent their houses make tremendous contributions to our economy. They built their homes using local contractors, paid full duty on their homes, have Bahamian caretakers. They spend money to market their properties (and by default the islands of the Bahamas ). They use Bahamian contractors for maintenance. When they are here they support the local merchants, grocery stores, tour operators, restaurants and taxi drivers. When they have visitors renting their houses, the guests do the same. They provide a tremendous boost to our economy and most make positive contributions by volunteering their time and making monetary contributions to local charities. All of these second homeowners have built their homes without the benefit of duty-free exemptions which are being offered to all of the new houses being built in the mega develop ments. So as far as that is concerned they have contributed substantially more to the coffers of the Treasury than all of these mega develop ments. Second home fury over tax br eak lossFROM page 1B

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BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011, PAGE 7B THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMASVisit our website at www.cob.edu.bs Gomez accountant and partner, was also given an extension until April 1, 2011, to file his own liquidation plan for Wellington Preserve, he now faces competition from rivals who do not have the interests of CLICO (Bahamas) creditors and policyholders at the top of their priority list. It is unclear how the votes process will work, but presumably if a majority of creditors are in favour of a plan submitted by Brennan Financial or someone else, then it is their process, not Mr Gomezs which will dictate Wellington Preserves fate. And Brennan Financial has made its goals perfectly clear, namely to transform itself from unsecured creditor to secured creditor at the head of the queue, plus place itself and other US creditors ahead of CLICO (Bahamas) and its CLICO Enterprises affiliate. The US-based financier has already submitted a low ball $10.8 million offer to acquire Wellington Preserve, which was immediately rejected by Mr Gomez and his attorneys. This, though, makes it clear that, if Brennan Financials rival liquidation plan is accepted, it will be willing to listen to offers well below the $50-$60 million that Wellington Preserve is estimated to be worth, let alone the $73 million that CLICO (Bahamas) and its affiliate pumped into it. In short, a Brennan Financial plan and liquidation, if successful, would leave next to nothing for Bahamian creditors. In its February 7, 2011, court filing, the US company said: "Brennan is prepared to move forward with a plan to satisfy all true creditors of the debtor's [Wellington Pre serve] estate in full. With the exception of an escrow deposit in the amount of $35,000, the debtor's sole asset is real property located in Wellington, Florida. The debtor's only real creditors are collectively owed less than $4 million." The last claim relates to Brennan Financial's assertion that Wellington Preserve and Mr Gomez are favouring CLICO (Bahamas) and its wholly-owned CLICO Enterprises in the liquidation, not surprising given that some $73.2 million of the project's total $78 million debts are owed to the two companies. However, Brennan is now alleging that the $73.2 million injected by CLICO (Bahamas) via CLICO Enterprises into Wellington Preserve was equity, not a loan or debt financing, and as such the two Bahamian companies should rank behind it in the list of creditors. "The debtor has failed to produce a single document evidencing the indebtedness underlying the debts scheduled for the CLICO entities," Brennan alleged.Infusions"Moreover, Brennan asserts that any funds received by the debtor from the CLICO entities constitutes capital infusions in the nature of equity that are subordinate to Brennan and the debtor's remaining creditors." Noting that there were many purchasers seeking to buy Wellington Preserve for more than $4 million, Brennan alleged that Mr Gomez had been attempting to liquidate it since 2009. "It is axiomatic that the debtor is delaying the liquidation of the Wellington property at the prejudice of the estate's creditors in an effort to increase the potential distributions to the debtor's equity holders [CLICO (Bahamas) and the Bahamian creditors]," Brennan alleged. "Notwithstanding the debtor's motives, the debtor has had at least 18 months already to maximise the value of the Wellington property. Given the debtor's track record in this case, the debtor should not be given a nanosecond of additional time in which to delay the liquidation of its assets." Offering to implement its own liquidation plan, Brennan said that on January 28, 2011, it had submitted its $10.89 million Letter of Intent offer to acquire Wellington Preserve to Mr Gomez and Mr Neiwirth. This, it added, would satisfy fully the claims of all US creditors. Responding then to what he described as Brennan's "low ball offer for the asset", Ronald Neiwirth, of the Miami-based Flower, White & Burnett law firm, Mr Gomezs Us attorneys, told Tribune Business that the $10.8 million purchase price was "so low, it was not even worth responding to". He added that Brennan was attempting to position itself as a secured creditor ranking ahead of all CLICO (Bahamas) Bahamian creditors, where it would recover 100 cents on the $1 in its claim, rather than its current status as an unsecured creditor "diluted by the claims of CLICO Enterprises". "At this juncture, the Bank ruptcy Court is committed to getting the best possible return for creditors," Mr Neiwirth told Tribune Business, adding that even if Mr Gomez lost exclusivity, there was nothing stopping him from pressing ahead with efforts to sell Wellington Preserve to the highest bidder. "We don't want to let it go too cheaply because it will affect the liquidation entities in the Bahamas. We want the best possible price for the liq uidation in the Bahamas," Mr Neiwirth added. "The claims are not very great with the exception of CLICO Enterprises. The real question is how much recov ery comes back to CLICO." Emphasising that Wellington Preserve was located in a high income, affluent area in West Palm Beach, Mr Neiwirth said its "uniqueness" meant Mr Gomez was opposed to "letting it go for bottom feeder prices". "The problem is this is somewhat of a unique property. It's been for sale for a couple of years. We've had a couple of contracts fall through, but this is one of a kind, unique in that area, and there is nothing like it there." CLICO r ecovery thr eat closer to becoming r ealityFROM page 1B

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the $250,000 as his 25 per cent share of Shorelines 2004 profits. The ruling almost, but not quite, brings an end to the five-year feud between the two former lifelong friends, the Privy Council ruling that since Mr Skinner was entitled to his net profit share for 2004 (the sum having been wrong), the amount should be determined by the Supreme Court registrar. And, given the ongoing controversy in relation to the Bonded Letter in Freeport, the judgment may also provide a reason for Customs to look closely at Shoreline and KST Investments, as it hints that the developments bonded account was previously used to buy personal/household items, potentially depriving the Government of legitimate import duty revenues. It is alleged that between about July 2000 and November 2004, Mr Skinner pur chased personal items by using KSTs bonded account at Dolly Madisons store in Freeport to a value of $1138 without accounting to KST for it, the Privy Council judgment noted. Mr Skinner said in evi dence that Mr Jervis had bought fishing tackle from Dolly Madison, and that he had asked him if he could get stuff from Dolly Madison. Mr Jervis asked him what he wanted to get and he replied: Just fishing tackle, small items. Mr Jervis said that that would be fine. Mr Skinner also said that Mr Jervis wife and brother also bought household goods on account from Dolly Madison. In short, it was Mr Skinners evidence that Mr Jervis had given him authority to do what he did. Grand Bahama Port Authority (GBPA) licencees in possession of a valid Bond letter can purchase goods from other licencees that are duty-free, provided they are for use in their business only. The Privy Council judgment hints that KSTs bonded account was being abused by Messrs Jervis, Skinner and their relatives, as they were using it to buy goods for their own personal and household use. Tribune Business understands that Customs demand late last year for GBPA licencees to furnish it with monthly bonded goods sales reports was sparked by suspicions that there was widespread abuse of bonded privileges by licencees of this very nature.OriginsRecalling the origins of the dispute between the two expatriates, who had been friends since the late 1970s, the Privy Council said its genesis stemmed from Mr Jerviss decision to relocate to Freeport for tax reasons in April 1998. After seeking Mr Skinners advice on a house he was acquiring or building, the discussions led to the idea of developing some land on the beach in or near Freeport. The development went ahead and was called Shoreline. Initially billed as an 86home development, only 76 properties were ultimately built. Messrs Jervis and Skinner had agreed that the profits from Shoreline would be split 75/25 between them, in favour of the former, who would finance the project while Mr Skinner used his experience as a quantity sur veyor to get it up and running. Mr Skinner, according to the judgment, started work full-time on Shoreline on March 1, 1999, looking after the construction side and being paid $7,000 per month, together with a $3,000 rental allowance. Although the employment agreement was never put in writing, the PSA was in Feb ruary 2001 at the insistence of Mr Skinner, who had begun to feel marginalised. He felt vulnerable, the Privy Council recorded. He was in the Bahamas on a one-year work permit. He had asked for a three-year permit, but had been told by Mr Jervis that such a permit was not available, although it later turned out that it was. Moreover, he had heard Mr Jervis say that he was not irreplaceable. Tensions between the pair started building in 2004, when Mr Jervis wrote to Mr Skinner, complaining about his alleged absenteeism and aggressive attitude to staff, customers and himself. Mr Skinner replied, and the Privy Council said: It is noteworthy that none of these allegations formed the basis of Mr Skinners subsequent dismissal. This occurred in early January 2005, when Mr Jervis complained that labour and material costs incurred in renovations done to Mr Skinners home, No.3 Shoreline, had not been accounted for in KSTs accounts. It was alleged that a construction crew headed by Kenneth Chinese Wilkinson had been instructed by Mr Skinner to book these costs to other Shoreline homes. Mr Skinner said he had told the work crew to book renovation costs to his home as repairs, but denied booking the costs to other properties. Mr Jervis said that even booking the costs to KST was wrong, and Mr Skinner accepted it was wrong, the Privy Council said. He also accepted that materials used had not been booked because they were used out of stock, but he also stated that Mr Jervis had used the company to pay for personal expenses, as well as Keith Jervis expenses. Mr Jervis replied that if this was the case, it had been accounted for in KSTs books, while Mr Skinner denied attempting to defraud the company. The next day, Mr Skinner was handed a termination letter, and after several without prejudice financial settlement offers were made by Mr Jervis, only to be rejected, the litigation battle commenced. Backing the Supreme Court verdict that Mr Skinner was unlawfully terminated in breach of contract, the Privy Council reiterated that it, like other appellate courts, was highly reluctant to interfere with factual findings made by trial judges, who had seen witnesses give testimony under cross-examination. Given that Mr Jerviss second appeal was essentially an attempt to reargue the facts, the Privy Council said Supreme Court justice Norris Carroll was entitled to reach his conclusions based on the evidence. The key test was whether Mr Skinner took KSTs materials and labour to work on his house without the companys approval, and no intention of paying for them. During the trial, while admitting he had not calculated what to repay KST and that the sums had not been accounted for when he was terminated, Mr Skinner said he had not booked the repairs to any other house, and had not intended to defraud Mr Jervis. The Privy Council said the judge was entitled to reach the conclusion he did, finding it was not credible to think Mr Skinner could carry out work of which Mr Jervis was unaware, since the two were next door neighbours. The appellate court also backed the trial judge over Mr Jerviss allegation that Mr Skinner received personal payment in-kind for $2,500 worth of granite work done by KST at the Grand Bahama apartment of Daniel Hoffman, failing to account to the company for that and failing to reimburse it for the granite costs. Instead of paying his bill to KST, with the concurrence of Mr Skinner, Mr Hoffman provided Mr Skin ner with a plasma television and sound system, which were delivered to him off Grand Bahama at sea, the Privy Council said of Mr Jerviss allegations. In response, Mr Skinner confirmed he had arranged for the granite to be installed at Mr Hoffmans apartment, but alleged that Mr Jervis said no payment should be received because Mr Hoffman had done them a favour. While admitting he had received a plasma TV, he denied it was for the granite work. The trial judge, though, backed Mr Skinner, finding the evidence of Mr Hoffman and others on the issue unre liable. BUSINESS PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM rfntbrfntb f rf tffffftftff tt n ft ttf tf ttntft tt tntft fff ff ntf rf rftfff trttr ffr fb t rfff frf ff r rfft f f tftff rffbff ffrfbffrf frftftff ff ftftfbbtttt t rff nftnntf ff nftfff tff ftfbt Court over turns $250k profit share fr om developmentFROM page 1B

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right way. KP Turnquest, who is also the Grand Bahama Chamber of Commerces president, together with Sky Bahamas chief executive, Captain Randy Butler, both confirmed to this newspaper the unease created among both airlines and private plane owners by Customs recent practice of boarding planes to ask questions about the crafts ownership and flight history. With Captain Butler describing this as a fishing expedition on Customs part, in a bid to determine the value of aircraft with a view to calculating the correct 10 per cent duty amount, his chairman confirmed he had been informed that the Departments officers boarded one Sky Bahamas plane in Freeport for this purpose. Mr Turnquest told Tribune Business that Customs seemed to be trying to determine what state its [the plane] in with a view to coming up with a value for this tax thing. Stating that this was anoth er area where the Bahamas seems to be reaching, Mr Turnquest said the way in which Customs was carrying out its assessments, together with the likely demands for current and back tax payments to be made, could become a significant issue when it came to plans for creating and expanding a Bahamian aircraft registry. Explaining that Customs plans to impose the one-time 10 per cent duty would impact current and future second homeowners/foreign investors who owned private planes, Mr Turnquest questioned why the Bahamas was favouring a one-time, upfront lump sum tax payment rather than the recurring revenues generated from an aircraft registrys annual registration fees What are we saying to these investors, particularly those with residency? Mr Turnquest asked. Give us our money. What are we trying to accomplish with this? There are competing jurisdic tions such as Aruba where there are no import taxes associated with the aircraft. We have to bear in mind our positioning and where were trying to go. Instead, were hitting these people with a one-time lump sum figure that is only going to serve to deter the growth of the market. It makes no sense? What are we trying to accomplish here. Contrasting the Governments tax policy for the Bahamian aviation industry with that for shipping, Mr Turnquest questioned why Bahamian-registered ships plying their trade in this nations waters were not subjected to similar Customs duty impositions. And the Sky Bahamas chairman added: If theyre trying to kill the industry, the private aviation industry, theyre going about it the right way. Im not sure theyll be successful, but they need to think through its impact. I dont believe any right-thinking policymaker wants this industry to face unplanned challenges other competitors do not have to face. Jet Blue, American, all these guys overnighting here do not have to face that. We have higher fuel costs that we have to deal with, higher airport fees that they do not have to face. They get subsidies from the Government to come to the islands that we dont have. How much more do you want to put on us, take money from us? Allow us to grow so we can employ more people and create more entrepreneurs. The more people trained as pilots, aviation personnel, engineers, mechanics, and customer service people, the more opportunities youve got for people to create wealth. To keep chopping us at the knees for short-term goals without any long-term view, its very detrimental to the industry and the country. Weve got to do better. Captain Butler, meanwhile, told Tribune Business that Customs officers had been asking his staff and other operators questions such as how old the plane was, and how many flying hours it had logged, when they boarded it. Adding that he was aware that such boarding and questioning had occurred in Nassau, Abaco and Long Island, among other locations, Captain Butler said: I couldnt tell you what the goal is. Theyre definitely on a fishing expedition. This is kind of backwards, because theyve gone out saying to people that theyve brought aircraft in here illegally, and now theyre only just going out to find out the information. I know its making people very uncomfortable. BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDA Y, FEBRUARY 17, 2011, PAGE 9B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Going the right way to destr oy aviationFROM page 1B CAPT. RANDY BUTLER

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ALAN FRAM, Associated Press WASHINGTON Republicans criticized a government report on the causes ofthe 2008 financial crisis as biased and political on Wednesday. Democrats fired back that Republicans want to roll back federal regulations of the financial industry. That exchange came as the House Financial Services Committee examined a study issued last month concluding that the near economic collapse was avoidable and was caused by failures by the financial industry and their federal regulators. The differences between the two parties underscored the partisan gap as the GOP-run House begins a year in which one goal is to block new regulations required by the financial overhaul law that Democrats and President Barack Obama enacted last summer. The Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission's report was endorsed by the panel's six Democratic commissioners. Its four Republicans dissented, saying the study played down factors such as how federal policies aimed at increasing home ownership encouraged the use of high-risk subprime loans. Rep. Robert Dold, R-Ill., said Democrats used the report "to support pre-established political philosophies." Rep. Michael Grimm, R-N.Y., said "some members of this commission were more interested in following an ideological agenda." Some of the harshest criticism came from former Rep. Bill Thomas, R-Calif., who was the top Republican on the commission. "From the beginning, I thought that the commission was created for political purposes," Thomas told the committee. He said commission staff used their time "to find gotcha documents to support provocative headlines,"and that information was leaked to embarrass commission Republicans. Thomas was among several Republicans who criticized Democrats, who controlled the House and Senate last year, for approving the overhaul legisla tion before the commission's report was issued. One reason for that haste, he said, was the impending retirement of then Senate Banking Committee Chairman Christopher Dodd, D-Conn., a 35-year veteran of Congress. "When someone is spending that much time in Congress and wants to move a product, it's very difficult to say no," Thomas said. The committee's top Democrat, Rep. Barney Frank, DMass., said Democrats pushed the legislation quickly due to pleas from worried Bush and Obama administration officials that "you really need to get this done quickly," and warnings from Wall Street that prolonging the legislative work would create uncertainty. Rep. Maxine Waters, DCalif., said GOP criticism was an attempt to undermine the financial overhaul law and "return the financial services industry to a nostalgic age" of less regulation. The commission's chairman and top Democrat, former California state treasurer Phil Angelides, said the report was written fairly. He said full implantation of the financial overhaul law "is critical and will help prevent a future crisis." BUSINESS PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 52wk-Hi52wk-Low Securit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.26 0.97AML Foods Limited 1.04 1.04 0.00 0.1230.0408.53.85% 10.759.67Bahamas Property Fund 10.63 10.63 0.00 0.0130.200817.71.88% 6.18 4.42Bank of Bahamas 4.42 4.42 0.00 0.1530.10028.92.26% 0.58 0.18Benchmark 0.18 0.18 0.00 -0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3 .49 2.70Bahamas Waste 2.70 2.70 0.00 0.1680.09016.13.33% 2 .15 2.14Fidelity Bank 2.17 2.17 0.00 0.0160.040135.61.84% 12.509.62Cable Bahamas 10.21 10.21 0.00 1.0500.3109.73.04% 2.84 2.36Colina Holdings 2.40 2.40 0.00 0.7810.0403.11.67% 7.00 5.40Commonwealth Bank (S1) 6.85 6.85 0.00 4510.4880.26014.03.80% 3 .65 1.63Consolidated Water BDRs 2.06 2.08 0.02 0.1110.04518.72.16% 2.55 1.40Doctor's Hospital 1.40 1.40 0.00 0.1070.11013.17.86% 6 .99 5.47Famguard 5.47 5.47 0.00 0.3570.24015.34.39% 10.207.23Finco 6.51 6.51 0.00 0.2870.00022.70.00% 11.408.77FirstCaribbean Bank 9.39 9.39 0.00 0.4940.35019.03.73% 5.51 3.75Focol (S) 5.48 5.48 0.004,0000.4520.16012.12.92% 1.00 1.00Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.0000.000N/M0.00% 7 .40 5.00ICD Utilities 7.40 7.40 0.00 0.0120.240616.73.24% 10.509.82J. S. Johnson 9.82 9.82 0.00 0.8590.64011.46.52% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 1.2070.2008.32.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-Low Security SymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 99.4699.46Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029) BAH29 99.460.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.000.00 52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Bid$ A sk$ LastPrice DailyVol E PS$ Div$ P/E Yield FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%30 May 2013 20 November 2029FRIDAY, 11 FEBURARY 2011BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,472.37 | CHG 0.02 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -27.14 | YTD % -1.81B ISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basis)Maturity 19 October 2017 7%RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)29 May 2015 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-232019 October 2022 Prime + 1.75% Prime + 1.75% 6.95%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:7% Interest 5 2wk Hi 5 2wk Low Symbol Bid $ A sk $ Last Price Daily Vol EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield 10.06 5.01Bahamas Supermarkets 5.01 6.01 14.00 -2.9450.000N/M0.00% 0.55 0.40RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55 0.0010.000256.60.00% 41.00 29.00ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00 4.5400.0009.030.00% 0.55 0.40RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55 0.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-Low Fund Name NAVYTD%Last 12 Months %NAV 3MTH 1.51221.4076CFAL Bond Fund1.51795.51%6.90%1.498004 2.95272.8300CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.95270.18%1.61%2.918697 1.58091.5114CFAL Money Market Fund 1.58080.43%4.59%1.550241 3.20252.8522Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.7049-0.56%-15.54% 13.638813.0484Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund 13.41640.44%-0.10% 114.3684101.6693CFAL Global Bond Fund 114.36849.98%12.49%109.392860 106.552899.4177CFAL Global Equity Fund 106.55284.75%7.18%100.779540 1.14651.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.14655.20%5.20% 1.11851.0000FG Financial Growth Fund 1.11854.73%4.73% 1.14911.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund 1.14915.35%5.35% 9.74859.1005Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 19.79504.85%5.45% 11.236110.0000Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 210.6417-1.20%0.50% 10.12669.1708Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 310.12661.27%1.27% 8.45104.8105Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund Equities Sub Fund8.45100.72%9.95% BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/MNot Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/200730-Nov-10 31-Jan-11 107.570619 105.776543 30-Jun-10 31-Dec-10 NAV 6MTH 1.475244 2.910084 1.533976TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752530-Nov-10 30-Sep-10 31-Jan-11 28-Jan-11 31-Jan-11MARKET TERMS31-Dec-10 31-Jan-11CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)31-Jan-11BISX Listed Mutual FundsNAV Date 30-Nov-10 31-Dec-10 5$1'2/3+%2:/,1RI /80%(552$'3%2;11$66$8%$+$0$6 Republicans: Report on financial crisis was biased NEW YORK Copper slipped Wednesday as businesses hold back on purchases because of higher prices. Some manufacturers have stockpiled inventories of copper. Others are cutting back on purchases or substituting different materials in certain applications. That has kept pressure on copper prices, which have traded in a narrow range between $4.226 a pound and $4.6285 a pound this year. CPM Group analyst Carlos Sanchez said he has seen similar trends in in other metals. There also are questions about whether copper demand may wane in China as it pushes measures to control inflation and the pace of its economic growth. Sanchez said he expects copper demand to remain strong, particularly in developing countries. The metal is used largely in consumer electronics, construction materials and transportation. Copper for March delivery fell 6.6 cents to settle at $4.47 a pound. In other metals trading, April gold added $1 to settle at $1,375.10 an ounce. In other March metals contracts, silver fell 6.7 cents to settle at $30.629 an ounce and palladium lost $1.55 to $838.35 an ounce. April platinum added $2.70 to settle at $1,834.30 an ounce and April gold added $1 to settle at $1,375.10 an ounce. In energy trading, oil prices rose after Israel's foreign minister claimed that Iran will send two warships through the Suez Canal on the way to Syria. The news added to tension in the region and "absolutely moved markets," according to PFGBest oil analyst Phil Flynn. Flynn said traders are worried that spreading unrest in the Middle East will disrupt oil production and shipments in the region. Benchmark oil for March delivery rose 67 cents to settle at $84.99 per barrel. In other Nymex trading, heating oil rose 4.58 cents to settle at $2.7748 a gallon and gasoline gained 5.59 cents to $2.5447 a gallon. Natural gas lost 5.5 cents to settle at $3.921 per 1,000 cubic feet. Grains and beans were mostly lower. In contracts for March delivery, wheat fell 3.25 cents to settle at $8.37 a bushel, corn was unchanged at $6.905 a bushel and soybeans lost 2 cents to settle at $13.66 a bushel. C OPPER F ALL S AS HIGH PRICES DISC OURA GE BUYERS BARACK OBAMA

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BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDA Y, FEBRUARY 17, 2011, PAGE 11B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Clients never find fault with her because she is ever will ing to make whatever changes clients ask. No is not in her vocabulary. Often ignoring her better judgment, the Ella of Frell designer subjugates her design sense to the clients will in order to avoid displeasing them. She is always at the clients beck and call and has no problem carrying water. Anyone of these characters could be an extreme or small er version of yourself in each. If you wish to be an awardwinning designer, please yourself. But if you wish to be a well-paid designer, always please your client. We are all unique and special in our very own personality type. We must continuously strive to grow smarter in our expertise and, hopefully, wiser, as we are all artists and designers in our own humble right. Do you see yourself in any of these personality types? Are you a Picasso or a Cap tain Hook? What is your philosophy? Until we meet again, have fun, enjoy life and stay on top of your game? NB: The author welcomes feed back at: deedee2111@hotmail.com The personality behind designFROM page 2B SAM HANANEL, Associated Press WASHINGTON Are some companies weeding out job applicants just because they are unemployed? After news accounts about the practice and requests from concerned lawmakers, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has jumped in, trying to figure out whether it's a widespread tactic that could violate federal job discrimination laws. Commissioners at an EEOC hearing Wednesday said they are investigating whether excluding the unemployed may have a greater effect on blacks, Latinos and other ethnic minorities that tend to have higher jobless rates. There are no specific legal protections for the unemployed. "The potential for disparate impact is there," said William Spriggs, assistant secretary for policy at the Department of Labor. Overall unemployment is 9 percent, with nearly 14 million people out of work. The jobless rate is 15.7 percent among blacks and 11.9 percent among Hispanics, according the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Spriggs said the chances of an employer considering an ethnic minority are decreased by one-third if jobless applicants are excluded. The pool of disabled applicants would be reduced by nearly 50 percent, he said. The EEOC, which enforces job discrimination laws, has not issued any guidance on the issue. But some on the fivemember agency suggested that could be coming. "I hope this gives our people in the field information to start thinking about a possible problem out there," said Stuart Ishimaru, one of three Democrats on the commission. "For employers it raises seri ous question of liability if, in fact, there is a disparate impact." Spriggs said it would be difficult for the government to measure the problem because most job openings are not post ed publicly. The Labor Department is aware of anecdotal reports that some recent company advertisements have discouraged the unemployed from applying. He said officials are concerned the practice could hamper the government's efforts to help millions of unemployed get back to work. "It probably has a bigger impact in the current labor mar ket" given the current unem ployment situation, Spriggs said. Helen Norton, a professor at the University of Colorado law school, said employers and staffing agencies have advertised jobs in fields from electronic engineers to restaurant and grocery managers with the explicit restriction that only currently employed candidates would be considered. "Some employers may use current employment as a signal of quality job performance," Norton said. "But such a correlation is decidedly weak. A blanket reliance on current employment serves as a poor proxy for successful job performance."Pr ominentIn one prominent report last year, an advertisement from Sony Ericsson, a global phone manufacturer that was recruiting workers for a new Georgia facility, was restricted to those currently employed. The company later removed the restric tion after media publicity. Christine Owens, executive director of the National Employment Law Project, said anecdotal evidence from job postings, conversations with job seekers and her interviews with officials at job placement firms suggests there may be a grow ing trend of excluding unemployed applicants, regardless of their qualifications. "It's particularly significant that these representatives of staffing agencies have said there seems to be a growing prac tice," Owens said. Fernan Cepero, a spokesman for the Society for Human Resource Management, said it takes an average of 27 days for an employer to fill an open position, and even longer for high-tech positions. Because open positions mean lost pro ductivity, "screening out the unemployed is unproductive," he said. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma) JOB SEARCH: In this photo taken Tuesday, Feb. 1, 2011, job seeker Rolando Cunanan leaves the Day Worker Center of Mountain View without work in Mountain View, Calif. Are companies excluding jobless from applying? INTERN A TION AL BUSINESS MARTIN CRUTSINGER, AP Economics Writer WASHINGTON Federal Reserve officials were slightly more optimistic last month about economic growth for this year than they were in November, reflecting expected gains in consumer and business spending from tax cuts. Fed officials said in an updated forecast released Wednesday that they think the U.S. economy will grow between 3.4 percent and 3.9 percent this year. That's an upward revision from their November forecast, which predicted gross domestic product will grow 3 percent to 3.6 percent. The latest outlook foresees little improvement in the unemployment rate. The central bank predicts that the rate, now at 9 per cent, will end the year at that level or possibly dip to 8.8 percent. The Fed doesn't expect the slightly faster growth to trigger high inflation. Its latest forecast is for prices to rise 1.3 percent to 1.7 per cent. That's only slightly more than its November projection, which expected consumer prices to increase 1.1 percent to 1.7 percent in 2011. Chairman Ben Bernanke and others on the central bank's inter est rate-setting panel remained cautious about how long it will take the economy to generate enough jobs to achieve normal unem ployment. The Fed defines that level as 5 percent to 6 percent. The Fed said it would take five to six years to lower the rate that much. Fed officials slightly more upbeat on economy

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The TribunesR E L I G I O NS E C T I O N T H U R S D A Y F E B R U A R Y 1 7 2 0 1 1 PG 3 1By ALESHA CADET T ribune Features Reporter THE MINISTRY of Mime invites all to attend the first religious mime conference the Bahamas has ever seen. Speaking w it h T ri bune Rel igi on, m embers of the Mi me Mi n i st ry sai d that w hil e there have been dance confer en c es w h i ch i ncorpo r ated el ement s of mi me, and a fe w m ime works h ops, t here has never been a conf erence t hat is sol ely dedicat ed t o the art of mim e, especi al ly as a r eli gious mi nis try Th e S i len t T ra v a il M ime Co n fe r e n c e s t a rts on Thurs day F ebr u a ry 24 at the Li fe C ha n g e rs M in is tri es I n te rn a tio n a l on B a c a rdi Road. T he o peni ng i s f o l l o w ed by t wo days of t h e o ry and prac ti cal ses sions on Fr iday and S a t u rd a y On Sunday night t he conference w il l clos e wi th a fr ee concert ent it led A Mi me s W o r sh ip Ex p e ri en c e a t th e Ba h a ma s H a rves t Church on Pri nce Charl es Dri ve. The Kin gd om M ime M in istrie s alo n g wi th t h e Church Fami ly of Li fe C hangers Mini str ies Internat ional is prepari n g to host the event. Th e K in g d om M im e M in is tr ie s I n t e r n a tio n a l (K M MI ) is a co m mu n ity based ou t reach mi me troupe, w hose eight member s r e p res en t vari o us c h ur ches and denominat ions. A c c o r ding to i ts mem b er s, the goal o f t he KMMI group i s fi rst t o glor if y God and secondly to becom e a p r oph et ic b l ess ing to t he body of C hris t. T h ey h av e ministere d thro ug ho ut the Baham as and the U n i ted Stat es usi ng t he a rt o f mi me. In addit ion, K MMI has conducted several t rai ning and mi me works h o p s T a v a rri e Smi th o f the Mim e Mi nis try s aid: It i s i mportant that w e po i nt out t his event takes pl ace duri ng t he m idterm break, s o we encour age p ar ents t o take advantage of thi s by get ti ng thei r ki ds i nvo l ved i n somethi ng posi ti ve duri ng t he vacat ion b r e a k f ro m s choo l T he Mi nis try of Mi me is wher e pers o ns si lent ly mi nist er the w o r d of God t hro u g h d ra m at ic g e st u re s a n d a n im a te d f ac ia l e x p ress ions. E ach m ini str y present ati on ai ms t o send a mess age of s alvat ion, deli verance and hope. W e at Ki n gdom Mime bel ieve t hat t he L o rd is call ing t ogether a Gideon s Army of w o r shipper s as he pr e p a res the body o f C h r is t for his r e t u rn. Also, we are doing our p a rt in the f ight agai nst c rim e by i nvolvi ng our youn g people in posit ive and charact er buil ding act ivi ti es. W e heard the visi on o f B ishop (Ne il ) El li s to buil d our nat ion as a spi ri tual oasi s t hrough the ini ti ati ve of r e l igi ou s touri sm. On an ann ual basis t hou sands of p er sons meet in Nort h Carol ina f or the Me ga-Mime C o nferen ce, ma ny who come from south of u s here i n the B ahamas. W e ve p ar t n e red wi th Paneh Mi me to host thi s regi onal ver sion of that conference thereby attracti n g r e l igious tourist h e re to our shores, Mr Sm it h sai d. S pec ial guests inc lude popular go s pel c irc ui t tr av e llin g mim e m in is te rs P as to rs T i mothy a n d C h andra Midget te o f Paneh Mi me Mini str ies. Thi s husband and w if e te am ar e al so t he host s of t h e MegaMime Conf erence h el d i n N o r th Carol ina every year P er sons i nteres ted i n the m ime conference in N assau can regi st er at Reve lat ion C h r is ti an A p par el at the Mal l of Mar athon or at Li fe Changer s Mi nis tri es Inter n a t i o n a l on B a cardi Road ; th ey can a l so e-mail Ki ng d o mM im e @g ma il.c o m o r v is it th e Facebook page Ki ngdom Mi me Mi n i st ri es I n t e rnati onal. T H E B A H A M A S H O S T S I T S F I R ST R E L I G I O U S M I M E C O N F E R E N C EKingdom Mime Ministries

