The Tribune.
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS PDF VIEWER ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01787
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: 1/24/2011
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:01787

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

( PDF )


Full Text

PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Attorney dies after shooting Volume: 107 No.51MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 2011 PRICE 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER LOWCLOUDS, BREEZY HIGH 77F L OW 68F I N S I G H T SEEINSIGHTSECTION S P O R T S Baby Doc: Mysterious return after French exile S EESECTIONE Tank vs Holyfield McCOMBO OF THE DAY N E W The Tribune THEPEOPLESPAPER BIGGESTANDBEST LATESTNEWSONWWW.TRIBUNE242.COM BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E By AVA TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter aturnquest@tribunemedia.net MEMBERS of a promin ent Bahamian family in the religious and legal communi ties are trying to make sense of the fatal shooting of one of their own this weekend. Attorney Dennis Gomez, the brother of Glenn Gomez, Comptroller of Customs, and husband of an acting magistrate, was gunned down outside his law firm early Saturday morning. Police were said to be actively investigating the ninth murder victim for the year, however up to press time there were no significant updates in the matter. Struck multiple times in the chest which severely damaged vital organs Mr Gomez died in hospital that evening shortly after 9pm. He was 57 years old. Damien Gomez, attorney and cousin of the deceased said: He was very badly injured on Friday night and the doctor didnt expect him to live even as long as he did too much damage was done to his heart and to his lungs. According to police, Mr Gomez had just left his law firm at York Street off Shirley Street when he was approached by two men one of whom was armed with a hand gun shortly before 2am on Saturday. Police indicated that Mr Gomez was accompanied by a woman at the time of the shooting, however her con nection to the victim is unclear at this time. Mr Gomez who was taken to hospital in a private vehicle reportedly received multiple gunshot wounds to his body after he struggled with his attackers. Family members were said to believe that the shooting was an armed robbery gone bad, based on existing information, however up to press time police had not yet confirmed a motive. Relatives SEE page 10 Member of prominent Bahamian family gunned down outside law firm THE Bahamas recorded its eighth murder for the first 21 days of the new year when a man died of stab wounds on Friday. Francoeur Etienne, 38, of Mackey Street was held up by a man while walking on Wilson Track Wednesday evening. The culprit stabbed Mr Etienne multiple times in his head after attempting to rob him. Mr Etienne was taken to hospital by ambulance where he remained in serious condition. He died of his injuries on Friday. Over the weekend the murS EE page 10 STABBING DEATH IS THE YEARS EIGHTH MURDER By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net THE unions opposing BTC's sale to Cable & Wireless will convene for a "strategy" meeting today in their continued fight against privatisation, said Bahamas Communications and Public Officers Union President Bernard Evans. Mr Evans said the current Supreme Court case launched by the BCPOU and the Bahamas Communications and Public Manager's Union to block the sale is only stage "three" of their 12-point plan. STATE Minister for Finance Zhivargo Laing yesterday expressed concern that some officers in the Customs Department are not accepting the modernisation of the government office and are in fact openly resisting changes that aim to improve operations and enhance integrity. Speaking at a church service for the International Day of Customs at St By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT While giving sworn testimony in the Supreme Court on Friday, teacher Andre Birbal, who is accused of having sex with two of his students, said both young men were good students at Eight Mile Rock High. The teacher said he had a casual student/teacher relationship with the young men. Birbal said he "liked one of the boys as a student," and he described the othSEE page 10 UNIONS TO HOLD STRATEGY MEETING OVER BTC S ALE CL AIM THAT SOME CUSTOMS OFFICERS ARE RESIS TING CHANGES T O DEPARTMENT SEE page 11 SEE page 11 CONCERN: Zhivargo Laing ANDTHEYREOFF! The Rotary Club of East Nassau's special Bed Race on Saturday helped to raise over $9,000 and increase awareness for Rotary's Polio Plus programme. SEE PAGETWO ROTARYBEDRACE RAISESTHOUSANDSFORPOLIO T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f ACCUSED TEACHER IN SEX C ASE S A Y S B O TH Y OUNG MEN WERE GOOD S TUDENT S

PAGE 2

E DITOR, The Tribune. The headlines in The G uardian and The Tribune of todays date, Thursday, J anuary 20, 2011, as respectively shown above, were, to say the least, disturbing. I am at a loss in trying to f igure out what our police force is attempting to fight, crime or armed terrorist? No one can deny the fact t hat crime is escalating at an a larming rate, by the same token no one can say that our police force has found t he answers to the problem; b ut stooping to the level of the criminal element responsible for the situation, ism ost certainly not the route to go. Trigger happy, Wild West characters. John Q Public is still reeli ng under the effects of a number of incidents of what c ould be termed trigger happy officers who, it appears, seem to think that to shoot first and ask questions later a re the reason for them b eing issued with a weapon. T he tragic loss of an efficient crime fighter and an outstanding member of the I nspectorate some weeks ago should have been a wake-up call to the powers that be to take a second look at the methods employed in the issuing of firearms to police personnel. Persons entrusted with the use of firearms must be carefully screened in the areas of character, decision making, observation, patience and the ability to reason. Violence begets V iolence T he Holy Scriptures reminds us that violence begets violence, if we were to take a look at the situa tion with regards to the drug war in Mexico, we will find the following: The governments decision to declare an all-out war on the drug cartels is definitely not working, over thirty plus thou sand persons have so far been executed, mostly secur ity personnel and under cover officers, in the most h orrible fashion imaginable. It has also been determined that the drug dealers werea ble to out-gun the security forces, simply because they were able to purchase superior fire power. We have trigger happy thugs on ours treets with AK47s, superior to police weapons, The last thing the police shouldw ant is an all-out shooting war with criminals on our s treets and in our communities, as innocent citizens will become the victims ofs uch folly. The police mandate and p riorities are: Preservation of the peace, protection of l ife and property, prevention of crime and the detection of crime. O peration Rapid strike, says the commissioner, has as its main objective the mission to seek out persons involved in murders, armedr obberies, possession of illegal firearms, stealing of vehicles, stabbings, breakings and all other criminal activities. If those priorities are the mission of the individ u al officers involved in operation rapid strike, then p lease, Mr Commissioner, tell us what the duties of the remainder of the force willb e during the operation of Rapid Strike; explain to John Q, what has happened to the mandate that you and every other member and hisb rother of that institution known as, and called the RBPF signed in order to become a member of that institution. Viz;T(1 T o preserve the peace in this nation, (2 the life and property of its citizens, (3 of crime and (4 tion of crime. My dear commissioner they have always been the primary reasons for the establishment of that great institution and will always be for the retention of it. If each and every member of the force focus on their mandate and identify the root cause for the escalation of offences in certain areas and collectively seek solu tions, it would be a step in the right direction. Out here, resting in the shade of retire ment, are many a sharp and a ctive investigative brain of years gone by that are available to you just for the asking. No one individual, including you, has the answers to our crime prob-l em; but collectively, we can find some answers. The dangers of carrying o ut ones mandate by means o f media exposure. Many modern day leaders o f institutions, corporations and indeed politicians, find it fashionable or convenient to operate through constant media exposure, this path is a dangerous one, for it must b e borne in mind that the m edia is a two-edged sword. N ever mind the glowing t erms and the well placed photos; because when you s tumble, falter or fall, they, the media are always the first to deliver the coup de g race to your hapless carcass. In fact advertising in advance your course ofa ction only defeats its pur pose. W e must all remind ourselves that crime is a social disease and must be treated as such. I t is the responsibility of all of us to unite in an effort to find a cure for the illness. In many cases we as a people are responsible for creating the climate that is r esponsible for the disease. In our system we tend to put the cart before the horse when it comes to crime, gove rnment is the chief culprit in this scenario. The millions of dollars put into new vehicles to add to an already congestive traffic problem should be spent in the rehabilitation system, after school programmes, trade school for drop-outs from school, and problem atic youths, while upgrading the community policing pro gramme. Your job, Mr Commissioner, is not and never was an easy one, it is a thankless one; but the nettle of the captain of a ship is not measured by how he handles his ship in calm or good weather; but how he does in a hurricane or rough seas. An autopsy of all pro grammes should be carried out before implementation, with a view to identifying flaws and/or loopholes, remember the buck stops with you and so will the blame. ERRINGTON W I WATKINS Nassau, January 21, 2011. EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 2011 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited N ULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI B eing Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 E ILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972P ublished Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising A dvertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 Nassau Fax: (242 F reeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 WEBSITE w ww.tribune242.com updated daily at 2pm Are the police trying to fight crime or armed terrorists? LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Carpe Diem seize the day, move ahead &RPIRUWDEOHRRPVDW&RPIRUWDEOHDWHV5RRPVIURPMXVWSHUQLJKW SOXVJUDWXLW\5HVWDXUDXQWDQG%DU 5HFUHDWLRQRRPHHWLQJRRP$OEDQV'ULYH T HE old proverb advises the tailor to cut his coat to suit his cloth. This is sound advise that would be well for Bahamians to seriously consider. Speaking at the recent Bahamas Business Outlook 2011c onference a College of the Bahamas associate professor, warning of economic apartheid,d escribed this countrys economy as the most oppressive model that fails to empower and d evelop Bahamians. She warned of disastrous consequences if it is retained. To her it is essentially an economy of service and cons umerism. She advises a diversification that would embrace the genius of the Bahamian p eople. Prime Minister Ingraham also believes in d iversification, as does Tourism Minister Vincent Vanderpool Wallace. But rather than a shift completely away from tourism, they both see enormous opportunities for diversification within the system. As the Prime Minister h as said this strong legitimate desire must be considered in the context of the reality of T he Bahamas. Mr Vanderpool Wallace also believes in diversification, but not necessarily in diversification that consumes much debate. Quot ing from a sermon by Monsignor Preston Moss, who in turn was quoting from Steven Covey, author of The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, Mr Vanderpool Wallace advised: The main thing is to keep the maint hing the main thing. Within the context of the Bahamas the m ain thing is tourism, which still presents tremendous opportunities if diversified. Jamaica, for example, was endowed with rich natural resources bauxite, gypsum, lime, marble, sand, silica. This provided Jamaica with many and varied opportunities for diversification. Not so the Bahamas. Our lot was to inherit an archipelagic nation of beautiful islands, m agnificent clear waters, more beaches than the Caribbean combined, and a comfortable climate. The cloth that our administrators were giv en to cut was one of beauty. What does one do with beauty? The pirates saw it as a group of islands, a mong which they could hide and waylay bullion-laden ships headed for Spain. The wrecke rs took advantage of the shallow waters, and the shoals just below the surface that brought s hips to a watery grave and prize money to their tattered pockets. Then came the winter tourists, escaping the cold blasts of the north. And then came Stafford Sands who saw an opportunity to take this same cloth of beau t y sand, sea and balmy weather and turn it into a number one, year-round industry. W hat both the Prime Minister and Mr VanderpoolW allace are saying is that there is much for Bahamians to develop within that industry, not forgetting, of course, the opportunities f or agriculture and fisheries to feed ourselves and our visitors. If New Providence and Paradise Island, said Mr Vanderpool Wallace, were a separate c ountry in our region, it would rank fifth in the number of stopover visitors, second in the number of total visitors and first in the number of cruise passengers in the entire Caribbean. What others also find surprising, he said, is that N ew Providence and Paradise Island, where nearly 70 per cent of our population resides, r epresents less than 2 per cent of the total land mass of the Bahamas. G oing further he pointed out that these two islands only 2 per cent of the total Bahamas would be the third wealthiest independent country in the western hemi sphere in terms of per capita income behind only the United States and Canada. If fully developing only 2 per cent of our islands yieldst hese kinds of results, he said, imagine what could happen if we began to utilise more of o ur natural assets? Instead the revenue from these two islands with the exception of Freeport, possibly Abaco and Eleuthera are spread thin to support the other islands in the archipelago. If the other islands could be developed, and made self sufficient with inter-island commerce between all of them; if Bahamians settled in the various island to help in their develo pment, instead of flocking to New Providence; if Bahamians living abroad could see opportunities that would entice them home to help in the growth of the islands, what a rich little country this could be. Yes, there is room for diversification much diversification within the sector itself. It w ill take a new generation of well educated Bahamians to seize the day and lead the way. W e are not at a dead end. There is much yet to be done.

PAGE 3

By SIR RONALD SANDERS ( The writer is a Consultant and former Caribbean Diplomat ). TOWARD the end of l ast year as a row raged between the Board of Directors of Caribbean Airlines Ltd (CAL t he government of Trinidad and Tobago, and the Minister of Transport, Jack W arner, alarm was e xpressed by several comm entators at published r eports in Port-of-Spain t hat CAL might not proc eed with plans to finalise a merger with Air Jamaica by April 30 this year. These reports emanated from conflicting statements credited to the former CAL Chief Executive Officer, I an Brunton, in which he h ad publicly declared himself fully in support of the A ir Jamaica merger but had s imultaneously advised the C AL Board not to consummate the deal. The cause for alarm was t wo-fold: The first was the effect that failure to complete the Air Jamaica deal would have on the Jamaican governments economic support arrange ments with the IMF; and the second was the irrepara-b le damage that would have been done to Caribbean integration if the Trinidada nd Tobago government left Jamaica deep in distress b y reneging on the deal. Dr Eric Williams arithmetical calculation of One from ten leaves nought that e ffectively ended the West Indies Federation, would undoubtedly have been i nvoked again this time b y Jamaica. R eassuringly, since then, t he CAL Board has made i t clear that it is in fact proc eeding with the Air Jamaica transaction. New planes have been brought into service and the reopening of Air Jamaica flightst o Londons Heathrow Airport has been announced. Mer ger Like many others in the region, who place some store in a truly regional airline to ensure that the Caribbean Community (CARICOM have some measure of independence from the vagaries of foreign carriers, I am g ratified that the merger b etween CAL and Air Jamaica is proceeding and that Jamaica will owns hares in the merged airline. It is to be hoped that this is a first step in the direction o f a single regionally-owned airline that will serve all CARICOM countries not only for tourists, but also in t he vital area of moving Caribbean people and goods around the region as t he regional integration p rocess is deepened. T his raises the question o f what happens with the s maller airline, LIAT, w hich is essential to interCARICOM transportation especially for Caribbean people. For some countries, LIAT is, indeed, an essen-t ial service, for without it, these countries especially D ominica and St Vincent and the Grenadines would have to rely on small, p rivate airlines that are insufficient to service their t ourism needs and their inter-regional trade. LIAT is owned by three g overnments Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados and St V incent and the Grenadines. All three are strapped for cash and if LIAT is not profitable year after year, these govern m ents will have to dip into their already depleted Treasuries to support the airline. The prospect of that hap p ening is not good. But, the other governments into whose countries LIAT flies have shown no interest in s upporting the airline, l argely because they too dont have the financial r esources. In this regard, a merger b etween the new CAL (including Jamaica LIAT would appear to m ake good economic sense, although CALs decision to p urchase French ATR aircraft instead of the Canadian dash-8s that LIAT hast raditionally flown would pose a problem of amalgam ation. But, even if that problem was overcome, the fur-t her difficulty would be devising a scheme for operations and service that would persuade the gov e rnments of the countries n ow served by LIAT that they would not be at the mercy of Trinidad-centred considerations by CAL. This will require very careful negotiations, diplomatic s kill, and political resolve t o reach and implement a w orkable consensus. How much of this politicalr esolve exists at the moment in CARICOM is a q uestion to which there is n o easy answer. T he answer is made more difficult by the recenta nnouncement by CAL that i t will shortly introduce flights that will compete with LIAT on some of its routes. The response of St Vincents Prime Minister Ralph Gonsalves to this announcement is instruct ive. He says that he is not o pposed to any competi t ion for LIAT, but that c ompetition must be on a l evel playing field. H is latter point may be an allusion to the fact that CAL enjoys the facility of fuel at a price less than the market price which LIAT has to pay. Paying less for fuel will give CAL an a dvantage over LIAT in one of two ways: either by allowing it to drop its prices t o customers below LIATs, a nd, therefore to grab a l arger market share; or by maintaining the same price as LIAT and, thereby,i ncreasing its revenues mak ing it more viable than LIAT. In either scenario, LIAT will suffer fromC ALs competition by hav ing to share the customers it now has. One possibility that c ould give a CAL-LIAT merger credibility and confidence is the involvement of the International Finance Corporation (IFC i nterested third party with e xperience in these matters. S uch a merger should try to ensure that the presento wners of LIAT end up with shares and a voice in t he merged CAL operation. I n the meantime, the peop le of CARICOM complain of the high costs oft ravel within the region. O f course, this is not only because of the charges by CAL and LIAT for their fares, but also because of the taxes that each government charges passengers for the use of their airports. T here has always been a n eed to rationalise air trans p ortation within CARIC OM in ways that serve t ourism and the movement o f people and goods within the region. That need has now become urgent. Dealing with it requires empathy among CARICOM Heads of Government and Ministers of T ransport and a firm resolve to deal with the issue in ways that would r esult around in a regional c onsensus. C an they do it? Yes they can, if every effort is made to put aside narrow chau-v inism, by balancing it with the other benefits that regionalism brings to everyones national development.B ut, we shall see. Responses and previous commentaries at: w ww.sirronaldsanders.com P AGE 8, MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 2011 THE TRIBUNE T O DISCUSS ST ORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM On airlines, tourism and Caribbean integration WORLDVIEW S IRRONALDSANDERS ByMIKE LIGHTBOURN AS A seller, youd prefer a nice clean, unconditional offer at full price, right? This, of course, assumes your home is properly priced. One way to encourage such confidence among potential pur chasers is to have an inspection report available during showings, as well as any receipts (or estimates for repairs. Why order an inspection when the purchasers will probably do so anyway? Because when you take the initiative and perform repairs before listing, you are basi cally presenting a clean bill of health for your home. Prelisting inspections are becom ing a popular way to give vendors an edge in our competitive market. Taking such action also provides a great opportunity to take care of problems that otherwise might come back to bite you. Purchasers today are armed with more knowledge than in the past, and they recognise the security offered when the vendor is forth right and demonstrating that there is nothing to hide. These are the conditions that are more likely to produce that uncon ditional offer. While its probably a given that the purchasers BREA agent will encourage them to order their own inspection if the home is not in top condition, you also have a greater sense of confidence knowi ng that there wont be any surprises. If you have any doubts about whether a prelisting inspection will improve your chances for an early sale, discuss it with your BREA representative, who will also undoubtedly have many other suggestions for successfully marketing your home. (Mike Lightbourn is president of Coldwell Banker Lightbourn Realty) STAY ONE STEP AHEAD! REALESTATE

PAGE 4

CAIRO Associated Press EGYPT'Stop security official accused an al-Qaidai nspired group in the Gaza Strip on Sunday of being behind the New Year's Day suicide bombing that killed 21 people outside a Coptic Christian church in the Mediterranean port city of Alexandria. Interior Minister Habib alAdly said conclusive evidence s howed the shadowy Army of Islam in the Palestinian territory was behind the planning and execution of the attack, which sparked three days of Christian rioting in Cairo and several other cities. It was the deadliest attack against Christians in Egypt in more than a d ecade. There has been no claim of responsibility for the bombing,which added to years of strained relations between Egypt's sizable Coptic minority and the country's Muslims. The government, eager to keep the sectarian tension under control, almost immediately blamed foreign elements for the attack. The Army of Islam dismissed Sunday's accusations on an extremist website, and the Hamas militants who control Gaza and have themselves battled with the smaller group was a lso skeptical of the Egyptian claim. Al-Adly said the group is believed to have recruited Egyptians in the planning and execution of the attack, but that this could not conceal the role it played in the "callous and terrorist" act. A n Interior Ministry statement later identified 26-yearold Alexandria resident Ahmed Lotfi Ibrahim as a lead suspect in the attack, saying he was recruited by the Army of Islam when he sneaked across theborder into the Gaza Strip in 2008. I t said operatives from the Army of Islam tasked him with monitoring Christian and Jew ish places of worship in Alexan dria. Last October, the statement said, Ibrahim identified two churches, including the one attacked on New Year's Day,as likely targets and sent his h andlers photographs of the two. He was told in December that "elements" have been sent to carry out the attack, the statement said without elabo rating. Security officials said earlier on Sunday that at least five Egyptians have been detainedin connection with the Alexandria bombing. They said the suspects have given investigators a full account of how they were contacted and eventually recruited by the Army of Islam. It was not immediately clear whether Ahmed, a university graduate who subscribed to the cause of jihad through the Internet, was one of those detained. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to share the information with the media. The Army of Islam is estimated to have several dozen operatives committed, like alQaida, to the ideas of a global jihad. The group seceded from the Hamas-linked Popular Resistance Committees in 2005 and currently has no ties with that group. In 2008, Hamas unleashed a deadly crackdown on it, storming its stronghold and killing 13 of its members and prompting it to since keep a low profile. The Army of Islam is thought to have participated in the kidnappings of Israeli soldier Sgt. Gilad Schalit in 2006 and BBC journalist Alan Johnston, who was later released. Late last year, Israel killed three members of the group in separate airstrikes, alleging the men had planned to attack Israeli and American targets in Egypt's Sinai Peninsula. "The Army of Islam in the land of Ribat (Palestine the allegation made by the Egyptian regime about our relation with the attack in the city of Alexandria," it said in an Internet posting. Hamas, which has ruled Gaza since 2007, voiced doubts and asked Cairo to provide evidence to back up its charge. "We call on the Egyptian brothers to provide evidence and information to the government in Gaza about these accusations. We deny the existence of al-Qaida in the Gaza Strip and we reaffirm that the Egypt ian national security is our national security," said Taher Nunu, Hamas government spokesman. Suspicion for the Alexandria bombing had fallen almost immediately on some kind of al-Qaida-linked local organiza tion after the terror group's branch in Iraq vowed to attack Christians in Iraq and Egypt over the cases of two Egyptian Christian women who sought to convert to Islam. The women, who were married to priests in the Coptic Orthodox Church, were prohibited from divorcing their husbands and sought to convert as a way out. The women have since been secluded by the Coptic Church, prompting Islamic hard-liners in Egypt to accuse the Church of imprisoning them and forcing them to renounce Islam. The Church denies the allega tion. Al-Adly's announcement came in an address he deliv ered during a ceremony marking Police Day that was attended by President Hosni Mubarak, Cabinet ministers and top police officials. In a separate address, Mubarak vowed that his government will "triumph over terror" and that he will do his utmost to maintain unity between Egyptians. About 10 percent of Egypt's 80 million people are Christians. "I will not be lenient with any sectarian actions from either side and will confront their perpetrators with the might and decisiveness of the law," warned Mubarak, Egypt's ruler of nearly 30 years. Mubarak also lashed out against calls made in the West, including by Pope Benedict XVI, for the need to protect the Christians of the Middle East after the Alexandria bombing and attacks against Christians in Iraq. INTERNATIONAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 2011, PAGE 13 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Egypt accuses Gaza militants of being behind Coptic church bomb AN EXPLODED car is seen in front of a Coptic Christian church as worshippers shout in the Egyptian city of Alexandria, Egypt, in this early Saturday Jan.1, 2011. An al-Qaida-linked group in Gaza was behind the New Year's suicide bombing that killed 21 Christians and wounded about a hundred outside a church in the Mediterranean port city of Alexandria, the country's interior minister announced Sunday. (AP

PAGE 5

JERUSALEM Associated Press AN ISRAELIpanel on S unday cleared the military and government of any wrongdoing during last year's deadly raid on a Gazab ound international flotilla, but the finding appeared unlikely to repair damage to I srael's standing. N ine pro-Palestinian a ctivists, eight Turkish citizens and a Turkish Ameri-c an, were killed as Israeli c ommandos boarded one of the ships in the flotilla, the M avi Marmara, last May 31. The report said the armed defense of Israel's maritimeb lockade of the Hamasruled coastal strip was justified under international law. A wave of international condemnation of the raid forced Israel to ease the blockade. T he incident damaged r elations with Turkey and l ed the U.N. chief to order an international investiga-t ion. Turkey swiftly cond emned Sunday's report, saying it was "surprised, appalled and dismayed." I sraeli Prime Minister B enjamin Netanyahu praised the inquiry. "I hope all those who r ushed to judgment against Israel and its soldiers will read this report and learn the truth about what hap p ened," Netanyahu said. "The truth is that our soldiers were defending our country and defendingt heir very lives." The nearly 300-page report echoed an earlier mil i tary investigation that faulte d the planning and execu tion of the operation. Even so, it said the blockade of Gaza and the raid were legala nd justified. "The actions carried out by Israel on May 31, 2010, to enforce the naval blockade had the regrettable con sequences of the loss of h uman life and physical injuries," read the report. Nonetheless, "the actions taken were found to be legalp ursuant to the rules of i nternational law." The flotilla aimed to bring attention to the blockade ofG aza, which Israel imposed after Hamas militants cap tured an Israeli soldier in 2006 and tightened afterH amas seized control of the territory the following year. Israel said the blockade was needed to preventH amas, an armed group that has fired thousands of rock ets at Israel, from building u p its arsenal. Critics have n oted the blockade did lit tle to weaken Hamas or halt weapons smuggling, while causing widespread economic hardship and short ages of foods and other basic i tems. Israeli forces were sent to commandeer the ships before dawn after the flotil l a ignored radio warnings to t urn back and refused an offer to dock at an Israeli port and transfer humani-t arian aid into Gaza over land. One of the ships radioed to the Israelis to "go back to Auschwitz," accord i ng to a military recording cited in the report. Five small ships were com mandeered without incident, b ut soldiers rappelling from helicopters onto the deck of the Marmara, with some 600p assengers on board, were a ttacked by several dozen activists armed with bars, slingshots and knives as they landed on deck one by one, according to video footager eleased by the military. The Israelis, caught off guard, were beaten, and some were thrown onto a l ower deck. According to Sunday's report, two soldiers were s hot, apparently with w eapons wrested from the I sraelis. Both soldiers and activists h ave said they acted in selfd efense. The flotilla was organized by an Islamic aid group from Turkey known by thea cronym IHH. Israel banned IHH, which has ties to Turkey's Islamic-orientedg overnment, in 2008 because o f alleged ties to Hamas. Turkey, formerly one of Israel's closest allies, recalledi ts ambassador to Israel after the incident, and ties between the former allies have not recovered. A n official Turkish comm ission investigating the incident condemned theI sraeli findings Sunday, sayi ng the blockade amounted to illegal "collective punish ment" of Gaza's 1.5 million people. It also accused Israelo f using unnecessary and excessive force. "Our commission is sur prised, appalled and dis mayed that the national inquiry process in Israel has resulted in the exonerationo f the Israeli armed forces," it said. In New York, U.N. spokesman Martin Nesirky s aid investigators there had received a copy of the Israeli report. As you know, to help c omplete their important m andate it is essential for the (U.N.m aterial provided by both s ides, Israel and Turkey," he said. Israel was forced by the outcry to ease the blockade.V irtually all foods and con sumer goods can now enter Gaza. But restrictions onm any exports and the import o f badly needed construction goods remain in place. Israel ordered the official i nquiry two weeks after the incident. The commission, headed by retired Supreme Courtj ustice Jacob Turkel, include d four Israeli members and two international observers David Trimble, a Nobel p eace laureate from North ern Ireland, and Brig. Gen. Ken Watkin, Canada's for mer chief military prosecu t or. All signed off on the conclusions. A fifth Israeli participant, 93-year-old international law expert Shabtai Rosenne, died during the deliberations. L ooking at 133 individual cases in which soldiers used force 16 of them involving shooting to kill the comm ission found soldiers had acted properly and that their lives had been in danger. T he soldiers, the report said, acted professionally in the f ace of extensive and unanticipated violence." T he report was based on t he testimony of Israeli officials, including the prime minister, defense minister and military chief. It alsol ooked at testimony from soldiers gathered by the military and 1,000 hours ofv ideo footage taken from the m ilitary, the Marmara and its passengers. The commission said a ctivists on board the ship refused invitations to testify. Alan Baker, a former legal a dviser to Israel's Foreign M inistry, said the commit tee's makeup gave the report i nternational credibility, but t he findings would have little impact on Israel's critics. "I doubt very much whether it will make ani mpression on those elements of the international community who are pushing the anti-Israel hostility," he said. I NTERNATIONAL NEWS P AGE 14, MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 2011 THE TRIBUNE T O DISCUSS ST ORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM IN SATURDAY TRIBUNE . PUZZLES, GAMES AND LOADS OF FUN IN Y OUR FREE KID SCOOP Israeli inquiry: Flotilla raid, blockade legal IN THIS MAY 31, 2010 FILE PHOTO the Mavi Marmara ship, the lead boat of a flotilla headed to the Gaza Strip which was stormed by Israeli naval commandos in a predawn confrontation, sails into thep ort of Ashdod, Israel. An Israeli inquiry commission defended the actions of the country's troops during last year's deadly raid on a Gaza-bound protest flotilla sailing from Turkey, finding in a report released Sunday, Jan. 23, 2011, that Israel had not violated international law. Ariel Schalit File/AP F ORMER ISRAELI SUPREME COURT JUSTICE J acob Turkel heads a press conference of the Turkel commission, an inquiry set up by the Israeli Government to investigate the Gaza flotilla raid, in Jerusalem, Sunday. (AP