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The T ribune PG32 Thursday February 17, 201 1RELIGIONRE V Fr Se bast ian Campbell has s e r v e d t he Pa r ish o f All Saints on C a lvary Hill f or more than 20 years H e wa s p rie s t to the e nt ire com m uni ty i n the sou the rn distri ct of N e w Pro v i d e n c e N o w he p r e p a re s fo r a ne w cha ll en ge a s R e ctor of the Pari sh of St Gre g o r y an d the C a rm icha e l com e Ap ril 1 Father C am pbell s aid he always w a nt e d t o be a p r iest; in f a c t the desir e for pr iesthood was s parked within him a t t he tender ag e of s ix whil e a t tending the St A n d r e w s Anglican C hurc h in Ar t h u r s T own, C at Is land und er the pastor a l le ader ship of the late Arc hdea c on Murillo B o n a b y The late B ishop Mic hae l E ldon, on t he advic e o f the vestr y appointed Father C am p be l l a s R e c t o r o f A ll S ai n t s N ovem ber 30, 199 0. Up to t h i s ti m e, t he pa r ish had experienc e d a r a pid s ucc ess ion of priest s. It appealed f or a rect o r to commit to s pen d quality time in the le aders hip of t he par ish. Ha ving ser v ed in this capacit y f or 20 years F a t he r Campbe ll has i nde ed fulf illed this r e ques t, pa r ish membe r s s aid. He was joined in minis try by his wif e Agatha, who is the paris h s mus ic dire c t o r and organist, his t wo chil dren Sebast ia n J r (bett e r known a s Sir B) Andr e e, and in r ec e n t t i m es h i s d au gh t e r i n l a w K imberly and g r and daughter Simone. P ar is h me mb e r s de s c r i be F a t he r C am pbell as someone w ho w a s a visiona r y f rom the v er y s tart. H e w a s able t o provide da ily leaders hip that has launc he d t he p ar ish int o a n or bit unknown t o it befor e , membe r s s a i d The o r dination of Rev Fathe r E Juli a n C a m pb e l l a n d R ev D ea c o n Al v ar d o Adder ley w ere cr ow ning moments for him, as the paris h had neve r a dvanc e d anyone f or the ordained ministr y Up o n ap p oi n t m en t t o t he p ar i s h, F a t he r C am pb e l l w as f ac e d w i t h t h e d au nt i ng t as k of pu r c h as i ng a s m uc h p r o p e r t y a s po s s i b l e ad j a c e nt t o t h e c h u rc h building and to proc eed w ith cons t ruc ting a state-ofthe art paris h c o mmunity c entre. Land w as purc ha s ed at a p r ic e of well over a qua r ter of a million dollars T he c om m un i t y c e n t r e w a s c on s t r u c t e d t h r ough self -help that was fueled by a C rus a de Drive. W e bu i lt a s the money came in; it took m o re than five ye ar s, but in the final a n al y s i s o n l y $6 0 0, 0 00 w a s b or r o w e d f r om the bank so as to c om plete t he details that couldn t wait for the s low s t ream of self-help. Overall it must have c ost approximately $ 2.5 million, the love o f feri ng f rom the faith ful pari shioner s and fr ie nds of the paris h. Now All Saints c an boast of having t he l a r g est paris h c entre in the diocese, complete w ith a hall that seats 1,000 pa r ish o ff ices a nd r ooms for shor t t e rm r e n t a l s c apa ble of holding r e t r e ats sleepove r s, c urs illo w ee kends ect T he c h ur ch building was fully a ir -condit ioned, floor til e d, c e i ling redone and the s a me. The visi o n of the pari sh w a s only realis e d b ec ause of bold leade r ship, paris h m embers said. P rogrammes and ministr ies f lourished duri ng his r e c t o r s h i p T h e re was Cli nical Pastor a l E ducation ( CPE ), whic h pr ovide s training f or pers ons ventu ri ng i nt o p ast or al c are and c o u n s e ll i n g. I t i s c on s i d er ed a g r e a t launch int o ec ume nic al waters a s trainees f r om many c hurc hes m ake use of t his tr aining Another programme the medic al m is sionar y is now be ing launched. Parish members s aid: He w a s a m ember of the team that ma pped the path for C P E t o b e l au n c h ed i n C od r i n gt o n C o l l eg e o ur t h eo l o gi c al s em i na r y i n B ar bados Othe r ac hievemen ts o f thi s v i s i o n a r y w ill include the GEMS A w a r d s w h e r e paris h i one r s ar e known as ge ms of t h e pa r i s h ; e du c at i o n f o r m i ni s t r y ; D i s c i p l es o f C h r i s t in C o mm u n it y ( D O C C ) ; t h e f o r m at i o n o f t he S o u t h e a s t e r n Y ou t h Pionee r s ( SYP) . Fathe r Campbe ll is c hairman of the C oun s el for Churc hes in s outheast N ew P ro vid enc e; c h air ma n of t he N at io nal H e roes C ommi ttee. H e w as an inst r u c t o r at the Pr og r am me SUR E and chaplain of the Pr incess Marg a ret Hospit a l Fathe r Campbell says he c redits his p a rents the late Sebastian and Alm eta C a mpbell, his 10 siblings and the r e l a tives in his wider fam ily w ith his suc cess es in his minis try to his God. W i t h ou t t h em no n e o f t he ab o ve w ould be pos sible, he s aid. All Saints Parish bids far ewell to Father Sebastian CampbellT H E T ot al Y o uth C hurc h of B ah am as Fai th Mi nis tr ies i n coll abor ati on w i th C ol la ge E n tert ai nm en t a nd D J C ou nse ll or p re se nts N e ve r Kn ew A Lo ve Like This a dra ma th at a dd resse s issue s suc h a s b ro ke n rel ati on ship s a nd do me stic v io l e n c e T h e thre e p a r t p rese nta ti on w ill be h el d t o m o rro w ni gh t at the Di pl om at C e ntre on C a rmi ch ae l Ro ad A d d i t i o n a l l y the S to p L ik in M an g an g, w ho sh ot t o lo c al fa me wi th t he ir on li ne v ide os, w i ll pre sen t a p la y en tit le d Wh at W ro ng W i th Lov e T o d a y Also sch ed ul ed for th e e v en t is D r Da ve B u rro ws, c on side re d to b e o ne of t he fore mo st a ut hori tie s o n yo uth mi ni stry in the B ah am as. He w ill spe ak to t he t ee na ge a nd yo ung a du lt au die nc e me m be rs on the sub je c t of ho w to fin d lov e i n tod ay s w orl d. D r B urro w s u ses the ve rna c ula r of the y outh to i llustra te hi s p oin ts a nd al so o f fers in form ati on from se ve ra l b ook s he w r ote on the top ic s o f se x a nd da ti ng For mo re in form ati on c on ta ct TY C a t 4 61 -6 43 0 o r e-m a il d av yb @ co ral w av e. c om yo ut hal ive@b fm mm. com or t y c @ b f m m c o m . N e v e r K n e w A L o v e L i k e T h i s F AREWELL: All Saints Parish s celebrations of praise and thanksgiving for Father Sebastian Campbell s 20 years of ministr y Celebrations were held on Friday Februar y 11, with a gospel concert and on Sunday Februar y 13, with a thanksgiving luncheon in the parish centre. POSITIVE: The T otal Y outh Church along with Collage Entertainment is hosting an event that will inspire young people to make positive changes in their lives.

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FOR too long family members have been thought of by the church as potential individual r ecruits. V ery little thought has been given to evangelise or nur ture the family as a unit. The emphasis has been upon the indi vidual. The approach overlooks the fact that the primary instruction and strength for the Christian life stems not from the chur ch but fr om the family A study of the Sunday school pupils in a large church revealed that not one child from an unchurched home lasted through the entir e series of the depar tmental pr ogrammes from the primar y to the youth. Somewher e along the line every one of these childr en became a Sunday school drop-out. Such a startling statistic strong ly emphasises the overwhelming influence of the home. If the church is to disciple the individual family member it must do everything possible to Christianise the family as a whole. T h e re are many ways in w hich the churches of our nation can incorporate a focus on the family unit into its pr ogrammes and activities. The importance of togetherness of the family is much better demonstrated than verbalised. The practice of a pastor in meeting the needs of his own family speaks much mor e loudly than any seminar on the subject. Here are some ways that family unity can be str essed by practical demonstration in our chur ches: Encourage families periodically to sit together during worship services. Invite ladies to attend special men s meetings and vice versa. Allow wives or husbands of board members to attend certain board meetings. Sponsor a Family of the Month. Sponsor periodic family retreats or camps. Promote an annual Family W eek to focus on the importance of the home. Plan recreational and social activities i n w hi ch t h e f a mi l y c an p ar t i c i p a t e together R em e m be r t h a t th e f am i l y i s o u r nation s greatest asset; let us guard it carefully The T ribuneThursday February 17, 201 1PG33RELIGIONEmphasis on the family unit BISHOP V G CLARKE TH E Unit y Cent re of Li ght pre s e n t s t he l ates t ed itio n of S pir itual Cinema thi s S u n d a y f ea t u r i n g t w o m o vi e s T h e G r a ff iti of M r T upaia and The Cake E a t e r s Th e doub le-bi ll on e sho rt fil m and o ne f ulllength st art s at 5pm. For a d onatio n o f $10 po pcorn and a dri nk are i n c l u d e d Th e m ovies will b e s creened at the cent re located in t he G ray s Mus ic Cent re b uildi ng on #16 Eas t A ven ue, C en tr e v i l l e THE C AKE EA T E R S ( 2 0 0 7 ) st ars T w i l i g h t s Bella, ac t res s Kris ti n Stewar t, an d Bru c e D e rn ( M ons ter Mu lholl and Dr ive, Big L ove) T he fi l m i s a co mi ng of age dr a ma whi c h explor es t he new ( and o ld) c o nnect ions bet w een two s malltown f amilies A young woman with a degener ative d iseas e feels s he has no t ime to los e in b ec om ing a w o man w h ile a y o ung man s t r u g g l e s t o r e c o n ci l e h i s f at h er a n d b ro t h e r Th e mo vie is 95 min utes l ong an d n ot r ecommend ed for child ren as it c o ntain s s om e a d ul t l an gu ag e a n d s e xu a l e le m e n t s THE GRA FFITI O F MR TUP A I A (2008) is a s h o rt fi lm that t ells th e s tor y of a j anito r a t an el ementar y s c h ool i n New Zealand w ho qu ietly goes th rou gh hi s r o u t i n e s a l mos t invi sib le to thos e ar ound him. One day Mr T up aia an i mmigr ant c lean er at a Cook I sl and schoo l an swer s a s tar tlin g mes sage fr om a mys ter iou s w r iter in a b athr oom s tal l. Th rou gh fou r w o rds s c r ibb led o n a wall, two l onely sou ls con nect. T he movie was writ ten b y Paul W a r d a n d dir ected by Chr is toph er Du dman. R u ntim e is 14 minut es. T w i l i g h t s t a r t o b e f e a t u r e d i n N a s s a u s S p i r i t u a l C i n e m aCHAMPION, Wis. Associated Press THE V atican has named a tiny shrine in a small northeast W isconsin town as a holy site. The Catholic Church has recognised the chapel in Champion near Green Bay as the location of an of ficial sighting of the V irgin Mary WTMJ AM says it is the only site in the country with that distinction. Green Bay Bishop David Ricken says t he V i rgin Mar y app eared ther e thr e e times to Belgium immigrant Adele Brise in 1859. Devotees have since visited the site to pray for miracles. Ricken star ted investigating the events and thr ee theological experts soon picked up the work. After two years of poring over letters and documents, experts decid ed her claims wer e true. The V atican validated those r esults in December .Catholic leaders declare new holy site in US ST AR A TTRACTION: Kristin Stewart attending the T wilight Saga Film New Moon photocall at the Crillon Hotel in Paris, France on November 10, 2009. (Wikimedia Commons) Statue of the Virgin Mar y

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Psalm 10 7: 20: He sen t his wo r d and heal ed th em, and d el ivered th em fro m t hei r d e s t ru c t i o n s T H E RE i s heali ng in Hi s w ord ; if yo u ca n ju st recei v e an d b elieve His wo rd th e m i ra c ulo us he a li ng pow e r of G od ( Y ah weh ) i s avail a b l e to yo u. T he greatest hi nd ran ce to Go d s heali n g po wer is do u bt an d u nb elief W e r e livi ng in a day and time wh ere th e e n emy h as pu ll ed o ut all o f h is d e cei v i n g tri cks a n d gimmick s, th ereby cau sin g man y well -mea n in g sai nt s to l ive b eneath th eir God o rd ain ed pr ivil e ges and b en e f its S a t a n s chi ef co u rier f or hi s d ece p ti ve tacti c s is (erro neo us reli g i o us teachi ngs) wh ich i n mos t cases are carri e d ou t b y ma n y religi ou s lead ers, wh o d o n t righ tl y di vid e th e w ord o f tru t h S ain ts, pl ease hear me! E ith er Go d s w o rd i s rea l tru e o r it s no t. Th e t ime has come fo r u s to sto p p layin g chu rch and b e th e ch urch t hat s b rin gin g glo ry an d h on o ur to Hi s n ame. C o n t r a ry t o c om pro mi si ng r e l i g i o u s belie fs; th e re i s (Gre ek: d unam i s prono u nced d oo 'nam-i s) wo rk in g po wer i n th e wo rd o f God W at ch th is! M atth ew 8 : 8: Th e cen tu rio n an swere d a n d sai d, Lo rd I am n o t w ort hy th a t th o u sho u ld est co me u n der my roo f: bu t sp eak th e wo rd o nl y an d my servant sh all b e healed . Un bel ief and reli g i ou s sti nk i ng th in ki n g has a way of h in deri ng th e po wer o f God t h e re f o r e i t s o f th e u tmos t imp o rtance t hat th ose who m yo u are co nn ected to sp iri tu ally b e a peo pl e o f faith th at s if you r e e xp ectin g a move of Go d. M atth ew 13: 58: An d h e d id n ot man y might y wo rk s t here becau se o f t hei r u n bel i e f T h ro u g h o ut t he scrip tu res we see wh e r e Y ah sh ua Messi a h (Jesus th e Ch ri st) wo ul d oft en t ake only thre e of Hi s disc iple s ( P e t e r Ja mes an d Jo hn ) wi th Hi m w hen a deman d was pl ace d up o n His ano i nti n g (Lu ke 8:51, 9:28). Co u ld i t b e t hat th ese th ree d isci p les bel ief system was at a h igh er level th an th e o t h e r s ? On e o f th e many tragedi es t hat p lagues t o d a y s ch u rch is t hi s: Th e po wer o f th e Gosp el is bei ng comp ro mised d a i ly by th e in comp let e reli g i o us p rosp erit y go spel T he p rimary teach in g s of th e p o werless c h u rch t od ay co ncern th e fi nan cial ma t eria l bless in g s a n d po s se ssions ye t ma n y sain ts are p r e m a t u r ely d yin g fro m all k in ds of si ckn esses an d d iseases. Can God (Y ahw e h ) h eal d iseases su ch as A I D S can ce r l u pu s, leu k e mi a, e t c? Y es, He can But t he pro b lem i s no t wit h God it s wi th o ur bel ief s y s tem, o u r l a ck o f f a i t h H e re s a powerful qu e stio n that wa s a s ked an d th en p rof ou n dl y ans were d James 5:14-15: Is an y s ick a mo n g yo u ? let h im ca l l fo r th e eld ers o f the ch urch ; an d let them pray o ver h im, ano in ti ng h i m wit h oi l in t he name o f th e L ord And th e p ray er of faith sh all sav e th e si ck, a n d th e Lo rd shal l raise h im up ; an d i f he h a ve commi tted si ns, t hey s hall b e f or g i ve n him. T he p ro bl em wi th to d ay s chu rch i s t hat i t s f il led wi th reli g i ou s in vesti g at ors t hat spen d time t a l ki n g ab o ut th e s ick ness, after wh ich a w a t ered d o wn, weak p rayer is o ff e red wi th t hi s ki nd of e n d in g, Lo rd, if i t s yo ur wil l. W h e reas h ea l in g fo r th e sick is ma n i feste d where th e sp iri tu a l ly matu re, eld ers o f th e ch urch pray the pr a yer of f a i th T he lack of f aith has b ro ugh t abo u t an accept abl e co mpr omi se an d q uest io ni n g o f G o d s wo rd wit hi n th e chu rch in as much th at i t s read ily expect e d fo r p erso ns w ho a re st rick en wi th any fo rm o f t e r min a l i ll n ess t o d ie. A gain h ere s wh at the scrip tu re s a ys; P salm 10 7: 2 0: He sen t hi s wo rd, and h e aled them, an d d elivere d th e m fro m the i r de s tr uc ti ons . A nd Ps a lm 1 03 : 3 : Wh o f orgi v et h all th in e i ni q ui ties; w ho h ea l eth all t hy di sease s . Fo r th e New T estament ch ur ch, h ere s wh at th e Bi bl e says con cerni n g th e wo rd th at was sent ; Joh n .1:1: In th e b e gi nn in g was th e W o r d and th e W o rd was wi th Go d, an d th e W o rd w a s Go d. A n d 1 Joh n 4: 10 : Her e i n i s lo ve, n o t th at we l oved Go d, b u t t hat he lo ve d us, an d sen t h is S on to be th e pr op it iati on fo r o ur si ns. Sai nt s, if you re g o i ng t o d ou bt an ythi n g mak e su re t hat you do u bt yo ur d ou b ts and n ot th e word o f Go d; bet ter sti ll, d ou b t yo ur r e l igio n and eve r y t hi ng t hat d o esn t l in e u p wit h God s w ord co n cerni ng y o u r h e a l i n g H e re s w hat Isai ah (53:5) says, B ut h e was wo u nd ed fo r o ur t ra n sgressi on s, h e was b rui sed fo r ou r in iq u iti es: th e ch asti semen t o f ou r peace was up o n hi m; and wi th h is stri p e s we a r e h e al e d He sen t h is wo rd Now it s u p to you t o re cei ve a n d b elieve Hi s wo r d For q uest ions and co m men t s contact us via e-m ail s:pastor mall en@yaho o. com or kmf ci@l i ve.com o r t elephon e numbe r 1-242 4 4 1 2 0 2 1 P astors Matt hew and Br en dal ee A l len K ingdom Mi nded Fell owshi p C en t re I n t e r n a t i o n a l The T ribune PG34 Thursday February 17, 201 1RELIGIONHe sent his word! P ASTOR MA TTHEW ALLEN By P ASTOR GLEN P ROLLE Hillside Restoration Centre THE impact Herod would have had on the psyche of all of Jer usalem was quite intriguing. And as wise men told Herod of the star they saw (representing another or new system of governance) and the fact that they had come to acknowledge the dawn of a new day not only terrified Herod, but all of Jer usalem with him. As a matter of fact, that singular incident alone is but a reminder of the kind of impact that those entr usted with leadership can have on its citizenr y Go bring me words that I too may go and worship him; I too may pay tribute and salutation to this new system of gov er nance. After all it was not to Her od's pleasure that a system of governance had emerged right in his backyard. For Her od the existence of another king meant an end to his tyranny and selfinterest style of governance. T h e a n no u n cem e nt o f a n e w ki n g, though still in embryonic form, was to be such a transformative force that not even the strength of the "Herodic" system of governance would be able to withstand the new culture about to emer ge. H e r o d u nd e r s t o o d t ha t s uc h an an nou nce men t m ean t t hat wit h eve r y new king or ruler was to come a mor e defined culture that r epresented a rejection of what was. He also understood that a community people and nation were to take on the spirit, nature, values and cul tur e of its king or ruler When the righteous are in authority the people r ejoice. It is critical therefore that we appreci ate the implications of national leader ship and its impact on the psyche and mannerisms of us as a people. Ri g ht e ou s l ea de r s h ip t he n m u s t b e m e a s u r e d i n wo r d s an d m a nn e r i s m s Righteous leadership keeps in perspec tive its primar y responsibility of ser ving those who are least amongst us. Righteous leadership knows the weight of gover nance and therefor e is both gracious and compassionate, otherwise gov er nance becomes oppressive to its people. Righteous leadership appreciates that governance is best for the people when the burdens of governance ar e shar ed or carried by those who govern rather than placed on the people. For Herod, hearing such an announce ment of a righteous king meant an end to his self-ser ving rulership. When the righteous are in authority the people rejoice and they actively par ticipate in the building of their nation, help ing to bring the dawn of a brand new day .Righteous authority Pastor Glen P RolleS a i n t s i f y o u r e g o i n g t o d o u b t a n y t h i n g m a k e s u r e t h a t y o u d o u b t y o u r d o u b t s a n d n o t t h e w o r d o f G o d ; b e t t e r s t i l l d o u b t y o u r r e l i g i o n a n d e v e r y t h i n g t h a t d o e s n t l i n e u p w i t h G o d s w o r d c o n c e r n i n g y o u r h e a l i n g . 02172011 CSEC RELIGION-2 2/16/11 10:09 PM Page 4

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The T ribuneThursday February 17, 201 1PG35RELIGIONBy MINISTER KEVIN L A EWING E V E R Y D A Y it s ee m s to be a st ru gg l e t o l iv e es pe c i al l y w i th th is b ru ta l e c o no m ic c ri si s lo om i ng ov e r ou r h ea d s. Y e t, I h av e o b se rv ed t w o di sti n c t o c c u rre n c e s t ha t h av e e n li g ht e ne d m y u nd e rst a nd in g t o a gr ea t e r r e a l i t y The f irs t on e is, C h ris ti an s a re suf f e r i n g t he sa m e fa te l ik e e ve ry o ne e l se du ri ng t hi s e c o no m ic do w nt ur n, s uc h a s ho me f o re c l o s u r e s, ba n kr u p t c y m a rit a l p r o b l e m s d ue t o in su ff ic i e nt o r l a c k of fi n an c e s a n d t he li st g o es o n. S e c o n d l y e v en th ou g h C hri st ia n s h a ve p ra c ti c e d t he bi b li c a l p ri nc i pl e s su c h a s tit hing, giving and off erin gs, i t would a p pe a r a s i f t he b ib li c a l p ri nc i p le s h a ve e i th er fa i le d t he m or se e m s a s if th e y re d oi n g so m et hi n g w ro n g w h i c h c a us in g t he p ri nc i pl e s to b e o f n o e ff e c t. My qu es ti on to Go d a n d to my se l f fo r tha t ma tter w as, W ha t is h app eni ng? A sid e fro m a l l o f th e a b ov e t he re a re th ose w h o do n t se rv e G o d, s ee m in g ly pr ac t ic e n on e of h is p ri nc i p le s, b ut y et th e y re p r o s p e rin g a nd l iv i ng i n a b un d an c e d uri n g t hi s v i c io us e c on o mi c c ri si s. S om e th in g i s f un d a me n ta ll y w ro n g he re a nd c l e a rly t he re m us t be a n a ns w er The B ib le c om ma n ds th a t w e w al k by f ai th a n d no t by s ig h t ( 2 C or in th ia n s. 5 : 7) which is a gener al command to all C h ri sti a ns, h o w ev e r G od h a s r ev e a le d t o m e th at a ll th a t a re de st in e d f or g r e a t n e s s a n d ha v e be e n c a l le d f or g re a te r w o rks w i l l b e fo rc e d to w a l k by f a it h ra th er th a n gi v e n t he op ti o n o f l ea v i ng th e w a lk of fa it h t o t he in di v id u al di sc r e t i o n A t fi rst th is w a s k in d o f c o nf us in g t o m e be c a us e I h a ve b ee n to ld th at Go d d oe s n ot vi o la te on e s f re e do m of c h oi c e b ut a s h e be g a n t o sh ow m e th ro ug h th e sc r ip tu r e s th e m y ste ry w a s i m me d ia te l y t ra ns fo r m e d in to a re v e la ti o n th a t c on se qu e nt ly m ad e me no t o nl y ap p re c ia te b ut a c c e p t w h at ot he r s and myself a r e presently going t h rou g h, w i th a n un de rs ta nd i ng th a t th e re is p ur po se f ue l li n g a ll of i t w i th ou t v io l at in g a n y o n e s fr ee d om of c h o ic e N o w t o w a l k b y fa it h l i te ra ll y me a n s to w al k in h ar mo ny w i th G od s w o rd as it pe rta in s t o o ur c i rc u mst a nc e s a nd da i ly l iv i ng Fo r e x a mp l e w he n o th e rs w ron g u s, w a l kin g b y fa i th d ic t a te s t ha t w e s ho ul d d ea l w it h t he m w it h l ov e in sp it e o f w h a t t he y ma y h a ve do ne t o us a nd a l so pr ay fo r th em O f c ou rse th is i s m o re e a si ly sa id t ha n do ne t he r e f o r e mo st C h ris ti an s c om p romi se i n a re a s s uc h a s th i s b e c au se th er e a re no d em a nd s ma d e on th e m in r e g a r d to w al k in g b y f a it h. O n t he ot he r h an d th e C hri st ia n t ha t h a s be e n c ho se n fo r g re at ne ss d oe s no t ha v e a c ho ic e i n th e m a tte r fo r e x a m pl e i n th e ti th e p ay i ng a l w a ys g iv i ng p u tti n g o th er s ab o ve se l f. A s a n e xa m pl e : A C h ri sti a n w ho h a s fa c e d fi n an c i al di f f i c u l t y bu t th e re i s no on e t o he l p hi m a n d al l t he sou rc e s of h e lp th at w e re on c e a v ai l ab le t o h i m h a ve e i th e r be e n shu t do w n or th es e sa me so u rc e s a re in a si mi l ar p os it io n. N ow t he re a li ty is t hi s, do e s t hi s C hr ist i an be c o me c on fu se d? Y e s Do e s t hi s C h ri sti a n ge t a ng ry w i th G od ? Y e s! D oe s h e fe e l a s i f t hi s C hri st ia n w a lk p ro d uc e s mo re p ro bl e ms th a n sol u ti on s? Y e s! Do e s h e f e el a s i f ev e ry o ne i s g et ti ng a h ea d e x c e pt hi m? Ag a i n y es H o w e v e r w ha t se t s t hi s C hr ist ia n a p a rt f r om th e o th e rs, is t ha t w h e n (n ot if ) a l l o f t he a b ov e m e nt io ne d sc e n a rio s ex p ir e, t hi s C h ri sti a n be c o me s c og n is an t of t he fa c t t ha t w a lk i ng by fa it h h as z e ro t o do w it h hi s f ee l in g s. T o t hi s e n d, th e re is n o op ti on fo r h im so h e is f or c ed to c on ti n ue w a lk i ng by f ai th a n d n o t b y si gh t or by w h a t h e fe e ls w i th ou t h is f re ed o m to c ho os e b ei n g v io l at e d No w r e m e m b e r w a l ki n g by fa i th a n d no t b y s ig h t is t o w a l k a c c o rdi n g t o G od s i n s t r u c ti on s o r h is w or d a n d n o t a c c or d i n g t o h ow th in g s a pp e ar or ho w w e fe e l T h e r e f o r e th i s C h ris ti an w h o i s f or c ed t o w a l k by f a it h du e to t he fa c t th at h e i s d e stin ed f or great nes s has been clearl y e q ui pp e d w it h kn o w le d ge to se e t he b i gg e r p i c t u r e of h is si tu a ti on a nd t ha t kn o w le d ge i s Go d i s in c on tro l Go d i s i n c o nt rol a s is fr eq u en tl y s ta te d b ut v e ry fe w u n de rst a nd t he m e an i ng o f t hi s sta t em e nt ; i t i mp l ie s th a t h e i s su pe r v i s i ng th e g o od an d t he ba d in o u r li v es L e t s re a d t he bi bl i c a l pr oo f of th is. The bo ok of (Psalms 6 6:1 0-1 2) r e ads: For t ho u, O G od h a s pr ov e d u s: t ho u h a ve t rie d u s, a s si lv e r is tri e d. Th o u b ro ug h t u s i nt o th e n e t; t ho u l a id a f fl ic t io n u po n ou r l oi n s. Th ou h a v e c a use d m e n to ri d e ov e r our h eads; we went t hro ugh f ir e and t h ro u gh w a te r: b ut th o u b ro ug h t u s o ut i nt o a w ea l th y p l ac e W ow W h at a n e y e o pe n er as y ou ve re a d f ol k s, G o d i s th e o n e i n c o nt ro l h e r e n o de v i l, d e mo n o r w it c hc ra f t w ork e r i s d oi n g th i s to y o u. Th e w or d i s un e qu i vo c a ll y c le a r; th ou me a ni n g Go d hi m se lf is th e o ne t es ti ng p ro v in g an d a l lo w i ng ot he rs to r id e o v e r yo u o nl y t o b ri ng y ou w h o i s tra n sfo r m i n g in to th e g re a tn e ss t ha t h e h a s c a ll e d y o u, to ma k e i t th rou g h th e se c h a ll e ng e s in to yo u r w ea l th y p la c e o r p l ac e of a bu n da n c e a nd li mi t le ss re s o u r c e s F ol ks t he w o rd s o f w i sd om f or to da y a re sim p ly th is, Go d w il l n ot p ut n e w w i ne in to ol d w in e sk in s ( Ma tt he w 9 : 1 7) Thi s h i nt s th at he w il l n ot b ri ng y ou to t ha t p r e p a re d w ea l th y pl a c e w i th ou t t ra ns fo rmi n g yo u r mi nd f ro m th a t o l d mi nd se t th ro ug h l if e s c ha l le n ge s a n d d if fi c ul ti e s w h ic h he is c e rta in l y i n c o nt rol of F or q ue s ti o n s e -m a i l K e v i n e wi n g@ c o r a l w a v e c o m .A m I b e i n g f o r c e d t o w a l k b y f a i t h ? Minister Kevin Ewing CONFIDENCE Insurance Agency Staff at St Georges Anglican Church Worship Service, giving God thanks for the past year and praying for his blessings and guidance for 2011. (far left) Reverend Kingsley Knowles, rector; Jerome Knowles, managing director of Confidence Insurance, and (far right) Reverend Andrew Toppin, assistant rector. CONFIDENCE INSURANCE P A YS VISIT ST GEORGE'S ANGLICAN CHURCH

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The T ribune PG36 Thursday February 17, 201 1RELIGIONS c e n e s f r o m t h e f u n e r a l s e rv ice f or t he la t e B is h op M ic ha el H ar t l ey El d on t h e f i r s t B a h a m i a n A n g l i c a n B i s h o p o f t h e B a h a m a s T u r ks an d Cai co s H u n d r e d s a t t e n d e d t h e s e r v i c e a t C h r i s t C h u r c h Cat h ed r al on T u es da y t o pa y t r ib ut e t o Bi s ho p El do n B i s h o p E l d o n w a s o rd ai n ed a s d ea con in 1 95 4 an d as a pr i es t in 1 95 5. H e w a s c o n s e c r a t e d B i s h o p S u f f r aga n of N ew P r o v i d e n c e on J un e 2 4, 1 971 and b ec am e D i o c e s a n B i s h o p i n A p r i l 19 72, s er vi ng i n t h at c ap aci t y f or 2 4 ye ar s un t il h is r e t i r eme nt in 1 996 B is h op El do n al s o s e r v e d as t he f o un di n g cha ir m an of t he Col l ege of t he Bah am as ( C O B ) b o a r d o f d i r e c t o r s s e rv in g fr o m 19 75 t o 19 95. POPE Benedict XVI said he has been closely following the delicate situation in Egypt and is praying that the tr oubled countr y can find a peaceful solution to their political unr est. T h e P op e m ad e h is f ir s t co mm en t s about the massive protests against the E gy p t i an g ov er nm e n t at t h e A n g el u s Prayer on Sunday February 6. I ask God that this land, blessed by the pr esence of the Holy Family may redisc ov er tr a nq u il it y a nd pe acef u l co ex is tence, in a shar ed commitment to the c o mm o n g oo d t h e P op e s ai d a s h e a d d r es s ed tho us and s of pil gri ms i n St Peter's Square.P o pe p ra y s f o r pea c e i n Egy pt GREEN balloons reading: "Y es to life" are held by pro-life movement activists during Pope Benedict XVI's Angelus prayer in St Peter's Square at the V atican, Sunday Februar y 6. The Pontiff says he is praying that Egypt can find tranquillity and peaceful coexistence. (AP) F UN E R AL S E RV I C E F O R T H E L AT EB I S H O PMIC HAELEL D ON