PAGE 6

BUSINESS PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 2011 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By RoyalFidelity Capital Markets It was a slow week of trading in the Bahamian stock market. Investors traded in seven out of the 24 listed securities with twoa dvancers and no decliners. EQUITY MARKET A total of 6,278 shares changed h ands, representing a significant decrease of 54,357 shares compared to the previous week's trading volume of 60,635 shares. AML Foods (AML ume leader and biggest advancer, trading a volume of 3,998 shares to see its stock price increase $0.03 and close at $1.04. F OCOL Holdings (FCL a volume of 1,000 shares to see its share price increase by $0.01, closing at $5.48. BOND MARKET Fidelity Bank Bahamas Series D Notes (FBBSD $23,000 notes at par value. Fidelity Bank Bahamas Series B Notes (FBBSB $20,000 notes at par value. COMPANY NEWS E arnings Releases: There were no earnings reports r eleased last week. RoyalFidelity Market Wrap EQUITY MARKET TRADING STATISTICS Week ending 21.01.11 BISXCLOSING WKLY PRICEVOLUME YTDPRICE SYMBOLPRICE CHANGECHANGE AML$ 1.04$0.033,9987.22% BBL$ 0.18$-00.00% BOB$ 4.90$-00.00% BPF$ 10.63$-00.00% BSL$ 5.01$-00.00% BWL$ 2.70$-00.00% CAB$ 10.21$-80-2.39% CBL$ 6.85$-400-2.14% CHL$ 2.40$-00.00% CIB$ 9.39$-00.00% CWCB$ 2.07$0.05013.11% DHS$ 1.60$-00.00% FAM$ 6.07$-00.00% FBB$ 2.17$-00.00% FCL$ 5.48$0.011,0000.37% FCLB$ 1.00$-00.00% FIN$ 6.51$-800-9.96% ICD$ 7.40$-00.00% JSJ$ 9.82$-00.00% PRE$ 10.00$-00.00% INTERNATIONAL MARKETS FOREX Rates Weekly %Change Currency CAD1.0072-0.35 GBP1.60080.83 EUR1.36241.77 Commodities Weekly%Change Commodity Crude Oil97.56-0.95 Gold1,343.50-1.72 I NTERNATIONAL STOCK MARKET INDEXES IndexWeekly% Change DJIA11,871.840.72 S&P 5001,283.35-0.76 NASDAQ2,689.54-2.39 Nikkei10,274.50-2.14 BOND MARKET TRADING STATISTICS BISX DESCRIPTION VOLUMEPARVALUE SYMBOL FBB13FBB Series C0$1,000 Notes Due 2013 FBB15 FBB Series D23 $1,000 Notes Due 2015 FBB17FBB Series A0$1,000 Notes Due 2017 FBB22`FBB Series B20$1,000 Notes Due 2022 ing in both himself and Gaye Knowles resigning as directors of Ameron Oil and Gas, which was incorporated as a Bahamian IBC on November 28, 2007. It was initially called American Oil& Gas Resources, before being renamed Ameron on June 10, 2009. The Ontario Securities Commission, on December 13, 2010, charged the three Bahamas-based residents, together with four Canadians Vadim Tsatskin, Mark Grinshpun, Oded Pasternak and Allan Walker with breaching the Canadian states securities laws by offering securities in MX-IV Ltd, a purported Bahamian limited partnership, to investors. The Commission alleged that the offering, which had Ameron Oil and Gas as its issuer, program manager and operator of MX-IV, was illegal and unauthorised because no prospectus or offering document was filed with it. And the regulator claimed that some $615,000 was raised from the sale of MX-IV units between June 2009-April 2010, based on alleged fraudulent information from the four Canadians that was false, inaccurate and misleading. The Ontario Securities Commission alleged that among the false information provided to investors was that wells were in production; Ameron had a 90 per cent success rate on previous projects; the return on investment in the MX-IV units would come within 90 days of investing; and that the net proceeds from the MX-IV unit sales would be reinvested in new well drilling. The directing minds of Ameron knew or ought to have known that aliases were being used when the MX-IV units were sold to members of the public by the salespersons, representatives or agents of Ameron, the Ontario Securities Commission alleged. Approximately 19 per cent of the MX-IV investors funds were paid to the Ameron salespersons involved in selling the MX-IV units to the MX-IV investors. The MX-IV investors were not informed of this fact. Allegation The only specific allegation made against Mr Howorth and the Knowless are that as officers and directors of Ameron, they authorised and permitted the conduct engaged in. Gaye Knowles was alleged to be Amerons president and chief executive, while Giorgio Knowles was its secretary. Mr Howorth was alleged to be the companys vice-president. Emphatically denying that the allegations were true against of the three, Mr Howorth told Tribune Business that Canadian attorneys had been hired to defend them against the Ontario Securities Commissions allegations. The facts are that I agreed to act as a director for the company with Mr Gaye Knowles, who was originally approached by a client to form and manage a Bahamas IBC with that name [Ameron], Mr Howorth told this newspaper via e-mail. It was made clear in writing to the beneficial owner of the company that any investment transactions carried out in the name of the company by him or his associates must be approved by the directors. He advised that he had consulted a Canadian lawyer who had made an application on behalf of the company to the Canadian Securities Commission to have the company approved to sell securities in Canada. The client was warned in writing not to commence any such sales unless and until such approval was granted. Immediately Mr Knowles and I were advised that these instructions were ignored, we resigned as directors of the company. Mr Howorth added: I am afraid this is an example of the client taking matters into his own hands and using an IBC to hide his illegal actions. This should not have any adverse effect on our business, as we have acted responsibly within the law. The illegal acts took place outside our control by persons in Canada, none of whom were authorised to so act by the company. Bahamas r esidents deny all allegations over $615k fraud FROM page 1B

PAGE 7

recommendations were proc edural (and p roviding all the more reason w hy their consideration and implementation could have moved ahead more swiftly. Meanwhile, Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, minister of tourism and aviation, told Tribune Business he was now in possession of the final recommendations for reform of the Bahamas gaming laws and regulations, and hoped to present them to the industry next month. In an e-mailed response to this newspaper, he said: I had the final review of the recommendations from the Gaming group with me, and hope to present it for consideration next month. I am not sure how long it will take to change regulations to effect whatever is agreed, but we will advance it as quickly as possible." Mr Markantonis and other industry chiefs say the changes are necessary to keep the Bahamas competitive as a destination for gamblers. Mr Markantonis comments come after Jamaicas minister of tourism, Edmund Bartlett, spoke to the worlds media at the recent Caribbean Marketplace tourism trade show, which took place in Montego Bay last week, about his governments casino dream. He revealed that Jamaica intends to grant three casino licenses this yea,r and is taking applications for others, with the expectation that each casino could bring in $40 million in revenue to the Government annually. Mr Markantonis said he sees this development as a big problem for the Bahamas, and a bigger issue than the fact that the Jamaican government has also just opened a state-ofthe-art convention centre t he Caribbeans largest in M ontego Bay in the hopes of g aining a greater share of this lucrative tourism market that the Bahamas, and Atlantis especially, has traditionally benefited from. I do think that will be a problem for us I am notg oing to hide it. If they do approve all these mega-resort casino licenses there, its just more casinos coming right on our doorstep. We have to keep working on the gaming regulations we have here, make sure they are friendly to the casinos we have here and, at the same time, we have to work on our marketing programs like anything else. You cant just roll over; you learn how to compete in a tougher market, said Mr Markantonis. Casinos in the Bahamas have suffered significant yearover-year declines in revenue in recent times. Atlantis reported an 8 per cent decline in 2010, while Crystal Palace saw an 18.5 per cent drop. While this is in part because of sluggish tourism levels overall, industry stakeholders have consistently pointed to out-dated gaming regulations as a contributing factor in a narrowing of this nations competitive advantage. In March 2009, Robert Sands, then Bahamas Hotel Association president, told this newspaper he believed radical change would be needed to gaming regulations i f the Bahamas is to maintain a competitive edge against other popular destinations. When Mr VanderpoolWallace last spoke to Tribune Business in October 2010 on the subject of the reforms proposed by the hotel and gaming industry to the sectors regulatory framework, he suggested the proposals were in front of (him under active consideration. T he Minister suggested the G overnment is looking to marry its own recommendations that it believes will be even more beneficial to Bahamian casino gaming with those proposed by the private sector, as it moves to" enhance and hold on to the significant competitive advantages" this nation has. BUSINESS PAGE 4B, MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 2011 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 6W$OEDQV'ULYH %HDXWLIXOVSDFLRXVVWXGLRDSDUWPHQW ) XOO\IXUQLVKHG SOXVHOHFWULFLW\ PRQWKVPLQLPXPVWD\ 7 for occupancy rates over 80 per cent. After an annual average occupancy rate for 2010 in the low 60s, the flagship Paradise Island resort is predicting a yearly occupancy ratea verage in the high 60s or low 70s for this year. One month does not make a year, but its a good sign, said Mr Markantonis of the April projections. Easter has moved to the end part of April, so its expanded the higher-rated tourism business, and we have seen theb ookings coming in at a much higher pace than they ever had. When I say a record, if we go over 80 per cent for the month its going to be amazing, and that would be amazing for the city. M r Markantonis said Kerzner Internationals $100 million expansion and renovation programme on Paradise Island s tarted last year and is going quite fine, with the most high profile new addition to Atlantiss amenities being the Teen Club, called Crush. The high-tech facility, initially budgetedt o cost $7 million, ultimately cost $11 million. Teenagers The club is for teenagers in the 13 to 17 year-old range, a nd features a Mocktail bar, a video-gaming tree, interactive table tops from which teenagers can place orders for d rinks and food, and a DJ booth and dance floor fit for a high-end New York City nightclub. Ninety new staff members were taken on to run the facili ty, which opened on December 20, 2010. Its mind boggling and worthy of adults, really, said Mr Markantonis, who said t he overrun came about as the company just kept adding stuff to the space. Meanwhile, another major development set to come on stream in 2011, which is projected toc ost Kerzner International a further $10 million, will be a Virgils BBQ restaurant in the Coral Towers, in the space w here the former Waters Edge restaurant once was. Its a giant new restaurant concept we are bringing in from New York. I think all of our local fans are going to lovet his place as much as the tourists. Its the same group as Carmines. Its a monster BBQ restaurant and we are building a 650 seater one right here. It will be the worlds most beautiful barbecue restaurant, said Mr Markantonis. The restaurant will require around 250 to 300 new staff to b e taken on, he projected. Other plans for 2011 include renovations to the casino and renovations to the Atlas restaurant, although the latter oft hese is still to be finalised, added Mr Markantonis. He revealed that guest satisfaction levels, measured by an i ndependent research company, JD Powers, continued to climb through 2010, with each month setting a new satis faction record. Thats a great tribute to our staff and their efforts, but also to the training programs, said Mr Markantonis. $100M ATLANTIS EXPANSION LEADS TO 90 NEW JOBS F ROM page 1B Atlantis: Get a move on with gaming reforms F ROM page 1B VINCENT VANDERPOOLWALLACE

PAGE 8

BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 2011, PAGE 5B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM between the US and the Bahamas. W ith Crowley and Seaboard Marine, two key members of the FloridaBahamas Shipowners & O perators Association, r evealing that the increases will apply to all imports and exports carried between the Bahamas and US as of Feb-r uary 20 this year, Khaalis Rolle, the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce and E mployers Confederations ( BCCEC) chairman, warned this nations economy would face serious problems if oil prices rose at the same r ate as in 2008. Crowley and Seaboard M arine said the move had been forced by the rising c ost of bunker fuel, which mirrors oil prices, and had risen by over $500 per met-r ic ton. T he Journal of Commerce Online reported: The two carriers said they will increase the bunker surcharge $66 on 20-foot equiv-a lent units, $132 on 40-foot equivalent units and $149 on all equipment over 40 feet. Acknowledging that there was little the Bahamas could do to directly influence globa l oil prices, Mr Rolle told T ribune Business that companies and households had to focus on ways to manage our energy consump tion. Agreeing with Prime Mini ster Hubert Ingraham that rising commodities prices, especially food and energy, p osed a major threat to the Bahamian economys gradual recovery from recession, the Chamber chief said that among ways to mitigate the impact from oil price increases were for the Government to reduce its taxes on fuel. This the Ingraham administration is unlikely to do, given the present fiscal crisis and Treasury desire to lay its hands on every cent of possible revenue, especially given that fuel taxes are among just four items that generate almost 40 per cent of the Governments annual revenues. But, alternatively, Mr Rolle called on Bahamian companies with the cash means to follow the likes ofS uper Value and hedge against rising energy and t ransportation costs by bulk b uying inventory in advance. And he urged the Governm ent to get on with implementing the National Energ y Policy, arguing it would p rovide a road map to r educe this nations fossil fuel dependence. Theres not much we can do to impact oil pricesb ecause theyre outside our scope of influence, but wen eed to find some way to mitigate and manage whats about to take place, Mr Rolle told Tribune Business. Its easy for me to say, but the Government has tol ook at the tax structure on f uel. Thats one area we can look at. Yet the Governments tax take actually increases as fuel prices rise, thanks to the 7 per cent Stamp Duty per gallon imposed on landed fuel, while it also takes a $1.16 per gallon flat rate tax to book. Given that the Government is unlikely to accept a reduced tax take from fuel, M r Rolle added: There has to be some sort of hedging that takes place, especially for companies that are fuel dependent. Were already talking about inflation derived from food costs, and thats a major concern. Super Values intention is to hedge, and I think thats a good strategy. If you have the capacity to hedge, youd better do it. During the last oil price spike, Super Value was one of the firms able to manage it relatively easily as their strategy focused on hedging, purchasing in bulk up front. Still, Mr Rolle said many Bahamian companies, espe-c ially small and mediumsized businesses that opera ted on a very tight budg et, with cash in, cash out, would find it impossib le to employ a hedging strategy. And, illustrating j ust how much the Bahamas w as at the mercy of oil specu lators and financial traders, Mr Rolle recounted being t old that one Alaskan oil pipeline being taken out ofs ervice for temporary repairs resulted in a $3i ncrease in global oil prices, as speculators pushed unwarranted concerns about a drop in global supply. Theres no real rhyme or reason about this, Mr Rollet old Tribune Business. Thats why its important weve got to go after the National Energy Policy, and the Government cannot delay rolling this out. It is an imperative, it is a must. The Bahamas needs to start weaning ourselves of fossil fuels, and even though the transition is an expensive one, the tragedy lies in not pursuing this relatively quickly. I think thats an e ven more expensive propo sition. Its important that the long awaited and muchdelayed National Energy Policy has to be implemente d and executed. The Chamber chairman said the pace of work on d eveloping a National Energy Policy seemed to have slowed over the last two years, as global oil prices fell back down to more normal l evels, the 2008 price shocks h aving sparked the Government into action. We went at kind of a frenetic pace initially, because we were going through a diff icult period of ever-increasing prices, and that has slowed somewhat because the storm slowed, but that storm is forming again, Mr R olle added. We just need t o find ways to manage our e nergy consumption. Warning that the Bahamas was headed down the same slippery slope of rising oil prices that took it into one of the worst mode rn recessions, he said: If t he rate of oil price increase s becomes steep and large, were going to have a serious problem. I dont know if theres going to be any hope for recovery. Mr Rolle said that with m any Bahamian firms hav ing come through one of the most difficult trading periods they will ever face, their ability and that of their customers to absorb energy price rises in their cost struct ure was limited. Its going to depend on t he individual firm and their ability to absorb it and pass it on. If you absorb it, how long can your business survive, and if you pass it on how much more is the cons umer going to take, and w hats that going to do to your business? asked Mr Rolle. RAPID NATIONAL ENERGY POLICY ROLL-OUT URGED FROM page 1B

PAGE 9

t hroughout the economy. Normally in November we have staff working one or two days a week. This will mean we will need all handso n deck, said Mr Markant onis of Atlantis. He was speaking at a press conference to officially announce the Bahamas having won a vote to receiveN ational Collegiate Athleti c Association (NCAA exempt status last week, w hich will attract college basketball teams to play in this nation because they willn o longer be subject to sanctions for doing so, and can see any wins or losses count towards their season record. Atlantis, the Ministries of Tourism and Sports, the Bahamas Basketball Federation and others have all lobbied for the Bahamas to receive the coveted exempt status for 14 months. With this achieved, Mr Markantonis predicted that the Battle 4 Atlantis will become the premier pres eason basketball tournam ent in the NCAA schedu le, following in the footsteps of brand name preseason basketball tourna-m ents such as Hawaiis Maui Invitational. The event comes on the heels of the Battle at Atlantis double-header tournament on December 18 last year, the success of which was credited by Bahamas Basketball Federation president, Lawrence Hepburn, with putting the Bahamas over the hump towards winning the votes needed to secure the status. The upcoming Thanksg iving tournament will be b igger than the 2010 event, i nvolving eight as-yetunidentified big US college teams competinga gainst each other over four to five days in 12 games. Mr Markantonis said: We put it in the Thanksgiving week because tradit ionally November has not been a strong month for us. Wed like to create a lot ofe nergy. If youve got eight teams here playing 12 games o ver a four or five-day period, people are going to be employed. Normally int hose months thats when people are working one or two days a week. The good news will be that this will mean all hands on deck. And its not just here...I would like to think that if eight teams travel with theirf ans, and get alumni coming, staying at all hotels a cross the island, that therell be a great trickle down in the economy. The strategy with doing it on Thanksgiving is it gives u s that holiday period when it makes sense to travel with the family and catch a fewd ays on top of the basketball and see Nassau, added M r Markantonis. With eight teams coming with their officials, friendsa nd families, Mr Markantonis said this alone could b ring around 1,500 people to the Bahamas. Add to this other fans who will pay toc ome and stay in Nassau to see the games, and thou sands more are anticipated. Ballroom T he ballroom, which Atlantis spent $500,000 converting into an NCAA-reg-u lation compliant basketball arena for the 2010 tournam ent, will be expanded from 2,500 to 4,500 seats toa ccommodate the bigger annual Thanksgiving events which are now in thep ipeline, while an additional ballroom will be converted into a practice court prior to the Battle 4 Atlantis. Mr Markantonis said Kerzner International has received significant interest already from college bas k etball teams who want to participate in the Battle 4 Atlantis this year and going forward. We have numerous teams speaking to us about 2012, 2013. In fact, we are booking teams even for 2015 now. I can tell you that as good as 2011 is going to be, youd be shocked at what we have coming in 2012, its just a major line-up. Everyone is fighting to come to this tourn ament, said Mr Markantonis. A lot of it is because besides being the premier pre-season basketball tournament, it will also be the richest within the NCAA guidelines, whether in terms of scholarships or athletic department donations or whatever it is. We have sufficient sponsors that will help us cover all of these expenses. Meanwhile, another boost could come in the form of NBA teams coming to play at the resorts facilities in the future. Three teams have been in touch with us. We are postponing those conversa tions for now because we have one priority at the moment, said Mr Markan-t onis. Besides the attention the resort and the Bahamas will receive directly from those t raveling to the country to participate in or attend the tournament, Mr Markanto nis said Atlantis is in discuss ions with several media houses about television coverage for the event. They have come to us to t alk about broadcasting these games live in the US, which is how you also attract top teams, said Mr Markantonis. BUSINESS PAGE 6B, MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 2011 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM All Nassau hotels will be full for Thanksgiving F ROM page 1B We have numerous teams speaking t o us about 2012, 2013. In fact, we are booking teams even for 2015 now. Ic an tell you that as good as 2011 is g oing to be, youd be shocked at what we have coming in 2012, its just am ajor line-up. Everyone is fighting to c ome to this tournament, George Markantonis INSIGHT F or the stories behind the news, read Insight on Mondays

PAGE 10

THE Air Conditioning Depot, a new full-service parts and supplies store located at the Builders Mall on Wulff Road, is a state-of-the-art addition not to the Builders Mall family, but to the air conditioning industryin The Bahamas. Having recently attended the International BuildersShow in Orlando, Florida, the largest show of its kind, the partners of Air Conditioning Depot were able to gain first hand knowledge of the cur rent industry status, as well as establish relationships with industry contacts and key companies. The AC Depot, as it is more commonly known, opened in the summer of 2010, and since then, has already become a leader in air conditioning equipment, parts, and supplies. Specializing in high SEER equipment, its energy efficient, economic Tempstar line is one of its best-sellers, and making aname for itself among air conditioning name brands in The Bahamas. Tempstar is actually owned by the same par ent as Carrier a well-known, long-standing air conditioning name and therefore carries with it a history of reliability, efficiency and comfort. The AC Depot also distributes the Carrier and Goodman lines, and prides itself on the variety of sizes of equip ment and their SEER ratings. For those unsure of what SEER is, the acronym stands for Seasonal Energy Efficiency Rating. In simple terms, it is a measurement used to determine how much electricity (or energy ditioner uses in exchange for how much cooling it puts out. The higher the SEER, the less electricity the AC uses, therefore making it less expensive to run. The caveat here, is that the initial cost to purchase a high SEER air conditioning is more than your average, basic, air conditioner, but the savings over time is in the neighbourhood of 50 per cent and statistics have shown that the investment pays itself back after the first year. For example, the aver age person in The Bahamas will purchase a 10 SEER unit, as opposed to a 14, 15 or 16 SEER unit. Most people only look at the initial cost to purchase and install a unit and not the cost of operating that unit. Under current U.S. law, the minimum SEER rating permitted is 13 SEER. With a similar climate to that of South Florida's, The Bahamas should implement, at the very least, a similar standard. The reason most people do not purchase high SEER equipment is that they just don't know that the alternatives exists. This is another area in which the Air Conditioning Depot will make a positive change and help the environment. Beginning this summer, the AC Depot plans to team up with BTVI and offer summer workshops for its students. They have also started a local contractor/installer sign-up programme, in which they plan to offer informational sessions on new and cuttinge dge equipment and technologies. AC Depot not only ser vices the air conditioning industry and its contractors, but also consumers directly, with their wide array of prod-u cts including ductless units, t ools and filters. BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 2011, PAGE 7B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM State-of-the-art addition to air conditioning industry I NTHEPINK: M ark Roberts, Builders Mall owner, and Chris Knowles, owner of AC Depot, pictured w ith the Pink Panther at the International Builders show in Orlando, Florida, last week. The Air Conditioning Depot, a new full-service parts and supplies store is a state-of-the-art addition to Builders Mall on Wulff Road. Pink Panther is an Owens Corning character that symbolises the companys insulation line of products that are pink. Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbour hoods. Per haps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

PAGE 11

e st related to sports tourism. Events are being establ ished, and we are projecting that sports tourism has the potential to make a big dent in the loss of that corporate business that our major hotels lost. We feel very strongly about it, M r Johnson said. We are on track, and we are particularly pleased that Tyrone [Sawyer, director of sports tourism at the Ministry of Tourism] and his team have made progress with the Mini stry of Youth and Sports and t he sector, and that we are gett ing much traction and seeing signfiicant growth groups resulting from sports tourism. And that's not just to Nassau and Paradise Island, but to Abaco, San Salvador, Grand Bahama. Meanwhile, Charles Mayn ard, minister of youth, sports a nd culture, said he, too, was of the opinion that sports-related visits to the Bahamas "could overtake the conventions market as a vehicle to bring people who ordinarily wouldntt ravel to the Bahamas on vacation to the Bahamas. He and Mr Johnson, along with Kerzner International (Bahamas aging director, George Markantonis, and Bahamas Basketball Federation president, LawrenceH epburn, were speaking at a press conference on Friday to discuss the granting of Nation-a l Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA to the Bahamas, which will a llow college basketball teams to play in the Bahamas without being subject to sports sanctions, and seeing their wins and losses added to their school sea-s on record. The victory, after 14 months of lobbying, paves the way fort he Battle 4 Atlantis eight team-tournament at Atlantis at Thanksgiving this year a major tourism draw and, according to Mr Maynard and others, "opens up more possibilities", helping to "propel our sportst ourism initiative to the next level. "It also opens the door for us to further penetrate the market and try to get other sporting disciplines to follow suit, and try to get exempt status as well...This is a wonderful thingf or the Bahamas overall," said Mr Maynard. He added that the Governm ent is keen to make good use of the new national stadium, set for completion this year, w ith any major international sporting attractions held there also set to produce spin-off benefits for Bahamian hotels and other services. A sked specifically what sporting events are set to come to this nation this year, MrS awyer declined to "make announcements for other people", but said there is "quite a bit on the drawing board" for 2011. He mentioned the Tour of the Bahamas cycling race,w hich is due to take place at the end of this month, organised by Holowesko Partners, as one example of such attractions. The race draws numerous cyclists from both the Bahamas and abroad to participate in the three-day long event. Mr Markantonis revealed thatA tlantis also has a "major tennis tournament" planned for this year, and would love tow ork on projects to bring big sports events to the national stadium. He said Kerzner International has been, and will continue, to lobby for PGA (Professional Golfers Association of America) exempt status in the hope of attracting more international golfing events to t he Bahamas. The BBF's president, Mr Hepburn, calling the newly-a nnounced NCAA exempt status a "dream come true" for the BBF, noted that it will noto nly pave the way for Atlantis t o host the Battle 4 Atlantis, but for more BBF organised e vents throughout the country. "We have always had numerous people coming to us wantin g to come here to put on tournaments. We have been running behind people to assist us with t his but today we have it. It hurt my heart to know we sit right next to the US but we couldnt put on a good enought ournament to attract a crowd from abroad, as good as a Maui classic (another major pre-season basketball tournament held in Hawaii). "It was a splended job on December 18, and I think thatp ut everything over the hump. Now I know the Federation is going to have numerous people calling. We have already heard from several big schools. We are just excited and delighted," said Mr Hepburn. M r Maynard added that the Government is set to debate the Sports Authority Bill in Parliament, which will establ ish a sports authority to "give you the real mechanism for the proper development of sports tourism, and the proper man-a gement and promotion of sports facilities throughout the country. "So this is all happening at the same time, and I think we should feel good about thec hances of the Bahamas for sports tourism," he said. BUSINESS PAGE 8B, MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 2011 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.260.97AML Foods Limited1.011.010.000.1500.0406.73.96% 10.759.67Bahamas Property Fund10.6310.630.000.0130.200817.71.88% 6.184.50Bank of Bahamas4.904.900.000.1530.10032.02.04% 0.580.18Benchmark0.180.180.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.492.70Bahamas Waste2.702.700.000.1680.09016.13.33% 2.152.14Fidelity Bank2.172.170.000.0160.040135.61.84% 12.509.62Cable Bahamas10.2110.210.001.0500.3109.73.04% 2.842.36Colina Holdings2.402.400.000.7810.0403.11.67% 7.005.40Commonwealth Bank (S1)6.856.850.000.4220.26016.23.80% 3.651.63Consolidated Water BDRs1.971.94-0.030.1110.04517.52.32% 2.551.60Doctor's Hospital1.601.600.000.1070.11015.06.88% 6.995.94Famguard6.076.070.000.3570.24017.03.95% 10.207.23Finco6.516.510.008000.2870.52022.77.99% 1 1.408.77FirstCaribbean Bank9.399.390.000.4940.35019.03.73% 5.513.75Focol (S)5.475.480.011,0000.3660.21015.03.83% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 7.405.00ICD Utilities7.407.400.000.0120.240616.73.24% 10.509.82J. S. Johnson9.829.820.000.8590.64011.46.52% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.9910.80010.18.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 99.4699.46Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029BAH2999.460.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +FBB13100.000.00 1 00.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Bid$ Ask$ LastPrice DailyVol EPS$ Div$ P/E Yield F INDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%30 May 2013 20 November 2029THURSDAY, 20 JANUARY 2011B ISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,480.08 | CHG 0.15 | %CHG 0.01 | YTD -19.43 | YTD % -1.30BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basis)Maturity 1 9 October 2017 7%RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)29 May 2015 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-232019 October 2022 Prime + 1.75% Prime + 1.75% 6.95%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:7 % Interest 52wk Hi 52wk Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Daily Vol EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield 10.065.01Bahamas Supermarkets5.016.0114.00-2.9450.000N/M0.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.350.400.550.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 Months %NAV 3MTH 1.51221.4076CFAL Bond Fund1.51795.51%6.90%1.498004 2.94742.8300CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.94742.10%2.09%2.918697 1.57431.4954CFAL Money Market Fund1.57404.44%4.44%1.555464 3.20252.8522Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund2.720212.72%4.63% 13.638813.0484Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund13.2825-0.63%-0.14% 114.3684101.6693CFAL Global Bond Fund114.36849.98%12.49%109.392860 106.552899.4177CFAL Global Equity Fund106.55284.75%7.18%100.779540 1.14151.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.14154.74%5.21% 1.11011.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.11013.94%7.60% 1.14281.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.14284.78%5.90% 9.74859.1005Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 19.79504.85%5.45% 11.236110.0000Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 210.6417-1.20%0.50% 10.00009.1708Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 39.6635-3.37%-3.37% 8.16434.8105Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund Equities Sub Fund8.39798.82%8.82% BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/MNot Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/200730-Nov-10 31-Dec-10 107.570619 105.776543 30-Jun-10 30-Nov-10 NAV 6MTH 1.475244 2.919946 1.538692TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752530-Nov-10 30-Sep-10 31-Dec-10 31-Dec-10 31-Dec-10MARKET TERMS30-Nov-10 30-Nov-10CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)30-Nov-10BISX Listed Mutual FundsNAV Date 30-Nov-10 30-Nov-10 &20021:($/7+) ,17+((0(&2857 &RPPRQ/DZt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t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page 1B Sports tourism could replace convention loss LAWRENCE HEPBURN

PAGE 12

DAVID K. RANDALL, AP Business Writer NEW YORK The news last week that Apple's Steve Jobs is taking a leave of absence was a big stor y. But something else about the company got far less attention and could be even more important to investors this year. Corporations "are adding i Pads to their approved device list at an amazing rate," Peter Oppenheimer, Apple Inc.'s chief financial officer, told anal ysts Tuesday. Apple's products, more known for their consumer appeal, are now used in by employees of Wells Fargo, Archer Daniels Midland,D uPont and others. Splurging on $500 iPads is a sign that the business cycle is starting to turn and that comp anies are starting to spend a record amount of cash they've accumulated. If the trend is real, companies will do what c onsumers haven't -spark a strong economic recovery. That c ould push the Standard & Poor's 500 index to its third s traight year of double-digit percentage gains. The last timet hat happened: the tech-boom days of the late 1990s. ''You're going to see a bigger commitment to growth this year because companies have u nderspent for quite some time," says Bill Stone, chief i nvestment strategist at PNC Asset Management. F inancial, technology and energy companies are the most l ikely to benefit from business spending, says David Bianco, a market strategist at Bank of A merica. Each group is up about 3 percent this year, near l y one percentage point ahead of the overall S&P 500. Those t hree groups account for nearly half of index's value. The continued success of financial, energy and technology stocks would point to a new s tage of this bull market, which has returned nearly 100 percents ince it began in March 2009. Consumer discretionary stocks, t he group of hotels, retail stores and automakers that depend on consumer spending, outperformed the last two years after being left for dead during the 2 008 financial crisis. Those companies are now lagging them arket, suggesting that the bounce back from the lows of t he recession is over. "Consumers don't have the income growth to sustain a more rapid pace of spending," says Jeffrey Kleintop, a market s trategist at LPL Financial. Instead, he says, businesses s pending will eventually lead to a pickup in the jobs market. C orporate spending on technology helped IBM Corp. beat analyst expectations last week. On Tuesday, IBM said that its 7 percent jump in revenue came in part from companies in the U.S. upgrading their computer systems. Its stock jumped a lmost 4 percent last week. Energy companies, meanwhile, are leading the market this year with a 3.4 percent j ump because of higher d emand, a sign of an improving economy. Oil company Schlumberger said Friday profit in the most recent quarter rose 31 perc ent. And financial companies are benefiting from loans to businesses, a signal that those companies plan to expand. J PMorgan said on its earnings c all last week that it added 400 middle-market companies as new commercial loan customers. Bank of America said F riday that demand for business loans stabilized last quarter, while US Bancorp said Wednesday that all of its comm ercial loans divisions were i mproving, with the exception of real estate. Financial companies have the added benefit of being cheap. The price-toe arnings ratio of the financial companies in the S&P 500 index averages 11.6, about half of its historical average. Financ ial companies are cheaper than a ny other group except for health care, which costs 11.2 times earnings. BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 2011, PAGE 9B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM GN-1170 Newest economic indicator: companies buying iPads