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T H U R S D A Y F E B R U A R Y 1 7 2 0 1 1 T H E T R I B U N E S E C T I O N E T O DISCUSS ST ORIES ON THIS P A GE LOG ON T O WWW .TRIBUNE242.COM BY BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net O N t h e o c c a s i o n o f t h e 7 8 t h a n n i v e r s a r y o f t h e b i r t h o f D e a c o n L e v i t i c u s U n c l e L o u A d d e r l e y f o r m e r p r i n c i p a l o f S t A u g u s t i n e s C o l l e g e ( S A C ) a n d n a t io n al s p o r ti n g l e g e n d t h e S t A u g u s t i n e s C o l l e g e A l u m n i A s s o c i a t i o n ( S A C A ) w i l l b e p r e s e n t i n g t h e 5 t h v e r s i o n o f i t s a n n u a l r o a d r a c e n a m e d i n h i s h o n o u r T h e U n c l e L o u R o a d R a c e a n d W a l k w i l l t a k e p la c e o n M a r c h 1 2 th 2 01 1 Ac c o r d in g to B en s o n R u ss e l l P u b l i c R e l a t i o n s D i r e c t o r f o r S A C A t h i s ye ar th e r a c e w ill f o llo w a n e w c o u r s e t h a t i s d es ig n e d t o t e s t t h e s t am in a o f p a r t i c i p a n t s a s w e l l a s i n c r e a s e t h e f u n f a c t o r T h i s y e a r t h e r a c e b e g i n s a t R a w s o n S q u a r e an d en d s at S A C. R un n er s w i l l b e e x p e c t e d t o t r a ve r s e b o th P ar a d is e I s l an d b r i d g e s T h e t w i s t t h i s y e a r R u s s e l l s a y s i s t h a t w a l k e r s w i l l b e e n c o u r a g e d t o f o r m r e l a y t e a m s s o t h a t t h e p e r s o n w h o s t a r t s a t R a w s o n S q u a r e ma y no t n e c es s a r ily b e t he s a m e p e r s o n t h a t f i n i s h e s a t S A C T h i s r a c e i s a l l a b o u t s p e e d R u s s e l l s a i d F i r s t o n e t o t h e f i n i s h l i n e i n t h e f a s t e s t t i m e a n d i n y e a r s t o c o m e i t w i l l b e a l l a b o u t m a t c h i n g a n d o r b r e a k i n g p r e v i o u s s p e e d r e c o r d s W a l k i n g r e l a y t e a m s a r e a l s o e n c o u r a g e d s o t h a t t h e y t o o c a n b o a s t a b o u t t h e i r s p e e d w h i l e e n j o y i n g t h e w a l k F o u r y e a r s a g o S A C A b e g a n t h i s e v e n t a s a t o o l t o b r i n g S A C s o l d s c h o l a r s t o g e t h e r i n a f u n a n d f i t n e s s a c t i v i t y H o w e v e r t h e o r g a n i s e r s a r e i n t e n t o n m a k i n g t h e e v e n t o n e o f t h e p r e m i e r e v e n t s o n t h e a n n u a l f i t n e s s c a l e n d a r G e n o N a i r n P r e s i d e n t o f S A C A a d d e d t h a t U n c l e L o u w a s a s p e c i a l k i n d o f a t h l e t e a n d a r o l e m o d e l t o m a n y w h o p a s s e d t h r o u g h t h e h a l l s o f S A C N a i r n s a i d t h e r a c e i s t h e p e r f e c t w a y t o h o n o r a m a n w h o s p e n t h i s l i f e t e a c h i n g y o u n g p e o p l e h o w t o e x c e l a t e d u c a t i o n a n d s p o r t s N a i r n r e m e m b e r s t h a t o n e o f U n c l e L o u s f a v o r i t e s a y i n g s w a s t o s e t y o u r g o a l s h i g h a n d d o n o t c o m p r o m i s e y o u r v a l u e s a n d i n t e g r i t y I n t h e s p i r i t o f c o m p e titio n S AC A is i nv itin g a ll o l d s c h o l a r s o f S A C f i t n e s s g u r u s a n d a l l t r a c k a n d o r r u n n i n g c l u b s t o t a k e p a r t i n t h i s e v e n t T h e r a c e h a s m a l e a n d f e m a l e d i v i s i o n s f o r r u n n e r s a n d w a l k e r s a n d i n c l u d e s a l l a g e b r a c k e t s b e g in n i n g a t 1 5 an d u n d e r u p t o 5 0 a n d o v e r P o r t io n s o f t h e r a c e w i l l b e r e c o r d e d f o r a d o c u m e n t a r y t h a t w i ll b e a i r e d o n l o c a l t e l e v i s i o n W e w o u l d l i k e t o e n c o u r a g e e v e r y o n e t o j o i n u s i n t h i s w o r t h w h i l e v e n t u r e e s p e c i a l l y o u r S A C f a m i l y R u s e l l s t r e s s e d I t p r o m i s e s t o b e l o t s o f f u n an d p hy s ic all y r e wa rd in g. R e g i s t e r f o r m s w i l l b e a v a i l a b l e f r o m 2 1 s t F e b r u a r y a t S u b w a y P r i n c e Ch ar les D riv e a nd S u bw ay C ab l e Be a c h R e gi s tr a t io n f e e i s $ 1 5 SACA set to host Uncle Lou Road Race and W alk By RENALDO DORSETT Tribune Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net O N E o f t h e m o s t d e c o r a t e d sw i mm er s i n Ba h am i a n h is tory w i ll j o i n a l i s t o f t h e m o s t n o t a b l e n a m e s i n A f r i c a n A m e r i c a n c u l tu r e w h e n sh e r e c e i v e s he r l a t e s t h o n o u r A l a n a D i l e tt e w i l l b e on e o f t w o a t hl e t e s r e c o g n i s e d fo r h e r c o nt r i b u t i o n s i n h e r s i g n a t u r e s p o r t a t t h e 2 5 t h A n n u a l B l a c k H i s t o r y In v i t a t i o na l S w i m M e e t, F e br u a r y 1 8 2 0 a t t h e T a k o m a A q u a t i c C e nt e r i n W a s h i n g t o n D C D i l l e te w i l l b e c e l e b r a t e d a l o ng w i t h M i c h a e l W r i g h t D i v i n g C h a m p i o n f or t h e U ni te d St a t e s A c c or di ng to i t s or g a ni si ng c om mi ttee the In vi ta tiona l wa s founde d w i t h t h e g o a l s o f p r o v i d i n g u rba n y outh nati on w i d e wi th a posi t i v e o u t l e t f o r e x p r e s s i o n e x p o sure to stron g compe t i tion, a f orum t o m e e t p os i ti v e r o l e m o de l s a nd the opportun i ty to vi sit the na t i on's c a p i t a l T h e m e e t w a s f o u n d e d b y t h e D e p a r t m e n t o f P a r k s a n d R e c r e a t i o n a n d t he U n i t e d B l a c k F u nd t he m e e t h a s g ro w n f r o m a s m a l l l o c a l c o m p e t i t i o n t o o n e n o w h a i l e d b y U S A S w i m m i n g t h e n a t i o n a l g o v e r n i n g b o d y f o r t h e spor t of sw i mm ing a s the "pr em ie r m i n o r i t y s w i m c o m p e t i t i o n i n t h e U n i t e d S ta t e s a nd i n th e W o r l d Gr ow n t o a n a n nua l e v e nt w h i ch f e a t u r e s h u n d r e d s o f m i n o r i t y sw i m me r s, ra ng i ng fr om a g e s 5 1 8 i t n o w f e a t u r e s s w i m m e r s f r o m a c r os s t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s In 1 9 8 9 i ts c om m i tt e e be g a n th e practic e h a s ch ose n courag eous a n d n ot a bl e A f r i c a n A m e r i c a ns w h o s e c o n tr i b u t i o ns a r e kn o w n th r o ug h out t he worl d to be re cogni ze d duri n g t h e w e e ke nd s e v e n ts I n h e r F r e s h m a n s e a s o n a t A uburn U n i v ersi ty, D il le tte' s t i me s i n t he 5 0 fre e and 20 0 ba ck set S E C s e a s o n -b e s t s a nd s h e a l s o c o m p e t e d i n t he 1 0 0 f l y a n d 2 0 0 I M a t th e U S. O p e n A s a s o p h o m o r e D i l l e t t e c o m p e t e d a t t h e N C A A C h a m p i o n s hi p s, a nd e a r ne d a n A l l -A m e r i c a hono ur in the 20 0 me dl e y re l a y. I n di v i d u a l l y a t N C A A s sh e f i n i s he d 2 3 rd i n t h e 1 0 0 b a c k, 4 0 th p l a c e i n t h e 1 0 0 f l y a n d a 5 8 t h p l a c e fi n i s h i n t he 5 0 f r e e A s a j uni or she ea r ned thr ee A ll A meri ca hon ors at t he 2 00 9 NCAA C h a m p i o n s h i p s D i l l e t t e t o o k f o u rt h i n t h e 1 0 0 fl y i n a t i m e t h a t r a n ks t hi r d a l l -t i me a t A u bu rn a n d w a s a m e m b e r o f t h e s c h o o l s Dilette to be honoured at Black History Invitational Swim Meet Alana DiletteSEE page 2E INSIDE International spor ts newsNO DEAL FOR PUJOLSSee stor y on pg 4E By RENALDO DORSETT Tribune Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net IN A t hird a nd d ec id ing g a me th at e x c e e d e d e x p e c t a t io n s, p e rf e c t sh o o ting from the field in overtime and a g r i t t y d e f en s iv e e f f o r t l e d t h e CR Walker Knights to their fourth cons e cu ti v e G SS S A S en i o r G i r l s b a s ketball title. T h e K n i gh t s c l i nc h ed t h e s e r i es when they edged out a 30-28 overti me w in o ve r th e R .M Ba il ey P ac e rs last night at the K endal Is a acs Gymnasium. T h e K n i g h t s g o t a s i d e h i g h 1 1 points from Jonetra Kelly, Tameka Martin fi nishe d w ith 1 0 poin ts, whi le Christina Williams finished with six points and nine rebounds. The Pacers opened the over time period with a steal and layup from S ha n e ll Fra z i e r to t a ke a n e a rly 2 7 -2 5 lead. K e l ly re spo nd e d w it h a r un ne r a nd M a rt i n c o n v e rt e d a f a s t b re a k l a y u p t o give the Knigh ts t he lead for good in the final period. After she made one of two from the line to bring her team within a s i n gl e p o i nt t h e P ac er s N i ck et r ya G i lc ud wh o f in i s h ed wi t h a g am e h i g h 1 2 p o i n t s f o u l e d o ut o f t h e g a m e on the ensuing possession which left h e r t e a m wi t h o u t i t s b e s t s c o r i n g option down the stretch. Af t er Ke ll y ma de on e of t wo a t t he li n e t o gi ve th e K ni gh t s a t wo p oi nt l e a d, Fra z i e r, w h o fi n ish e d w i th seven points for the Pac ers faile d to respond on the op posite end w ith an opportunity to tie the game. Fr a zi er mi s s e d b ot h fr e e t h r ows with 8.3 seconds left to play and the K n i g h t s we r e a b l e t o r u n o u t t h e clock and claim the title. T he team that want it the mos t SEE page 3E G S S S A S E N I O R G I R L S B A S K E T B A L L A C T I O N Edge out Pacers in overtime

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SPORTS P AGE 2E, THURSDA Y FEBRUAR Y 17, 201 1 TRIBUNE SPOR TS T O DISCUSS ST ORIES ON THIS P A GE LOG ON T O WWW .TRIBUNE242.COM BY BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net T H E B a p t i s t S p o r t s C o u n c i l opened its 2011 Rev. Dr. David S. Johnson Basketball Classic on Saturday at the Baillou Hills Sporting C o m p l e x w i t h t w o o f t h e t h r e e d e f e n d i n g c h a m p i o n s c o n t i n u i n g where they left off last year. I n t h e 1 5 a n d u n d e r d i v i s i o n M a c e d o n i a b l a st e d L a t t e r D a y S a i n t s 3 7 -1 6 w hi l e Te m p le Fe l lo w sh ip he l d o ff Gol den Gate s No. 1 3 8-3 1. In ot h e r g a m e s p la y e d, Ma c e do n i a d e f. C hr is ti an Ta be r na c l e 5 4 -4 7 (1 9 ); M ac ed o ni a d e f L a t t er D ay 43 38 (M); Latter-Day nipped Mt. Tabor 26-25 (19); Temple Fellowship def. Mt Pleasant Green 49 2 6 (19) and Fi rs t B ap tist d ef. g old en Ga tes No. 2 32-22 (M). Her es a s ummar y of the games played:MACEDONIA 37 LATTER-DAY SAINTS 16T h e c o m b o f S t e v e n M i t c h e l l T eric o Strac han a nd Da von A dde r ley all s c or ed eight, Dezon Taylor h ad six, A aro n C am pbell f ive and Jimi co Brow n four as the defe nding 1 5 -a n d -u n de r c ha m p i on s p u ll e d o f f a ro u t J a m a l S i m o n h a d s i x a n d L o g a n Harris added four in the loss. MACEDONIA 54 CHRISTIAN TABERNACLE 47Karon Pratt had a game high 26 po in ts, Ra sh ad Kn ow l e s h a d sw e ve n an d The ro n Tay l or ad de d fi ve in t he win for Macedonias 19-and-under. Christian Tabernacle got 16 from L Collie and 11 from R Smith. Mace d on i a 4 3 L a tt e r-D a y Sa i n ts 3 8 : D i no Flo w ers sco red 1 0 Ca rson S au nde rs and Rashad Know les b ot h had nine an d Baccus Roll e chip ped i n wit h s e ve n in t h e m en s vi c t or y Al c ot F o x s c o r e d 1 2 a n d L l o y d B a i l e y helped out with 11 in the loss.LATTER-DAY 26 MT. TABOR 25L loy d Bai le y s cor ed 12 A lco tt Fox had seven and Gino Ferguson a dde d f iv e in t he w i n fo r t he 1 9 -a nd under. Jorann Adderley had eight, Deniro Moss had seven and David Kemp had five in the loss.TEMPLE FELLOWSHIP 49 MT. PLEASANT GREEN 26G a b b ie La u re n t h a d 1 3 B ra s ha w n White had eight and Trevor Smith, Ke v in B urrow s an d J o hna tha n Go rdon all had six in the 19-and-under w i n A a ro n C a s h h a d a g am e h ig h 1 5 an d Anto nious C olli e added nin e in the loss.FIRST BAPTIST 32 GOLDEN GATES NO.2 22C a d r o n F er g u s o n s co r ed e i g h t Cr u z S i m o n h ad s e ve n a n d T o n y Williams chipped in with six in the mens win. Ted Rolle had seven in the loss.TEMPLE FELLOWSHIP 38 GOLDEN GATES NO.1 31 J oh n S mi t h h ad 10 Ke vi n Bu r r o w s s i x I a n P i n d e r a n d G a b b i e Lau rent b oth had f ive a n d Tr evor Smith and Jason Cooper both had fo ur i n the m ens victo ry. Kr is to ff Stuart scored 11, Wayde Higgs had n i n e a n d D e w a d e Mu r ra y a d d e d s e v en in the loss.SATURDAYS SCHEDULEField one 10 a.m. Temple Fellowship vs St. j ohn s (15 ); 11 a. m. C hri stia n Tab ern a c l e v s L a t t e r D a y S a i n t s ( 1 5 ) ; no on M t T ab or v s G ol de n Ga te s (19); 1 p.m. Mt. Pleasant Green vs Latter-Day Saints (19); 2 p.m. Latter-Day Sai nts vs F i r st B aptist (M) ; 3 p.m. Chris tian Tabernacle vs Golden Gates (M). Court two 1 0 a .m S t. P au l s vs G ol de n G at es (15); 11 a.m. Golden Gates vs Mt. N e b o ( 1 9) ; n o on Ma c e d on i a v s F a it h United (19); 1 p.m. Temple Fellow ship vs Christian Tabernacle (19); 2 p.m. Golden Gates No.2 vs Temple F e l l o w s h i p ( M) ; 3 p m Ma c e d o n i a v s Church of the Nazarene (M). N e w s e a s o n u n d e r w a y f o r R e v D r David S. Johnson Basketball Classic recordbre aking 2 00 m edle y rel ay that fi ni s he d s e c o n d Wh en D il l e tte w a s he a ded i nto he r s e n i o r y e a r a t A u b u r n l e a d i n g t h e te a m i n th e 1 0 0 a n d 5 0 m e t r e s b u tt e rfl y, w a s the sec on d fa st e st 10 0 ba ck a n d f ou r t h f a s t e s t i n b ot h t h e 5 0 a n d 1 0 0 f r e e w h e n s h e g o t t h e n e w s i n S e p t e m b e r t h a t s h e w o u l d n o t b e a l l o w e d t o c o m pe te d ue to a c o a c hi n g e r r o r du r i n g h e r r e d s hi r t fr e s hm a n s e a s on T h e 2 3 -y e a r -o l d h a s c om p e te d fo r th e B a h a m a s fo r y e a r s o n t he i nt e r n a t i o n a l s t a g e e v e r y t h i n g r a n g i n g fr o m th e C a r i ft a G a m e s t o t h e P a n A m G a m e s a n d t h e S u m m e r O l y m p i c s i n 2 0 0 8 In 20 0 7, Di le tte Al ic ia L ig htbourne A r i a n n a V a n d e r p o o l W a l l a c e a n d N i k i a D e v e a u x s w a m t o a b r o n z e m e d a l f i n i s h i n t h e P a n A m e r i c a n G a m e s, th e c o u n tr y s h i g h e s t m e d a l fi ni s h a t a n e v e nt o f th a t m a g n i t u de D i l e t te i s t h e h o l d e r o f fo u r i n d i v i d u a l B a h a m i a n N a t i o n a l r e c o r d s a n d a sh a re h ol de r of th re e a d di ti o na l r e c or d s a s a r e l a y t e a m m e m b e r S h e b e c a m e t h e r e c o r d h o l d e r o f t he 2 0 0 m B a c k st r ok e i n J un e o f 2 0 0 7 w i t h a ti m e o f 2 : 2 1 3 2 s a t t h e C h a r l ot t e U n t ra s w i m J u s t a y e a r l a t e r i n h e r d e b u t O l y m p i c a p p e a r a n c e D i l e t t e s e t a n e w m a r k o f 1 : 0 2 5 6 s i n t h e 1 0 0 m B a c k s t ro k e a n d a t t h e F I N A W o rl d C ha m p i o ns h i p s i n 2 0 0 9 s h e s e t n e w n a t i o n a l r e c o r d s i n t h e 5 0 m b a c k stroke i n 2 9. 83 s a nd the 5 0m B utt e rfly i n 2 7 0 7 s. A l s o a t th e F I N A W or l d C ha m p i o n s h i p s D i l l e t t e a l o n g s i d e A L i c i a L i g h tb o u r n e A r i a n n a V a n d e r p o o l Wa l la ce and Te i sha Li g ht bourne se t a n e w m a r k i n t h e 4 0 0 m M e d l e y i n 4 : 1 5 5 9 s a n d a t t h e W o r l d L C C ha m p i on s h i ps t he t e a m a g a i n s e t a ne w r ec ord i n the 4 0 0 m Fr ee s tyl e 3: 4 8 .3 4 s. D i l l e t t e a nd h e r S w i f t S w i m C l u b te amma tes Mic kay la L ig htbourn, Je nn a C h a p l i n a nd A s h l e y B ut l e r s w a m t o a r e c o r d t i m e o f 2 : 0 5 7 0 s a t t h e 2 0 0 8 N a t i o n a l s .BL A CK HIST OR Y INVIT A TI ON AL SWI M MEET HONOREES1989 Martin Luther King, Jr 1990 Martin Luther King, Jr 1991 Frederick Douglass 1992 Sojourner Truth 1993 Benjamin Banneker 1994 Mary McLeod Bethune 1995 George Washington Carver 1996 Harriet Tubman 1997 Booker T. Washington 1998 Dr. Dorothy L. Height 1999 Walter Washington 2000 Eleanor Holmes Norton 2001 Dr. Calvin Rolark 2002 Dr. William H. Rumsey 2003 Dan Knise and Clarence Bishop 2004 Sharon Pratt 2005 Chuck Hinton, Fred Lee Valentine, and Mamie 2006 20th Annual Black History I n v i t a t i o n a l S wi m M e e t Co m m i t t e e 2007 Jim Ellis and Frederick Evans, II 2008 Bradford A. Tatum 2009 Cullen Jones 2010 Maritza Correia, Byron Davis, S a bi r Mu ha m me d Da v id Gog g in s 2011 M ic ha e l Wri gh t a nd Al an a Dill et te DiletteFROM page 1E

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w on i t, sa i d Ma r ti n w ho sh o t 3 6 f r o m t h e f i e l d a n d 4 7 f r o m th e li ne. We want ed it t he m ost w e c a me o ut a nd p la ye d wit h th e hea rt of a ch amp io n Twin s i s te r Ton ique a Mart i n a p p l a u d e d t h e P a c e r s e f f o r t b u t s a i d h e r t e a m p r o v e d t h a t t h e y w e r e t h e b e s t te am throug hout th e se ason. R M c a m e o u t a n d t h e y p lay ed a hard g ame out he re to nigh t," she said. But onl y th e b es t co u ld pu l l t hr o u gh ou t of th at ga me t oda y and w e s h o w e d t h e m w e h a v e he a r t a n d we pl a ye d t o t he b est of our a bility out there ." A slow s c ori ng first ha lf for b o th t e a ms g a v e w a y t o a h i g h sc oring sec ond as bo th tea ms l a i d t h ei r c h a m p io n sh i p h op e s o n the lin e. K e l l y w h o s c o r e d t h e ga m e' s o p e n in g b as k e t an d m ade its fina l fre e th r o w, le d he r t e am to a c hampionship i n just he r fi r st sea son in th e G SSSA s e nior d ivisio n. "W e pla ye d w el l, we c am e o u t h a r d s h e s a i d T h e y p lay ed w ell but w e j ust we re b etter tonig ht." Ne ither te am led by m ore t h a n a si n g l e b a s ke t i n th e f i rs t h alf w hic h fea tured fo ur ties a nd th r e e lea d c han ges. Ar ie l Stuart, w ho finis h ed w i t h j u s t f o u r p o i n t s b u t a g a m e h ig h 10 re b ou nd s, ma d e a jum per from the fre e throw li n e w i th 4 5 s e co n ds l e f t t o p lay to gi ve the Pa ce r s a 10 -8 l ead hea ded into the hal f. Ch r i s t ina Wi llia ms tie d th e g a me a t 10 for th e K nig ht s o n t he g a me 's o p en i n g po s s e s s i o n The K nigh ts re ac hed th eir biggest lead of the game on a nothe r W illi ams lay up for a 19 1 4 l e a d w i t h 6: 5 0 l e f t t o p l a y S t u a r t s p o r t i n g a v i s i b l e l i m p m a d e a j u m p e r j u s t be f or e s he ex it e d t h e ga me a n d F ra z i e r fo l lo w e d w it h t w o a t th e line to pu ll the Pac ers w ithi n one 1 9-18 Wi llia ms made a fad ea wa y j u m p e r w i t h j u s t u n d e r a m inute left to p lay to gi ve th e K nig hts a 2 5-2 1 le ad but th e P a c e r s w o u l d s t a g e a l a te ra l l y W i t h 3 5 se c o n d s l e f t t o p l a y G ilc ud ma de a run ning lay up to bring he r tea m w ithin one On t he def ens ive end s he m ade a s te al at ha lfc ourt a nd fo r c ed a foul whi ch sent her t o t h e f r e e t h r o w l i n e w i t h e igh t sec onds l eft to pla y. She m ade on e o f tw o from th e li ne to tie the ga me a t 2 5 a nd force ove rtime Kinght s Head Coac h Ken L i g h tb o u rn e sa i d t h e f o u r c o n se c u tiv e t itl e w i ns w a s a te sta m e nt t o th e d et erm in a tio n h is t e a m d i s p l a y e d f o r y e a r s b e g in n in g w i t h i ts se n io r l e ad e r s h i p I t o l d m y g ir l s o nc e i s a m i s t a k e t w o t i m e s y o u r e l u c k y t h r e e t i m e s y o u r e a lrigh t, but four time s, you 're re ady and w e w e r e read y for th is o ne, he s a id "Jo ne tr a p lay ed lik e a bea st, I c ould n't b e l i e v e i t T o n i T a m i M y s e n i or s t h e y r e a l l y st e p pe d u p I m h a pp y fo r t he s e g i rl s a n d I l o v e th e m l i ke m y da u g h te rs SPORTS TRIBUNE SPOR TS THURSDA Y FEBRUAR Y 17, 201 1, P AGE 3E T O DISCUSS ST ORIES ON THIS P A GE LOG ON T O WWW .TRIBUNE242.COM K n i g ht s c l i nc h ti t l eFROM page 1E G S S S A S E N I O R G I R L S B A S K E T B A L L A C T I O N



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By AVA TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter aturnquest@tribunemedia.net THE NATIONAL Development Party has reaffirmed its commitment to principles, not pragmatics following Andre Rollins decision to join the Progressive Liberal Party. In response to Dr Rollins suggestion that the third party also merge with the official opposition, Renward Wells, leader of the NDP, explained that such a move would involve deep changes to its policy of supporting a true democratic process. Mr Wells said: If the PLP or the FNM were serious about democracy in this country, and democracy not stopping at the door of their political party, then there would be no need for the NDP. In an interview with The Tribune, the third party denied reports published yes terday that Dr Rollins had been forced out of the party or that he had been its leader. Mr Wells said: He felt that it was more pragmatic for him to join one of the major parties, so hes going with his pragmaticism; we are about principles and we will remain to be about these principles. He explained that since Dr Rollins resigned from the post o f chairman of the partys e xecutive steering committee i n April, the partys momentum has not slowed. The party held a debate and convention in November, during which members elected a leader, deputy leader and chairman. Mr Wells said: For us this is not unexpected. He came to us, we entertained him, heard what it was he had to say, he informed us that he was resigning from the party and weve moved on. This party had long since moved on, we wish him all the best in his endeavours. Dr Rollins tendered his resignation to the party in a meeting on Tuesday night and announced his intentions to join the PLP yesterday. In a press statement, Dr Rollins invited the NDP to join the PLP, which he feels is the party that best encapsulates their principles and philosophies. D r Rollins said: This will p rovide the most realistic m eans of translating NDP ideas into national policies and programmes that are crucial for significant future growth and development. It is my view that the Progressive Liberal Party is the only major political organisation that meets this fundamental criterion. In response to Dr Rollins suggestion, Mr Wells added: Give every member the opportunity to vote as to who should lead those parties, and the people in the constituency the right to choose who they would like to represent them. If they deepened democracy then we would know that they would be serious about the second part of our mission, which is empowering the Bahamian people. LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011 THE TRIBUNE NDP vows to stick to principles after Rollins decision to join PLP JOININGPLP: Andre Rollins

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LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011, PAGE 3 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM THE fight to have BTC remain in Bahamian hands is a political one, and all who oppose the sale of the company to Cable and Wireless should band together, Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell told a crowd gathered at the Prince Charles Rally site during the opposition partys rally on Tuesday night. Mr Mitchell accused the FNM of proposing to sell the furniture to save the house, saying that the legacy of Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham is one of destruction. He also chided the government for attacking union leaders who are simply acting in the best interests of their members. I would advise union leaders however that this is a political battle and the forces must come together not stand apart if we are to win. All of us must stand together. There is no point in arguing that because the PLP stands with you that makes you PLP. W e are fighting for the nation: not PLP or FNM, Mr Mitchell said. He said that the country is in a strange place where the leaders of the country are attacking their own citizens because those citizens dare to say they do not want BTC sold. The Minister of Labour says because the union president called for an Egypt moment, that the union president is fomenting violence. I too support an Egypt moment which had nothing to do with violence. It was a peaceful movement by people of that country to remove a dictator from office. The only violence in that campaign was violence by the state against its own people. Does the Minister of Labour propose the use of violence against his own people in Nassau? We have a history of peaceful dissent and civil disobedience in this country and it is time to employ that tool, the Fox Hill MP said. Mr Mitchell said that when a government cannot hear, it must feel the voice of the people. Recently, they published an article in the newspaper by a group calling itself Consumer Voices Bahamas. This is one of a number of FNM front organisations. They said they held a poll and most people support the FNM's decision to sell BTC and oppose the PLPs position. That poll is not worth the paper it is written on. The fact is you dont need a poll to hear the noise in the market place. People do not want BTC sold to Cable and Wireless. W hich part of No does the FNM not understand? This is the same mistake they made in the referendum of 2002, Mr Mitchell said. He said that the issue is not whether BTC should be sold but to whom should the government should sell it and on what terms. WHEN the PLP government wins the nextg eneral election, it will rescue the economy from the mismanagement of the FNM, Elizabeth MP Ryan Pinder told party supporters at a rally in his constituency last night. M r Pinder said the Bahamas is still in the worst economic slump since the 1920s, and the global recession is not solely responsible. It is the lack of vision of the present government which has made our condition even worse. Their response is to borrow, borrow and borrow some more. So much sot hat it will be our children w ho will be straddled w ith the task of having to repay our debt, the Elizabeth MP said H e also blamed the F NM for failing to manage the crime explosion in r ecent years. Governments are elected to lead, particularly in the face of a monumental crisis which cont inues to escalate. Good governments, like the one y ou had under the C hristie PLP administration, implement strategiesto get at the root causes of delinquent behaviour. This FNM governm ent, however, is also bankrupt on vision in this r egard. We need change and we need it now, Mr P inder said. H e promised the crowd t hat when the PLP wins t he next election, it will put in place programmes to accelerate the economic recovery of the Bahamas. He urged thep eople of his constituency to prepare themselves to take advantage of the u pcoming opportunities. We will put in programmes that preparey ou to succeed, prepare y ou to understand how to grow your business, prepare you to be in the bestp osition to secure that employment opportunity. We will leverage the c ommunity efforts we developed over the last year to implement crime prevention programmes s o you can be confident that Elizabeth is a safe place to live, a safe place t o succeed. In this upcom ing year we will work in partnership to prepare for opportunities, said MrP inder. A 25-YEAR-OLDman accused of stabbing his former girlfriend on Sunday was arraigned in Magistrates Court yesterday charged with attempted murder. Devon Adderley of Rockcrusher stands accused of the attempted murder of Lashan Smith. Smith, 23, was stabbed on Sunday while stopped atthe traffic lights on Jerome Avenue and Chesapeake Road. Adderley was not required to enter a plea to the charge. Prosecutor Godfrey Brennen objected to Adderley being granted bail, claiming that he had made death threats to the victim. Adderleys attorney Michael Kemp noted that Adderley has been on bail for 10 years on an armed robbery charge. Mr Kemp also told the court his client alleges that the victims sister, who is a police officer, has been harassing him. Magistrate Derrence Rolle ordered that Adder ley be fitted with an elec tronic monitoring bracelet. He was ordered to be at home by 7pm each day and to stay away from the complainant and witness es. The case was adjourned to March 15. PLP WILL RESCUE ECONOMY FROM FNM MISMANAGEMENT MAN ACCUSED OF STABBING FORMER GIRLFRIEND APPEARS IN C OURT Opponents of BTCsale should band together SAMIE PETITFRERE a sixth grade student of Naomi Blatch Primary School, gets her eyes tested by Ron Redner of Roswell Rotary yesterday. Rotary Club International conducted eye examinations at the school and will be visiting more government schools this week. Photo/ Tim Clarke R OTARYCLUBINTERNATIONALKEEPSANEYEONSTUDENTS B TCFIGHT: F red Mitchell PERRY Christie, leader of the Progressive Liberal Party, celebrated the one year anniversary of the Elizabeth constitutency by-election at a party rally last night. He praised Ryan Pinder, member of parliament for Elizabeth, for prov ing himself in his first year in office to be a winner. Make no mistake about it: Ryan has proven himself to be a key member of the new generation of future leadership that is taking shape within the PLP. I expect even greater things of this young man in the years to come. Indeed I am confident that Ryan Pinder is destined to play an important, possibly even an historic, part in the next generation of leader ship that is emerging within our great party, said Mr Christie. To Senator Dr Duane Sands, former Elizabeth candidate, he said bring it on in the next election. The result next time will be no different, except for one thing. The next time around, Ryan will beat Duane so bad, Duane will give up politics for good and return to the operating room where he belongs. PLP leader praises winner Ryan Pinder ELIZABETH MP: R yan Pinder SEE page 10

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EDITOR, The Tribune. Dr. Duane Sands will be a wonderful addition to the Senate. He is a very well trained and experienced doctor who has served his country and our people for many yearsi ncluding with trauma p atients as Director of Accident and Emergency at PMH. N ot only has he helped t o save lives as a surgeon, having performed the first o pen heart surgery in the c ountry, he has also been an advocate for sustainable and expanded health care for allB ahamians. He has also s erved as PMH's Chief of Surgery. I t is so good to see highly a ccomplished people at the t op of their fields engaged in the political process at the h ighest levels. I t reminds me of the appointment of Vincent Vanderpool Wallace to the Ministry of Tourism. He is of course one of the best int he field of tourism in the region and perhaps around t he world. Just like Mr. Vanderpool Wallace's entry into politics,D r. Sands' appointment bodes well for our politics a nd should encourage others like him to make such a sac rifice and a contribution. I nstead of so many people complaining from the sidelines, they should get involved and like Obama says, be the change theyw ant to see. It's easy to complain and be cynical. It's much harder to make a difference. Our political system is as goodo r as broken as our efforts to get involved. Both PLPs and FNMs who have met Dr. Sands as a person, doctor or as a candidate will attest to his i ntegrity and his care and concern for people regardless of their political beliefs. Just as he served on various public boards in the past, he is now Chairman of theM ortgage Corporation. D r. Sands not only has a social conscience, he also has common sense in terms o f getting things done. I look forward to hearing the voice of this capable and p atriotic Bahamian who has a progressive spirit and is committed to the social development and welfare ofo ur people. H e has demonstrated his commitment to The B ahamas in action and in s ervice, not just in speeches a nd public relations gim micks. B LS Nassau, February, 2011 EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited N ULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI B eing Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 E ILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972P ublished Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama W EBSITE www.tribune242.com updated daily at 2pm SHE WAS brilliant, charming, hardw orking, loyal and caring. Her life was dedicated to the education of Bahamians, b ecause as she said recently a well educate d populace is the only sensible ingredient to e nsure the successful development of society. K eva Marie Bethel, the only daughter of the late Hon. Sidney Eldon and his wife, R owena (Winnie in the footsteps of her brother, Michael, foury ears her senior. Michael was already estab lishing an outstanding scholastic record, havi ng been accepted as a student at St Catherines College, Cambridge. In September, 1956, an age when it was not usual for girls to leave the Bahamas for studies abroad, Keva Eldon became the firstB ahamian woman to enter Cambridge, reading Modern Languages at Girton College. I n December 1983 she became the first woman second Bahamian principal of the College of the Bahamas. By then the College was entering its ninth year. At her installation ceremony, brother Michael, by t hen the first Bahamian bishop of the Anglican Diocese delivered the installation prayer.H e was the founding chairman of the College of the Bahamas Council serving from 1 976 to 1995. Together, brother and sister guided the college through its formative years. In August, 1995 on her 60th birthday she officially retired, but was encouraged to cont inue as College president on a year-to-year contract. However, in August, 1997, shea nnounced that she would officially retire at the end of the 1998 academic year. She l ooked forward, she joked, to finding out how it felt to be deliciously bored. However, Dr Keva Bethel, president emeritus of the College, was too vibrant a woman to entertain boredom, not only was s he active on many boards, but she and Dr Gail Saunders, former director general of H eritage, were now the Colleges first resi dent scholars. Dr Bethel was researching t he history of Education in the Bahamas and the development of the College, and Dr Saunders was continuing her research on the history of race relations. It is understood that Dr Bethel had completed the d raft for the first chapter of her book and was busy reading the College Councils min u tes. They were both fascinated, said Dr Saunders, going through the pages of The T ribune and Guardian for that period. It is hoped that her daughter, Nicholette Bethel Burrows, herself an accomplished scholar, will now complete her mothers work. However, the loyalty to the very end that brother and sister had for each other, and Kevas dedication to her brother when he fell seriously ill and could no longer care for himself was not only heroic, but inspirat ional. Bishop Eldon retired in 1996, due to failing health, after 24 years as bishop. Six y ears ago he lapsed into a coma and was c ared for by nurses at his sisters home. A lthough he knew no one, brother and sister had such an affinity of spirit that Keva felt t hat Michael was aware of her presence. He followed her with his eyes. He listened as she r ead to him daily. She discussed topics she felt would interest him and she held his hand.A t times she was convinced he squeezed hers. However, doctors could see no sign of a wareness. She felt he was aware at least of her. When his insurance ran out, Keva struggled financially to support him. Eventually the Anglican Diocese made arrangementsw ith the Princess Margaret Hospital and for the last two years, he was a patient there.E very afternoon his loyal sister with the books they both enjoyed was at his side. She read to him, she talked to him and she held his hand. Late last year she told him that she would be leaving for a short while. She was n ot well, but she would be back. She left for MD Anderson in Texas where she was diag n osed with ovarian cancer no cure, but treatable. Her friends were amazed at how r esigned she was to her fate. There was no questioning of Oh, God why me? There was nothing like that said Dr Saunders, She never complained, never questioned it, she just took it in her stride. B ut the spirit of brother and sister seemed to be one. When she started to fail in Doc t ors Hospital, so did he at Princess Margaret. He was leading the way for her to fol l ow. It seemed she was just hanging to life to make certain that he was safely in the arms of his Maker. He died at 12.50am, Monday, February 7. Keva seemed relieved when she was told. A t about 5am on Tuesday, February 15 the same day of brother Michaels funer a l at around 5am Keva Marie stepped out of her body and moved on to better t hings, daughter Nicolette announced to her friends. Later that day during her brothers funeral service a moment of silence was held to honour his sister. B rother and sister prelate and educator had left the Bahamian scene together. A nd as Governor General Sir Arthur Foulkes said of him when speaking on behalf o f the Bahamian people, he could have also said of her they both understood that education was fundamental to developing the people of the country they loved. Our deepest sympathy goes out to their family. May they be consoled to know that this country has lost two leaders who have made Bahamians very proud. Duane Sands will be a good addition to the Senate LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net A dedicated brother and sister leave scene 0U-RVHSKRPOLQVRQ EDITOR, The Tribune. I was saddened by the death of my friend, Paul Bower, and s hare in great measure the grief of his widow, Ericka and sons, Nigel and Bobby. I met Paul a few years after World War II. He became a special friend and our chance meetings always brightened my day. P aul served as an officer on HMS Hind, one of the Allied ships off the Normandy coast at dawn, June 6, 1944. These ships and their crews, aided by the Air Force, were i n the forefront of the largest invasion in history. Under their protection but with many casualties Allied soldiers secured a bridge head. Subsequent and increasingly larger landings of men and weapons finally led to victory. T hose who came after are forever grateful to those who led the way. CHESTER THOMPSON Nassau, February 10, 2011. Saddened b y death of my friend Paul Bower EDITOR, The Tribune. Re: Well turn country into small Egypt. Tribune February 9, 2011. THE childish temper tantrums of trade unions may be an indication of how far a country has progressed toward national maturity. KEN W KNOWLES, MD Nassau, February 9, 2011. Trade unions and temper tantrums INSIGHT For the stories behind the news, read Insight on Mondays

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By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net BISHOP Earl Randy Frase r said yesterday he was left feeling wounded after allegations surfaced that he had sexual relations with a young girl whom he had agreed toc ounsel. F raser, who was back on the witness stand yesterday, said that after the allegations came to light during a confrontation at his church on Palm Sunday 2006, he requested a one year leave of absence. During that time I was very wounded, wounded in spirit and emotions. I was likea bleeding shepherd. Its diff icult for a bleeding shepherd to tend to his flock, Fraser said. F raser, senior pastor at Pil grim Baptist Temple in St James Road, is accused ofh aving sex with a 16-year-old g irl between July 2005 and February 2006. Fraser described Palm Sund ay 2006 as a day he will never forget. Our service was desecrate d by outsiders. It was interr upted and serious allegations were hurled at me, he told the court. T hat morning, he said, fol lowing the 8am service, he received a voice-mail on hisc ellular phone. He said the p erson, who claimed to be an aunt of the complainant, said: Im coming up there today. A ccording to Fraser, the woman said she was bringingthe police with her. H e told the court that he summoned the complainants grandmother and another aunt into his office and asked t hem where the complainant was. He said that the aunt told h im that she was in the bathroom crying and would not come out. Fraser claimed he went to the bathroom to gether but she was not there. H e told the court that he f ound her crying and trembling inside the car of one of t he church members. Fraser said that he asked her what was going on and she said she did not know. He said that the comp lainants aunt and grandm other were also puzzled. F raser went on to testify t hat about 15 minutes into the 11am service, two people stormed into the church. He said that the woman he identified as the complainan-t s mother was shouting, but h e could not understand what s he was saying. According to Fraser, the womans brother asked, Where the pastor is? before he was removed from thes anctuary by some male congregation members. Fraser claimed that inside his office, the mother began to speak to him directly, charging him with having sexw ith her daughter for $30 a week. According to Fraser, the w oman shouted, You going to pay my mortgage off, $40,000. He also told the court that an aunt of the complainant added that if their mother became ill, he would pay herm edical expenses. Fraser claimed he just sat in the chair and said nothing. I felt very disturbed, disapp ointed and humiliated, he said. LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011, PAGE 5 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Allegations left Bishop Fraser feeling wounded B ISHOP E arl Randy Fraser

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L OCAL NEWS P AGE 6, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011 THE TRIBUNE T O DISCUSS ST ORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM T HE SECOND in a series o f Consumer Voices B ahamas polls were cond ucted over the weekend, w hen CVB travelled to Aba c o to ask residents how they feel about the privatisaion of BTC. The poll was conducted at Marsh Harbour, Murphy Town, Treasure Cay, Coop ers Town and Fox Town. M arlene Minus, chairperson of CVB, and two execu tive members of the group c onducted the poll. T he purpose was to ascer tain consumer opinions on the governments plan to privatise BTC and also to iden t ify major areas of concern with regard to telecoms serv ices. Yes or no answers were g iven to the following quest ions: Do you support the gov e rnments plan to privatize BTC? Are you satisfied with the services offered by BTC? The age, gender, race, and address of the respondents was also collected. N inety-seven persons, or 57 per cent of the 170 per sons who participated in the p oll, said they support priv atisation. Fifty-one persons, or 30 per cent, do not support the sale. Twenty-two individu a ls, or 13 per cent, are unde cided. A baconians said BTC n eeds to improve customer s ervice, and signal strength a nd quality, particularly in t he community of Bahama P alm and the southern end of the island. There were also concerns about a shortage of phone lines in German Town and a slow response to repair requests. T he first poll was conducted on January 28 on Bay Street, Nassau, and surveyed2 36 individuals. T he majority of those polled in New Providence also supported privatisation. The CVB said it will con t inue to hold surveys in oth er Family islands. Poll:Majority of Abaco residents back sale of BTC

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By DENISE MAYCOCK T ribune Freeport R eporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT The Humane Society of GrandB ahama is very disappointed that four US veterinarians have been blocked by the Department o f Agriculture from assisting with a local spay/neuter c linic. T ip Burrows, managing director of HSGB, said conc erns about the visiting vets a nd the clinic were raised by t he Bahamas Veterinary A ssociation. Although the vets are on the island, she said they are unable to do any work even a fter taking vacation time to a ttend the clinic. Four US veterinarians a nd four vet technicians gave up vacation time and paid their own way here to donate their time and expertise for a cause they believes trongly in, she said. The Bahamas Veterinary Association apparently feelst hat with three Bahamian vets now in Freeport, those vets could do thousandso f spays and neuters in a year through the Grand Bahama Port Authoritys spay/neuter voucher pro g ramme, The GBPA has put a cap on the funding for s pay/neuter, and the new budget would allow for a maximum of 800 spays andn euters in a years time, she s aid. Ms Burrows believes that 800 is not enough, and esti m ates that there could be more than 6,000 dogs and cats potentially breeding ont he island. The Humane Societys animal shelter on Coral Road is full and the organi s ation was counting on the assistance of the four vets, who along with their twol ocal Bahamian vets, were lending their expertise to the clinic. The organisation is hopi ng to perform some 2,000 surgeries per year to decrease and control the unwanted animal population on the island. The four-day clinic started on Monday at Eight Mile Rock, where many persons cannot afford to have their pets spayed and neutered, thus contributing to the stray animal problem in West Grand Bahama. The Humane Society and the Kohn Foundation announced last week a field clinic at St Stephens Parish Hall. Shelter vets, Bahamians Dr Dawn Gibbs and Dr Chante Wildgoose, and four US vets, Robin Brennen, Bridget Barry, Deb C ampbell and Tanya Perry w ere to perform the surge ries. Ms Burrows said she have tried contacting Dept ofA griculture officials concerning the decision taken r egarding the US vets, but has been unable to reach anyone. Animals She said the GBPA is the o nly Bahamian entity that h as ever funded spay/neuter programmes on the island. She noted that their funding is meant for Freeport/Port area, and not meant to cover animals out s ide of Freeport. According to the Humane Society official, over 30 per cent of the shelter intake are animals from West Grand Bahama. You have only to drive from Eight Mile Rock to West End to see the scope o f the problem. There are m any animals belonging to r esidents of West Grand Bahama that will never be brought to Freeport for ster-i lisation unless the HSGB picks them up. We do not have the funding, resources or manpower to do this on a regular basis, hence the need for this clinic. This field clinich as been funded by Humane Society International, Amigos Fund, and manyc aring individuals, both local and abroad. We are especially gratef ul to Humane Society Intern ational and Amigos Fund w hich have both provided generous grants; we are still s hort of our estimated bud get, however, which is why your help is more importantt han ever. Our good friends at Waugh Construction are donating the venue, which is the empty storefront next to Commonwealth Bank in the Harbour West plaza, where City Market is, The entrance to the clinic will be through the gate between the back of the bank and the Texaco station, she said. LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011, PAGE 7 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Four US vets blocked from assisting local spay/neuter clinic CARACAS, Venezuela Associated Press VENEZUELANand French authorities have seized 3.6 metric tons of cocaine aboard a vessel in the Caribbean Sea. Venezuelan Justice Minister Tareck El Aissami says seven suspects were arrested during the anti-drug operation off Venezuel a's coast. Venezuela is a major hub for gangs that smuggle Colombian cocaine to the United States and Europe. El Aissami said Wednesday that Venezuela is cooperating with foreign governments to fight drug smuggling. He called Tuesday's bust "a tough blow" to traff ickers. U.S. officials have accused President Hugo Chavez's government of lax anti-drug efforts. Chavez counters that his government is doing everything possible to stem the flow of drugs through Venezuela. VENEZUELANS, FRENCH SEIZE HUGE DRUG HAUL

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L OCAL NEWS P AGE 8, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011 THE TRIBUNE T O DISCUSS ST ORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM BETTY K AGENCIES LTDPhone 322-2142 322-2875 322-2813Freight Warehouse: 322-8926 Fax 322-6089 NOTICE OF RELOCATION OF BETTY K AGENCIES OFFICES OPENWednesday Feb 17 at 8:00am NE corner of Victoria & Bay StreetsALL PHONE NUMBERS REMAIN THE SAME. The next Betty K sailing is arriving Thursday Feb 18 at the Arawak Cay Terminal. Regular sailings resume as follows: Nassau 2 per week as of Monday Feb 28 Abaco 1 per week as of March 1st. BETTY K AGENCIES LTD PARKING BAY STREETV I C T O R I A A V E N U EWATERFRONT T HE man entrusted with the victim and witness care programme in the courts of Eng l and received special care from Bahamian friends this month, as he experienced the Bahama Host programme. S imon Deacy, the national manager of the No Witness, No Justice programme in Engl and and Wales, got a close e ncounter with Bahamian cul t ure as Pastor Ivan Rolle and his wife, Ruthanne, hosted himf or a day. M r Deacy, who was in Nassau as the facilitator of a witness care conference, worshiped with the Rolles at Comfort House Ministries. He also participated in a junkanoo rush and enjoyed a meal with theR olles. T he Rolles said it was a plea sure to host Mr Deacy as he w orked to help Bahamians i mprove the care given to vic tims of crime and witnesses of the court. Mr Deacy is pictured at Com f ort House Ministries and taking part in a junkanoo rush. BahamaHost is a long-stand i ng project that pairs hospitable Bahamians with visitors inter ested in immersing themselves in local culture. Criminal justice expert gets taste of BahamaHost S IMON DEACY the national manager of the No Witness, No Justice programme in England a nd Wales, enjoys junkanoo. n INTERNATIONALNEWS NEW YORK Associated Press A SOMALIpirate who kidnapped and brutalized the captain of a U.S.-flagged merchant ship off the coast of Africa in 2009 was sentenced to more than 33 years in prison Wednesday by an emotional judge who told him he deserved a stiff punishment for leading a crew of armed bandits bent on committing "depraved acts." U.S. District Judge Loretta A. Preska choked up as she read at length from letters writ ten by Capt. Richard Phillips and traumatized sailors who were aboard the cargo vessel commandeered by Abdiwali Abdiqadir Muse. The recent spate of piracy on the Indian Ocean and else where "is not a Disneylandesque problem," she quoted Phillips as saying. "These are not Johnny Depps. They threaten seamen's lives, repeatedly. ... They deprive us of the rights that they themselves complain about." Another officer from the ship, Colin Wright, appeared in person to urge the judge to impose a lengthy term. He recalled being shot at and held at gunpoint by Muse and three other pirates. "What happened to us was terrible," said Wright, 44. "I'm not the same person I was and I never will be." Muse pleaded guilty last year to hijacking, kidnapping and hostage-taking charges. Before he was sentenced, he apolo gized to the victims, claiming he was a desperate, small-time player in a Somali piracy syn dicate that has collected mil lions of dollars in ransoms. "I'm very sorry for what I did," he said through an inter preter. "I got my hands into something that was more pow e rful than me." Preska imposed the maxi mum prison sentence of 33 years, nine months. She noted that prosecutors had described the pirates as experienced, coordinated and sadistic even playing Russian roulette with their hostages during the five-day siege of the Maersk Alabama. "They appeared to relish even their most depraved acts of physical and psychological violence," she said. Muse, wearing a green crewneck shirt and khaki pants, stared straight ahead and showed no emotion as the sentence was announced. The defendant's mother, speaking to The Associated Press by phone Wednesday before the sentencing from his hometown in central Somali, had predicted he would be brave. "From what I know of him, he won't cry although he is a kid because he is stronger than a crying child," she said. "In his life, he passed through a lot of hardships. ... Men are sharpened by hardship." Muse's father, Abdiqadir Muse Gedi, said he wanted U.S officials to "let him take his term in Somalia." The federal prosecution in Manhattan was part of a stepped-up effort to stem a wave of 21st century piracy by seeking justice in U.S. courts, at times using 19th century maritime laws. Late last year, a Virginia jury found five other Somali men guilty of exchanging gunfire with a U.S. Navy ship off the coast of Africa. Scholars called it the first piracy case to go to trial since the Civil War, whena New York jury deadlocked on charges against 13 Southern privateers. SOMALI PIRATE GETS MORE THAN 33 YEARS IN PRISON

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A NASTASIA Papageorge has won the 2011 New Providence Junior Champion Young Chef Contest. A nastacia impressed the j udges chefs Joseph Swoboda of Sandals, Tiffany B arton of the Wyndham a nd Devin Johnson of the S heraton with her tasty "Island Sea Barefoot Rice"a nd Bahamian Junkanoo R ush Cake. The 14-year-old ninth grade student of LW Young Junior High School, earned a total of 424.5 points with these two dishes. Jasmine Glinton of Anat ol Rodgers High School p laced second with 420 p oints with her entries, Lobster Bisque" and "Sapodilla Coconut Cake w ith Fruit Filling." Peter Outten of AF Adderley Junior High School came in third with 403.5 points for "OuttensD umpling Soup" and "Seasoned Junkanoo Rice." T he contest, held at AF Adderley, is a preliminary to the 19th Annual All I sland Champion Young Chef Finals, scheduled for M arch 16 at AF Adderley for juniors and March 17 atG overnment High School f or seniors, with over $3,300 in scholarships avail-a ble. The top two New Provi dence juniors move on to the National Junior Champ ion Young Chef competition, explained Sharon Ferg uson, Ministry of Education home economics officer, who co-ordinates the e vent with PS Advertising and Public Relations throughout the nations schools. F or the ninth year, there a re cash prizes for the win ners: $250 for first, $150 for second, $100 for third and $ 50 for fourth. National senior champio n young chefs will receive $1,500, $750, $300, and $200 respectively, said Keith P arker of PS Advertising, which has been co-ordinating the event since its incep tion. T he sponsors are Mahatm a Rice and Robin Hood Flour. LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011, PAGE 9 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM The Mercedes-Benz C-ClassYour most enjoyable drive ever.The Mercedes-Benz C-Class is a pleasure tobehold offering a new interpretation of d riving pleasure. Its taut lines lend it an a ir of effortless superiority while the wide radiator grille and distinctive rear section announce a vehicle with a real presence and dynamic personality. Few cars can compete with its ability to adjust so many facets of its character from the interior to the drive technology so quickly and precisely in response t oexternal conditions and your own particular needs. The key to this flexible response is the standard-fit Agility Control Package which includes selective damping. The interior offers noticeably more space and a more distinctive atmosphere tosuit your taste. As you will see, the C-Class is the perfect embodiment of the Mercedes-Benz philosophy.Tyreflex Star MotorsWulff Road, P. O. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas, Tel 242.325.4961 Fax 242.323.4667OUR PARTS DEPARTMENT IS FULLY STOCKED WITH EVERY COMPONENT NECESSARY TO ENSURE THAT YOUR MERCEDES RUNS TROUBLE FREE. TRAINED TECHNICIANS ON DUTY. Anastacia Papageorge wins Nassaus Junior Young Chef competition A NASTACIA PAPAGEORGE o f LW Young Jr High School won the 2011 New Providence Junior C hampion Young Chef Contest. P hoto/ D eanndra Ferguson / PS News/Features JASMINE GLINTON of Anatol Rodgers High School placed s econd. Photo/ Deanndra Ferguson /PS News/Features

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Bahamas. These are the papers showing the land was turned over from the Treasury to the Ministry of Housing. I dont know of any other papers that could be characterised as legitimate papers, he said. The Ministry of Housing is proceeding with plans to transform the shanty town into a new subdivision, known temporarily as Fire Trail. Two homes in the middle of planned roadways are to be demolished this week. The residents were given notice by the Ministry of Housing several weeks ago. Bishop Davis explained the churchs only involvement was to collect the money and turn it over to Ms Burns. We do mission work in that area and in our effort to help the people it came to our understanding that she owned the property. We were trying to help the residents to try to develop proper housing. We suggested since she owned the land that she make available to them portions. We were not aware of the governments plans, said Bishop Davis. Despite public animosity expressed over Haitian villages, Bishop Davis said of his churchs ministry: This is the church, the church of Jesus. Our job is to preach love; to preach salvation. Our church is filled with Haitians from top to bottom. There is no division in our church. Those who come to us are a part of us. We embrace them. These are our brothers and sisters. We carry ourselves in the church and the community in the name of Jesus to spread the message of Jesus. We are not immigration, this is the church of Jesus. Our people know my heart and our job is to lift whoever we come in contact with. We try to preach Christ with them so when they go back they can become servants of Jesus and lift their brothers and sisters. It could be that they come here to hear the message of deliverance, of liberation, to receive the message of Jesus, he said. The Ministry of Housing met with residents of the area in question and Haitian pastors early last year to inform them of the governments plans. To the best of his knowledge, Mr Rolle said Bishop Davis was not involved in any meetings. I was even amazed that someone had the nerve to charge people on the land that was published in the newspa per as belonging to the government. Since last July we have said to the residents this is the land that belongs to the Ministry of Housing and this is what we propose to do, Mr Rolle said. According to Ms Burns, the Baillou family formerly farmed the land for 30 years. They had a big beautiful farm with beautiful bananas, she said. They have been asking for payment from residents for years, with little success. There were other people round there fooling them. They said they were paying them. We asked them if those people brought any paper. We did. Last year we went there three times, she said. Earlier this week, Mr Rolle said many Haitian villages sprung up because people on these properties either worked for someone or paid someone who was a Bahamian national. He said the genesis of some villages is a Bahamian who may have farmed the land and hired one or two Haitian workers. He said the general involvement of Bahamians in the growth and development of Haitian shanty towns is always the story that is not printed, and in many cases, Bahamians are facilitators. Residents of Bois Pen, for example, the Haitian village off Joe Farrington Road, said there are at least two Bahamian landowners who manage land in the village. One is said to col lect $10-15 rent on a weekly basis from residents. Ms Burns said claims that only Haitians are being asked to pay are a lie. She said attempts to collect money from Bahamians squatting on the land have been unsuccessful. Government Yard is said to have the highest number of Bahamian residents than any shanty town in New Providence. Neither Ms Burns nor her associate, Mr Baillou, are members of Golden Gates Assembly. Bishop Davis said he did not know her and had never seen her until she brought documents to the church to show the land was owned by the person on whose behalf she acted. The church had no relationship with Ms Burns other than we understood she owned the property and we were trying to help the people, he said. Ms Burns said she approached Bishop Davis because they would listen to him. She said he was willing to help because he knew the terrible living conditions and heb elieved something needed to be done to help. Apparently they respect him to listen to him more than me. They did not give me the money in my hand. When I went to Bishop Davis the girl in the front desk said there is an envelope here. I said how much is it, she said I dont know. I said let me open it then, in the envelope everything came up to $1,300 with the names of those who pay. They leave it there. I know the girl is a decent girl, she wouldnt steal any money. She said she gave them a receipt, said Ms Burns. Father Vilfort Roland of the Queen of Peace Parish, a Catholic church on Fire Trail involved in Haitian ministry, questioned the Bishops involvement: Why did the Bishop come into this matter? Father Roland said the resi dents, most of whom have only paid a deposit, trusted the arrangement because of Bishop Davis involvement. After the government informed them to move, she still asked for the balance. All they have is a receipt. She says if they pay the balance she will give them the lease agreement and get a stop order on the government, Father Roland said. Mr Rolle said the ministry could not be of much assistance for the residents wanting to get their money back. Who is it that can help them? We were not involved. They know who they gave their money to and they can contact the relevant authorities to cause them to get their monies back. We are not associated with the collection of funds or monies from Haitians or anybody else, said Mr Rolle. Bishop Davis is well known for his involvement in the miracle water phenomenon of 2005. The product first came to light in a press release published by Bishop Davis that said that a man who was pronounced dead later came back to life as a result of the water with the potential to bring about miracles. The water was sold by the Singing Prophet Bishop Lawrence Rolle from Bishop Davis church. Bishop Davis was most recently in the news in 2009 denying claims that he had profited from an allegedly questionable land deal involving Crown land. According to documents, Bishop Davis church authorised Arawak Homes to create the low cost housing subdivision, Ross Davis Estates, from 3.75 acres of Crown land granted by the government to the church for $2,500. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham raised the alarm over the deal because the land had originally been granted during his former administration to build an old folks home. Former Prime Minister Perry Christie confirmed that it was he who signed off on the variation to the original Crown land grant that creat ed a housing subdivision instead of the intended old folks or community home. Bishop Davis church has been involved in missionary work in the Haitian communities neighbouring the church for 40 years. The day before the Mackey Yard fire, Bishop Davis said the church ministered in the village. We give them clothes. We employ them. We have a school here, and many of them are enrolled. We educate and provide food and help them with their docu ments. I have made many trips to Haiti so I know first hand what their life is like in Haiti and what it is like here, said Bishop Davis. L OCAL NEWS P AGE 10, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011 THE TRIBUNE T O DISCUSS ST ORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM He may be a good doctor, but he really is no politician. And when it comes to Elizabeth, Dr. Sands is a man without a future. And you can tell him, I said so! said Mr Christie. He called on the party machinery to ready itself for the upcoming general election. We need to begin now to mobilize in earnest for the next General Election. It aint long now. I expect that now that Baha Mar is beginning to roll and other projects are in the works, the Prime Minister may call an early election. We must be ready for it if he does! If he doesnt call it and instead goes deeper into his term, we will have lost nothing by having prepared for an earlier con test, said Mr Christie. But whether he calls the General Election later or sooner, either way, I am supremely confident of one thing and its this: With Gods help and yours, we will be the next Government of The Bahamas! There is no doubt in my mind about that, he said. Mr Christie said the internal bickering and back-biting must therefore stop. We need to come together in unity and in common purpose on all and in each of the constituencies. Unity must be our watchword. Common purpose must be at the core of all our preparations. There is no time to lose. We have to get ready now. There is much to be done and the time we have to do it in is dwindling fast. Mr Christie congratulated the newest cross-over PLP, Dr Andre Rollins, on joining the party. One year after being a National Development Party (NDP bye-election Mr Rollins decided to join the PLP. We welcome him in our ranks we know him to be a well trained intelligent young Bahamian with a solid vision for The Bahamas and strong ideas of how best it can be governed. We know the soul searching and analyzing that he has gone through and we are pleased that at the end of a long and thoughtful process he has chosen the PLP as his political home, said Mr Christie. I want you all to know that, as the leader of the PLP Dr. Rollins has joined us without discussing with me any preconditions or concessions of any kind. His approach pleases and impresses me and it leads me to say that I am most sincere in my belief that there is a role for Dr. Rollins in the public affairs of our country and I look forward to our holding productive discussions with him, he said. FROM page one PLP leader praises winner Ryan Pinder FROM page three PRAISE: Perry Christie Church in shanty town rent shock SHOCKED: Brensil Rolle

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100 new jobs during and after the refurbishment phase. While there are Exumians clamouring for jobs inh ousekeeping or front desk, there is a real void in skilled locals who can fill posts in pastry arts, advanced dive masters or the engineeringf ield, said hotel manager Patrick Drake. To offset this, the property has focused on in-h ouse cross-training and certifying of existing staff, a process that takes months. "The greatest drawback o ver here is the training for a lot of the people who are homegrown," said MrD rake. If you have a man in the kitchen that's been there 30 years but he has nothing that shows anything any day he leaves you ... he has nothing that shows anything. If he had certification he can now go anywhere, any other country, but that is something that all the islands are very poor at doing. "Things even like diving, we have people cross-train ing because as many islands as we have, you think that it would be easy to get divers, and advanced divers. The truth is we are very, very short here. Most of the islanders don't swim at all, so I can't even get them to work in water sports. So it goes back to the point I was making about where the demand is. It's not that you don't have the labour out there but they don't have the skills for what you really need. The resort is looking for dive masters, a boat cap tain and first mate, a fulltime gym instructor, and pastry artists dry areas in the Exuma labour pool. The local schools must recognise the burgeoning opportunities on Exuma and prepare high school graduates with more than passing grades if they are to compete, added Mr Drake. "Why I keep stressing the point is because I want the message to get out to the school systems that we have to get people a little more trained than just hav ing gotten through school those days are now gone." L OCAL NEWS P AGE 12, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011 THE TRIBUNE T O DISCUSS ST ORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM NR36I am no longer at Baha-Retreat Spa.I can now be reached at 427-1054or 322-2829Agatha Aggie Almace Agatha Aggie Almace NASSAU GLASS COMPANYwill be CLOSED S aturday February 19thfor our companys i n order to give our staff a well-deserved break.W e will reopen on Monday February 21stWe apologise for any inconvenience causedMackey Street 393-8165 tive lifestyle. According to reports, District School Superintendent Julian Anderson, who has responsibility for WPP, confronted Deleveaux on January 4 and inquired about his post at the s chool. He had said Deleveaux was unable to produce paperwork, but explained he was sentt o Grand Bahama by another education official and his paperwork would be coming in short order. After following up on the matter, Mr Anderson said the accused was unable to produce any paperwork. D eleveaux, of Freeport, was not represented in court by counsel. D r Rollins said: "It is my strong conviction that it is neit her wise, nor practical, to continue pursuing the development of a new political part y in an environment of scarce r esources and weak public demand, where prospects for success are long-term at besta nd with so much at stake in our nations immediate future." D r Rollins said while he s hared the idealism of many concerning the imperfections of the major parties, he apprec iated the importance of prag matism in strategically solving national problems. D r Rollins added: It is still m y belief that Bahamians want to see change in our n ations politics, because they realise the critical role that g overnment must play in correcting the now regressive course of our national devel-o pment. L ast year, Dr Rollins was one of five candidates fighting to represent Elizabeth Estates, securing 49 votes. Shortly after the by-election, Dr Rollins was courtedb y Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham and former PLP first lady Dame Marguerite Pindling, who invited him to join their parties. In July, Fox Hill MP Fred M itchell expressed his desire t o see Dr Rollins cross over to the PLP after his performance in the country's first politicald ebate, a week prior to the b y-election. At that time, the orthodontist maintained his mem b ership in the NDP. In yesterdays statement, Dr Rollins encouraged the l eadership of the NDP to consider the viability of merging w ith the PLP. He said: Just as I believe in our nations potential for greatness, despite our present shortcomings, I am also conf ident that notwithstanding the PLPs imperfections, this groundbreaking party stillp ossesses the capacity for change. Dr Rollins added: Whate ver the partys ultimate decis ion, they know that I shall r espect their right to proceed as they deem best, yet hold o ut hope that we will be of one accord; but I have decided to act now to follow my c onvictions and to proudly join the PLP. SEE PAGE TWO FROM page one Bahamians need mor e tr aining FROM page one Andre Rollins FROM page one Man jailed for posing as teacher JAILED: Leroy Leonardo Deleveaux outside of court yesterday.

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The Ministry of Education and an American foreign disaster aid agency have embarked on a joint initiative to make school environmentsin the Bahamas safer. The initiative will focus on preparedness, but will also cover the steps that should be taken during and after a dangerous event on a school campus. It will cover safety issues including: natural disasters such as hurricanes and tornados violence perpetrated by students and/or parents unsafe school buildings and infrastructure Beryl Armbrister, consultant and disaster risk management specialist at the Office of US Foreign Disaster Assistance for Latin America a nd the Caribbean ( USAID/OFDA) along with a team of officers that include: Christopher Smith, acting director of security; Sabrina Skinner, education officer; Anslo Strachan, chief school attendance officer; and Lisa Fitz-Charles, administrative officer, travelled to North Andros to host a School Safety Stakeholders Forum. Mrs Armbrister explained that a School Safety Plan is being designed by the USAID/OFDA, but that it is important to hear from all stakeholders, both in New Providence and on the family islands, in order to draft a comprehensive policy that would be relevant to their needs. She indicated that in addition to regularising how schools respond to issues of safety, the policy will also address social elements that can lead to unsafe environments. The participants, who included security officers, principals, teachers, students, and other officers in the public service, were informed of the purpose of the visit, after which they were divided into groups to discuss and find solutions to various scenarios, such as: contaminated water cholera outbreak vandalism armed suspect entering a school hostage situations hidden weapons on campus weapon use on campus during the day The feedback of all of the participants was recorded and they were urged to continue to discuss the issues raised and look at the forum as only a first step in making their schools safer. Mr Smith, who gave the vote of thanks, encouraged the participants to take responsibility for the communities in which they live, and to take disaster preparedness seriously because they do not have the all of the resources that the people who live in New Providence have. He indicated that they need to be aware of the skills people possess, and the available resources, both human and material. LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011, PAGE 13 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Bahamas/US partner to make local schools safer SAFETYFIRST: Andros workshop participants.