PAGE 13

MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 2011 T HETRIBUNE SECTIONE Page 2 Cross country meet a success TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM VOLLEYBALL N PVA C HAMPIONSHIPS THE Scottsdale Vixens got one step closer to winning another New Providence Volleyball Association ladies' title as they held off the Johnson Lady Truckers in a m arathon two hours and 14 minutes match on Friday at the DW Davis Gymnasium. W ith a 18-25, 25-14, 23-25, 2 8-26 and 15-12 victory, the D efenders took a 2-0 lead in t heir best-of-five champio nship series. They could h ave wrapped up the title and repeated as champions in g ame three that was played y esterday. No results were available for that match. I n Friday's victory, Cheryse Rolle led the Vixens with 16 points. In a losing effort, Davia Moss led the Lady Truckers and all scorers with 1 7 points. I n the men's affair, the Scotiabank Defenders brought their A game and e vened their series 1-1 as they defeated the Technicians Club in three straight sets 25-19, 25-2 1 and 25-19. Shedrick Forbes led all scorers and the Defenders with 11 points. R enaldo Knowles led the Technicians with 10 points inthe lost. Game three of their series was also played on Sunday, but no results were available. TENNIS KNOWLES ELIMINATED J UST when he was hoping to bounce back, Mark Knowles' participation in t he Australian Open was cut short in Melbourne, Australia. Already eliminated with his n ew partner Michal Mertinak of Solvenia frrom the men's doubles, Knowles teamed up w ith Ekena Vesnina from Russia in the mixed doubles, but that only lasted throughthe first match. On Saturday, Knowles and Vesnina were ousted in thefirst round by the tournamen t 's top seeded team of Americans Liezel Huber and Bob Bryan USA 7-6 (4 O nly Friday, Knowles and Mertinak, seeded number 12, were stunned 7-6 (3 the team of Eric Butorac and Jean-Julien Rojer. Knowles and Mertinak were winners oftheir first round match 6-4, 76(5 Gabashvili and Mikhail Kukushkin. ROAD RACE BSC RUN/WALK RACE THE Baptist Sports Coun cil will hold its Deaconess Joanne 'Mother' Webb Fami ly Fun Run/Walk Race on Saturday from the Charles W. Saunders High School, Jean Street, starting at 7 a.m. The registration fee for the 15-and-under, 19-and-under, 20-29, 30-39, 40-49 and 50and-over divisions in the men and female walk and run, is $10. Immediately following the race, a health fair will take place. A souse out to aid the BSC's basketball trip to San Salvador will also take place. The price is $10. BASKETBALL BSC LEAGUE REGISTRATION THE Baptist Sports Council will hold a final registration meeting on Saturday at 10 a.m. at the Charles W. Saunders High School for all Churches interested in participating in the 2011 Rev. Dr. David S. Johnson Basketball Classic. The Classic is scheduled to start on Saturday, February 5. It will feature the men, ladies, 19-and-under, 5-and-under divisions. The entry fee is $100.00 per team in each division. By BRENT STUBBS S enior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net T HEY went to the third round and ended up with a "No Decision" as Sherman 'the Tank' Williams' b id to clinch the World Boxing Federation's heavyweight title away from Evander "the Real Deal" Holyfield on Saturday night. The 12-round main event bout dubbed "Redemption in America" and carried live on Pay-Per-View saw Holyfield h ead butt and throw a couple blows behind the head of Williams in the first round. That resulted in Williams turning up the heat in the second round as suffered a cut over his left eye. After taking a series of blows and what was called an accidental head butt, Holyfield was b leeding too much that he didn't answer the bell for the fourth round as the fight ended up in a "no contest" before a jammed pack black-tie crowd from Americas resort -The Greenbriers Colonial Hall -in White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia. Im back, said Williams who staggered Holyfield at the end of the third round with an overhand right. This fight was circus: on again, off again. But I stayed focused. I hurt him with an overhand punch. Lets bring this fight to Atlantis Holyfield-Williams II. Ill take his place in Denmark and fight Nielson. Williams was referring to Holyfield's next scheduled bout on March 5 against Brian Niel son that is now in jeopardy because of his injury. Im cut, Holyfield said after the fight. He head-butted me. He came down on me with his head. I dont know about my next fight (March 5 vs. Brian Nielson in Denmark). Im cut, Im cut. Ill give Sherman a rematch. In his first fight since his 10 round loss on October 10 last year to Manuel Charr in Stadthalle, Rostock, Mecklen burg-Vorpommern, Germany, the 5-feet, 11-inches Williams f rom Grand Bahama topped the scale at 258 pounds, compared to the 6-21/2 Holyfield from Atlanta, Georgia, who came in at 224 a fter his eight round decision over Francois Botha to clincht he WBF title on April 10. Ive had my own personal s etbacks. To get over what I did was a miracle. I trained h ard for this fight. I was fighting a legend and I cant take any thing away from him. I feel like I should have won by TKO. I cut him with an overhand right, but I respect him," Williams said. As a youngster growing up, 38-year-old Williams said he idolized Holyfield, but never envisioned fighting the 48-yearold former three-time world champion. I root for him. Hes almost 50 and still training and per forming. I admire what hes done but its time to let younger guys fight and older guys do television commentary," Williams quipped. "Hes not as good looking as I am. Youve made sacrifices, won 4 world championships and fought in the Olympics. But this is a new time, a new era. Mr. Holyfield shouldnt be tak NO CONTEST sports NOTES ATTACKING: Sherman The Tank Williams has a bloodied Evander Holyfield doubled up. THETANK VS HOLYFIELD DEFENDING: The Tank fends off an Evander Holyfield offensive. Holyfield fails to answer bell for fourth round after accidental head butt By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net RAY Minus Jr. was impressed with what he saw as his Champion Boxing Club opened their 2011 season with their first amateur boxing show on Saturday night at the Wulff Road Boxing Center. So was national amateur boxing coach Andre Seymour, who brought one of his competitors from his Carmichael Knockout Boxing Club to participate against one of Minus' Champion Boxing Club competitor. "This is great. This is a good evelopment programme. Ray is doing a great job," Seymour said. "He is working with the kids in the inner city. These kids have natural talent. "We just have to continue to work with them because if we can do that, we will have al ot more boxers coming up. But in years to come, we don't want them to drift away. So we have to keep the talent and groom them for international tournaments." Seymour said he hope to support more of Minus' shows in the future with more of his boxing coming from the Carmichael Road area to take on the boxers from the Kemp Road area. In the only mixed match of the night, Malik Lungrin, representing Seymour's Knockout Boxing Club, took on Tavaris Deveaux from Minus' Champion Boxing Club. With the home crowd cheering him on, Deveaux was able to out-punch Lungrin 6-4 for the win. In one of the highlight bout of the Ray Minus Jr impressed with Champion Boxing Club season opener SEE page 3E AMATEUR B O XIN G SHO W: W ulf f R oad Bo xing Cent er SEE page 3E PHOTOS: Steven Limentani

PAGE 14

SPORTS PAGE 2E, MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 2011 TRIBUNE SPORTS TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM A BOUT 100 competitors showed up on Saturday at Fort Charlotte as Albury Sayle Primary School hosted its annual Cross Country Championships. Meet Director William McFord said the event, sponsored by Bethel Brothers Mortuary, was a tremendouss uccess and they are already looking ahead to a greater impact from Albury Sayle's track and field team this year. This should really help us as we get ready to partici pate in the Primary Schools Track and Field Meet," s aid McFord of the meet that is hosted by the New Providence Primary Schools Sports Association in May. A lthough only four schools Albury Sayle, Claridge, Hillcreast and One-On-One Academy participated, McFord said the competition was keenly contested. Below is a look at the top three finishers in each of the sevencategories contested: Boys 6-and-under Matyus Chipman, Albury Sayle, 5:58.34. Boys 7-8 Dudley Pierre, Albury Sayle, 5:09.12; Nadarias Ferguson, claridge, 5:26.94; Lathario Milfrise, Albury Sayle, 5:52.44. Girls 7-8 Destinee gomez, Albury Sayle, 6:25.69; Terwaashan Robinson, 6:06.10; Tenae Lewis, Albury Sayle, 6:22.97. Boys 9-10 Urich Ferguson, Claridge, 7:18.19; Peter Sylvester, Albury Sayle, 7:22.85; Stanley Pierre, Albury Sayle, 7:29.91. Girls 9-10 Shanghah Bowe, Claridge, 4:40.32; Antonea Butler, Claridge, 4:49.41; Keianna Downer, Albury Sayle, 4:53.16. Boys 11-12 Keyshawn Marshall, Claridge, 5:41.03; Marc Ville, Albury Sayle, 5:41.72; Marcus Williams, Claridge, 5:47.22. Girls 11-12 Cheriah Ferguson, Claridge, 6:26.94; Folashade Sanusi, Claridge, 6:53.94; Aaleyhy Nixon, Albury Sayle, 6:56.08. Up to 100 children take part in tremendously successful meet ALBURYSAYLE PRIMARYSCHOOL: CROSSCOUNTRYCHAMPIONSHIPS ANDWEREOFF! Over 100 children participated in a cross country race over the weekend at Fort Charlotte. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f RECOGNITION: Children are pictured receiving their awards.

PAGE 15

S PORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 2011, PAGE 3E TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net IN an effort to further develop the game of basketball and increase the level of the product produced on the floor, the Bahamas Basketball Federation (BBF tive of improving the skills of coaches across the country. The BBF recently announced it will host its second annual International Basketball Coaches Clinic with a myriad of high profile coaches imported for a weekend of tutelage in various aspects of the game. This year's edition of the event will be hosted in conjunction with the Atlantis Resort, August 3-7, at the world class facility which has taken a vested interest in basketball since it hosted the "Battle at Atlantis" and was integral in the Bahamas becoming just the third country to receive exempt status from the NCAA. According to federation executives, the objective of the clinic, which will again feature top college coaches from t he US and the Bahamas, is to increase the pool of qualified coaches in the country in the various leagues and youth development programmes, paving the way for their long-term involvement in the sport. Edgar Pickstock, Vice President of the Bahamas Basketball Federation "Although their contribution has already been so great thus far, Atlantis and its team continues to go above and beyond the call of duty in terms of t he development of the game of bask etball in this country," he said, Atlantis will be lending its assistance to the BBF for the second edition of its International Coaches Clinic. Coaches from top Division I Univer sities such as Duke, North Carolina and others. With respects to the exempt status we expect great things out of this and it gives us an even greater opportunity for us to market our tours and events. The BBF completed its first edition of the International Basketball Coaches Clinic last August with a myriad of high profile coaches imported for a weekend of tutelage in various aspects of the game. BBF president Lawrence Hepburn said the progression of the game, in the increased knowledge of its coaches is not an option, but is mandated by the federation. As a federation, whether it is this administration or the next, we are faced with a mandate to educate ourc oaches, he said, We must also ensure that our young athletes are in the best possible position to succeed by receiving the best possible coaching they can have. At the conclusion of last year's clinic, Hepburn noted the disappointingn umber of local coaches who took advantage of the event, something the federations hopes will improve this year. The one thing that appears to be a bit of a disappointment is the turnout from local coaches. I must say wee xpected a greater turnout based on the number and calibre of visiting coaches we had in town to conduct the clinic. We anticipated more than 5 0 coaches to come and take part and that did not happen but as a federation it is our job to provide the opportunities, to learn it is up to these coaches to take advantage, he said. For those that attended it was an experience for them that they will not soon forget and would undoubtedly make them better at what they do. It was a learning experience for those that came to listen, but also for those who presented and many lasting relationships were formed. Highlighting the group of visiting coaches was Frank Martin, head coach of the Kansas State Wildcats. Martin led the upstart Wildcats to the Elite Eight round of the NCAA tournament. They finished the season 29-8 overall, second in the Big 12 at 11-5, and ended the season as the seventh ranked team in the nation. Also appearing at the event was Ronnie Arrow, head coach of the University of South Alabama, Ed Kershn er, iconic high school coach and member of the Florida High School Basketball Hall of Fame, Royce Huseman Kingwood High School Texas5 A State Championship Coach, Gale Goestenkors University of Texas, Larry Tidwell Lamar University, Don Showalter USA Basketball U17 National Coach and Cliff Ellis -C oastal Carolina University. Move to continue improving skills of basketball coaches night, Jermaine Allen, last year's most improved junior boxer of the year, continued to shine as he polished off Garrett Bain 12-8, winning all three of the rounds. "He was a little older and bigger than me, but I trained hard, so I just went at him," said Allen, a 13-year-oldg rade eight student at DW D avis Junior High School. As he loosk ahead to the rest of the season, Allen said he just need to work on his early morning training, making sure that he's in better condition when he come intot he gym to work out. In what turned out to be the fight of the night, Peterson Wra upset last year's Junior Boxer of the Year, Don Rolle, with a close 10-9 decision. Wra actually took the fight to Rolle and for the most part, the two traded a series of punches. When it was over and Wra was was awarded the victory, Rolle displayed some unsportsmanlike conduct as referee Gregory Storr raised Wra hand when Minus Jr. read the result. "It's a good feeling beating him," said Wra, another 13year-old eighth grader at DW Davis. "Coach told me to move around and throw the jab and that was what I did." Minus Jr. said he was pleased with the performances from the boxers. "It was great. We saw mas sive improvement from last year, so we're happy to come out with a bang in the new year," he stressed. "We had about ten fights. We had a whole lot of new fighters com ing on stream so far." Minus Jr. said this year his Champion Boxing Club will be traveling to Fort Lauderdale, Florida to compete in a couple of shows against the American boxers to test their skills. "We're going to take advantage of those shows so that we can lift the level of com petition for these boxers," he insisted. "Our programme is not just going to stick here. We are going to seek bigger and better competition." Results from Saturday's show are posted below: Bernard Munroe def. Desmond Kelly 5-4. Kenzell Armbrister def. Leneikp Carey 5-4. Trae Johnson def. Miguel Gibson 6-2. Garvin Rolle def. Renardo Sweeting 94. Ticko Munroe def. Tyreke Young 9-7. Tavaris Deveaux def. Malik Lungrin 64. Jermaine Allen def. Garrett Bain 12-8. Peterson Wra def. Don Rolle 10-9. Jarrad Roker def. Tyreke Young 6-5. Ray Minus Jr impressed FROM page 1E ing punches from younger guys. T hats how I feel. Its time for h im to move on but, if he wants, we can do it again. Williams, who has a 43-10-2 win-loss-draw record with 19 knockouts, said he knew from the second round that Holyfield was in trouble. After the first round he was falling into my trap. When he felt I was in retreatbang with the overhand right, and thats w hen I saw blood," Williams said. Holyfield, (43-10-2, 28 KOs w as hoping for a completely different outcome. Im very disappointed. He fought the way he should have. He understood he would have his head low when he threw the overhand right. If I didnt move back, wed clash heads," he admitted. "It was to his advantage to get l ower because hes short. Being that short he had to fight thatf ight. He didnt have to, he chose to. As for the fight being stopped, Holyfield added: Stuff like this happens and Ill shake it off. H opefully, Ill get this stitched up a nd it wont be a problem. Life goes on, its part of boxing. Fight ruled a no contest F ROM page 1E INTERNATIONALBASKETBALLCOACHESCLINIC LAWRENCE HEPBURN Dynamos vs Bears SOCCER Baha vs CBL United Tim Clarke /Tribune staff Baha vs CBL United Baha vs CBl United Bears vs Western Warriors Bears vs Western Warriors O N THE BALL: Y oungsters show of f their soccer skills in the Bahamas F ootball Association Youth League. The children play every Saturday. They are pictured at the National Development Centre at the Baillou Spor ts Complex.