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LOCAL NEWS PAGE 14, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM B y DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT An Emergency Water Facility that would provide f resh water in the aftermath of a hurricane or crisis was officially commissioned in Grand Bahama on Wednesday. The facility, located on Grand Bahamian Way, is equipped with a reverse osmosis plant capable of producing 6,000 gallons of water per day from sea water. T he project was funded through donations totalling more $200,000 from the TK Foundation, the Bahamas Rotary Clubs of District 7020, Grand Bahama Rotary Clubs of District 6990, Rotary Clubs of District 5280, the Rotary Foundation, and the business sector. The back-to-back hurricanes that hit Grand B ahama in 2004 and left thousands without access to fresh water highlighted the need for an emergency water facility. The project was first conceived in 2006 by the TK Foundation, which approached Rotary to p artner with them. Attending the commissioning were Rotary m embers from local clubs, the Nassau Clubs, and from Santa Monica, Los Angeles. Also present were Island Administrator Don Cornish, who has responsibility for NEMA in Freeport, and Eight Mile Rock MP Vernae G rant. The facility is built to withstand Category Five hurricanes and storm surge. It has a 60gallon water storage tank and a deep underground wellw ith unlimited access to sea water. W augh Construction was the contractor and project manager. Mike Stafford, assistant district governor elect for Grand Bahama Rotary Clubs District 6990,s aid there was tremendous support for the project locally, nationally and internationally. After the hurricanes (Frances and Jeanne of 2004, the first people that came to help were our friends from the Rotary Clubs of Nassau who co-ordinated and provided phenomenal relief assistance. They brought over fresh water on the plane and the weight of the water prevented themb ringing more food items, he said. This water facility will take that out of the e quation and we will now have water right here on Grand Bahama, he said. Mr Stafford said water from the facility will only be used after a hurricane. We are not in competition with any of the water companies; it will only be used after a hurricane hits thec ountry, he said. Mr Stafford said the facility does not use the public water supply like the other water producers o n the island, so it will not be affected if the supply is cut off or if the chlorine level rises. This water facility uses sea water which is pumped from over1 00ft deep and our water supply would never be out of water, he said. Lindsey Cancino of the Rotary C lub of East Nassau and the former CFO of the TK Foundation, said after the devastation of the last three hurricanes to hit Grand Bahama, There was a sense ofu rgency to do something long term that would help if this ever happened again. Mr Cancino said the TK Foundation went a bout trying to establish how we would apply for a matching grant from the Rotary Foundation. I called Rotarian Barry Rassin and he told me that Myles Pritchard who is now a member of the Rotary Club of Santa Monica, California, was looking to do a water project in the Bahamas and thats how we got this started. Jillian Alexander, co-chair of Rotary District 5 280WCS, said this is the largest water project Rotary has done. Her district includes eightR otary Clubs in the California area. This is first time we have done anything this l arge. Typically, water projects have been catching rain water and having storage tanks with gravel in them and sandstone to make sure the water stays clean, but this is a much larger project than the typical project and serving a much larg-e r community of 45,000 people, she said. Ms Alexander said her district was able to r aise $22,000, a matching grant of $45,000 was donated by the Rotary Foundation, and $25,000 w as given by District 7020 for an overall total of $95,000 from Rotary. She said the TK Foundation contributed $ 120,000. Administrator Don Cornish commended the T K Foundation, the Rotary Clubs and the Rotary Foundation on behalf of NEMA for their genero us donation and contribution to the Grand Bahama community. We believe that there is clear need for cooperation among other organisations with the government and the private sector. NEMA has an awesome task as the governmental agency responsible for protecting the population during crises and catastrophes. We cannot do it alone, he said. Emergency Water Facility is commissioned on GB WATERFACILITY: Move to provide fresh water in the aftermath of a hurricane.

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AMNESTY INTERNATIONALhas urged members of Trinidad and Tobagos parliament to vote against a constitutional amendment Bill that would allow executionsto be resumed in the country. Under the proposed Bill, scheduled to be debated on February 18, courts across thecountry would be able to circumvent judicial rulings that enhanced human rights protection and resulted in a halt to executions in 1999. Authorities in the Caribbean nation claim car-r ying out executions is a way t o tackle rising numbers of murders and deter others from committing violent crime. Trinidad and Tobago has a real problem with murder and violent crimes, but experience has shown that facili tating executions is not the solution, said Chiara Liguori, researcher on Trinidad and T obago at Amnesty Internat ional. Hurrying executions or ignoring appeals already in progress violates defendants rights by denying them due process guaranteed under international law. The proposed Bill would allow people to be executed even if they were appealinga gainst their sentence, which is their right. We urge Parliament not to accept the proposed Bill and instead tackle the root causes of violent crime and reform the police and justice systems. What may seem a technical change in the Constitutionis in fact a matter of life and death for many people. M ore than 40 people are currently on death row in Trinidad and Tobago. In 1984, the United Nations Economic and Social Council said an execution should not be carried out if there is any appeal or recourse procedure pending on the case. The new Bill would cir cumvent this principle and allow for expedited executions. Currently, under a ruling by the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council, acting as the highest court in the country, any execution carried out five years after the original sentence constitutes torture, which is illegal under the countrys Constitution. The lengthy appeals process for death penalty casesm eans that, in pract ice, no executions are able to be carried out within the five year period and most sentences have been commuted to prison terms. But Amnesty International says the proposed Bill will ignore that ruling and make the constitution inconsistent with human rights. We are extremely conc erned that the new Bill would allow for someone to be executed within a short period after a sentence is passed, not allowing for proper appeals and that others could be kept on death row for years on end, said Chiara Liguori. The prime minister, Kamla P ersad-Bissessar, has been reported as referring to the death penalty as a weapon in (our murder rate. She is quoted on her Facebook website as saying: The government that I have the honour to lead will ensure that this law is implemented and convicted murderers must suffer and pay the ultimate p rice by having the sentence of death carried out. The country is one of 93 countries in the world that retains the death penalty for ordinary crimes. Even though death sentences have continued to be handed out in Trinidad and Tobago, no executions have been carried out since 1999. CARIBBEAN NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011, PAGE 15 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Have you heard the good news? You CAN save money!If you need a lower premium,low deductibles,generous benefits and a fast claims service,pick up the phone and ask NIBA for a great insurance deal.Its time to pay less for insuring your car! Tel.677-6422 or visit www.nibaquote.com NASSAU INSURANCE BROKERS AND AGENTS LIMITED Atlantic House,2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue P.O.Box N-7764 Nassau Tel.677-6422 www.nibaquote.com Open Saturdays10.00am2.00pm #66'06+1072$//&,9,/(59$176 7KDWVULJKWD/RDQDSSURYHGZLWKLQKRXUV 38%/,&:25.(56&2(5$7,9( &5(',7,21/,0,7(' Trinidad and Tobago urged to stop drive towards executions Amnesty wants MPs to vote against amendment Bill

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By LUDOVICO FALLA for The Nassau Institute IN AN after dinner conv ersation a few days ago I h ad to answer the assertion that the problem with capitalism is greed. My brief answer was that greed, as long as correctly defined, is a problem of human nature, n ot a problem of the system o f social organisation adopted by society. Greed is defined by the Cambridge dictionary as a very strong wish to continuously get more of something, especially food or money.L eaving gluttony aside, the strong wish to get more money, by definition, is the wish to obtain more goods or services now or in the future, t hose things which money can buy. Why is greed a problem? G reed cannot be judged by a third party as only the individual can say whether thea cquisition of goods and serv ices leads him to a higher level of satisfaction or not. Therefore we know we are in the presence of greed only when the strong wish to getm ore goods and services is matched by signs of unhappiness. This should warn us that most of what we call greed is just a pattern of consumption that we envy or we don ot agree with. W hy human beings pursue the acquisition of more and better goods and services is a question for psychologists, but we can agree that it is p ervasive. Will this characteristic of human nature be different u nder capitalism or socialism? The history of societies organised in one or the other can tell us that the strong wish to get more goods and services is as pervasive in one a s in the other, but it is chann eled in very different ways. Under capitalism, true capitalism, the only way to make money is to provideg oods or services of such q uality and price that many others are drawn to buy them and reward the supplie r with profits. If this provis ion of goods and services is not continuously improved the profits will disappear through the forces of competition and entrepreneurship. U nder socialism and crony o r state capitalism the way to obtain more goods and services is to seek the political favours of those whor ule. I f you think greed is wrong you should try to convince those who suffer it to seek a dvice with a priest, a psychologist or a good friend. What is clear is that it existsb oth under capitalism and socialism in all its forms. Greed is not an argument to attack capitalism or even socialism for that matter. P AGE 16, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011 THE TRIBUNE T O DISCUSS ST ORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Greed and social organisation O PINION W W h h y y h h u u m m a a n n b b e e i i n n g g s s p p u u r r s s u u e e t t h h e e a a c c q q u u i i s s i i t t i i o o n n o o f f m m o o r r e e a a n n d d b b e e t t t t e e r r g g o o o o d d s s a a n n d d s s e e r r v v i i c c e e s s i i s s a a q q u u e e s s t t i i o o n n f f o o r r p p s s y y c c h h o o l l o o g g i i s s t t s s , b b u u t t w w e e c c a a n n a a g g r r e e e e t t h h a a t t i i t t i i s s p p e e r r v v a a s s i i v v e e .

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MANAMA, Bahrain Associated Press T HEswelling protests against Bahrain's rulers gained momentum Wednesday with huge crowds calling for a sweeping political overhaul and the kingdom's stunned leaders appearing to shift tactics after attempts to crush the uprising stoked rage on the streets and sharp criticism from Western a llies. The widening challenges to the Arab world's political order emboldened by the downfall of old-guard regimes in Tunisia and Egypt also flared in Libya for the first time, with riot police battling protesters marching against the 42-year rule of Moammar G adhafi. In Yemen, the embattled president flooded the ancient capital of Sanaa with security forces to try to stamp out demonstrations that began nearly a week ago. They turned deadly Wednesday in the southern port of Aden, with two people killed in clashes with police. "It's clear now that no Arab l eader can truly feel comfortable," said Ali Fakhro, a political analyst and commentator in Bahrain. "Those days have been swept away." It's also taken a big swipe at Western policy assumptions. Tiny Bahrain has an outsized importance for Washington as home of the U.S. Navy's 5th Fleet,a counterweight to Iran's military expansion in the Gulf. Yemen is a strategic battleground against Islamic militants inspired by alQaida. Even Gadhafi once an archfoe of the West has been grad ually rebuilding international ties and remains a mercurial, but wellexamined, factor in Mideast affairs. In many ways, Bahrain is mirroring Egypt's uprising on a small er scale and with malls and con ference centers as the backdrop instead of the faded glory of Cairo's Tahrir Square. Protesters have turned a landmark square in the capital of Manama into their base camp, which was swollen with tens of thousands of people by nightfall Wednesday. Their chants literally reverberated off the buildings and bridges. They sang the Egyptian national anthem. Their next important move takes a page directly from the Egypt unrest: calling for a major march after Friday prayers to re-energize its followers. The ruling Sunni dynasty long accused of trampling the aspirations of Bahrain's Shiite major ity has retrenched after unleashing security forces in street clashes that left at least two dead since Monday. Riot squads have hung back as the crowds took con trol of Pearl Square, dominatedby a 300-foot (90-feet to Bahrain's history as a pearl diving center. An emergency parliament meeting was called for Thursday, but it may only serve to show the country's divisions and reinforce its image as the most politically volatile in the Gulf. The main Shiite opposition bloc, with 18 of the 40 seats, has said it will not return to the chamber until the protest demands are met. It began Monday as a cry for the country's Sunni monarchy to loosen its grip, including handpicking most top government posts, and open more opportunities for the country's Shiites, who have long complained of being blocked from decision-making roles or key posts in the military. But the uprising's demands have steadily grown bolder. Many protesters are calling for the government to provide more jobs and better housing, free all political detainees and abolish a system that offers Bahraini citizenship to Sunnis from around the Middle East as a way to close the gap with Shiites, who account for 70 percent of the population. Many of the newly minted nationals get jobs in security forces to further cement the number of presumed loyalists protecting the ruling system. Increasingly, protesters are also chanting slogans to wipe away the entire ruling dynasty that has led Bahrain for more than 200 years and is firmly backed by the Sunni sheiks and monarchs across the Gulf. Although Bahrain is sandwiched between two of OPEC's heavyweights, Saudi Arabia and Qatar, it has limited oil resources and depends heavily on its role as a regional financial hub and playground for Saudis, who can drive over a causeway to enjoy Bahrain's Western-style bars, hotels and beaches. As night fell in the square, a Shiite imam extolled Bahrain's young people as the lions of reform. "This square is a trust in your hands and so will you whittle away this trust or keep fast?" the imam said. "So be careful and be concerned for your country and remember that the regime will try to rip this country from your hand but if we must leave it in coffins then so be it!" Across the city, a caravan of cars from government supporters waved national flags and displayed portraits of King Hamad bin Isa Al Khalifa. "Come join us!" they yelled into markets and along busy streets. "Show your loyalty." Social networking websites also were abuzz with calls to press a head with the protests. They were matched by insults from presumed government backers calling the demonstrators traitors and agents of Shiite powerhouse Iran. Some pointed out that Iranian hard-liners have called Bahrain the Islamic Republic's "14th province" because of its Shiite links. B ut the head of the largest Shiite political bloc, Sheik Ali Salman, said there are no demands for an Islamic role in politics. "We are not looking for a religious government like Iran's, butwe demand a civil government" that represents Shiites and Sunnis, he told a news conference. B ahrain's relative calm Wednesday was in stark contrast with other Arab political showdowns. But all share efforts to escalate protests this week. In Libya, security forces fired rubber bullets and water cannons at hundreds of marchers in Beng hazi, the second-largest city. Wit-n esses said some police stations were set on fire and one protester said he saw snipers on a roof of a security headquarters firing on protesters. The unrest was triggered by the temporary detention Tuesday of an activist but quickly turned intoa rare public challenge to Gadh afi. Video clips posted on the Inter net showed protesters carrying signs and chanting: "No God but Allah, Moammar is the enemy of Allah" and "Down, down to cor ruption and to the corrupt." Activists using Facebook and Twitter have called for nationwided emonstrations Thursday. In Yemen, meanwhile, more than 2,000 police fanned out across the capital Sanaa after six days of Egypt-style demonstrations against President Ali Abdullah Saleh, who has held power for 32 years. The police fired in the air and b locked thousands of students at Sanaa University from joining thousands of other protesters in the capital of the Arab world's most impoverished nation. In the southern port of Aden, two people were killed when police fired on protesters. A call spread via Facebook and Twitter urging Yemenis to join a series of "One Million People" rallies on Friday. Dozens of Jordanians took to the streets outside King Abullah II's palace in the sixth straight week of protests, demanding that people be allowed to elect their prime minister. Internet service in Bahrain was slow and spotty, but it appeared that authorities did not try to close it down fully. But unlike vast Cairo, Bahrain is little more than a collection of towns and villages with just 500,000 native-born citizens and nearly the same number of expatriate workers. Word spreads easily by phone and from family to family. Thousands turned out with out any special call to organize for the funeral procession of 31year-old, Fadhel al-Matrook, the second known fatality from the clashes. Later, in Pearl Square, his father Salman pleaded with protesters not to give up. "He is not only my son. He is the son of Bahrain, the son of this nation," he yelled. "His blood shouldn't be wasted." The bloodshed brought embar rassing rebukes from allies such Britain and the United States. A statement from Bahrain's interior ministry said suspects have been "placed in custody" in connection with the two protester deaths, but gave no further details. In the past week, Bahrain's rulers have tried to defuse calls for reform by promising nearly $2,700 for each family and pledg ing to loosen state controls on the media. Similar concessions have been made by leaders in the Gulf to try to pre-empt protests. In Oman, the ruling Sultan Qaboos Bin Said announced Wednesday an increase in the minimum monthly salary for private sector workers from 140 rials ($365 ($520 As protesters in Bahrain settled in for another night in the square, the mood was more festive than tense. People sipped tea, snacked on donated food and smoked appleand grape-flavored tobacco from water pipes. The men and women mainly sat separately the women a sea of black in their traditional dress. Some youths wore the red-and-white Bahraini flag as a cape. The leadership of the protesters is still unclear and disorganized. A few scuffles have broken out between some of the people in the main area near the speakers' platform. But many tried to downplay the idea that the revolt is primarily for Shiite rights. "The needs of the people are populist and not sectarian. We are not Shiite, Sunni or liberals," said Jassem Jawad, 23, a musician and part-time civil servant. "I am not a political man ... But I know I want a chance to pick my own prime minister. How is it fair for a prime minister to hold power for 39 years? Its ridiculous." I NTERNATIONAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011, PAGE 17 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Protest wave grows: Bahrain then Yemen and now Libya BAHRAINIS SHOUT SLOGANS in Pearl Square, Manama, Bahrain Tuesday, Feb.15, 2011. Protesters demanding sweeping political reforms from Bahrain's rulers held their ground Wednesday in an Egypt-style occupation of the c apital's landmark square. (AP

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I NTERNATIONAL NEWS P AGE 18, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011 THE TRIBUNE T O DISCUSS ST ORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM WASHINGTON Associated Press E XTREMErainstorms and snowfalls have grown substantially stronger, two studies suggest, with scientists for the first time finding the telltale fingerprints of man-made global warming on downpours that often cause deadly flooding. Two studies in Wednesday's i ssue of the journal Nature link heavy rains to increases in greenhouse gases more than ever before. One group of researchers looked at the strongest rain and snow events of each year from 1951 to 1999 in the Northern Hemisphere and found that the m ore recent storms were 7 percent wetter. That may not sound like much, but it adds up to be a substantial increase, said the report from a team of researchers from Canada and Scotland. The study did not single out specific storms but examined worst-of-each-year events all over the Northern Hemisphere. While the study ended in 1999, the close of the decade when scientists say climate change kicked into a higher gear, the events examined were similar to more recent disasters: deluges that triggered last year's deadly floods in Pakistan and in Nashville, Tennessee, and this winter's paralyzing blizzards in parts of the United States. The change in severity was most apparent in North America, but that could be because that is where the most rain gauges are, scientists said. Both studies should weaken the argument that climate change is a "victimless crime," said Myles Allen of the University of Oxford. He co-authored the second study, which connected flooding and climate change in Britain. "Extreme weather is what actually hurts people." Jonathan Overpeck, a University of Arizona climate scientist, who did not take part in either study, praised them as sensible and "particularly relevant given the array of extreme weather that we've seen this winter and stretching back over the last few years." Not all the extreme rain and snow events the scientists studied cause flooding. But since 1950, flooding has killed more than 2.3 million people, according to the World Health Organization's disaster database. The British study focused on flooding in England and Wales in autumn of 2000. The disaster cost more than $1.7 billion in insured damages and was the wettest autumn for the region in more than 230 years of record-keeping. Researchers found that global warming more than doubled the likelihood of that flood occurring. Similar studies are now under way to examine whether last year's deadly Russian heat wave and Pakistan floods which were part of the same weather event can be scientifically attributed to global warming. For years scientists, relying on basic physics and climate knowledge, have said global warming would likely cause extremes in temperatures and rainfall. But this is the first time researchers have been able to point to a demonstrable cause-and-effect by using the rigorous and scientifically accepted method of looking for the "fingerprints" of human-caused climate change. The scientists took all the information that shows an increase in extreme rain and snow events from the 1950s through the 1990s and ran dozens of computer models numerous times. They put in the effects of greenhouse gases which come from the burning of fossil fuels and then ran numerous models without those factors. Only when the greenhouse gases are factored in do the models show a similar increase to what actually happened. All other natural effects alone don't produce the jump in extreme rainfall. Essentially, the computer runs show climate change is the only way to explain what's happening. Scientists connect global warming to extreme rain IN THIS Aug. 11, 2011 file photo, Pakistani villagers wave to a helicopter approaching Ghaus Pur near Sukkur, in Pakistan's Sindh province. Extreme rainstorms and snowfalls have grown substantially stronger, two studies have suggested. (AP

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INTERNATIONAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011, PAGE 19 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM ROME Associated Press ITALIAN PREMIER Silvio Berlusconi showed aplomb in t he face of charges that could end his political career, saying Wednesday he isn't worried about his impending prostitution trial or calls for his resignation. It was the first public comment by the 74-year-old leader since he was indicted Tuesday o n charges he paid for sex with a 17-year-old Moroccan girl and then used his influence to cover it up. He spoke shortly before holding talks and a working dinner with Russian President Dmitry Medvedev, his first international meeting since the indictment. B erlusconi has denied any wrongdoing, dismissing the accusations as "groundless" and the case as a "farce" and a "shame." He has accused prosecutors of trying to topple his government. On Wednesday, the premier dodged questions about the case during a news conference on economic themes in Rome and, in contrast with recent days, did not go on the offensive to defend himself. "Out of love of my country, I won't talk about this," Berlusconi told reporters. "I can only say one thing: I'm not worried at all." Berlusconi also avoided the topic in remarks before a meeting with Medvedev, focusing instead on the close ties between Russia and Italy. "I believe that I am a point of reference for Russia within the European Union, and I have personally tended to all of the relations that the EU has and will develop with the Russian federation," Berlusconi said, emphasizing his close personal friendships with Medvedev and Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin. The prostitution trial starts April 6 before three female judges an ironic twist for the premier. Italian women staged nationwide protests last week contending that the scandal and Berlusconi's view of women is degrading to female dignity. The three judges were picked at random. The indictment marks a serious challenge to Berlusconi's grip on power at a time when the premier is weakened by an acrimonious split with an exally. It reignited calls for Berlusconi's resignation, with the opposition contending the scandal with allegations of wild parties at the premier's villas with scantily clad women has embarrassed Italy and damaged its image abroad. "A premier who is a defendant, who spends his days disputing the magistrates, is undoubtedly a man with no time to govern, and probably with no authority to do so effectively," a leading political analyst, Stefano Folli, wrote in Wednesday's financial newspaper Il Sole 24 Ore. The abuse of influence charge carries a prison sentence of four to 12 years, and if Berlusconi is sentenced to more than five years, he would be barred from ever again holding public office. The child prostitution charge carries a possible prison term of six months to three years. Even if found guilty, it is unlikely he would ever go to prison. The appeals process would take years, and in Italy people over 75 rarely serve time. Berlusconi's deepening legal woes also test his crucial alliance with the Northern League, which he relies on for a majority in parliament. While other Berlusconi allies quickly came to his defense, Northern League leaders mostly kept silent about the indictment, which observers read as a sign of unease. Berlusconi met with League leader and government minister Umberto Bossi and other party officials on Tuesday night. "We are as united as ever, and determined to continue the legislature until its natural end," Berlusconi told reporters Wednesday. Italys indicted Berlusconi says hes not worried ITALIAN PREMIER Silvio Berlusconi listens to a reporter's question during a press conference at the Chigi Premier's palace, in Rome, Wednesday, Feb. 16, 2011. (AP

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SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $4.75 $4.77 $4.69 By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor The Privy Council has u pheld all bar one of the decisions made by the Bahamian courts over the long-running dispute between the two principalso f the Grand Bahamabased Shoreline real estate development, finding only that the junior partner was not entitled to the sumo f $250,000 derived from a Profit Sharing Agreement (PSA T he London-based court, the highest appellate court i n the Bahamian Judicial system, only altered the Supreme Court and Courto f Appeal rulings in one respect, deciding that at no time was there a legally binding agreement that Steven Jervis and his com-p any, KST Investments, would pay Victor Skinner Court overturns $250k profit share from development SEE page 8B Privy Council upholds all other Bahamian court findings over long-running feud between principals of Shoreline real estate project* Judgment provides ground for possible Customs probe over alleged Freeport bond abuses By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A looming threat to maximising recovery from them ain asset available to Bahamian creditors of CLICO (Bahamas step closer to becoming real ity, after a US court this week gave permission for develop ment of a rival plan to liquidate the Wellington Preserve real estate project. The US Bankruptcy Court for the southern district of Florida, via a February 14, 2011, ruling has given Brennan Financial, another Wellington Preserve creditor, permission to file a reorganisation/liquidation plan for the 545-acre project, which accounts for 63 per cent of CLICO (Bahamas assets. And, more importantly, the court has given Brennan Financial and any other interested party permission to not only develop competing liq uidaton plans, but to also solicit votes in favour of such plan. While Craig A. Tony Gomez, the Baker Tilly CLICO RECOVERY THREAT IS CLOSER T O BEC OMING REALIT Y Rival creditor gets court approval to develop and seek votes on competing plan to liquidate project accounting for 63% of insolvent insurer s assets CRAIG GOMEZ SEE page 7B By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The imposition of 10 per cent import duty on all aircraft in the Bahamas will only serve to deter the growth of the market and d evelopment of a Bahamian aircraft registry, Sky Bahamas chairman has told Tribune Business, adding: If theyre trying to kill the private aviation industry,t heyre going about it the Going the right way to destroy aviation 10% duty on planes will only deter Bahamian aviation s ector growth and set back aircraft registry, says GB C hamber chief Tells government that keep chopping us at the knees for short-term goals serves no purpose Urges that Bahamas must do better, and questions whati t is trying to achieve given competitive positioning K P TURNQUEST SEE page 9B By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A lmost two-thirds of Bahamian hotels, some 63 perc ent, expect to incur a net loss once their audited financials for 2 010 are completed, a Bahamas Hotel Association (BHA vey has revealed, although between 60-70 per cent ofr esorts said key performance i ndicators were expected to either slightly improve or remain flat in 2011. With the BHAs 2010 review a nd tourism outlook survey, a copy of which has been obtained by Tribune Business, indicated some modest opti-m ism and confidence was r eturning to the Bahamas main private sector industry and e mployer, the results also showed that out of the 30 prope rties polled, some 60 per cent 18 rated the strength of the tourism aspect of the economy in the Bahamas today as weak. J ust 7 per cent of the Nass au/Paradise Island, Grand Bahama and Family Islandp roperties polled rated the Bahamian tourism industry as strong, while 23 per cent and 10 per cent described its strength as moderate and extremely weak respectively. W ith 63 per cent of those h otels, representing 10,000 employees and almost 50 per cent of the Bahamian hotel room inventory, making a net l oss for 2010 (37 per cent were in the black), the short-term outlook for the sector remains challenging, despite tentativer ecovery signs. O n the positive side, some 60 per cent of Bahamian resorts p olled had a fair outlook for tourism in 2011, with 3 per cent ( just one hotel) forecasting a positive year. Yet, with 30 per cent and 3 per cent sharing a negative and extremely negative forecast, one-third of the i ndustry (10 hotels polled t inues to remain gloomy. Forecasting key indicators f or 2011, only 7 per cent of hotels surveyed by the BHA p redicted that employment numbers, sales/revenues and pricing would be down significantly compared to 2010. The significantly down percenta ge increased for profits (17 per cent), plus capital spending and room occupancy (both 13 per cent). I n the down some category, some 30 per cent of hotels predicted this would happen to their employment and revenuel evels during 2011, with 13 per c ent adding this would also happen to profits, capital spending a nd room occupancy. On a more encouraging note, Hotels: 2/3 incur net loss in 2010 B etween 60-70% of properties surveyed by BHA expect flat or modest improvement in 2011, but 60% still rate tourism economy as weak SEE page 4B By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor Abaco second homeowners a re up in arms after being told that at the moment they cann ot obtain the promised real property tax break in return for r egistering their homes and agreeing to pay room tax. Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, minister of tourism and aviation, and Zhivargo Laing, m inister of state for finance, could not be contacted for comm ent and did not return mes sages before press time yesterd ay afternoon, with a Cabinet meeting ongoing yesterday, but Internet forums and chat rooms were alive with complaints over the issue. One irate second homeown er said they had registered theirh ome with the Ministry of Tourism as a small hotel in D ecember 2009, in accordance with the 2009 Small Hotels Act, g iven that the property was rented out to other visitors. Under the Act, the homeowner said they were supposed to obtain a real property tax e xemption the first $250,000 in value would be exempt, plus t he 0.75 per cent on the addi tional value between $250,000 Second home fury over tax break loss SEE page 4B

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By DEIDRE M. BASTIAN D esign is a universal language. It transcends a ll cultural and national boundaries. It is diverse and ever-changing. Despite the fact that designs can be universally appreciated, thea rtists behind them are all unique and talented. Have you ever asked yourself: How do I contribute to the design community? Evi-d ently, designers from different walks of life might have similar answers to this question and yet be different. S ome designers may educate those who may not yet h ave developed an appreciation for design and art, w hile others aim to improve the overall quality of design on the Internet. Moreover,s ome designers are content to primarily to attain a good living from their talents andn othing more. Human beings constantly w ear masks to hide true feelings, thoughts and personality, and some designersw ear masks of their own as well. H uman nature is to wear different masks according to the role played, yet despite these our true personality s till shines through. Lets take a look at several designer personality types The Pablo Picasso Designer: A perfectionist. T he Pablo Picasso designer does not allow for any pixel t o be out of place. Egotistical, he/she does not care about others opinions. TheP ablo Picasso designer has strong beliefs which cannot be swayed by money. Theiro nly concern is for the ingenuity of ideas. A man out to change the world of design, he does not succumb to the whims of clients, and believes it is t heir loss if they do not heed his advice. Believing he is a cut above the rest, he admits to only af ew other designers in the world as being his peers. T he Pablo Picasso designer sees himself, above all. as an artist. T he Albert Einstein Designer: A smart man with excellent work ethic, the A lbert Einstein designer has the motto No pain, no gain. U nafraid of ridicule, he dares to be different. Failure is the mother of all suc-c ess, and the Albert Einstein designer has a never-giveup attitude. He may not geti t right each time or win every competition, but he b elieves his hard work will eventually pay off and that he will be recognised one day for his talents and effort. H is strong faith and belief enables him to patiently wait f or the day. For him, the question is not if he will triumph, but when. T he David Copperfield Designer: The David Copperfield designer is a great storyteller and illusionist. Capable of anything regard less of how seemingly i mpossible it is, he conjures the best designs for his clients. He does not come cheap and gives a cleverlyc onstructed illusion, using his great storytelling skills. He leads clients to believeh e is the only designer that can meet their needs. B ehind the scenes, the client will never realise the hardworking talents that supporth im, as he delegates the work but claims all the credit in the end. T he Captain Hook Designer: Why create when y ou can steal? The Captain Hook designer is cunning. He scouts for the most innovative and successful designs a nd makes them his own, not by blatantly duplicating but by cleverly working inh is own ideas and inspiration. C raftily avoiding outright plagiarism, the Captain Hook designer hooks suc-c essful ideas to create a fresh new concept. Money b eing his sole interest, this d esigner passes off designs as new creations, and is unfazed by whether he loses clients. T he Mahatma Gandhi D esigner: Believing he is o bliged to write wrongs, the Mahatma Gandhi designer takes it upon himself to effect change through peaceful means. He feels an oblig-a tion to improve design standards, regardless of any difficulties or opposition he might face. If he has to achieve his goal one clienta t a time, he will gladly do so. A forward-thinking designer who sets trends, he advocates for what he believes is necessary toi mprove and sustain the design industry. The Bashful Dwarf D esigner: S hunning the spotlight, the Bashful Dwarf d esigner always feels like he could have done a better job. When praised, he isq uick to share the credit with colleagues. Insecure a bout his talents, he is content to work behind the scenes and let others taket he honour. The Bashful Dwarf designer doesnt think much of fame or for-t une. He believes many other designers deserve more r ecognition, but remains content with his spot in life. The Ella of Frell Designe r: T he real Ella of Frell fell under a spell and couldnt s ay no to anyone. Slightly different, the Ella of Frell designer actually believest he customer is always right and goes all out to please. BUSINESS PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM COME SEE US AT THE SHERATON NASSAU BEACH RESORT Thursday, February17th: 5:00 to 8:00pm at the CanadianBoarding School Fair and Friday,February 18th: 5:30 to 8:00pm Camp Kandalore Information Evening WHAT ARE YOU UP TO THIS SUMMER? The personality behind design THE ART OF GRAPHIX DEIDRE M.BASTIAN SEE page 11B

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By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor Emeras talks with the Government over a potential m anagement contract to run the Bahamas Electricity Corporation (BEC work in progress a senior executive with the Canadian utility giant has revealed, with the two sides exploring several scenarios to determine the right first step. Confirming Emeras continuing interest in becoming involved with BEC, Ray Robinson, executive chairman of Grand Bahama Power Company, in which the Canadian power giant holds a controlling 80.4 per cent interest,said the company was comm itted to doing the right t hing when it came to the 1 00 per cent state-owned power provider. Thats still a work in progress, Mr Robinson said of talks with the Government. Discussions are still ongoing.We continue to state our interest in the Bahamas and BEC, and doing the right thing for the Government, BEC and its customers. Were looking at not one scenario but two or three othe r scenarios to see what is the first right step. Emera was contracted by the Government last year to conduct a 60-day review of BEC and make recommendations for getting it back ona sound financial footing, and its interest has progressed from there. The Government, though, with its attention focused on the Bahamas Telecommunications Company (BTC kept a low profile where the BEC talks are concerned, no doubt wanting to avoid more potential union unrest given the situation surrounding its first privatisation. Speaking on Emera's preliminary BEC findings, Earl Deveaux, minister of the environment, told Tribune Business last year: "Emera was able to greatly enhance our understanding of BEC's energy production, and its challenges in regard to a number of things fuel sources, generating mix, options for leveraging the purchase of fuel supplies. "There are a lot of early options for remediation that we think will greatly assist in bringing BEC's generating capacity and operating systems under better control." Tribune Business reported in December how the Government had received a proposal from Emera for improving BEC's operational efficiency, and perhaps eventually taking over managerial control or acquiring the stateowned power supplier. A source with knowledge of BEC's operations told Tribune Business that while such discussions remained "very, very preliminary", a formal proposal was received "around a month ago". "The Government sent back some comments and they responded, but it has not progressed very far since then. The Prime Minister needed to have some input but he has been fairly consumed with BTC, the source said. Asked why Emera was so interested in the Bahamas, Mr Robinson told Tribune Business: We can see the potential here. Its proximity to the US, and theres a lot of opportunity, we believe, for interconnection between some of the islands. We like the business climate in the Bahamas and, relatively speaking, throughout the Caribbean. Theyre [the Bahamas] close to North America, so theyre not as anxious about doing business with organisations from North America. There is a natural relationship between the Bahamas and Canada, and specifically easte rn Canada. A lot of relationships are pre-existing. A lot of Bahamians are schooled in Nova Scotia, so that area is not foreign to the Bahamas. So that helps to form relationships and do business together. BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011, PAGE 3B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM .,1*6:$<$&$'(0<&+2/$56+,3 $11281&(0(17.LQJVZD$FDGHP\OHDGLQJ%DKDPLDQVFKRROZLWK UHSXWDWLRQIRUH[FHOOHQFHLQDFDGHPLFVDWKOHWLFVDQGWKHDU FRPPLWPHQWWR&KULVWLDQYDOXHVDQGVWURQJWUDGLWLRQRISXEOLF VHUYLFHLVLQYLWLQJSXEOLFVFKRROVWXGHQWVHQWHULQJ*UDGHLQ 6HSWHPEHUWRDSSOIRU WZRf SUHVWLJLRXVHDUVFKRODUVKLSV$fKH*UDFHDWKDP.HPSFKRODUVKLS1DPHGLQKRQRXURI.LQJVZD\IRXQGHU*UDFH7DWKDP.HPS7KLV VFKRODUVKLSLVIRUZHOOURXQGHGVWXGHQWZLWKSURYHQVWURQJDFDGHPLF SHUIRUPDQFH%f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fDFDGHPLF\HDUV*UDGHVDQGWR GDWHf7UDQVFULSWVZLOORQO\EHFRQVLGHUHGYDOLGLIWKH\DUHVXEPLWWHGLQ \RXU VFKRROVVHDOHGHQYHORS 1RWH 6KRUWOLVWHGFDQGLGDWHVZLOOEHLQYLWHGWRVLWWKHVFKRODUVKLS H[DPLQDWLRQDQGDSSHDUDWDQLQWHUYLHZ'HDGOLQH&RPSOHWHDSSOLFDWLRQSDFNDJHVKRXOGEHUHFHLYHG DWWKH+LJK6FKRRO'HVNLQWKH$GPLQLVWUDWLRQ %XLOGLQJE\DU WK (QWHUWREH7UDLQHGLQWKH.LQJV([LWWREHWKH 'LIIHUHQFH CUSTOMER NOTICEScotiabank (Bahamas that with recent enhancements to our service network all Merchant Customers have been upgraded to the Scotiabank VX510 POS terminals for credit card processing services. These new terminals provide enhanced levels of security and ensure easy upload of the newest operation features offered by Credit Card Companies and facilitate ongoing upgrades for the processing of transactions. All new features being rolled out by the Credit Card Companies will be fully functional on these new terminals. Some of Scotiabanks card services are available exclusively on these new terminals (ie.Debit/Credit cards). These services on the Scotia Network are no longer available through the Tripoint Terminals. Your current Merchant Services Agreement with Scotiabank remains unchanged. Should you have any questions/concerns regarding the new terminals and the features we invite you to contact us at 242-356-1647 or by email at bsbsc.merchantsupport@scotiabank.com. Emera eyes island interconnect goal T alks over BEC still a work in progress, with government and Canadian firm eyeing two or three other scenarios to see what is the first right step RAY ROBINSON

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between 60-70 per cent of Bahamian resorts forecast that these six key indicators would either be flat with 2010 levels or up some. O nly 3 per cent (one hotel predicted that revenues, capital spending and room occupancy would be up significantly in 2011 compared to 2 010. Apart from the recession, the Bahamian hotel industry also blamed high airfares and high operating costs for their current performance, together with the Bahamas being a high cost d estination. Comparing 2010 with 2009, 33 per cent of Bahamian hotels s urveyed said revenues and profits were down significantly compared to 2009. Another 37 per cent fell into this cate-g ory on capital spending, with 27 per cent and 20 per cent seeing significantly down room occupancy and pricing. With most staffing cuts in the sector taking place at end-2008, employment was only signific antly down for 10 per cent of properties in 2010. Again, the Bahamian hotel industry fell either into the down some or same up some categories when comparing 2010 to 2009. Between 4 0-57 per cent fell into the latter two categories combined for all six key financial performance indicators, while between 33 per cent to 17 per cent were in t he down some category. Very few were up significantly in 2010. All this confirms a Bahamian hotel industry that is far from being out of the woods, andi t is far from adding new jobs to r eplace the employees shed in late 2008 and early 2009. Asked to state the three most important factors impacting their business today in priority order, t he obvious number one was t he worldwide recession and sluggish US economy. Close behind, though, were airlift issues availability, reliability, high cost and the high cost of doing business in the B ahamas, especially cost and reliability of electricity, t elecommunications, group insurance and National Insur-a nce Board (NIB Asked to set out the most i mportant issues for the BHA, Promotion Boards and Ministry of Tourism to work on, the hotels said these were airlift, marketing to generate increased better promotion of the islands, and reduced utility, licensing, tax and duty costs. With 84 per cent of those polled participating in the Ministry of Tourisms Companion Fly Free initiative, some 32 perc ent described it as very effective and 32 per cent as effective, with just 8 per cent saying it made no impact and 28 per cent saying it was minimally effective. Some 80 per cent of Bahamia n hotels said they would participate in a similar initiative, w ith only 10 per cent saying they would not either becauset hey were not wholesaler driven or because it was ineffect ive or not cost-effective. The remaining 10 per cent added that they would participate with conditions, namely ensuring island-specific benef its, a better understanding of how to increase value to our hotel, and without the 2 per cent tax increase. And, to prepare for Baha Mars new room inventory in 2014, the hotels urgede nhanced marketing and training initiatives, plus improved product development that focused on downtown Nassaus rehabilitation, better taxi standards, safety and security, traffic control and airport develo pment. BUSINESS PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Hotels: 2/3 incur net loss in 2010 F ROM page 1B and $500,000. This was intended to compensate for the 6 per cent room tax paid to the Government on rentals, which increased to 10 per cent in t he 2010-2011 Budget. We collected and paid the hotel tax all year, the homeowner said. Last week we got our property tax bill with no exemptions. Today, I spoke with a fine lady in Nassau at the Ministry of Tourism who tells me that there h ave been legislative glitches in the Small Hotels Act and that the Ministry of Finance is granting n o second homeowners the reduced property tax incentive at the moment. She also said that the Small Hotels Act is currently under revi-s ion. The homeowner added: The official whom I s poke with in the Marsh Harbour tax office seemed uniformed about these proceedings and t old me I must be in residence at my house in Abaco for four months a year to qualify for the t ax reduction. Nothing in the law as I read it says anything about four months or more of residency per yeart o qualify. The woman at the Department of Tourism agrees. She says there is no such resi-d ency requirement for the tax incentive. Similar issues were raised in a letter posted o n the Internet by well-known Great Guana Cay resident, Troy Albury. He said: Foreign owners o f second homes in Guana Cay all went over to the office in Marsh Harbour to the real property tax office and signed up for this program received a tax No. and started collecting and remitting the taxes when there were rentals. It was a hassle to do so as the office in Marsh Harbour will not take cash or personal cheques, so a bank draft had to be purchased, but many went ahead with the program as they thought it w as the right thing to do and they hoped the revenue would be used to improve the islands. Also, since they were promised a break on their p roperty taxes, they felt it was something in it for them Well, now to their surprise, they receive their tax bills and are informed by the new tax officer that there have been some glitches in the systema nd there will be no tax break. They have to pay their full tax bill and now, all of a sudden, there is a four-month minimum that you must live iny our house in order to get the tax discount. This was never discussed in the original discussions ora nywhere in the information that was circulated. M any of them feel cheated and would never have s igned up for the program if they knew they w ould not receive any benefit. Mr Albury added: Second homeowners that r ent their houses make tremendous contributions to our economy. They built their homes u sing local contractors, paid full duty on their homes, have Bahamian caretakers. They spendm oney to market their properties (and by default the islands of the Bahamas ). They use Bahamia n contractors for maintenance. When they are h ere they support the local merchants, grocery stores, tour operators, restaurants and taxi driv ers. When they have visitors renting their houses, t he guests do the same. They provide a tremendous boost to our economy and most make pos-i tive contributions by volunteering their time and making monetary contributions to local chari ties. All of these second homeowners have built their homes without the benefit of duty-free exemptions which are being offered to all of the new houses being built in the mega develop m ents. So as far as that is concerned they have contributed substantially more to the coffers of t he Treasury than all of these mega develop ments. Second home fury over tax break loss FROM page 1B

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BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011, PAGE 7B THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMASVisit our website at www.cob.edu.bs Gomez accountant and partner, was also given an extension until April 1, 2011, to file his own liquidation plan for Wellington Preserve, he now faces competition from rivals who do not have the interests of CLICO (Bahamas tors and policyholders at the top of their priority list. It is unclear how the votes process will work, but presumably if a majority of creditors are in favour of a plan submitted by Brennan Financial or someone else, then it is their process, not Mr Gomezs which will dictate Wellington Preserves fate. And Brennan Financial has made its goals perfectly clear, namely to transform itself from unsecured creditor to secured creditor at the head of the queue, plus place itself and other US creditors ahead of CLICO (Bahamas CLICO Enterprises affiliate. The US-based financier has already submitted a low ball $10.8 million offer to acquire Wellington Preserve, which was immediately rejected by Mr Gomez and his attorneys. This, though, makes it clear that, if Brennan Financials rival liquidation plan is accepted, it will be willing to listen to offers well below the $50-$60 million that Wellington Preserve is estimated to be worth, let alone the $73 million that CLICO (Bahamas pumped into it. In short, a Brennan Financial plan and liquidation, if successful, would leave next to nothing for Bahamian creditors. I n its February 7, 2011, c ourt filing, the US company said: "Brennan is prepared to move forward with a plan to satisfy all true creditors of the debtor's [Wellington Pre serve] estate in full. With the exception of an escrowd eposit in the amount of $35,000, the debtor's sole asset is real property located in Wellington, Florida. The debtor's only real creditors are collectively owed less than $4 million." The last claim relates to Brennan Financial's assertion t hat Wellington Preserve and Mr Gomez are favouring CLICO (Bahamas wholly-owned CLICO Enterprises in the liquidation, not surprising given that some $73.2 million of the project's total $78 million debts are owed to the two companies. However, Brennan is now alleging that the $73.2 million injected by CLICO (Bahamas prises into Wellington Preserve was equity, not a loan or debt financing, and as such the two Bahamian companies should rank behind it in the list of creditors. "The debtor has failed to produce a single document evidencing the indebtedness underlying the debts scheduled for the CLICO entities," Brennan alleged. Infusions "Moreover, Brennan asserts that any funds received by the debtor from the CLICO entities constitutes capital infusions in the nature of equity that are subordinate to Brennan and the debtor's remaining creditors." Noting that there were many purchasers seeking to buy Wellington Preserve for more than $4 million, Brennan alleged that Mr Gomez had been attempting to liquidate it since 2009. "It is axiomatic that the d ebtor is delaying the liquidation of the Wellington property at the prejudice of the estate's creditors in an effort to increase the potential distributions to the debtor's equity holders [CLICO (Bahamas creditors]," Brennan alleged. "Notwithstanding the debtor's motives, the debtor has had at least 18 months already to maximise the value of the Wellington property. Given the debtor's track record in this case, the debtor s hould not be given a nanosecond of additional time in which to delay the liquidation of its assets." Offering to implement its own liquidation plan, Brennan said that on January 28, 2011, it had submitted its $10.89 million Letter of Intent o ffer to acquire Wellington Preserve to Mr Gomez and Mr Neiwirth. This, it added, would satisfy fully the claims of all US creditors. Responding then to what he described as Brennan's "low ball offer for the asset", Ronald Neiwirth, of the Miami-based Flower, White & Burnett law firm, Mr Gomezs Us attorneys, told Tribune Business that the $10.8 million purchase price was "so low, it was not even worth responding to". He added that Brennan was attempting to position itself as a secured creditor ranking ahead of all CLICO (Bahamas tors, where it would recover 100 cents on the $1 in itsc laim, rather than its current status as an unsecured creditor "diluted by the claims of CLICO Enterprises". "At this juncture, the Bank ruptcy Court is committed to getting the best possible r eturn for creditors," Mr Neiw irth told Tribune Business, adding that even if Mr Gomez lost exclusivity, there was nothing stopping him from pressing ahead with efforts to sell Wellington Preserve to the highest bidder. "We don't want to let it go too cheaply because it will affect the liquidation entities in the Bahamas. We want the best possible price for the liq uidation in the Bahamas," Mr Neiwirth added. "The claims are not very great with the exception of CLICO Enterprises. The real question is how much recov ery comes back to CLICO." Emphasising that Wellington Preserve was located in a high income, affluent area in West Palm Beach, Mr Neiwirth said its "uniqueness" meant Mr Gomez was opposed to "letting it go for bottom feeder prices". "The problem is this is somewhat of a unique property. It's been for sale for a couple of years. We've had a couple of contracts fall through, but this is one of a kind, unique in that area, and there is nothing like it there." CLICO recovery threat closer to becoming reality FROM page 1B

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t he $250,000 as his 25 per c ent share of Shorelines 2 004 profits. The ruling almost, but not quite, brings an end to the f ive-year feud between the t wo former lifelong friends, the Privy Council ruling that since Mr Skinner was entitled to his net profit share for 2004 (the sum havingb een wrong), the amount s hould be determined by the Supreme Court registrar. A nd, given the ongoing c ontroversy in relation to the Bonded Letter in F reeport, the judgment may also provide a reason for Customs to look closely atS horeline and KST Investments, as it hints that the d evelopments bonded account was previously used to buy personal/householdi tems, potentially depriving the Government of legitim ate import duty revenues. It is alleged that between about July 2000 and November 2004, Mr Skinner pur c hased personal items by using KSTs bonded account at Dolly Madisons store inF reeport to a value of $1138 without accounting to KST f or it, the Privy Council judgment noted. Mr Skinner said in evi d ence that Mr Jervis had bought fishing tackle from D olly Madison, and that he had asked him if he could get stuff from Dolly Madi-s on. Mr Jervis asked him what he wanted to get and he replied: Just fishing tackle, small items. Mr Jervis said that that would be fine. Mr Skinner also said that Mr Jervis wife and brother also bought household goods on account from Dolly Madison. In short, it was M r Skinners evidence that Mr Jervis had given him authority to do what he did. Grand Bahama Port Authority (GBPA licencees in possession of a valid Bond letter can purchase goods from other licencees that are duty-free, p rovided they are for use in their business only. The Privy Council judgment hints that KSTs bonded account was being abused by Messrs Jervis, Skinner a nd their relatives, as they were using it to buy goods for their own personal and household use. T ribune Business understands that Customs d emand late last year for G BPA licencees to furnish it with monthly bonded goods sales reports was sparked by suspicions that there was w idespread abuse of bonded privileges by licencees of this very nature. Origins Recalling the origins of the dispute between the two expatriates, who had been friends since the late 1970s, t he Privy Council said its genesis stemmed from Mr Jerviss decision to relocate to Freeport for tax reasons i n April 1998. After seeking Mr Skinn ers advice on a house he w as acquiring or building, the discussions led to thei dea of developing some land on the beach in or near F reeport. The development went ahead and was called Shoreline. I nitially billed as an 86home development, only 76 p roperties were ultimately built. Messrs Jervis and Skinner had agreed that the profits from Shoreline would be split 75/25 between them, in favour of the former, who would finance the project w hile Mr Skinner used his experience as a quantity sur v eyor to get it up and run n ing. Mr Skinner, according to t he judgment, started work full-time on Shoreline on M arch 1, 1999, looking after the construction side and being paid $7,000 per month, together with a $3,000 rental allowance. A lthough the employment agreement was never put in writing, the PSA was in Feb ruary 2001 at the insistence of Mr Skinner, who had begun to feel marginalised. He felt vulnerable, the P rivy Council recorded. He w as in the Bahamas on a one-year work permit. He h ad asked for a three-year permit, but had been told by Mr Jervis that such a permit was not available, although it later turned out that it was. Moreover, he had heard Mr Jervis say that he was not irreplaceable. Tensions between the pair s tarted building in 2004, when Mr Jervis wrote to MrS kinner, complaining about his alleged absenteeism and aggressive attitude to staff, c ustomers and himself. Mr Skinner replied, and the P rivy Council said: It is noteworthy that none of these allegations formed the basis of Mr Skinners subseq uent dismissal. T his occurred in early January 2005, when Mr Jervis complained that labour and material costs incurred in renovations done to Mr S kinners home, No.3 Shoreline, had not been accounted for in KSTs accounts. It wasa lleged that a construction crew headed by Kenneth Chinese Wilkinson had been instructed by Mr Skinner to book these costs to other Shoreline homes. M r Skinner said he had told the work crew to book renovation costs to his home as repairs, but denied booking the costs to other prope rties. Mr Jervis said that even b ooking the costs to KST was wrong, and Mr Skinner accepted it was wrong, the Privy Council said. He also a ccepted that materials used had not been booked because they were used out of stock, but he also statedt hat Mr Jervis had used the c ompany to pay for personal expenses, as well as Keith Jervis expenses. Mr Jervis replied that if this was the case, it had been a ccounted for in KSTs b ooks, while Mr Skinner denied attempting to defraud the company. The next day, Mr Skinner was h anded a termination letter, and after several without prejudice financial settlement offers were made by Mr Jervis, only to be reject ed, the litigation battle com-m enced. Backing the Supreme Court verdict that Mr Skinner was unlawfully termi-n ated in breach of contract, the Privy Council reiterated that it, like other appellate courts, was highly reluctant to interfere with factual findings made by trial judges, who had seen witnesses givet estimony under cross-examination. Given that Mr Jerviss second appeal was essentially an attempt to reargue the facts, the Privy Council saidS upreme Court justice Norris Carroll was entitled to r each his conclusions based on the evidence. The key t est was whether Mr Skinner took KSTs materials a nd labour to work on his h ouse without the compan ys approval, and no intention of paying for them. During the trial, while a dmitting he had not calculated what to repay KST and t hat the sums had not been a ccounted for when he was t erminated, Mr Skinner said he had not booked the repairs to any other house, and had not intended to defraud Mr Jervis. The Privy Council said the judge was entitled to reach the conclusion he did, finding it was not credible to think Mr Skinner could carry out work of which Mr Jervis was unaware, since t he two were next door neighbours. T he appellate court also b acked the trial judge over Mr Jerviss allegation that M r Skinner received pers onal payment in-kind for $ 2,500 worth of granite work d one by KST at the Grand Bahama apartment of Daniel Hoffman, failing to account to the company for that and failing to reimburse it for the granite costs. Instead of paying his bill to KST, with the concurrence of Mr Skinner, Mr Hoffman provided Mr Skin ner with a plasma television and sound system, whichw ere delivered to him off Grand Bahama at sea, the Privy Council said of Mr Jerviss allegations. In response, Mr Skinner c onfirmed he had arranged for the granite to bei nstalled at Mr Hoffmans a partment, but alleged that Mr Jervis said no payments hould be received because M r Hoffman had done them a favour. While admitting h e had received a plasma TV, he denied it was for the granite work. The trial judge, though, backed Mr Skinner, finding the evidence of Mr Hoffman and others on the issue unre liable. BUSINESS PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM r Court overturns $250k profit share from development F ROM page 1B

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right way. K P Turnquest, who is also the Grand Bahama Chamber of Commerces president, together with Sky Bahamas chief executive, Captain Randy Butler, both confirmed to this newspaper the unease created among both airlines and private plane owners by Customs recent practice of boarding planes to ask questions about the crafts ownership and flight history. With Captain Butler describing this as a fishing expedition on Customs part, in a bid to determine the value of aircraft with a view to calculating the correct 10 per cent duty amount, his chairman confirmed he had been informed that the Departments officers boarded one Sky Bahamas plane in Freeport for this purpose. Mr Turnquest told Tribune Business that Customs seemed to be trying to determine what state its [the plane] in with a view to coming up with a value for this tax thing. Stating that this was anoth er area where the Bahamas seems to be reaching, Mr Turnquest said the way in which Customs was carrying out its assessments, together with the likely demands for current and back tax payments to be made, could become a significant issue when it came to plans for creating and expanding a Bahamian aircraft registry. Explaining that Customs plans to impose the one-time 10 per cent duty would impact current and future second homeowners/foreign investors who owned private planes, Mr Turnquest questioned why the Bahamas was favouring a one-time, upfront lump sumtax payment rather than the recurring revenues generated from an aircraft registrys annual registration fees What are we saying to t hese investors, particularly those with residency? Mr Turnquest asked. Give us our money. What are we try ing to accomplish with this? There are competing jurisdic tions such as Aruba where t here are no import taxes associated with the aircraft. We have to bear in mind our positioning and where were trying to go. Instead, were hitting these people with a one-time lump sum figure that is only going to serve to deter the growth of the market. It makes no sense? What are we trying to accomplish here. Contrasting the Governments tax policy for the Bahamian aviation industry with that for shipping, Mr Turnquest questioned why Bahamian-registered ships plying their trade in this nations waters were not subjected to similar Customs duty impositions. And the Sky Bahamas chairman added: If theyre trying to kill the industry, the private aviation industry,t heyre going about it the right way. Im not sure theyll be successful, but they need to think through its impact. I dont believe any right-thinking policymaker wants this industry to face unplanned challenges other competitors do not have to face. Jet Blue, American, all these guys overnighting here do not have to face that. We have higher fuel costs that we have to deal with, higher airport fees that they do not have to face. They get subsidies from the Government to come to the islands that we dont have. How much more do you want to put on us, take money from us? Allow us to grow so we can employ more people and create more entrepreneurs. The more people trained as pilots, aviation personnel, engineers, mechanics, and customer service people, the more opportunities youve got for people to create wealth. To keep chopping us at the knees for short-term goals without any long-term view, its very detrimental to the industry and the country. Weve got to do better. Captain Butler, meanwhile, told Tribune Business that Customs officers had been asking his staff and other operators questions such as how old the plane was, and how many flying hours it had logged, when they boarded it. Adding that he was aware that such boarding and questioning had occurred in Nassau, Abaco and Long Island, among other locations, Captain Butler said: I couldnt tell you what the goal is. Theyre definitely on a fishing expedition. This is kind of backwards, because theyve gone out saying to people that theyve brought aircraft in here illegally, and now theyre only just going out to find out the information. I know its making people very uncomfortable. BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011, PAGE 9B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Going the right way to destroy aviation FROM page 1B CAPT. RANDYBUTLER

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ALAN FRAM, Associated Press WASHINGTON Republicans criticized a government report on the causes of the 2008 financial crisis as b iased and political on Wednesd ay. Democrats fired back that Republicans want to roll back federal regulations of the financial industry. T hat exchange came as the House Financial Services Comm ittee examined a study issued l ast month concluding that the near economic collapse was avoidable and was caused by failures by the financial industry a nd their federal regulators. The differences between the two parties underscored the partisan gap as the GOP-run H ouse begins a year in which o ne goal is to block new regulations required by the financial overhaul law that Democrats and President Barack Obam a enacted last summer. The Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission's report was endorsed by the panel's six D emocratic commissioners. Its f our Republicans dissented, saying the study played down factors such as how federal policies aimed at increasing home o wnership encouraged the use of high-risk subprime loans. Rep. Robert Dold, R-Ill., said Democrats used the report to support pre-established p olitical philosophies." Rep. Michael Grimm, R-N.Y., said "some members of this commission were more interested in following an ideological agenda." Some of the harshest critic ism came from former Rep. Bill Thomas, R-Calif., who was the top Republican on the commission. From the beginning, I t hought that the commission was created for political purposes," Thomas told the committee. He said commission s taff used their time "to find gotcha documents to support p rovocative headlines,"and that information was leaked to e mbarrass commission Republicans. Thomas was among several Republicans who criticized Democrats, who controlled the H ouse and Senate last year, for approving the overhaul legisla tion before the commission's report was issued. One reason for that haste, he said, was the impending retirement of then Senate Banking Committee C hairman Christopher Dodd, D-Conn., a 35-year veteran of Congress. "When someone is spending that much time in Congress and wants to move a product, it's very difficult to say no," Thomas said. T he committee's top Democrat, Rep. Barney Frank, DM ass., said Democrats pushed the legislation quickly due to p leas from worried Bush and O bama administration officials t hat "you really need to get this d one quickly," and warnings from Wall Street that prolongi ng the legislative work would create uncertainty. R ep. Maxine Waters, DCalif., said GOP criticism wasa n attempt to undermine the financial overhaul law and return the financial services industry to a nostalgic age" of less regulation. T he commission's chairman and top Democrat, former Cali fornia state treasurer Phil Angelides, said the report was w ritten fairly. He said full implantation of the financial overhaul law "is critical and will help prevent a future crisis." BUSINESS PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1 .260.97AML Foods Limited1.041.040.000.1230.0408.53.85% 10.759.67Bahamas Property Fund10.6310.630.000.0130.200817.71.88% 6.184.42Bank of Bahamas4.424.420.000.1530.10028.92.26% 0.580.18Benchmark0.180.180.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3 .492.70Bahamas Waste2.702.700.000.1680.09016.13.33% 2 .152.14Fidelity Bank2.172.170.000.0160.040135.61.84% 12.509.62Cable Bahamas10.2110.210.001.0500.3109.73.04% 2.842.36Colina Holdings2.402.400.000.7810.0403.11.67% 7.005.40Commonwealth Bank (S1)6.856.850.004510.4880.26014.03.80% 3 .651.63Consolidated Water BDRs2.062.080.020.1110.04518.72.16% 2.551.40Doctor's Hospital1.401.400.000.1070.11013.17.86% 6 .995.47Famguard5.475.470.000.3570.24015.34.39% 10.207.23Finco6.516.510.000.2870.00022.70.00% 11.408.77FirstCaribbean Bank9.399.390.000.4940.35019.03.73% 5.513.75Focol (S)5.485.480.004,0000.4520.16012.12.92% 1 .001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 7 .405.00ICD Utilities7.407.400.000.0120.240616.73.24% 10.509.82J. S. Johnson9.829.820.000.8590.64011.46.52% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.001.2070.2008.32.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 9 9.4699.46Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029BAH2999.460.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +FBB13100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.00 5 2wk-Hi 5 2wk-Low S ymbol B id$ A sk$ L astPrice D ailyVol E PS$ D iv$ P /E Y ield FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%30 May 2013 20 November 2029F RIDAY, 11 FEBURARY 2011BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,472.37 | CHG 0.02 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -27.14 | YTD % -1.81B ISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basis)Maturity 19 October 2017 7%RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)29 May 2015 W W W.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-23201 9 October 2022 Prime + 1.75% P rime + 1.75% 6.95%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:7% Interest 5 2wk H i 5 2wk L ow S ymbol B id $ A sk $ L ast P rice D aily V ol E PS $ D iv $ P /E Y ield 10.065.01Bahamas Supermarkets5.016.0114.00-2.9450.000N/M0.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.350.400.550.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 Months %NAV 3MTH 1.51221.4076CFAL Bond Fund1.51795.51%6.90%1.498004 2.95272.8300CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.95270.18%1.61%2.918697 1.58091.5114CFAL Money Market Fund1.58080.43%4.59%1.550241 3.20252.8522Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund2.7049-0.56%-15.54% 13.638813.0484Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund13.41640.44%-0.10% 114.3684101.6693CFAL Global Bond Fund114.36849.98%12.49%109.392860 106.552899.4177CFAL Global Equity Fund106.55284.75%7.18%100.779540 1.14651.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.14655.20%5.20% 1.11851.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.11854.73%4.73% 1.14911.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.14915.35%5.35% 9.74859.1005Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 19.79504.85%5.45% 11.236110.0000Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 210.6417-1.20%0.50% 10.12669.1708Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 310.12661.27%1.27% 8.45104.8105Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund Equities Sub Fund8.45100.72%9.95% BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/MNot Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/200730-Nov-10 31-Jan-11 107.570619 105.776543 30-Jun-10 31-Dec-10 NAV 6MTH 1.475244 2.910084 1.533976TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752530-Nov-10 30-Sep-10 31-Jan-11 28-Jan-11 31-Jan-11MARKET TERMS31-Dec-10 31-Jan-11CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)31-Jan-11BISX Listed Mutual FundsNAV Date 30-Nov-10 31-Dec-10 5$1'2/3+%2:/,1RI /80%(552$'3%2;1$66$8%$+$0$6 Republicans: Report on financial crisis was biased NEW YORK Copper slipped Wednesday as businesses hold back on purchases because of higher prices. Some manufacturers have stockpiled inventories of copper. Others are cutting back on purchases or substituting different materials in certain applications. That has kept pressure on copper prices, which have traded in a narrow range between $4.226 a pound and $4.6285 a pound this year. CPM Group analyst Carlos Sanchez said he has seen similar trends in in other metals. There also are questions about whether copper demand may wane in China as it pushes measures to control inflation and the pace of its economic growth. Sanchez said he expects copper demand to remain strong, particularly in developing countries. The metal is used largely in consumer electronics, construction materials and transportation. Copper for March delivery fell 6.6 cents to settle at $4.47 a pound. In other metals trading, April gold added $1 to settle at $1,375.10 an ounce. In other March metals contracts, silver fell 6.7 cents to settle at $30.629 an ounce and palladium lost $1.55 to $838.35 an ounce. April platinum added $2.70 to settle at $1,834.30 an ounce and April gold added $1 to settle at $1,375.10 an ounce. In energy trading, oil prices rose after Israel's foreign minister claimed that Iran will send two warships through the Suez Canal on the way to Syria. The news added to tension in the region and "absolutely moved markets," according to PFGBest oil analyst Phil Flynn. Flynn said traders are worried that spreading unrest in the Middle East will disrupt oil production and shipments in the region. Benchmark oil for March delivery rose 67 cents to settle at $84.99 per barrel. In other Nymex trading, heating oil rose 4.58 cents to settle at $2.7748 a gallon and gasoline gained 5.59 cents to $2.5447 a gallon. Natural gas lost 5.5 cents to settle at $3.921 per 1,000 cubic feet. Grains and beans were mostly lower. In contracts for March delivery, wheat fell 3.25 cents to settle at $8.37 a bushel, corn was unchanged at $6.905 a bushel and soybeans lost 2 cents to settle at $13.66 a bushel. COPPER FALLS AS HIGH PRICES DISCOURAGE BUYERS BARACK OBAMA