PAGE 16

SPORTS PAGE 4E, MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 2011 TRIBUNE SPORTS TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net SWIFT Swimming literally cut their cake and ate it too as they dominated their Gunite Pools/Swift Swimming 20th Anniversary Swim Meet on Saturday night at the Betty Kelly Kenning Aquatic Center. Swift Swimming compiled a 1,018 point victory to easily beat out the six-team field as they shared their anniversary cake during the postmeet celebrations. Their nearest rival was the Barracuda Swim Club with 519. "We made a real effort to get a lot of our kids out so they can get in their times," said head coach Andy Knowles, who started the club in 1990, but their first season was launched in 1990/91 calendar year. "So they did very well." Reminiscent of the earlier days of their existence, Swift Swimming changed the format of the meet where they hosted the heats in the morning and staged the finals in the evening over the two day period similar to what is done at the Bahamas Swimming Federation's Nationals and the Carifta Games. Additionally, Swift Swimming through their long-time sponsor Gunite Pool, presented the top three high point winners in each of the six age group with a pot of flower that had their gold, silver or bronze medal stuck in the middle. They also were presented with a coupon from Wendy's Restaurant. Like they did in dominating the meet, Swift Swimming captured all but two of the top individual high point awards. Dustin Tynes, com peting unattached in the boys 13and-over and Allison Taylor from Team Orca in Grand Bahama, com peting in the girls 8-and-under, crashed the party. Tynes, 14, collected a total of 43 points for his title over Anibal Her nandez Valdes of Swift and Peter Farquharson, unattached, who both had 39. Taylor, 7, collected 32 points to out-distance Swift's Dylan Roberts (28 Bowe (27 See scoreboard for their individual performances. Swift's individual winners were Mark Thompson (43 boys; Lilly Higgs (50 Morley (59 Allen (52 berg (55 ley (49 Pleased A number of the swimmers interviewed after the meet were pleased with their performances. "It was good. I was happy with my performance," said Albury, who hada successful showing in the girls 100 fly. "The competition was good. I'm in the lower end of my age group, but I was happy with my performance." Morley, the 14-year-old champion in the girls 13-and-over division, said it's still early in the season, but she was pleased with her effort. "I did a couple of personal bests, so that was exciting," stated Morley, who competed in the 50 and 100 breast, 50 back, 200 and 400 IM and 200 free. Simone Sturrup, competing in the girls 11-12 division, said she felt she did a great job. "I think I did a great job. I did personal best and I made the cut for CCCAN," said Sturrup, who sur passed the qualifying time in the 50 fly. "The competition was good at times, but I didn't have a lot of push." Tremaine Allen, the winner of the girls 11-12 division over Sturrup, said she got off to a shaky start, but as the meet progressed, she got better. "I felt good about my performance. I have to keep working at it to make sure I get my Carifta times because I need them know to qualify," she stressed. Peter Morley, 9, said his perfor mance was good. "I was very happy, especially with my 50 free because I came first just by a touch," he reflected. "I think I can do better." Lilly Higgs, 10, was more delight ed in the improvement of her times. "I beat some of my times I did early in the meet," said Higgs, about her 50 free and both the 50 and 100 back. "I'm hoping that I can contin ue to improve. I want to win Nation als this year." Nick Holmberg, 12, said he had a g reat time competing in the meet. "I think my performance was very good," said Holmberg, who was impressed with his 50 fly and 50 and 100 free. "I just want to continue beating my times as I go this year.' Anibal Hernandez, 15, said he performed well, but there's still a lot more room for improvement. "I'm planning on making the Carif ta team again this year and hopefully CCCAN, so I have to work more on my starts, my turns and my sta mina as a long distance swimmer." Swift Swimming dominate meet GUNITE POOLS/SWIFTSWIMMING20THANNIVERSARYSWIMMEET TEAM SCORES TEAM POINTS Swift Swimming 1,018 Barracuda Swim Club 519 Dolphin Swimming Club 290 Sea Bees Swim Club 143 Team Orca 99 Freeport Aquatic Club 35 High Point Winners 8-and-under Girls Taylor, Allison, Team Orca, 32; Roberts, Dylan, Swift Swimming-BA, 28; Bowe, Cecily, Dolphin Swimming Club-BA, 27. 8-And-Under Boys Thompson, Mark, Swift Swimming-BA, 43; Neely, Shawn, Team Orca, 37; Carey, Davante, Barracuda Swim Club, 36. 9-10 Girls Higgs, Lilly, Swift Swim ming, 50; Albury, Lauren, Unattached, 34; Reed, Charlotte, Swift Swimming, 32. 9-10 Boys Morley, Peter, Swift Swim ming, 59; Thompson, Luke, Swift Swimming, 42; Gibson, Samuel, Barracuda Swim Club, 32. 11-12 Girls Allen, Tremaine, Swift Swimming, 52; Sturrup, Simone, Swift Swimming, 52; Higgs, Albury, Swift Swimming, 37. 11-12 Boys Holmberg, Nick, Swift Swimming, 55; Bowe, Clement, Dolphin Swimming Club, 45; Levarity, Andre, Unattached, 40. 13-And-Under Girls Morley, Laura, Swift Swimming, 49; Crispo, Miriam, Unattached, 35; Smith, Taryn, Unattached, 31. 13-And-Under Boys Tynes, Dustin, Unattached, 43; Hernandez Valdes, Anibal, Swift Swimming, 39; Farquar son, Peter, Unattached, 39. INDIVIDUAL RESULTS Girls 9-10 400 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Higgs, Lilly L, SWIFT-BA, 6:37.75. -, Clarke, Arleisha O, ORCA, DQ. Girls 11-12 400 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Allen, Tremaine T, SWIFT-BA, 5:24.34. 2, Higgs, Albury A, SWIFT-BA, 5:48.62. 3, Thompson, Tristen Q, SWIFT-BA, 7:31.04. Girls 13-99 400 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Crispo, Miriam E, UNATT, 4:51.23. 2, Evans, Joanna, UN-LL-ZZ, 4:54.48. 3, Lowe, Abigail H, SWIFT-BA, 4:57.05. Boys 9-10 400 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Morley, Peter G, SWIFT-BA, 6:09.18. 2, Roach, Jacob L, SWIFT-BA, 7:12.45. 3, Pinder, Conner J, SWIFT-BA, 7:16.38. Boys 11-12 400 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Bowe, Clement, DSC-BA, 5:33.03. 2, Fernander, N'Nhyn M, BSC, 6:28.21. 3, Sands, Alec R, SWIFT-BA, 6:33.05. Boys 13-99 400 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Lowe, Matthew D, BSC, 4:31.91. 2, Moses, Zach T, SWIFT-BA, 4:44.26. 3, Hernandez Valdes, Anibal X, SWIFTBA, 4:45.74. Girls 8 & Under 50 LC Meter Butterfly 1, Taylor, Allison R, ORCA, 1:06.37. 2, Roberts, Dylan A, SWIFT-BA, 1:13.93. --, Thompson, Zaylie-E P, SWIFT-BA, DQ. Girls 9-10 50 LC Meter Butterfly 1, Pinder, Amber M, BSC, 42.17. 2, Lon gley, Sian C, BSC, 47.32. 3, Major, Alaunte B, BSC, 47.86. Girls 11-12 50 LC Meter Butterfly 1, Sturrup, Simone R, SWIFT-BA, 31.55. 2, Weech, Andreas T, SBSC, 32.51. 3, Lloyd, Keitra A, SBSC, 35.93. Girls 13 & Over 50 LC Meter Butterfly (Finals 31.74. 2, Albury, Maya K, UN-LL-ZZ, 31.75. 3, Moss, Berchadette P, DSC-BA, 32.64. Boys 8 & Under 50 LC Meter Butterfly (Finals 2, Neely, Shawn W, ORCA, 1:01.58. 3, Thompson, Mark-A W, SWIFT-BA, 1:02.36. Boys 9-10 50 LC Meter Butterfly (Finals 39.40. 2, Morley, Peter G, SWIFT-BA, 40.19. 3, Bastian, Izaak Z, BSC, 44.25. Boys 11-12 50 LC Meter Butterfly (Finals BA, 35.76. 2, Austin, Aikman L, BSC, 41.22. 3, Pratt, Geshon A, BSC, 48.37. Boys 13 & Over 50 LC Meter Butterfly (Finals ZZ, 28.67. 2, Carey, Dionisio S, BSC, 28.70. 3, Higgs, Donovan J, SWIFT-BA, 30.18. Girls 9-10 100 LC Meter Breaststroke (Finals 2, Kemp, Reagan M, DSC-BA, 2:02.24. 3, Albury, Lauren D, UN-LL-ZZ, 4:15.19. --, Russell, Victoria E, SWIFT-BA, DQ. Girls 11-12 100 LC Meter Breaststroke (Finals BA, 1:31.69. 2, Thompson, Maya A, SWIFT-BA, 1:43.12. 3, Albury, Shannon P, UN-LL-ZZ, 1:48.44. Girls 13-99 100 LC Meter Breaststroke (Finals 1:21.92. 2, Moss, Shaunte J, SWIFTBA, 1:25.29. 3, Evans, Joanna, UN-LL-ZZ, 1:33.59. Boys 9-10 100 LC Meter Breaststroke (Finals 2, Strachan, Trent J, BSC, 1:39.95. 3, Thompson, Luke-K C, SWIFT-BA, 1:45.84. Boys 11-12 100 LC Meter Breaststroke (Finals 1:27.72. 2, Levarity, Andre, UN-LL-ZZ, 1:28.93. 3, Holmberg, Nick B, SWIFTBA, 1:30.36. Boys 13-99 100 LC Meter Breaststroke (Finals 1:10.65. 2, McCarroll, Toby N, DSC-BA, 1:17.00. 3, Moses, Zach T, SWIFT-BA, 1:19.72. Girls 8 & Under 50 LC Meter Backstroke 1, Newbold, Jolise J, ORCA, 56.66. 2, Roberts, Dylan A, SWIFT-BA, 58.81. 3, Taylor, Allison R, ORCA, 59.56. Girls 9-10 50 LC Meter Backstroke 1, McCarroll, Zoe N, DSC-BA, 43.17. 2, Higgs, Lilly L, SWIFT-BA, 43.22. 3, Scriven, Taja M, SBSC, 46.76. Girls 11-12 50 LC Meter Backstroke 1, Weech, Andreas T, SBSC, 36.63. 2, Allen, Tremaine T, SWIFT-BA, 39.14. 3, Hernandez, Jade E, DSC-BA, 41.95. Girls 13 & Over 50 LC Meter Backstroke 1, Saunders, Je'Nae K, BSC, 34.58. 2, Morley, Laura J, SWIFT-BA, WINNINGCOMBINATION: Swift Swimming meet winners. VICTORYISSWEET: Swift celebration cake. L IGHTNING s trikes at Swift meet. swift meet RESULTS HERE are the results of the Gunite Pools/Swift Swimming 20th Anniversar that wrapped up on Saturday at the Betty Kelly Kenning Aquatic Center: SEE page 5E