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BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011, PAGE 11B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Clients never find fault with her because she is ever will ing to make whatever changes clients ask. No is not in her vocabulary. Often ignoring her better judgment, the Ella of Frell designer subjugates her design sense to the clients will in order to avoid displeasing them. She is always at the clients beck and call and has no problem carrying water. Anyone of these characters could be an extreme or small er version of yourself in each. If you wish to be an awardwinning designer, please yourself. But if you wish to be a well-paid designer, always please your client. We are all unique and special in our very own personality type. We must continuously strive to grow smarter in our expertise and, hopefully, wiser, as we are all artists and designers in our own humble right. Do you see yourself in any of these personality types? Are you a Picasso or a Cap tain Hook? What is your philosophy? Until we meet again, have fun, enjoy life and stay on top of your game? NB: The author welcomes feed back at: deedee2111@hotmail.com The personality behind design FROM page 2B SAM HANANEL, A ssociated Press WASHINGTON Are some companies weedi ng out job applicants just because they are unemployed? After news accounts about t he practice and requests from concerned lawmakers, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has jumped i n, trying to figure out whether it's a widespread tactic that could violate federal job dis-c rimination laws. C ommissioners at an EEOC hearing Wednesday said they are investigating whether excluding the unemployed may have a greater effect on blacks, Latinos and other ethnic minorities that tend to have higher jobless rates. There are no specific legal protections for the unemployed. "The potential for disparate i mpact is there," said William Spriggs, assistant secretary for policy at the Department of L abor. Overall unemployment is 9 percent, with nearly 14 million p eople out of work. The jobless rate is 15.7 percent among b lacks and 11.9 percent among Hispanics, according theB ureau of Labor Statistics. Spriggs said the chances of a n employer considering an ethnic minority are decreasedby one-third if jobless applic ants are excluded. The pool of disabled applicants would be reduced by nearly 50 percent, he said. T he EEOC, which enforces job discrimination laws, has not issued any guidance on the issue. But some on the fivemember agency suggested that could be coming. "I hope this gives our people in the field information to start thinking about a possible p roblem out there," said Stuart Ishimaru, one of three D emocrats on the commission. "For employers it raises seri o us question of liability if, in fact, there is a disparate i mpact." Spriggs said it would be diff icult for the government to measure the problem because most job openings are not post ed publicly. The Labor Department is aware of anecdotal reports that some recent company advertisements have dis-c ouraged the unemployed from applying. He said officials are concerned the practice could hamp er the government's efforts to help millions of unemployed get back to work. "It probably has a bigger impact in the current labor mar ket" given the current unem ployment situation, Spriggs s aid. Helen Norton, a professor at the University of Colorado law school, said employers and s taffing agencies have advert ised jobs in fields from electronic engineers to restaurant and grocery managers with the explicit restriction that only cur-r ently employed candidates would be considered. "Some employers may use current employment as a signal of quality job performance," Norton said. "But such a cor-r elation is decidedly weak. A blanket reliance on currente mployment serves as a poor proxy for successful job perform ance." Pr ominent In one prominent report last year, an advertisement fromS ony Ericsson, a global phone manufacturer that was recruit-i ng workers for a new Georgia facility, was restricted to those c urrently employed. The company later removed the restric t ion after media publicity. Christine Owens, executive director of the National Employment Law Project, said anecdotal evidence from job p ostings, conversations with job seekers and her interviews witho fficials at job placement firms suggests there may be a grow i ng trend of excluding unemployed applicants, regardless of their qualifications. "It's particularly significant that these representatives of s taffing agencies have said there seems to be a growing prac t ice," Owens said. Fernan Cepero, a spokesman f or the Society for Human Resource Management, said it takes an average of 27 days for an employer to fill an open position, and even longer for h igh-tech positions. Because open positions mean lost pro d uctivity, "screening out the unemployed is unproductive," h e said. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma J OBSEARCH: I n this photo taken Tuesday, Feb. 1, 2011, job seeker Rolando Cunanan leaves the Day Worker Center of Mountain View witho ut work in Mountain View, Calif. Are companies excluding jobless from applying? INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MARTIN CRUTSINGER, A P Economics Writer WASHINGTON Federal Reserve officials were slightly more optimistic last month about economic growth for this year than they were in November, reflecting expected gains in consumer and business spending from tax cuts. Fed officials said in an updated forecast released Wednesday that they think the U.S. economy will grow between 3.4 percent and 3.9 percent this year. That's an upward revision from their November forecast, which predicted gross domestic product will grow 3 percent to 3.6 percent. The latest outlook foresees little improvement in the unemployment rate. The central bank predicts that the rate, now at 9 per cent, will end the year at that level or possibly dip to 8.8 percent. The Fed doesn't expect the slightly faster growth to trigger high inflation. Its latest forecast is for prices to rise 1.3 percent to 1.7 per cent. That's only slightly more than its November projection, which expected consumer prices to increase 1.1 percent to 1.7 percent in 2011. Chairman Ben Bernanke and others on the central bank's inter est rate-setting panel remained cautious about how long it will take the economy to generate enough jobs to achieve normal unem ployment. The Fed defines that level as 5 percent to 6 percent. The Fed said it would take five to six years to lower the rate that much. Fed officials slightly more upbeat on economy

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The Tribune's R E L I G I O N S E C T I O N T H U R S D A Y F E B R U A R Y 1 7 2 0 1 1 PG 3 1 By ALESHA CADET T ribune Features Reporter T HE MINISTRY of Mime invites all to attend the first religious mime con ference the Bahamas has ever seen. Speaking w it h T ri bune Rel igi on m embers of the Mi me Mi n i st ry sai d that w hil e there have been dance confer en c es w h i ch i ncorpo r ated el ement s of mi me, and a fe w m ime works h ops, t here has never been a conf erence t hat is sol ely dedicat ed t o the art of mim e, especi al ly as a r eli gious mi nis try Th e S i len t T ra v a il M ime Co n fe r e n c e s t a r ts on Thurs day F ebr u a r y 24 at the Li fe C ha n g e rs M in is tri es I n te rn a tio n a l on B a c a r di Road. T he o peni ng i s f o l l o w ed by t wo days of t h e o r y and prac ti cal ses sions on Fr iday and S a t u rd a y On Sunday night t he conference w il l clos e wi th a fr ee concert ent it led "A Mi me' s W o r sh ip Ex p e ri en c e" a t th e Ba h a ma s H a r ves t Church on Pri nce Charl es Dri ve. The Kin gd om M ime M in istrie s alo n g wi th t h e Church Fami ly of Li fe C hangers Mini str ies Internat ional is prepari n g to host the event. Th e K in g d om M im e M in is tr ie s I n t e r n a tio n a l (K M MI ) is a co m mu n ity based ou t reach mi me troupe, w hose eight member s r e p r es en t vari o us c h ur ches and denominat ions. A c c o r ding to i ts mem b er s, the goal o f t he KMMI group i s fi rst t o glor if y God and secondly to becom e a p r oph et ic b l ess ing to t he body of C hris t. T h ey h av e ministere d thro ug ho ut the Baham as and the U n i ted Stat es usi ng t he a r t o f mi me. In addit ion, K MMI has conducted several t rai ning and mi me works h o p s T a v a r ri e Smi th o f the Mim e Mi nis try s aid: "It i s i mportant that w e po i nt out t his event takes pl ace duri ng t he m idterm break, s o we encour age p ar ents t o take advantage of thi s by get ti ng thei r ki ds i nvo l ved i n somethi ng posi ti ve duri ng t he vacat ion b r e a k f r o m s choo l T he Mi nis try of Mi me is wher e pers o ns si lent ly mi nist er the w o r d of God t hr o u g h d ra m at ic g e st u re s a n d a n im a te d f ac ia l e x p r ess ions. E ach m ini str y present ati on ai ms t o send a mess age of s alvat ion, deli verance and hope. W e at Ki n gdom Mime bel ieve t hat t he L o r d is call ing t ogether a Gideon' s Army of w o r shipper s as he pr e p a r es the body o f C h r is t for his r e t u r n. Also, we are doing our p a r t in the f ight agai nst c rim e by i nvolvi ng our youn g people in posit ive and charact er buil ding act ivi ti es. W e heard the visi on o f B ishop (Ne il ) El li s to buil d our nat ion as a spi ri tual oasi s t hrough the ini ti ati ve of r e l i gi ou s touri sm. On an ann ual basis t hou sands of p er sons meet in Nort h Carol ina f or the Me ga-Mime C o nferen ce, ma ny who come from south of u s here i n the B ahamas. W e' ve p ar t n e r ed wi th Paneh Mi me to host thi s regi onal ver sion of that conference thereby attracti n g r e l igious tourist h e r e to our shores, Mr Sm it h sai d. S pec ial guests inc lude popular go s pel c irc ui t tr av e llin g mim e m in is te rs P as to rs T i mothy a n d C h andra Midget te o f Paneh Mi me Mini str ies. Thi s husband and w if e te am ar e al so t he host s of t h e MegaMime Conf erence h el d i n N o r th Carol ina every year P er sons i nteres ted i n the m ime conference in N assau can regi st er at Reve lat ion C h r is ti an A p par el at the Mal l of Mar athon or at Li fe Changer s Mi nis tri es Inter n a t i o n a l on B a cardi Road ; th ey can a l so e-mail Ki ng d o mM im e @g ma il.c o m o r v is it th e Facebook page Ki ngdom Mi me Mi n i st ri es I n t e r nati onal. T H E B A H A M A S H O S T S I T S F I R ST R E L I G I O U S M I M E C O N F E R E N C E Kingdom Mime Ministries

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The T ribune PG 32 Thursday February 17, 201 1 RELIGION RE V Fr Se bast ian Campbell has s e r v e d t he Pa r ish o f All Saints on C a lvary Hill f or more than 20 years H e wa s p rie s t to the e nt ire com m uni ty i n the sou the rn distri ct of N e w Pr o v i d e n c e N o w he p r e p a r e s fo r a ne w cha ll en ge a s R e ctor of the Pari sh of St Gr e g o r y an d the C a r m icha e l com e Ap ril 1 Father C am pbell s aid he always w a nt e d t o be a p r iest; in f a c t the desir e for pr iesthood was s parked within him a t t he tender ag e of s ix whil e a t tending the St A n d r e w s Anglican C hurc h in Ar t h u r s T own, C at Is land und er the pastor a l le ader ship of the late Arc hdea c on Murillo B o n a b y The late B ishop Mic hae l E ldon, on t he advic e o f the vestr y appointed Father C am p be l l a s R e c t o r o f A ll S ai n t s N ovem ber 30, 199 0. Up to t h i s ti m e, t he pa r ish had experienc e d a r a pid s ucc ess ion of priest s. It appealed f or a rect o r to commit to s pen d quality time in the le aders hip of t he par ish. Ha ving ser v ed in this capacit y f or 20 years F a t he r Campbe ll has i nde ed fulf illed this r e ques t, pa r ish membe r s s aid. He was joined in minis try by his wif e Agatha, who is the paris h' s mus ic dir e c t o r and organist, his t wo chil dren Sebast ia n J r (bett e r known a s Sir B) Andr e e, and in r ec e n t t i m es h i s d au gh t e r i n l a w K imberly and g r and daughter Simone. P ar is h me mb e r s de s c r i be F a t he r C am pbell as someone w ho w a s a visiona r y f rom the v er y s tart. "H e w a s able t o provide da ily leaders hip that has launc he d t he p ar ish int o a n or bit unknown t o it befor e ," membe r s s a i d The o r dination of Rev Fathe r E Juli a n C a m pb e l l a n d R ev D ea c o n Al v ar d o Adder ley w ere cr ow ning moments for him, as the paris h had neve r a dvanc e d anyone f or the ordained ministr y Up o n ap p oi n t m en t t o t he p ar i s h, F a t he r C am pb e l l w as f ac e d w i t h t h e d au nt i ng t as k of pu r c h as i ng a s m uc h p r o p e r t y a s po s s i b l e ad j a c e nt t o t h e c h u r c h building and to proc eed w ith cons t r uc ting a state-ofthe art paris h c o mmunity c entre. Land w as purc ha s ed at a p r ic e of well over a qua r ter of a million dollars T he c om m un i t y c e n t r e w a s c on s t r u c t e d t h r ough self -help that was fueled by a C r us a de Drive'. W e bu i lt a s the money came in; it took m o r e than five ye ar s, but in the final a n al y s i s o n l y $6 0 0, 0 00 w a s b or r o w e d f r om the bank so as to c om plete t he details that couldn' t wait for the s low s t r eam of self-help. Overall it must have c ost approximately $ 2.5 million, the love o f feri ng f rom the faith ful pari shioner s and fr ie nds of the paris h. "Now All Saints c an boast of having t he l a r g est paris h c entre in the diocese, complete w ith a hall that seats 1,000 pa r ish o f f ices a nd r ooms for shor t t e r m r e n t a l s c apa ble of holding r e t r e ats sleepove r s, c urs illo w ee kends ect T he c h ur ch building was fully a ir -condit ione d, floor til e d, c e i ling redone and the s a me. The visi o n of the pari sh w a s only realis e d b ec ause of bold leade r ship," paris h m embers said. P r ogrammes and ministr ies f lourished duri ng his r e c t o r s h i p T h e r e was Cli nical Pastor a l E ducation ( CPE ), whic h pr ovide s training f or pers ons ventu ri ng i nt o p ast or al c are and c o u n s e ll i n g. I t i s c on s i d er ed a g r e a t launch int o ec ume nic al waters a s trainees f r om many c hurc hes m ake use of t his tr aining Another programme the medic al m is sionar y is now be ing launched. Parish members s aid: He w a s a m ember of the team that ma pped the path for C P E t o b e l au n c h ed i n C od r i n gt o n C o l l eg e o ur t h eo l o gi c al s em i na r y i n B ar bados Othe r ac hievemen ts o f thi s v i s i o n a r y w ill include the GEMS A w a r d s w h e r e paris h i one r s ar e known as ge ms of t h e pa r i s h ; e du c at i o n f o r m i ni s t r y ; D i s c i p l es o f C h r i s t in C o mm u n it y ( D O C C ) ; t h e f o r m at i o n o f t he S o u t h e a s t e r n Y ou t h Pionee r s ( SYP) ." Fathe r Campbe ll is c hairman of the C oun s el for Churc hes in s outheast N ew P r o vid enc e; c h air ma n of t he N at io nal H e r oes C omm i ttee. H e w as an inst r u c t o r at the Pr og r am me SUR E and chaplain of the Pr incess Mar g a r et Hospit a l Fathe r Campbell says he c redits his p a r ents the late Sebastian and Alm eta C a mpbell, his 10 siblings and the r e l a tives in his wider fam ily w ith his suc cess es in his minis try to his God. W i t h ou t t h em no n e o f t he ab o ve w ould be pos sible," he s aid. All Saints Parish bids far ewell to Father Sebastian Campbell T H E T ot al Y o uth C hurc h of B ah am as Fai th Mi nis tr ies i n coll abor ati on w i th C ol la ge E n tert ai nm en t a nd D J C ou nse ll or p r e se nts "N e ve r Kn ew A Lo ve Like This" a dra ma th at a dd resse s issue s suc h a s b r o ke n rel ati on ship s a nd do me stic v io l e n c e T h e thr e e p a r t p rese nta ti on w ill be h el d t o m o r ro w ni gh t at the Di pl om at C e ntre on C a rmi ch ae l Ro ad A d d i t i o n a l l y the S to p L ik in' M an' g an g, w ho sh ot t o lo c al fa me wi th t he ir on li ne v ide os, w i ll pre sen t a p la y en tit le d Wh at W ro ng W i th Lov e T o d a y Also sch ed ul ed for th e e v en t is D r Da ve B u r ro ws, c on side re d to b e o ne of t he fore mo st a ut hori tie s o n yo uth mi ni stry in the B ah am as. He w ill spe ak to t he t ee na ge a nd yo ung a du lt au die nc e me m be rs on the sub je c t of ho w to fin d lov e i n tod ay s w orl d. D r B urro w s u ses the ve rna c ula r of the y outh to i llustra te hi s p oin ts a nd al so o f fers in form ati on from se ve ra l b ook s he w r ote on the top ic s o f se x a nd da ti ng For mo re in form ati on c on ta ct TY C a t 4 61 -6 43 0 o r e-m a il d av yb @ co ral w av e. c om yo ut hal ive@b fm mm. com or t y c @ b f m m c o m N e v e r K n e w A L o v e L i k e T h i s F AREWELL: All Saints Parish' s celebrations of praise and thanksgiving for Father Sebastian Campbell' s 20 years of ministr y Celebrations were held on Friday Februar y 11, with a gospel concert and on Sunday Februar y 13, with a thanksgiving luncheon in the parish centre. POSITIVE: The T otal Y outh Church along with Collage Entertainment is hosting an event that will inspire young people to make positive changes in their lives.

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FOR too long family members have been thought of by the church as poten tial individual r ecruits. V ery little thought has been given to evangelise or nur tur e the family as a unit. The emphasis has been upon the indi vidual. The approach overlooks the fact that the primary instruction and strength for the Christian life stems not from the chur ch but fr om the family A study of the Sunday school pupils in a large church revealed that not one child from an unchurched home lasted through the entir e series of the depar tmental pr ogrammes from the primar y to the youth. Somewher e along the line every one of these childr en became a Sunday school drop-out. Such a startling statistic strong ly emphasises the overwhelming influ ence of the home. If the church is to disciple the individ ual family member it must do everything possible to Christianise the family as a whole. T h e r e are many ways in w hich the churches of our nation can incorporate a focus on the family unit into its pr ogrammes and activities. The importance of "togetherness" of the family is much better demonstrated than verbalised. The practice of a pastor in meeting the needs of his own family speaks much mor e loudly than any seminar on the sub ject. Here are some ways that family unity can be str essed by practical demonstra tion in our chur ches: Encourage families periodically to sit together during worship services. Invite ladies to attend special men' s meetings and vice versa. Allow wives or husbands of boar d members to attend certain board meet ings. Sponsor a "Family of the Month". Sponsor periodic family retreats or camps. Promote an annual "Family W eek" to focus on the importance of the home. Plan recreational and social activities i n w hi ch t h e f a mi l y c an p ar t i c i p a t e together R em e m be r t h a t th e f am i l y i s o u r nation' s greatest asset; let us guard it car efully The T ribune Thursday February 17, 201 1 PG 33 RELIGION Emphasis on the family unit BISHOP V G CLARKE TH E Unit y Cent re of Li ght pr e s e n t s t he l ates t ed itio n of S pir itual Cinema thi s S u n d a y f ea t u r i n g t w o m o vi e s T h e G r a f f iti of M r T upaia" and "The Cake E a t e r s Th e doub le-bi ll on e sho rt fil m and o ne f ulllength st art s at 5pm. For a d onatio n o f $10 po pcorn and a dri nk are i n c l u d e d Th e m ovies will b e s creened at the cent r e located in t he G ray' s Mus ic Cent re b uildi ng on #16 Eas t A ven ue, C en tr e v i l l e THE C AKE EA T E R S ( 2 0 0 7 ) st ars T w i l i g h t s Bella, ac t res s Kris ti n Stewar t, an d Br u c e D e r n ( M ons ter Mu lholl and Dr ive, Big L ove) T he fi l m i s a co mi ng of age dr a ma whi c h explor es t he new ( and o ld) c o nnect ions bet w een two s malltown f amilies A young woman with a degener ative d iseas e feels s he has no t ime to los e in b ec om ing a w o man w h ile a y o ung man s t r u g g l e s t o r e c o n ci l e h i s f at h er a n d b ro t h e r Th e mo vie is 95 min utes l ong an d n ot r ecommend ed for child ren as it c o ntain s s om e a d ul t l an gu ag e a n d s e xu a l e le m e n t s THE GRA FFITI O F MR TUP A I A (2008) is a s h o r t fi lm that t ells th e s tor y of a j anito r a t an el ementar y s c h ool i n New Zealand w ho qu ietly goes th rou gh hi s r o u t i n e s a l mos t invi sib le to thos e ar ound him. One day Mr T up aia an i mmigr ant c lean er at a Cook I sl and schoo l an swer s a s tar tlin g mes sage fr om a mys ter iou s w r iter in a b athr oom s tal l. Th rou gh fou r w o r ds s c r ibb led o n a wall, two l onely sou ls con nect. T he movie was writ ten b y Paul W a r d a n d dir ected by Chr is toph er Du dman. R u ntim e is 14 minut es. T w i l i g h t s t a r t o b e f e a t u r e d i n N a s s a u s S p i r i t u a l C i n e m a CHAMPION, Wis. Associated Press THE V atican has named a tiny shrine in a small northeast W isconsin town as a holy site. The Catholic Church has recognised the chapel in Champion near Green Bay as the location of an of ficial sighting of the V irgin Mar y WTMJ AM says it is the only site in the country with that distinction. Green Bay Bishop David Ricken says t he V i r gin Mar y app eared ther e thr e e times to Belgium immigrant Adele Brise in 1859. Devotees have since visited the site to pray for miracles. Ricken star ted investigating the events and thr ee theological experts soon picked up the work. After two years of poring over letters and documents, experts decid ed her claims wer e true. The V atican vali dated those r esults in December Catholic leaders declare new holy' site in US ST AR A TTRACTION: Kristin Stewart attending the T wilight Saga Film New Moon photocall at the Crillon Hotel in Paris, France on November 10, 2009. (Wikimedia Commons) Statue of the Virgin Mar y

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Psalm 10 7: 20: "He sen t h is wo r d and heal ed th em, and d el ivered th em fro m t hei r d e s t ru c t i o n s T H E RE i s heali ng in Hi s w ord ; if yo u ca n ju st recei v e an d b elieve His wo rd th e m i ra c ulo us he a li ng pow e r of G od ( Y ah weh ) i s avail a b l e to yo u. T he greatest hi nd ran ce to Go d' s heali n g po wer is do u bt an d u nb elief W e r e livi ng in a day and time wh ere th e e n emy h as pu ll ed o ut all o f h is d e cei v i n g tri cks a n d gimmick s, th ereby cau sin g man y well -mea n in g sai nt s to l ive b eneath th eir God o rd ain ed pr ivil e ges and b en e f its S a t a n s chi ef co u rier f or hi s d ece p ti ve tacti c s is (erro neo us reli g i o us teachi ngs) wh ich i n mos t cases are carri e d ou t b y ma n y religi ou s lead ers, wh o d o n' t righ tl y di vid e th e w ord o f tr u t h S ain ts, pl ease hear me! E ith er Go d' s w o r d i s rea l tru e o r it s no t. Th e t ime has come fo r u s to sto p p layin g chu rch and b e th e ch urch t hat' s b rin gin g glo ry an d h on o ur to Hi s n ame C o n t r a r y t o c om pro mi si ng r e l i g i o u s belie fs; th e re i s (Gre ek: d unam i s prono u nced d oo 'nam-i s) wo rk in g po wer i n th e wo rd o f God W at ch th is! M atth ew 8 : 8: "Th e cen tu rio n an swer e d a n d sai d, Lo rd I am n o t w ort hy th a t th o u sho u ld est co me u n der my roo f: bu t sp eak th e wo rd o nl y an d my servant sh all b e healed ." Un bel ief and reli g i ou s sti nk i ng th in ki n g has a way of h in deri ng th e po wer o f God t h e re f o r e i t' s o f th e u tmos t imp o rtance t hat th ose who m yo u are co nn ected to sp iri tu ally b e a peo pl e o f faith th at' s if you 'r e e xp ectin g a move of Go d. M atth ew 13: 58: An d h e d id n ot man y might y wo rk s t here becau se o f t hei r u n bel i e f T h r o u g h o ut t he scrip tu res we see wh e r e Y ah sh ua Messi a h (Jesus th e Ch ri st) wo ul d oft en t ake only thre e of Hi s disc iple s ( P e t e r Ja mes an d Jo hn ) wi th Hi m w hen a deman d was pl ace d up o n His ano i nti n g (Lu ke 8:51, 9:28). Co u ld i t b e t hat th ese th ree d isci p les' bel ief system was at a h igh er level th an th e o t h e r s ? On e o f th e many tragedi es t hat p lagues t o d a y s ch u rch is t hi s: Th e po wer o f th e Gosp el is bei ng comp ro mised d a i ly by th e in comp let e reli g i o us p rosp erit y go spel T he p rimary teach in g s of th e p o werless c h u r ch t od ay co ncern th e fi nan cial ma t eria l bless in g s a n d po s se ssion s ye t ma n y sain ts are p r e m a t u r ely d yin g fro m all k in ds of si ckn esses a n d d iseases. Can God (Y ahw e h ) h eal d iseases su ch as A I D S can ce r l u pu s, leu k e mi a, e t c? Y es, He can But t he pro b lem i s no t wit h God it' s wi th o ur bel ief s y s tem, o u r l a ck o f f a i t h H e re s a powerful qu e stio n that wa s a s ked an d th en p rof ou n dl y ans wer e d James 5:14-15: "Is an y s ick a mo n g yo u ? let h im ca l l fo r th e eld ers o f the ch urch ; an d let them pray o ver h im, ano in ti ng h i m wit h oi l in t he name o f th e L ord And th e p ray er of faith sh all sav e th e si ck, a n d th e Lo rd shal l raise h im up ; an d i f he h a ve commi tted si ns, t hey s hall b e f or g i ve n hi m." T he p ro bl em wi th to d ay s chu rch i s t hat i t s f il led wi th reli g i ou s in vesti g at ors t hat spen d time t a l ki n g ab o ut th e s ick ness, after wh ich a w a t ered d o wn, weak p rayer is o ff e r ed wi th t hi s ki nd of e n d in g, "Lo rd, if i t s yo ur wil l". W h e r eas h ea l in g fo r th e sick is ma n i feste d where th e sp iri tu a l ly matu re, eld ers o f th e ch urch pray the pr a yer of f a i th T he lack of f aith has b ro ugh t abo u t an accept abl e co mpr omi se an d q uest io ni n g o f G o d s wo rd wit hi n th e chu rch in as much th at i t' s read ily expect e d fo r p erso ns w ho a r e st rick en wi th any fo rm o f t e r min a l i ll n ess t o d ie. A gain h er e s wh at the scrip tu re s a ys; P salm 10 7: 2 0: He sen t hi s wo rd, and h e aled them, an d d elivere d th e m fr o m the i r de s tr uc ti ons ." A nd Ps a lm 1 03 : 3 : "Wh o f orgi v et h all th in e i ni q ui ties; w ho h ea l eth all t hy di sease s ." Fo r th e New T estament ch ur ch, h er e s wh at th e Bi bl e says con cerni n g th e wo rd th at was sent ; Joh n .1:1: "In th e b e gi nn in g was th e W o r d and th e W o r d was wi th Go d, an d th e W o r d w a s Go d. A n d 1 Joh n 4: 10 : "He r e i n i s lo ve, n o t th at we l oved Go d, b u t t hat he lo ve d us, an d sen t h is S on to be th e pr op it iati on fo r o ur si ns. Sai nt s, if you 're g o i ng t o d ou bt an ythi n g mak e su re t hat you do u bt yo ur d ou b ts and n ot th e word o f Go d; bet ter sti ll, d ou b t yo ur r e l igio n and eve r y t hi ng t hat d o esn' t l in e u p wit h God s w ord co n cerni ng y o u r h e a l i n g H e re s w hat Isai ah (53:5) says, B ut h e was wo u nd ed fo r o ur t ra n sgressi on s, h e was b rui sed fo r ou r in iq u iti es: th e ch asti semen t o f ou r peace was up o n hi m; and wi th h is stri p e s we a r e h e al e d He sen t h is wo rd Now it s u p to you t o re cei ve a n d b elieve Hi s wo r d For q uest ions and co m men t s contact us via e-m ail s:pastor mall en@yaho o. com or kmf ci@l i ve.com o r t elephon e numbe r 1-242 4 4 1 2 0 2 1 P astors Matt hew and Br en dal ee A l len K ingdom Mi nded Fell owshi p C en t re I n t e r n a t i o n a l The T ribune PG 34 Thursday February 17, 201 1 RELIGION He sent his word! P ASTOR MA TTHEW ALLEN By P ASTOR GLEN P ROLLE Hillside Restoration Centre THE impact Herod would have had on the psyche of all of Jer usalem was quite intriguing. And as wise men told Herod of the star they saw (representing another or new system of governance) and the fact that they had come to acknowledge the dawn of a new day not only terrified Herod, but all of Jer usalem with him. As a matter of fact, that singular inci dent alone is but a reminder of the kind of impact that those entr usted with leader ship can have on its citizenr y Go bring me words that I too may go and worship him; I too may pay tribute and salutation to this new system of gov er nance. After all it was not to Her od's pleasure that a system of governance had emerged right in his backyard. For Her od the existence of another king meant an end to his tyranny and selfinterest style of governance. T h e a n no u n cem e nt o f a n e w ki n g, though still in embryonic form, was to be such a transformative force that not even the strength of the "Herodic" system of governance would be able to withstand the new culture about to emer ge. H e r o d u nd e r s t o o d t ha t s uc h an an nou nce men t m ean t t hat wit h eve r y new king or ruler was to come a mor e defined culture that r epresented a rejec tion of what was. He also understood that a community people and nation were to take on the spirit, nature, values and cul tur e of its king or ruler When the right eous are in authority the people r ejoice. It is critical therefore that we appreci ate the implications of national leader ship and its impact on the psyche and mannerisms of us as a people. Ri g ht e ou s l ea de r s h ip t he n m u s t b e m e a s u r e d i n wo r d s an d m a nn e r i s m s Righteous leadership keeps in perspec tive its primar y responsibility of ser ving those who are least amongst us. Righteous leadership knows the weight of gover nance and therefor e is both gra cious and compassionate, otherwise gov er nance becomes oppressive to its people. Righteous leadership appreciates that governance is best for the people when the burdens of governance ar e shar ed or carried by those who govern rather than placed on the people. For Herod, hearing such an announce ment of a righteous king meant an end to his self-ser ving rulership. When the righteous are in authority the people rejoice and they actively par tici pate in the building of their nation, help ing to bring the dawn of a brand new day Righteous authority Pastor Glen P Rolle S a i n t s i f y o u r e g o i n g t o d o u b t a n y t h i n g m a k e s u r e t h a t y o u d o u b t y o u r d o u b t s a n d n o t t h e w o r d o f G o d ; b e t t e r s t i l l d o u b t y o u r r e l i g i o n a n d e v e r y t h i n g t h a t d o e s n t l i n e u p w i t h G o d s w o r d c o n c e r n i n g y o u r h e a l i n g 02172011 CSEC RELIGION-2 2/16/11 10:09 PM Page 4