PAGE 17

S PORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 2011, PAGE 5E TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM SWIMMINGSCOREBOARD 35.01. 3, Reed, Doran G, SWIFT-BA, 35.94. Boys 8 & Under 50 LC Meter Backstroke 1, Thompson, Mark-A W, SWIFT-BA, 53.46. 2, Taylor, Lamar C, FAC, 1:00.21. 3, Neely, Shawn W, ORCA, 1:00.39.B oys 9-10 50 LC Meter Backstroke 1, Morley, Peter G, SWIFT-BA, 42.42. 2, Thompson, Luke-K C, SWIFT-BA, 47.36. 3, Bevans, Paul A, BSC, 49.43. Boys 11-12 50 LC Meter Backstroke 1, Holmberg, Nick B, SWIFT-BA, 38.87. 2, Levarity, Andre, UN-LL-ZZ, 42.13. 3, Gibson, D'Angelo K, DSC-BA, 43.17. Boys 13 & Over 50 LC Meter Backstroke 1, Carey, Dionisio S, BSC, 30.48. 2, Morley, Laron K, DSC-BA, 32.42. 3, Cooper, Farion J, DSC-BA, 34.10. Girls 9-10 200 LC Meter IM 1, Higgs, Lilly L, SWIFT-BA, 3:33.59. 2, Longley, Sian C, BSC, 3:40.78. 3, Major, Alaunte B, BSC, 3:41.74. Girls 11-12 200 LC Meter IM 1, Sturrup, Simone R, SWIFT-BA, 2:53.38. 2, Allen, Tremaine T, SWIFT-BA, 2:59.45. 3, Higgs, Albury A, SWIFT-BA, 3:06.19. Girls 13 & Over 200 LC Meter IM 1, Crispo, Miriam E, UNATT, 2:39.37.2, Morley, Laura J, SWIFT-BA, 2:40.75. 3, Albury, Maya K, UN-LL-ZZ, 2:44.19. Gunite Pools/Swift Swimming 20th Anniverasry 01/21/2011 to 01/22/2011 Girls 9-10 400 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Higgs, Lilly L, SWIFT-BA, 6:37.75. -, Clarke, Arleisha O, ORCA, DQ. Girls 11-12 400 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Allen, Tremaine T, SWIFT-BA, 5:24.34. 2, Higgs, Albury A, SWIFT-BA, 5:48.62. 3, Thompson, Tristen Q, SWIFT-BA, 7:31.04. Girls 13-99 400 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Crispo, Miriam E, UNATT, 4:51.23.2, Evans, Joanna, UN-LL-ZZ, 4:54.48. 3, Lowe, Abigail H, SWIFT-BA, 4:57.05. B oys 9-10 400 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Morley, Peter G, SWIFT-BA, 6:09.18.2, Roach, Jacob L, SWIFT-BA, 7:12.45. 3, Pinder, Conner J, SWIFTBA, 7:16.38. Boys 11-12 400 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Bowe, Clement, DSC-BA, 5:33.03. 2, Fernander, N'Nhyn M, BSC,6 :28.21. 3, Sands, Alec R, SWIFT-BA, 6:33.05. Boys 13-99 400 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Lowe, Matthew D, BSC, 4:31.91. 2, Moses, Zach T, SWIFT-BA, 4:44.26. 3, Hernandez Valdes, Anibal X, SWIFT-BA, 4:45.74. Girls 8 & Under 50 LC Meter Butterfly 1, Taylor, Allison R, ORCA, 1:06.37. 2, Roberts, Dylan A, SWIFT-BA, 1:13.93. --, Thompson, Zaylie-E P, SWIFT-BA, DQ. Girls 9-10 50 LC Meter Butterfly 1, Pinder, Amber M, BSC, 42.17. 2, Longley, Sian C, BSC, 47.32. 3, Major, Alaunte B, BSC, 47.86. Girls 11-12 50 LC Meter Butterfly 1, Sturrup, Simone R, SWIFT-BA, 31.55. 2, Weech, Andreas T, SBSC, 32.51. 3, Lloyd, Keitra A, SBSC, 35.93. Girls 13 & Over 50 LC Meter Butterfly 1, Smith, Taryn, UN-LL-ZZ, 31.74. 2, Albury, Maya K, UN-LL-ZZ, 31.75.3, Moss, Berchadette P, DSC-BA, 32.64. Boys 8 & Under 50 LC Meter Butterfly 1, Carey, Davante S, BSC, 46.16. 2, Neely, Shawn W, ORCA, 1:01.58. 3, Thompson, Mark-A W, SWIFT-BA, 1:02.36. Boys 9-10 50 LC Meter Butterfly 1, Gibson, Samuel A, BSC, 39.40. 2, Morley, Peter G, SWIFT-BA, 40.19. 3, Bastian, Izaak Z, BSC, 44.25. Boys 11-12 50 LC Meter Butterfly 1, Holmberg, Nick B, SWIFT-BA, 35.76. 2, Austin, Aikman L, BSC, 41.22. 3, Pratt, Geshon A, BSC, 48.37. 4, Sands, Alec R, SWIFT-BA, 53.34. --, Dames, Joshua, DSC-BA, DQ. Boys 13 & Over 50 LC Meter Butterfly 1, Farquarson, Peter, UN-LL-ZZ, 28.67. 2, Carey, Dionisio S, BSC, 28.70. 3, Higgs, Donovan J, SWIFT-BA, 30.18. Girls 9-10 100 LC Meter Breaststroke 1, Longley, Sian C, BSC, 1:46.06. 2, Kemp, Reagan M, DSC-BA, 2:02.24. 3, Albury, Lauren D, UN-LL-ZZ, 4:15.19. Girls 11-12 100 LC Meter Breaststroke 1, Allen, Tremaine T, SWIFT-BA, 1:31.69. 2, Thompson, Maya A, SWIFT-BA, 1:43.12. 3, Albury, Shannon P, UN-LL-ZZ, 1:48.44. Girls 13-99 100 LC Meter Breaststroke 1, Morley, Laura J, SWIFT-BA, 1:21.92. 2, Moss, Shaunte J, SWIFT-BA, 1:25.29. 3, Evans, Joanna, UN-LL-ZZ, 1:33.59. Boys 9-10 100 LC Meter Breaststroke 1, Bastian, Izaak Z, BSC, 1:38.69. 2, Strachan, Trent J, BSC, 1:39.95. 3, Thompson, Luke-K C, SWIFT-BA, 1:45.84. Boys 11-12 100 LC Meter Breaststroke 1, Cox, Tyrique J, SBSC, 1:27.72. 2, Levarity, Andre, UN-LL-ZZ, 1:28.93. 3, Holmberg, Nick B, SWIFTBA, 1:30.36. Boys 13-99 100 LC Meter Breaststroke 1, Tynes, Dustin E, UN-LL-ZZ, 1:10.65. 2, McCarroll, Toby N, DSC-BA, 1:17.00. 3, Moses, Zach T, SWIFT-BA, 1:19.72. Girls 8 & Under 50 LC Meter Backstroke 1, Newbold, Jolise J, ORCA, 56.66. 2, Roberts, Dylan A, SWIFT-BA, 58.81. 3, Taylor, Allison R, ORCA, 59.56. Girls 9-10 50 LC Meter Backstroke 1, McCarroll, Zoe N, DSC-BA, 43.17. 2, Higgs, Lilly L, SWIFT-BA, 43.22. 3, Scriven, Taja M, SBSC, 46.76. Girls 11-12 50 LC Meter Backstroke 1, Weech, Andreas T, SBSC, 36.63. 2, Allen, Tremaine T, SWIFT-BA, 39.14. 3, Hernandez, Jade E, DSC-BA,41.95. Girls 13 & Over 50 LC Meter Backstroke 1, Saunders, Je'Nae K, BSC, 34.58. 2, Morley, Laura J, SWIFT-BA, 35.01. 3, Reed, Doran G, SWIFT-BA, 35.94. Boys 8 & Under 50 LC Meter Backstroke 1, Thompson, Mark-A W, SWIFT-BA, 53.46. 2, Taylor, Lamar C, FAC, 1:00.21. 3, Neely, Shawn W, ORCA, 1:00.39. Boys 9-10 50 LC Meter Backstroke 1, Morley, Peter G, SWIFT-BA, 42.42. 2, Thompson, Luke-K C, SWIFT-BA, 47.36. 3, Bevans, Paul A, BSC, 49.43. Boys 11-12 50 LC Meter Backstroke 1, Holmberg, Nick B, SWIFT-BA, 38.87. 2, Levarity, Andre, UN-LL-ZZ, 42.13. 3, Gibson, D'Angelo K, DSC-BA, 43.17. Boys 13 & Over 50 LC Meter Backstroke 1, Carey, Dionisio S, BSC, 30.48. 2, Morley, Laron K, DSC-BA, 32.42. 3, Cooper, Farion J, DSC-BA, 34.10. Girls 9-10 200 LC Meter IM 1, Higgs, Lilly L, SWIFT-BA, 3:33.59. 2, Longley, Sian C, BSC, 3:40.78. 3, Major, Alaunte B, BSC,3:41.74. Girls 11-12 200 LC Meter IM 1, Sturrup, Simone R, SWIFT-BA, 2:53.38. 2, Allen, Tremaine T, SWIFT-BA, 2:59.45. 3, Higgs, Albury A, SWIFT-BA, 3:06.19. Girls 13 & Over 200 LC Meter IM 1, Crispo, Miriam E, UNATT, 2:39.37. 2, Morley, Laura J, SWIFT-BA, 2:40.75. 3, Albury, Maya K, UN-LL-ZZ,2:44.19. Boys 8 & Under 200 LC Meter IM 1, Carey, Davante S, BSC, 3:44.66. 2, Thompson, Mark-A W, SWIFT-BA, 4:15.78. --, Taylor, Lamar C, FAC, DQ. Boys 9-10 200 LC Meter IM 1, Gibson, Samuel A, BSC, 3:25.45. 2, Roberts, Joshua D, SWIFT-BA, 3:49.85. 3, Strachan, Trent J, BSC,3:55.17. Boys 11-12 200 LC Meter IM 1, Bowe, Clement, DSC-BA, 3:01.95. 2, Levarity, Andre, UN-LL-ZZ, 3:15.19. 3, Rahming, Nicholas J, SWIFT-BA,3:21.61. Boys 13 & Over 200 LC Meter IM1 Tynes, Dustin E, UN-LL-ZZ, 2:28.44. 2, Moses, Zach T, SWIFT-BA, 2:35.20. 3, Cleare, Zarian L, DSC-BA, 2:41.73. Girls 11-12 400 LC Meter IM 1, Allen, Tremaine T, SWIFT-BA, 6:21.27. 2, Higgs, Albury A, SWIFT-BA, 6:48.63. Girls 13-99 400 LC Meter IM1 Crispo, Miriam E, UNATT, 5:35.37. 2 Morley, Laura J, SWIFT-BA, 5:40.28. 3, Evans, Joanna, UN-LL-ZZ,5:56.30. Boys 11-12 400 LC Meter IM 1, Bowe, Clement, DSC-BA, 6:34.18. Boys 13-99 400 LC Meter IM 1, Tynes, Dustin E, UN-LL-ZZ, 5:24.54. 2, Moses, Zach T, SWIFT-BA, 5:30.21. 3, Lloyd, Keith J, SBSC, 5:55.31. Girls 8 & Under 100 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Bowe, Cecily, DSC-BA, 1:32.99. 2, Roberts, Dylan A, SWIFT-BA, 1:34.18. 3, Newbold, Jolise J, ORCA,1:59.05. Girls 9-10 100 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Higgs, Lilly L, SWIFT-BA, 1:21.54. 2, Albury, Lauren D, UN-LL-ZZ, 1:24.20. 3, Reed, Charlotte L, SWIFT-BA, 1:25.42. Girls 11-12 100 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Sturrup, Simone R, SWIFT-BA, 1:04.81. 2, Weech, Andreas T, SBSC, 1:06.25. 3, Higgs, Albury A, SWIFT-BA, 1:12.41. Girls 13 & Over 100 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Smith, Taryn, UN-LL-ZZ, 1:03.56. 2, Greene, Gabrielle S, BSC, 1:04.69. 3, Reed, Doran G, SWIFT-BA,1:05.64. Boys 8 & Under 100 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Neely, Shawn W, ORCA, 1:44.69. 2, Colebrooke, Kailen D, SWIFT-BA, 1:53.29. 3, Taylor, Lamar C, FAC, 1:54.33. Boys 9-10 100 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Morley, Peter G, SWIFT-BA, 1:18.94. 2, Thompson, Luke-K C, SWIFT-BA, 1:20.62. 3, Rolle, Keilan, UNLL-ZZ, 1:24.43. Boys 11-12 100 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Holmberg, Nick B, SWIFT-BA, 1:14.20. 2, Coakley, Kadyn A, SBSC, 1:15.23. 3, Austin, Aikman L, BSC,1:19.04. Boys 13 & Over 100 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Roberts, Mancer B, BSC, 57.47. 2, Farquarson, Peter, UN-LL-ZZ, 58.34. 3, Cleare, Zarian L, DSC-BA, 1:00.36. Girls 8 & Under 50 LC Meter Breaststroke 1, Bowe, Cecily, DSC-BA, 52.95. 2, Thompson, Zaylie-E P, SWIFT-BA, 1:21.85. Girls 9-10 50 LC Meter Breaststroke 1, McCarroll, Zoe N, DSC-BA, 46.61. 2, Longley, Sian C, BSC, 47.47. 3, Albury, Lauren D, UN-LL-ZZ, 49.97. Girls 11-12 50 LC Meter Breaststroke 1, Sturrup, Simone R, SWIFT-BA, 42.28. 2, Albury, Shannon P, UN-LL-ZZ, 48.42. 3, Knowles, Lauren G, SWIFTBA, 49.39. Girls 13 & Over 50 LC Meter Breaststroke 1, Morley, Laura J, SWIFT-BA, 37.60. 2, Albury, Maya K, UN-LL-ZZ, 38.27. 3, Moss, Shaunte J, SWIFT-BA, 38.57. Boys 8 & Under 50 LC Meter Breaststroke 1, Carey, Davante S, BSC, 54.33. 2, Thompson, Mark-A W, SWIFT-BA, 1:01.08. 3, Taylor, Lamar C, FAC, 1:14.17. Boys 9-10 50 LC Meter Breaststroke 1, Bastian, Izaak Z, BSC, 45.71. 2, Morley, Peter G, SWIFT-BA, 47.50. 3, Thompson, Luke-K C, SWIFT-BA, 47.91. Boys 11-12 50 LC Meter Breaststroke 1, Cox, Tyrique J, SBSC, 39.37. 2, Levarity, Andre, UN-LL-ZZ, 39.89. 3, Holmberg, Nick B, SWIFT-BA, 41.70. Boys 13 & Over 50 LC Meter Breaststroke 1, Tynes, Dustin E, UN-LL-ZZ, 31.74. 2, Moses, Zach T, SWIFT-BA, 35.85. 3, Deveaux, Brandon L, BSC, 37.50. Girls 9-10 100 LC Meter Backstroke 1, Higgs, Lilly L, SWIFT-BA, 1:35.83. 2, Reed, Charlotte L, SWIFT-BA, 1:47.08. 3, Stamp, Virginia A, BSC, 1:52.74. Girls 11-12 100 LC Meter Backstroke 1, Allen, Tremaine T, SWIFT-BA, 1:25.21. 2, Hernandez, Jade E, DSC-BA, 1:32.35. 3, Thompson, Kistacia K, BSC, 1:47.27. Girls 13-99 100 LC Meter Backstroke 1, Morley, Laura J, SWIFT-BA, 1:15.27. 2, Saunders, Je'Nae K, BSC, 1:15.84. 3, Misiewicz, Anna J, BSC, 1:21.64. Boys 9-10 100 LC Meter Backstroke 1, Gibson, Samuel A, BSC, 1:39.37. 2, Strachan, Trent J, BSC, 1:49.70. 3, St Rose, Shamar C, BSC, 1:52.93. Boys 11-12 100 LC Meter Backstroke 1, Bowe, Clement, DSC-BA, 1:25.72. 2, Coakley, Kadyn A, SBSC, 1:30.98. 3, Rahming, Nicholas J, SWIFT-BA, 1:41.92.B oys 13-99 100 LC Meter Backstroke 1, Carey, Dionisio S, BSC, 1:09.53. 2, Hernandez Valdes, Anibal X, SWIFT-BA, 1:12.55. 3, Morley, Laron K, DSC-BA, 1:16.85. Girls 8 & Under 50 LC Meter Freestyle1, Bowe, Cecily, DSC-BA, 41.31. 2, R oberts, Dylan A, SWIFT-BA, 48.35. 3 Newbold, Jolise J, ORCA, 51.88. Girls 9-10 50 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Higgs, Lilly L, SWIFT-BA, 35.44. 2, McCarroll, Zoe N, DSC-BA, 35.99. 3, Albury, Lauren D, UN-LL-ZZ, 36.74. Girls 11-12 50 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Sturrup, Simone R, SWIFT-BA, 29.71. 2, Weech, Andreas T, SBSC, 30.34. 3, Hernandez, Jade E, DSC-BA, 36.12. Girls 13 & Over 50 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Greene, Gabrielle S, BSC, 29.27. 2, Smith, Taryn, UN-LL-ZZ, 29.72. 3, Reed, Doran G, SWIFT-BA, 30.20. Boys 8 & Under 50 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Neely, Shawn W, ORCA, 42.95. 2, Thompson, Mark-A W, SWIFT-BA, 43.57. 3, Taylor, Lamar C, FAC, 46.98. Boys 9-10 50 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Morley, Peter G, SWIFT-BA, 35.75. 2, Roberts, Joshua D, SWIFT-BA, 36.24. 3, Morris, David F, DSC-BA, 37.39. Boys 11-12 50 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Holmberg, Nick B, SWIFT-BA, 31.20. 2, Levarity, Andre, UN-LL-ZZ, 32.89. 3, Fernander, N'Nhyn M, BSC, 33.13. Boys 13 & Over 50 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Roberts, Mancer B, BSC, 25.74. 2, Higgs, Donovan J, SWIFT-BA, 27.42. 3, Kerr, Kohen K, BSC, 27.93. Girls 11-12 100 LC Meter Butterfly 1, Sturrup, Simone R, SWIFT-BA, 1:22.12. 2, Lloyd, Keitra A, SBSC, 1:27.78. 3, Higgs, Albury A, SWIFT-BA, 1:31.47. Girls 13-99 100 LC Meter Butterfly 1, Crispo, Miriam E, UNATT, 1:08.71. 2, Albury, Maya K, UN-LL-ZZ,1:10.85. 3, Bevans, Jourdan A, BSC, 1:23.03. Boys 9-10 100 LC Meter Butterfly 1, Morley, Peter G, SWIFT-BA, 1:45.20. Boys 13-99 100 LC Meter Butterfly 1, Farquarson, Peter, UN-LL-ZZ, 1:05.24. 2, Cleare, Zarian L, DSC-BA, 1:08.96. 3, Lloyd, Keith J, SBSC, 1:09.77. Girls 8 & Under 200 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Thompson, Zaylie-E P, SWIFT-BA, 3:41.36. 2, Taylor, Allison R, ORCA, 4:12.40. Girls 9-10 200 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Albury, Lauren D, UN-LL-ZZ, 3:13.67. 2, Higgs, Lilly L, SWIFT-BA, 3:14.35. 3, Reed, Charlotte L, SWIFT-BA, 3:14.83. Girls 11-12 200 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Allen, Tremaine T, SWIFT-BA, 2:36.53. 2, Sturrup, Simone R, SWIFT-BA, 2:38.39. 3, Higgs, Albury A, SWIFT-BA, 2:44.99. Girls 13 & Over 200 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Crispo, Miriam E, UNATT, 2:20.56. 1, Morley, Laura J, SWIFT-BA, 2:20.56. 3, Smith, Taryn, UN-LL-ZZ, 2:23.57. Boys 8 & Under 200 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Carey, Davante S, BSC, 3:42.33. 2, Thompson, Mark-A W, SWIFT-BA, 3:59.54. 3, Neely, Shawn W, ORCA, 4:05.06. Boys 9-10 200 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Thompson, Luke-K C, SWIFT-BA, 3:03.77. 2, Rolle, Keilan, UN-LL-ZZ, 3:07.31. 3, Roach, Jacob L, SWIFT-BA, 3:27.62. Boys 11-12 200 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Bowe, Clement, DSC-BA, 2:36.53. 2, Holmberg, Nick B, SWIFT-BA, 2:37.86. 3, Cox, Tyrique J, SBSC, 2:38.86. Boys 13 & Over 200 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Lowe, Matthew D, BSC, 2:08.87. 2, Hernandez Valdes, Anibal X, SWIFT-BA, 2:14.03. 3, Farquarson, Peter, UN-LL-ZZ, 2:14.62. Boys 9-10 200 LC Meter IM 1, Gibson, Samuel A, BSC, 3:25.45. 2, Roberts, Joshua D, SWIFT-BA, 3:49.85. 3, Strachan, Trent J, BSC, 3:55.17. Boys 11-12 200 LC Meter IM 1, Bowe, Clement, DSC-BA, 3:01.95. 2, Levarity, Andre, UN-LL-ZZ, 3:15.19. 3, Rahming, Nicholas J, SWIFTBA, 3:21.61. Boys 13 & Over 200 LC Meter IM 1, Tynes, Dustin E, UN-LL-ZZ, 2:28.44. 2, Moses, Zach T, SWIFT-BA, 2:35.20. 3, Cleare, Zarian L, DSC-BA, 2:41.73. Girls 11-12 400 LC Meter IM 1, Allen, Tremaine T, SWIFT-BA, 6:21.27. 2, Higgs, Albury A, SWIFT-BA, 6:48.63. Girls 13-99 400 LC Meter IM 1, Crispo, Miriam E, UNATT, 5:35.37. 2, Morley, Laura J, SWIFT-BA, 5:40.28. 3, Evans, Joanna, UN-LL-ZZ, 5:56.30. Boys 11-12 400 LC Meter IM 1, Bowe, Clement, DSC-BA, 6:34.18. Boys 13-99 400 LC Meter IM1 Tynes, Dustin E, UN-LL-ZZ, 5:24.54. 2, Moses, Zach T, SWIFT-BA, 5:30.21. 3, Lloyd, Keith J, SBSC, 5:55.31. Girls 8 & Under 100 LC Meter Freestyle1, Bowe, Cecily, DSC-BA, 1:32.99. 2, Roberts, Dylan A, SWIFT-BA,1 :34.18. 3, Newbold, Jolise J, ORCA, 1 :59.05. Girls 9-10 100 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Higgs, Lilly L, SWIFT-BA, 1:21.54. 2, Albury, Lauren D, UN-LL-ZZ, 1:24.20. 3, Reed, Charlotte L, SWIFT-BA, 1:25.42. Girls 11-12 100 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Sturrup, Simone R, SWIFT-BA, 1:04.81. 2, Weech, Andreas T, SBSC, 1:06.25. 3, Higgs, Albury A, SWIFT-BA, 1:12.41. Girls 13 & Over 100 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Smith, Taryn, UN-LL-ZZ, 1:03.56. 2, Greene, Gabrielle S, BSC, 1:04.69. 3, Reed, Doran G, SWIFT-BA, 1:05.64. Boys 8 & Under 100 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Neely, Shawn W, ORCA, 1:44.69. 2, Colebrooke, Kailen D, SWIFT-BA, 1:53.29. 3, Taylor, Lamar C, FAC, 1:54.33. Boys 11-12 100 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Holmberg, Nick B, SWIFT-BA, 1:14.20. 2, Coakley, Kadyn A, SBSC, 1:15.23. 3, Austin, Aikman L, BSC, 1:19.04. Boys 13 & Over 100 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Roberts, Mancer B, BSC, 57.47. 2, Farquarson, Peter, UN-LL-ZZ, 58.34. 3, Cleare, Zarian L, DSC-BA, 1:00.36. Girls 8 & Under 50 LC Meter Breast stroke1, Bowe, Cecily, DSC-BA, 52.95. 2, Thompson, Zaylie-E P, SWIFT-BA, 1:21.85. Girls 9-10 50 LC Meter Breaststroke 1, McCarroll, Zoe N, DSC-BA, 46.61. 2, Longley, Sian C, BSC, 47.47. 3, Albury, Lauren D, UN-LL-ZZ, 49.97. Girls 11-12 50 LC Meter Breaststroke 1, Sturrup, Simone R, SWIFT-BA, 42.28. 2, Albury, Shannon P, UN-LL-ZZ, 48.42. 3, Knowles, Lauren G, SWIFTBA, 49.39. Girls 13 & Over 50 LC Meter Breaststroke 1, Morley, Laura J, SWIFT-BA, 37.60. 2, Albury, Maya K, UN-LL-ZZ, 38.27. 3, Moss, Shaunte J, SWIFT-BA, 38.57. Boys 8 & Under 50 LC Meter Breaststroke 1, Carey, Davante S, BSC, 54.33. 2, Thompson, Mark-A W, SWIFT-BA, 1:01.08. 3, Taylor, Lamar C, FAC, 1:14.17. Boys 9-10 50 LC Meter Breaststroke 1, Bastian, Izaak Z, BSC, 45.71. 2, Morley, Peter G, SWIFT-BA, 47.50. 3, Thompson, Luke-K C, SWIFT-BA, 47.91. Boys 11-12 50 LC Meter Breaststroke 1, Cox, Tyrique J, SBSC, 39.37. 2, Levarity, Andre, UN-LL-ZZ, 39.89. 3, Holmberg, Nick B, SWIFT-BA, 41.70. Boys 13 & Over 50 LC Meter Breaststroke 1, Tynes, Dustin E, UN-LL-ZZ, 31.74. 2, Moses, Zach T, SWIFT-BA, 35.85. 3, Deveaux, Brandon L, BSC, 37.50. Girls 9-10 100 LC Meter Backstroke 1, Higgs, Lilly L, SWIFT-BA, 1:35.83. 2, Reed, Charlotte L, SWIFT-BA, 1:47.08. 3, Stamp, Virginia A, BSC, 1:52.74. Girls 11-12 100 LC Meter Backstroke 1, Allen, Tremaine T, SWIFT-BA, 1:25.21. 2, Hernandez, Jade E, DSC-BA, 1:32.35. 3, Thompson, Kistacia K, BSC, 1:47.27. Girls 13-99 100 LC Meter Backstroke 1, Morley, Laura J, SWIFT-BA, 1:15.27. 2, Saunders, Je'Nae K, BSC, 1:15.84. 3, Misiewicz, Anna J, BSC, 1:21.64. Boys 9-10 100 LC Meter Backstroke 1, Gibson, Samuel A, BSC, 1:39.37. 2, Strachan, Trent J, BSC, 1:49.70. 3, St Rose, Shamar C, BSC, 1:52.93. Boys 11-12 100 LC Meter Backstroke 1, Bowe, Clement, DSC-BA, 1:25.72. 2, Coakley, Kadyn A, SBSC, 1:30.98. 3, Rahming, Nicholas J, SWIFT-BA, 1:41.92. Boys 13-99 100 LC Meter Backstroke 1 Carey, Dionisio S, BSC, 1:09.53. 2, Hernandez Valdes, Anibal X, SWIFT-BA, 1:12.55. 3, Morley, Laron K, DSC-BA, 1:16.85. Girls 8 & Under 50 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Bowe, Cecily, DSC-BA, 41.31. 2, Roberts, Dylan A, SWIFT-BA, 48.35. 3, Newbold, Jolise J, ORCA, 51.88. Girls 9-10 50 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Higgs, Lilly L, SWIFT-BA, 35.44. 2, McCarroll, Zoe N, DSC-BA, 35.99. 3, Albury, Lauren D, UN-LL-ZZ, 36.74. Girls 11-12 50 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Sturrup, Simone R, SWIFT-BA, 29.71. 2, Weech, Andreas T, SBSC, 30.34. 3, Hernandez, Jade E, DSC-BA, 36.12. Girls 13 & Over 50 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Greene, Gabrielle S, BSC, 29.27. 2, Smith, Taryn, UN-LL-ZZ, 29.72. 3, Reed, Doran G, SWIFT-BA, 30.20. Boys 8 & Under 50 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Neely, Shawn W, ORCA, 42.95. 2, Thompson, Mark-A W, SWIFT-BA, 43.57. 3, Taylor, Lamar C, FAC, 46.98. Boys 9-10 50 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Morley, Peter G, SWIFT-BA, 35.75. 2, Roberts, Joshua D, SWIFT-BA, 36.24. 3, Morris, David F, DSC-BA, 37.39. Boys 11-12 50 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Holmberg, Nick B, SWIFT-BA, 31.20. 2, Levarity, Andre, UN-LL-ZZ, 32.89. 3, Fernander, N'Nhyn M, BSC, 33.13. Boys 13 & Over 50 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Roberts, Mancer B, BSC, 25.74. 2, Higgs, Donovan J, SWIFT-BA, 27.42. 3, Kerr, Kohen K, BSC, 27.93. Girls 11-12 100 LC Meter Butterfly 1 Sturrup, Simone R, SWIFT-BA, 1:22.12. 2, Lloyd, Keitra A, SBSC, 1:27.78. 3, Higgs, Albury A, SWIFT-BA, 1:31.47. Girls 13-99 100 LC Meter Butterfly 1, Crispo, Miriam E, UNATT, 1:08.71. 2, Albury, Maya K, UN-LL-ZZ, 1:10.85. 3, Bevans, Jourdan A, BSC, 1:23.03. Boys 9-10 100 LC Meter Butterfly 1, Morley, Peter G, SWIFT-BA, 1:45.20. Boys 13-99 100 LC Meter Butterfly 1, Farquarson, Peter, UN-LL-ZZ, 1:05.24. 2, Cleare, Zarian L, DSC-BA, 1:08.96. 3, Lloyd, Keith J, SBSC, 1:09.77. Girls 8 & Under 200 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Thompson, Zaylie-E P, SWIFT-BA, 3:41.36. 2, Taylor, Allison R, ORCA, 4:12.40. Girls 9-10 200 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Albury, Lauren D, UN-LL-ZZ, 3:13.67. 2, Higgs, Lilly L, SWIFT-BA, 3:14.35. 3, Reed, Charlotte L, SWIFT-BA, 3:14.83. Girls 11-12 200 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Allen, Tremaine T, SWIFT-BA, 2:36.53. 2, Sturrup, Simone R, SWIFT-BA, 2:38.39. 3, Higgs, Albury A, SWIFT-BA, 2:44.99. Girls 13 & Over 200 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Crispo, Miriam E, UNATT, 2:20.56. 1, Morley, Laura J, SWIFT-BA, 2:20.56. 3, Smith, Taryn, UN-LL-ZZ, 2:23.57. Boys 8 & Under 200 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Carey, Davante S, BSC, 3:42.33. 2, Thompson, Mark-A W, SWIFT-BA, 3:59.54. 3, Neely, Shawn W, ORCA, 4:05.06. Boys 9-10 200 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Thompson, Luke-K C, SWIFT-BA, 3:03.77. 2, Rolle, Keilan, UN-LL-ZZ, 3:07.31. 3, Roach, Jacob L, SWIFT-BA, 3:27.62. Boys 11-12 200 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Bowe, Clement, DSC-BA, 2:36.53. 2, Holmberg, Nick B, SWIFT-BA, 2:37.86. 3, Cox, Tyrique J, SBSC, 2:38.86. Boys 13 & Over 200 LC Meter Freestyle 1, Lowe, Matthew D, BSC, 2:08.87. 2, Hernandez Valdes, Anibal X, SWIFT-BA, 2:14.03. 3, Farquarson, Peter, UN-LL-ZZ, 2:14.62. F ROM page 4E THAN WINNING FEELING: Swift Swimming.