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The T ribune Thursday February 17, 201 1 PG 35 RELIGION By MINISTER KEVIN L A EWING E V E R Y D A Y it s ee m s to be a st ru gg l e t o l iv e es pe c i al l y w i th th is b ru ta l e c o no m ic c ri si s lo om i ng ov e r ou r h ea d s. Y e t, I h av e o b se rv ed t w o di sti n c t o c c u rre n c e s t ha t h av e e n li g ht e ne d m y u nd e rst a nd in g t o a gr ea t e r r e a l i t y The f irs t on e is, C h ris ti an s a re suf f e r i n g t he sa m e fa te l ik e e ve ry o ne e l se du ri ng t hi s e c o no m ic do w nt ur n, s uc h a s ho me f o re c l o s u r e s, ba n kr u p t c y m a rit a l p r o b l e m s d ue t o in su ff ic i e nt o r l a c k of fi n an c e s a n d t he li st g o es o n. S e c o n d l y e v en th ou g h C hri st ia n s h a ve p ra c ti c e d t he bi b li c a l p ri nc i pl e s su c h a s tit hing, giving and off erin gs, i t would a p pe a r a s i f t he b ib li c a l p ri nc i p le s h a ve e i th er fa i le d t he m or se e m s a s if th e y 're d oi n g so m et hi n g w ro n g w h i c h c a us in g t he p ri nc i pl e s to b e o f n o e ff e c t. My qu es ti on to Go d a n d to my se l f fo r tha t ma tter w as, W ha t is h app eni ng'? A sid e fro m a l l o f th e a b ov e t he re a re th ose w h o do n t se rv e G o d, s ee m in g ly pr ac t ic e n on e of h is p ri nc i p le s, b ut y et th e y 're p r o s p e rin g a nd l iv i ng i n a b un d an c e d uri n g t hi s v i c io us e c on o mi c c ri si s. S om e th in g i s f un d a me n ta ll y w ro n g he re a nd c l e a rly t he re m us t be a n a ns w er The B ib le c om ma n ds th a t w e w al k by f ai th a n d no t by s ig h t ( 2 C or in th ia n s. 5 : 7) which is a gener al command to all C h ri sti a ns, h o w ev e r G od h a s r ev e a le d t o m e th at a ll th a t a re de st in e d f or g r e a t n e s s a n d ha v e be e n c a l le d f or g re a te r w o rks w i l l b e fo rc e d to w a l k by f a it h ra th er th a n gi v e n t he op ti o n o f l ea v i ng th e w a lk of fa it h t o t he in di v id u al di sc r e t i o n A t fi rst th is w a s k in d o f c o nf us in g t o m e be c a us e I h a ve b ee n to ld th at Go d d oe s n ot vi o la te on e s f re e do m of c h oi c e b ut a s h e be g a n t o sh ow m e th ro ug h th e sc r ip tu r e s th e m y ste ry w a s i m me d ia te l y t ra ns fo r m e d in to a re v e la ti o n th a t c on se qu e nt ly m ad e me no t o nl y ap p re c ia te b ut a c c e p t w h at ot he r s and myself a r e presently going t h r ou g h, w i th a n un de rs ta nd i ng th a t th e re is p ur po se f ue l li n g a ll of i t w i th ou t v io l at in g a n y o n e s fr ee d om of c h o ic e N o w t o w a l k b y fa it h l i te ra ll y me a n s to w al k in h ar mo ny w i th G od s w o rd as it pe rta in s t o o ur c i rc u mst a nc e s a nd da i ly l iv i ng Fo r e x a mp l e w he n o th e rs w ron g u s, w a l kin g b y fa i th d ic t a te s t ha t w e s ho ul d d ea l w it h t he m w it h l ov e in sp it e o f w h a t t he y ma y h a ve do ne t o us a nd a l so pr ay fo r th em O f c ou rse th is i s m o re e a si ly sa id t ha n do ne t he r e f o r e mo st C h ris ti an s c om p romi se i n a re a s s uc h a s th i s b e c au se th er e a re no d em a nd s ma d e on th e m in r e g a r d to w al k in g b y f a it h. O n t he ot he r h an d th e C hri st ia n t ha t h a s be e n c ho se n fo r g re at ne ss d oe s no t ha v e a c ho ic e i n th e m a tte r fo r e x a m pl e i n th e ti th e p ay i ng a l w a ys g iv i ng p u tti n g o th er s ab o ve se l f. A s a n e xa m pl e : A C h ri sti a n w ho h a s fa c e d fi n an c i al di f f i c u l t y bu t th e re i s no on e t o he l p hi m a n d al l t he sou rc e s of h e lp th at w e re on c e a v ai l ab le t o h i m h a ve e i th e r be e n shu t do w n or th es e sa me so u rc e s a re in a si mi l ar p os it io n. N ow t he re a li ty is t hi s, do e s t hi s C hr ist i an be c o me c on fu se d? Y e s Do e s t hi s C h ri sti a n ge t a ng ry w i th G od ? Y e s! D oe s h e fe e l a s i f t hi s C hri st ia n w a lk p r o d uc e s mo re p ro bl e ms th a n sol u ti on s? Y e s! Do e s h e f e el a s i f ev e ry o ne i s g et ti ng a h ea d e x c e pt hi m? Ag a i n y es H o w e v e r w ha t se t s t hi s C hr ist ia n a p a rt f r om th e o th e rs, is t ha t w h e n (n ot if ) a l l o f t he a b ov e m e nt io ne d sc e n a rio s ex p ir e, t hi s C h ri sti a n be c o me s c og n is an t of t he fa c t t ha t w a lk i ng by fa it h h as z e ro t o do w it h hi s f ee l in g s. T o t hi s e n d, th e re is n o op ti on fo r h im so h e is f or c ed to c on ti n ue w a lk i ng by f ai th a n d n o t b y si gh t or by w h a t h e fe e ls w i th ou t h is f re ed o m to c ho os e b ei n g v io l at e d No w r e m e m b e r w a l ki n g by fa i th a n d no t b y s ig h t is t o w a l k a c c o rdi n g t o G od s i n s t r u c ti on s o r h is w or d a n d n o t a c c or d i n g t o h ow th in g s a pp e ar or ho w w e fe e l T h e r e f o r e th i s C h ris ti an w h o i s f or c ed t o w a l k by f a it h du e to t he fa c t th at h e i s d e stin ed f or great nes s has been clearl y e q ui pp e d w it h kn o w le d ge to se e t he b i gg e r p i c t u r e of h is si tu a ti on a nd t ha t kn o w le d ge i s Go d i s in c on tr o l Go d i s i n c o nt rol a s is fr eq u en tl y s ta te d b ut v e ry fe w u n de rst a nd t he m e an i ng o f t hi s sta t em e nt ; i t i mp l ie s th a t h e i s su pe r v i s i ng th e g o od an d t he ba d in o u r li v es L e t s re a d t he bi bl i c a l pr oo f of th is. The bo ok of (Psalms 6 6:1 0-1 2) r e ads: For t ho u, O G od h a s pr ov e d u s: t ho u h a ve t rie d u s, a s si lv e r is tri e d. Th o u b ro ug h t u s i nt o th e n e t; t ho u l a id a f fl ic t io n u po n ou r l oi n s. Th ou h a v e c a use d m e n to ri d e ov e r our h eads; we went t hro ugh f ir e and t h r o u gh w a te r: b ut th o u b ro ug h t u s o ut i nt o a w ea l th y p l ac e W ow W h at a n e y e o pe n er as y ou ve re a d f ol k s, G o d i s th e o n e i n c o nt ro l h e r e n o de v i l, d e mo n o r w it c hc ra f t w ork e r i s d oi n g th i s to y o u. Th e w or d i s un e qu i vo c a ll y c le a r; th ou me a ni n g Go d hi m se lf is th e o ne t es ti ng p r o v in g an d a l lo w i ng ot he rs to r id e o v e r yo u o nl y t o b ri ng y ou w h o i s tra n sfo r m i n g in to th e g re a tn e ss t ha t h e h a s c a ll e d y o u, to ma k e i t th rou g h th e se c h a ll e ng e s in to yo u r w ea l th y p la c e o r p l ac e of a bu n da n c e a nd li mi t le ss r e s o u r c e s F ol ks t he w o rd s o f w i sd om f or to da y a re sim p ly th is, Go d w il l n ot p ut n e w w i ne in to ol d w in e sk in s ( Ma tt he w 9 : 1 7) Thi s h i nt s th at he w il l n ot b ri ng y ou to t ha t p r e p a re d w ea l th y pl a c e w i th ou t t ra ns fo rmi n g yo u r mi nd f ro m th a t o l d mi nd se t th ro ug h l if e' s c ha l le n ge s a n d d if fi c ul ti e s w h ic h he is c e rta in l y i n c o nt rol of F or q ue s ti o n s e -m a i l K e v i n e wi n g@ c o r a l w a v e c o m A m I b e i n g f o r c e d t o w a l k b y f a i t h ? Minister Kevin Ewing CONFIDENCE Insurance Agency Staff at St George's Anglican Church Worship Service, giving God thanks for the past year and pray ing for his blessings and guidance for 2011. (far left) Reverend Kingsley Knowles, rector; Jerome Knowles, managing director of Confidence Insurance, and (far right) Reverend Andrew Toppin, assistant rector. CONFIDENCE INSURANCE P A YS VISIT ST GEORGE'S ANGLICAN CHURCH

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The T ribune PG 36 Thursday February 17, 201 1 RELIGION S c e n e s f r o m t h e f u n e r a l s e r v ice f or t he la t e B is h op M ic ha el H ar t l ey El d on t h e f i r s t B a h a m i a n A n g l i c a n B i s h o p o f t h e B a h a m a s T u r ks an d Cai co s H u n d r e d s a t t e n d e d t h e s e r v i c e a t C h r i s t C h u r c h Cat h ed r al on T u es da y t o pa y t r ib ut e t o Bi s ho p El do n B i s h o p E l d o n w a s o r d ai n ed a s d ea con in 1 95 4 an d as a pr i es t in 1 95 5. H e w a s c o n s e c r a t e d B i s h o p S u f f r aga n of N ew P r o v i d e n c e on J un e 2 4, 1 971 and b ec am e D i o c e s a n B i s h o p i n A p r i l 19 72, s er vi ng i n t h at c ap aci t y f or 2 4 ye ar s un t il h is r e t i r eme nt in 1 996 B is h op El do n al s o s e r v e d as t he f o un di n g cha ir m an of t he Col l ege of t he Bah am as ( C O B ) b o a r d o f d i r e c t o r s s e r v in g fr o m 19 75 t o 19 95. POPE Benedict XVI said he has been closely following the "delicate situation" in Egypt and is praying that the tr oubled countr y can find a peaceful solution to their political unr est. T h e P op e m ad e h is f ir s t co mm en t s about the massive protests against the E gy p t i an g ov er nm e n t at t h e A n g el u s Prayer on Sunday February 6. "I ask God that this land, blessed by the pr esence of the Holy Family may redis c ov er tr a nq u il it y a nd pe acef u l co ex is tence, in a shar ed commitment to the c o mm o n g oo d t h e P op e s ai d a s h e a d d r es s ed tho us and s of pil gri ms i n St Peter's Square. P o pe p ra y s f o r pea c e i n Egy pt GREEN balloons reading: "Y es to life" are held by pro-life movement activists during Pope Benedict XVI's Angelus prayer in St Peter's Square at the V atican, Sunday Februar y 6. The Pontiff says he is praying that Egypt can find tranquillity and peaceful coexistence. (AP) F UN E R AL S E RV I C E F O R T H E L AT E B I S H O P MIC HAEL EL D ON

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T H U R S D A Y F E B R U A R Y 1 7 2 0 1 1 T H E T R I B U N E S E C T I O N E T O DISCUSS ST ORIES ON THIS P A GE LOG ON T O WWW .TRIBUNE242.COM BY BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net O N t h e o c c a s i o n o f t h e 7 8 t h a n n i v e r s a r y o f t h e b i r t h o f D e a c o n L e v i t i c u s U n c l e L o u A d d e r l e y f o r m e r p r i n c i p a l o f S t A u g u s t i n e s C o l l e g e ( S A C ) a n d n a t io n al s p o r ti n g l e g e n d t h e S t A u g u s t i n e s C o l l e g e A l u m n i A s s o c i a t i o n ( S A C A ) w i l l b e p r e s e n t i n g t h e 5 t h v e r s i o n o f i t s a n n u a l r o a d r a c e n a m e d i n h i s h o n o u r T h e U n c l e L o u R o a d R a c e a n d W a l k w i l l t a k e p la c e o n M a r c h 1 2 th 2 01 1 Ac c o r d in g to B en s o n R u ss e l l P u b l i c R e l a t i o n s D i r e c t o r f o r S A C A t h i s ye ar th e r a c e w ill f o llo w a n e w c o u r s e t h a t i s d es ig n e d t o t e s t t h e s t am in a o f p a r t i c i p a n t s a s w e l l a s i n c r e a s e t h e f u n f a c t o r T h i s y e a r t h e r a c e b e g i n s a t R a w s o n S q u a r e an d en d s at S A C. R un n er s w i l l b e e x p e c t e d t o t r a ve r s e b o th P ar a d is e I s l an d b r i d g e s T h e t w i s t t h i s y e a r R u s s e l l s a y s i s t h a t w a l k e r s w i l l b e e n c o u r a g e d t o f o r m r e l a y t e a m s s o t h a t t h e p e r s o n w h o s t a r t s a t R a w s o n S q u a r e ma y no t n e c es s a r ily b e t he s a m e p e r s o n t h a t f i n i s h e s a t S A C T h i s r a c e i s a l l a b o u t s p e e d R u s s e l l s a i d F i r s t o n e t o t h e f i n i s h l i n e i n t h e f a s t e s t t i m e a n d i n y e a r s t o c o m e i t w i l l b e a l l a b o u t m a t c h i n g a n d o r b r e a k i n g p r e v i o u s s p e e d r e c o r d s W a l k i n g r e l a y t e a m s a r e a l s o e n c o u r a g e d s o t h a t t h e y t o o c a n b o a s t a b o u t t h e i r s p e e d w h i l e e n j o y i n g t h e w a l k F o u r y e a r s a g o S A C A b e g a n t h i s e v e n t a s a t o o l t o b r i n g S A C s o l d s c h o l a r s t o g e t h e r i n a f u n a n d f i t n e s s a c t i v i t y H o w e v e r t h e o r g a n i s e r s a r e i n t e n t o n m a k i n g t h e e v e n t o n e o f t h e p r e m i e r e v e n t s o n t h e a n n u a l f i t n e s s c a l e n d a r G e n o N a i r n P r e s i d e n t o f S A C A a d d e d t h a t U n c l e L o u w a s a s p e c i a l k i n d o f a t h l e t e a n d a r o l e m o d e l t o m a n y w h o p a s s e d t h r o u g h t h e h a l l s o f S A C N a i r n s a i d t h e r a c e i s t h e p e r f e c t w a y t o h o n o r a m a n w h o s p e n t h i s l i f e t e a c h i n g y o u n g p e o p l e h o w t o e x c e l a t e d u c a t i o n a n d s p o r t s N a i r n r e m e m b e r s t h a t o n e o f U n c l e L o u s f a v o r i t e s a y i n g s w a s t o s e t y o u r g o a l s h i g h a n d d o n o t c o m p r o m i s e y o u r v a l u e s a n d i n t e g r i t y I n t h e s p i r i t o f c o m p e titio n S AC A is i nv itin g a ll o l d s c h o l a r s o f S A C f i t n e s s g u r u s a n d a l l t r a c k a n d o r r u n n i n g c l u b s t o t a k e p a r t i n t h i s e v e n t T h e r a c e h a s m a l e a n d f e m a l e d i v i s i o n s f o r r u n n e r s a n d w a l k e r s a n d i n c l u d e s a l l a g e b r a c k e t s b e g in n i n g a t 1 5 an d u n d e r u p t o 5 0 a n d o v e r P o r t io n s o f t h e r a c e w i l l b e r e c o r d e d f o r a d o c u m e n t a r y t h a t w i ll b e a i r e d o n l o c a l t e l e v i s i o n W e w o u l d l i k e t o e n c o u r a g e e v e r y o n e t o j o i n u s i n t h i s w o r t h w h i l e v e n t u r e e s p e c i a l l y o u r S A C f a m i l y R u s e l l s t r e s s e d I t p r o m i s e s t o b e l o t s o f f u n an d p hy s ic all y r e wa rd in g. R e g i s t e r f o r m s w i l l b e a v a i l a b l e f r o m 2 1 s t F e b r u a r y a t S u b w a y P r i n c e Ch ar les D riv e a nd S u bw ay C ab l e Be a c h R e gi s tr a t io n f e e i s $ 1 5 SACA set to host Uncle Lou' Road Race and W alk By RENALDO DORSETT Tribune Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net O N E o f t h e m o s t d e c o r a t e d sw i mm er s i n Ba h am i a n h is tory w i ll j o i n a l i s t o f t h e m o s t n o t a b l e n a m e s i n A f r i c a n A m e r i c a n c u l tu r e w h e n sh e r e c e i v e s he r l a t e s t h o n o u r A l a n a D i l e tt e w i l l b e on e o f t w o a t hl e t e s r e c o g n i s e d fo r h e r c o nt r i b u t i o n s i n h e r s i g n a t u r e s p o r t a t t h e 2 5 t h A n n u a l B l a c k H i s t o r y In v i t a t i o na l S w i m M e e t, F e br u a r y 1 8 2 0 a t t h e T a k o m a A q u a t i c C e nt e r i n W a s h i n g t o n D C D i l l e te w i l l b e c e l e b r a t e d a l o ng w i t h M i c h a e l W r i g h t D i v i n g C h a m p i o n f or t h e U ni te d St a t e s A c c or di ng to i t s or g a ni si ng c om mi ttee the In vi ta tiona l wa s founde d w i t h t h e g o a l s o f p r o v i d i n g u rba n y out h nati on w i d e wi th a posi t i v e o u t l e t f o r e x p r e s s i o n e x p o sure to stron g compe t i tion, a f orum t o m e e t p os i ti v e r o l e m o de l s a nd the opportun i ty to vi sit the na t i on's c a p i t a l T h e m e e t w a s f o u n d e d b y t h e D e p a r t m e n t o f P a r k s a n d R e c r e a t i o n a n d t he U n i t e d B l a c k F u nd t he m e e t h a s g ro w n f r o m a s m a l l l o c a l c o m p e t i t i o n t o o n e n o w h a i l e d b y U S A S w i m m i n g t h e n a t i o n a l g o v e r n i n g b o d y f o r t h e spor t of sw i mm ing a s the "pr em ie r m i n o r i t y s w i m c o m p e t i t i o n i n t h e U n i t e d S ta t e s a nd i n th e W o r l d Gr ow n t o a n a n nua l e v e nt w h i ch f e a t u r e s h u n d r e d s o f m i n o r i t y sw i m me r s, ra ng i ng fr om a g e s 5 1 8 i t n o w f e a t u r e s s w i m m e r s f r o m a c r os s t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s In 1 9 8 9 i ts c om m i tt e e be g a n th e practic e h a s ch ose n courag eous a n d n ot a bl e A f r i c a n A m e r i c a ns w h o s e c o n tr i b u t i o ns a r e kn o w n th r o ug h out t he worl d to be re cogni ze d duri n g t h e w e e ke nd s e v e n ts I n h e r F r e s h m a n s e a s o n a t A uburn U n i v ersi ty, D il le tte' s t i me s i n t he 5 0 fre e and 20 0 ba ck set S E C s e a s o n -b e s t s a nd s h e a l s o c o m p e t e d i n t he 1 0 0 f l y a n d 2 0 0 I M a t th e U S. O p e n A s a s o p h o m o r e D i l l e t t e c o m p e t e d a t t h e N C A A C h a m p i o n s hi p s, a nd e a r ne d a n A l l -A m e r i c a hono ur in the 20 0 me dl e y re l a y. I n di v i d u a l l y a t N C A A s sh e f i n i s he d 2 3 rd i n t h e 1 0 0 b a c k, 4 0 th p l a c e i n t h e 1 0 0 f l y a n d a 5 8 t h p l a c e fi n i s h i n t he 5 0 f r e e A s a j uni or she ea r ned thr ee A ll A meri ca hon ors at t he 2 00 9 NCAA C h a m p i o n s h i p s D i l l e t t e t o o k f o u rt h i n t h e 1 0 0 fl y i n a t i m e t h a t r a n ks t hi r d a l l -t i me a t A u bu rn a n d w a s a m e m b e r o f t h e s c h o o l s Dilette to be honoured at Black History Invitational Swim Meet Alana Dilette SEE page 2E INSIDE International spor ts news NO DEAL FOR PUJOLS See stor y on pg 4E By RENALDO DORSETT Tribune Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net IN A t hird a nd d ec id ing g a me th at e x c e e d e d e x p e c t a t io n s, p e rf e c t sh o o ting from the field in overtime and a g r i t t y d e f en s iv e e f f o r t l e d t h e CR Walker Knights to their fourth con s e cu ti v e G SS S A S en i o r G i r l s b a s ketball title. T h e K n i gh t s c l i nc h ed t h e s e r i es when they edged out a 30-28 over ti me w in o ve r th e R .M Ba il ey P ac e rs last night at the K endal Is a acs Gymnasium. T h e K n i g h t s g o t a s i d e h i g h 1 1 points from Jonetra Kelly, Tameka Martin fi nishe d w ith 1 0 poin ts, whi le Christina Williams finished with six points and nine rebounds. The Pacers opened the over time period with a steal and layup from S ha n e ll Fra z i e r to t a ke a n e a rly 2 7 -2 5 lead. K e l ly re spo nd e d w it h a r un ne r a nd M a rt i n c o n v e rt e d a f a s t b re a k l a y u p t o give the Knigh ts t he lead for good in the final period. After she made one of two from the line to bring her team within a s i n gl e p o i nt t h e P ac er s N i ck et r ya G i lc ud wh o f in i s h ed wi t h a g am e h i g h 1 2 p o i n t s f o u l e d o ut o f t h e g a m e on the ensuing possession which left h e r t e a m wi t h o u t i t s b e s t s c o r i n g option down the stretch. Af t er Ke ll y ma de on e of t wo a t t he li n e t o gi ve th e K ni gh t s a t wo p oi nt l e a d, Fra z i e r, w h o fi n ish e d w i th seven points for the Pac ers faile d to respond on the op posite end w ith an opportunity to tie the game. Fr a zi er mi s s e d b ot h fr e e t h r ows with 8.3 seconds left to play and the K n i g h t s we r e a b l e t o r u n o u t t h e clock and claim the title. T he team that want it the mos t SEE page 3E G S S S A S E N I O R G I R L S B A S K E T B A L L A C T I O N Edge out Pacers in overtime

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SPORTS P AGE 2E, THURSDA Y FEBRUAR Y 17, 201 1 TRIBUNE SPOR TS T O DISCUSS ST ORIES ON THIS P A GE LOG ON T O WWW .TRIBUNE242.COM BY BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net T H E B a p t i s t S p o r t s C o u n c i l opened its 2011 Rev. Dr. David S. Johnson Basketball Classic on Sat urday at the Baillou Hills Sporting C o m p l e x w i t h t w o o f t h e t h r e e d e f e n d i n g c h a m p i o n s c o n t i n u i n g where they left off last year. I n t h e 1 5 a n d u n d e r d i v i s i o n M a c e d o n i a b l a st e d L a t t e r D a y S a i n t s 3 7 -1 6 w hi l e Te m p le Fe l lo w sh ip he l d o ff Gol den Gate s No. 1 3 8-3 1. In ot h e r g a m e s p la y e d, Ma c e do n i a d e f. C hr is ti an Ta be r na c l e 5 4 -4 7 (1 9 ); M ac ed o ni a d e f L a t t er D ay 43 38 (M); Latter-Day nipped Mt. Tabor 26-25 (19); Temple Fellowship def. Mt Pleasant Green 49 2 6 (19) and Fi rs t B ap tist d ef. g old en Ga tes No. 2 32-22 (M). Her e's a s ummar y of the games played: MACEDONIA 37 LATTER-DAY SAINTS 16 T h e c o m b o f S t e v e n M i t c h e l l T eric o Strac han a nd Da von A dde r ley all s c or ed eight, Dezon Taylor h ad six, A aro n C am pbell f ive and Jimi co Brow n four as the defe nding 1 5 -a n d -u n de r c ha m p i on s p u ll e d o f f a ro u t J a m a l S i m o n h a d s i x a n d L o g a n Harris added four in the loss. MACEDONIA 54 CHRISTIAN TABERNACLE 47 Karon Pratt had a game high 26 po in ts, Ra sh ad Kn ow l e s h a d sw e ve n an d The ro n Tay l or ad de d fi ve in t he win for Macedonia's 19-and-under. Christian Tabernacle got 16 from L Collie and 11 from R Smith. Mace d on i a 4 3 L a tt e r-D a y Sa i n ts 3 8 : D i no Flo w ers sco red 1 0 Ca rson S au nde rs and Rashad Know les b ot h had nine an d Baccus Roll e chip ped i n wit h s e ve n in t h e m en s vi c t or y Al c ot F o x s c o r e d 1 2 a n d L l o y d B a i l e y helped out with 11 in the loss. LATTER-DAY 26 MT. TABOR 25 L loy d Bai le y s cor ed 12 A lco tt Fox had seven and Gino Ferguson a dde d f iv e in t he w i n fo r t he 1 9 -a nd under. Jorann Adderley had eight, Deniro Moss had seven and David Kemp had five in the loss. TEMPLE FELLOWSHIP 49 MT. PLEASANT GREEN 26 G a b b ie La u re n t h a d 1 3 B ra s ha w n White had eight and Trevor Smith, Ke v in B urrow s an d J o hna tha n Go rdon all had six in the 19-and-under w i n A a ro n C a s h h a d a g am e h ig h 1 5 an d Anto nious C olli e added nin e in the loss. FIRST BAPTIST 32 GOLDEN GATES NO.2 22 C a d r o n F er g u s o n s co r ed e i g h t Cr u z S i m o n h ad s e ve n a n d T o n y Williams chipped in with six in the men's win. Ted Rolle had seven in the loss. TEMPLE FELLOWSHIP 38 GOLDEN GATES NO.1 31 J oh n S mi t h h ad 10 Ke vi n Bu r r o w s s i x I a n P i n d e r a n d G a b b i e Lau rent b oth had f ive a n d Tr evor Smith and Jason Cooper both had fo ur i n the m en's victo ry. Kr is to ff Stuart scored 11, Wayde Higgs had n i n e a n d D e w a d e Mu r ra y a d d e d s e v en in the loss. SATURDAY'S SCHEDULE Field one 10 a.m. Temple Fellowship vs St. j ohn 's (15 ); 11 a. m. C hri stia n Tab ern a c l e v s L a t t e r D a y S a i n t s ( 1 5 ) ; no on M t T ab or v s G ol de n Ga te s (19); 1 p.m. Mt. Pleasant Green vs Latter-Day Saints (19); 2 p.m. Latter-Day Sai nts vs F i r st B aptist (M) ; 3 p.m. Chris tian Tabernacle vs Golden Gates (M). Court two 1 0 a .m S t. P au l' s vs G ol de n G at es (15); 11 a.m. Golden Gates vs Mt. N e b o ( 1 9) ; n o on Ma c e d on i a v s F a it h United (19); 1 p.m. Temple Fellow ship vs Christian Tabernacle (19); 2 p.m. Golden Gates No.2 vs Temple F e l l o w s h i p ( M) ; 3 p m Ma c e d o n i a v s Church of the Nazarene (M). N e w s e a s o n u n d e r w a y f o r R e v D r David S. Johnson Basketball Classic recordbre aking 2 00 m edle y rel ay that fi ni s he d s e c o n d Wh en D il l e tte w a s he a ded i nto he r s e n i o r y e a r a t A u b u r n l e a d i n g t h e te a m i n th e 1 0 0 a n d 5 0 m e t r e s b u tt e rfl y, w a s the sec on d fa st e st 10 0 ba ck a n d f ou r t h f a s t e s t i n b ot h t h e 5 0 a n d 1 0 0 f r e e w h e n s h e g o t t h e n e w s i n S e p t e m b e r t h a t s h e w o u l d n o t b e a l l o w e d t o c o m pe te d ue to a c o a c hi n g e r r o r du r i n g h e r r e d s hi r t fr e s hm a n s e a s on T h e 2 3 -y e a r -o l d h a s c om p e te d fo r th e B a h a m a s fo r y e a r s o n t he i nt e r n a t i o n a l s t a g e e v e r y t h i n g r a n g i n g fr o m th e C a r i ft a G a m e s t o t h e P a n A m G a m e s a n d t h e S u m m e r O l y m p i c s i n 2 0 0 8 In 20 0 7, Di le tte Al ic ia L ig htb ourne A r i a n n a V a n d e r p o o l W a l l a c e a n d N i k i a D e v e a u x s w a m t o a b r o n z e m e d a l f i n i s h i n t h e P a n A m e r i c a n G a m e s, th e c o u n tr y s h i g h e s t m e d a l fi ni s h a t a n e v e nt o f th a t m a g n i t u de D i l e t te i s t h e h o l d e r o f fo u r i n d i v i d u a l B a h a m i a n N a t i o n a l r e c o r d s a n d a sh a re h ol de r of th re e a d di ti o na l r e c or d s a s a r e l a y t e a m m e m b e r S h e b e c a m e t h e r e c o r d h o l d e r o f t he 2 0 0 m B a c k st r ok e i n J un e o f 2 0 0 7 w i t h a ti m e o f 2 : 2 1 3 2 s a t t h e C h a r l ot t e U n t ra s w i m J u s t a y e a r l a t e r i n h e r d e b u t O l y m p i c a p p e a r a n c e D i l e t t e s e t a n e w m a r k o f 1 : 0 2 5 6 s i n t h e 1 0 0 m B a c k s t ro k e a n d a t t h e F I N A W o rl d C ha m p i o ns h i p s i n 2 0 0 9 s h e s e t n e w n a t i o n a l r e c o r d s i n t h e 5 0 m b a c k stroke i n 2 9. 83 s a nd the 5 0m B utt e rfly i n 2 7 0 7 s. A l s o a t th e F I N A W or l d C ha m p i o n s h i p s D i l l e t t e a l o n g s i d e A L i c i a L i g h tb o u r n e A r i a n n a V a n d e r p o o l Wa l la ce and Te i sha Li g ht bourne se t a n e w m a r k i n t h e 4 0 0 m M e d l e y i n 4 : 1 5 5 9 s a n d a t t h e W o r l d L C C ha m p i on s h i ps t he t e a m a g a i n s e t a ne w r ec ord i n the 4 0 0 m Fr ee s tyl e 3: 4 8 .3 4 s. D i l l e t t e a nd h e r S w i f t S w i m C l u b te amma tes Mic kay la L ig htb ourn, Je nn a C h a p l i n a nd A s h l e y B ut l e r s w a m t o a r e c o r d t i m e o f 2 : 0 5 7 0 s a t t h e 2 0 0 8 N a t i o n a l s BL A CK HIST OR Y INVIT A TI ON AL SWI M MEET HONOREES 1989 Martin Luther King, Jr 1990 Martin Luther King, Jr 1991 Frederick Douglass 1992 Sojourner Truth 1993 Benjamin Banneker 1994 Mary McLeod Bethune 1995 George Washington Carver 1996 Harriet Tubman 1997 Booker T. Washington 1998 Dr. Dorothy L. Height 1999 Walter Washington 2000 Eleanor Holmes Norton 2001 Dr. Calvin Rolark 2002 Dr. William H. Rumsey 2003 Dan Knise and Clarence Bishop 2004 Sharon Pratt 2005 Chuck Hinton, Fred Lee Valentine, and Mamie 2006 20th Annual Black History I n v i t a t i o n a l S wi m M e e t Co m m i t t e e 2007 Jim Ellis and Frederick Evans, II 2008 Bradford A. Tatum 2009 Cullen Jones 2010 Maritza Correia, Byron Davis, S a bi r Mu ha m me d Da v id Gog g in s 2011 M ic ha e l Wri gh t a nd Al an a Dill et te Dilette FROM page 1E

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w on i t, sa i d Ma r ti n w ho sh o t 3 6 f r o m t h e f i e l d a n d 4 7 f r o m th e li ne. We want ed it t he m ost w e c a me o ut a nd p la ye d wit h th e hea rt of a ch amp io n Twin s i s te r Ton ique a Mart i n a p p l a u d e d t h e P a c e r s e f f o r t b u t s a i d h e r t e a m p r o v e d t h a t t h e y w e r e t h e b e s t te am throug hout th e se ason. R M c a m e o u t a n d t h e y p lay ed a hard g ame out he re to nigh t," she said. But onl y th e b es t co u ld pu l l t hr o u gh ou t of th at ga me t oda y and w e s h o w e d t h e m w e h a v e he a r t a n d we pl a ye d t o t he b est of our a bility out there ." A slow s c ori ng first ha lf for b o th t e a ms g a v e w a y t o a h i g h sc oring sec ond as bo th tea ms l a i d t h ei r c h a m p io n sh i p h op e s o n the lin e. K e l l y w h o s c o r e d t h e ga m e' s o p e n in g b as k e t an d m ade its fina l fre e th r o w, le d he r t e am to a c hampionship i n just he r fi r st sea son in th e G SSSA s e nior d ivisio n. "W e pla ye d w el l, we c am e o u t h a r d s h e s a i d T h e y p lay ed w ell but w e j ust we re b etter tonig ht." Ne ither te am led by m ore t h a n a si n g l e b a s ke t i n th e f i rs t h alf w hic h fea tured fo ur ties a nd th r e e lea d c han ges. Ar ie l Stuart, w ho finis h ed w i t h j u s t f o u r p o i n t s b u t a g a m e h ig h 10 re b ou nd s, ma d e a jum per from the fre e throw li n e w i th 4 5 s e co n ds l e f t t o p lay to gi ve the Pa ce r s a 10 -8 l ead hea ded into the hal f. Ch r i s t ina Wi llia ms tie d th e g a me a t 10 for th e K nig ht s o n t he g a me 's o p en i n g po s s e s s i o n The K nigh ts re ac hed th eir biggest lead of the game on a nothe r W illi ams lay up for a 19 1 4 l e a d w i t h 6: 5 0 l e f t t o p l a y S t u a r t s p o r t i n g a v i s i b l e l i m p m a d e a j u m p e r j u s t be f or e s he ex it e d t h e ga me a n d F ra z i e r fo l lo w e d w it h t w o a t th e line to pu ll the Pac ers w ithi n one 1 9-18 Wi llia ms made a fad ea wa y j u m p e r w i t h j u s t u n d e r a m inute left to p lay to gi ve th e K nig hts a 2 5-2 1 le ad but th e P a c e r s w o u l d s t a g e a l a te ra l l y W i t h 3 5 se c o n d s l e f t t o p l a y G ilc ud ma de a run ning lay up to bring he r tea m w ithin one On t he def ens ive end s he m ade a s te al at ha lfc ourt a nd fo r c ed a foul whi ch sent her t o t h e f r e e t h r o w l i n e w i t h e igh t sec onds l eft to pla y. She m ade on e o f tw o from th e li ne to tie the ga me a t 2 5 a nd force ove rtime Kinght s Head Coac h Ken L i g h tb o u rn e sa i d t h e f o u r c o n se c u tiv e t itl e w i ns w a s a te sta m e nt t o th e d et erm in a tio n h is t e a m d i s p l a y e d f o r y e a r s b e g in n in g w i t h i ts se n io r l e ad e r s h i p I t o l d m y g ir l s o nc e i s a m i s t a k e t w o t i m e s y o u r e l u c k y t h r e e t i m e s y o u r e a lrigh t, but four time s, you 're re ady and w e w e r e read y for th is o ne, he s a id "Jo ne tr a p lay ed lik e a bea st, I c ould n't b e l i e v e i t T o n i T a m i M y s e n i or s t h e y r e a l l y st e p pe d u p I 'm h a pp y fo r t he s e g i rl s a n d I l o v e th e m l i ke m y da u g h te rs SPORTS TRIBUNE SPOR TS THURSDA Y FEBRUAR Y 17, 201 1, P AGE 3E T O DISCUSS ST ORIES ON THIS P A GE LOG ON T O WWW .TRIBUNE242.COM K n i g ht s c l i nc h ti t l e FROM page 1E G S S S A S E N I O R G I R L S B A S K E T B A L L A C T I O N


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