PAGE 18

S PORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 2011, PAGE 7E ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SALVADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's h ighs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDOLow: 51F/11C L ow: 52F/11C L ow: 61F/16C Low: 64F/18C Low: 64F/18C L ow: 67F/19C Low: 68F/20C Low: 55F/13C H igh: 68F/20C High: 67F/19C H igh: 71F/22C H igh: 72F/22C H igh: 73F/23C H igh: 73F/23C H igh: 77F/25C L ow: 56F/13C H igh: 69F/21C Low: 65F/18C High: 75F/24CRAGGED ISLANDLow: 66F/19C High: 81F/27C Low: 69F/21C H igh: 79F/26C L ow: 62F/17C High: 75F/24C Low: 65F/18C H igh: 76F/24C L ow: 68F/20C High: 82F/28C Low: 66F/19C High: 78F/26C L ow: 68F/20C H igh: 80F/27C L ow: 72F/22C H igh: 82F/28C Low: 64F/18C High: 76F/24C H igh: 68F/20CFREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE WEATHER REPORT 5-DA YFO RECASTAreas of low clouds a nd breezy B reezy with patchy c louds M ostly sunny and b reezy C hance for a couple o f showers M ostly sunny and pleasant High:7 Low:68High:8 High:8 High:7 AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeelP artly sunny and pleasant High:73Low:71Low:64Low:61 AccuWeather RealFeel 6 F The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperatureis an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and elevation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 67F 79-71F 85-62F 78-60F 7 5-61F Low:62TODAYTONIGHTTUESDAYWEDNESDAYTHURSDAYFRIDAY ALMANACH igh ..................................................70F/21C Low ....................................................63F/17C Normal high ......................................77F/25C N ormal low ........................................65F/18C Last year's high ..................................81F/27C Last year's low ..................................73F/23C A s of 1 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Y ear to date ..................................................0.46" N ormal year to date ......................................1.31" Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday Temperature P recipitation SUNANDMOON TIDESFORNASSAU Last N ewFirst Full Jan. 26Feb. 2Feb. 11Feb. 18S unrise . . . 6:55 a.m. Sunset . . . 5:49 p.m. M oonrise . 11:10 p.m. Moonset . . 10:05 a.m. Today Tuesday Wednesday Thursday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 1 1:01 a.m.2.84:59 a.m.-0.6 11:40 p.m.2.85:23 p.m.-0.9 11:55 a.m.2.55:58 a.m.-0.3 -----6:16 p.m.-0.7 12:40 a.m.2.87:02 a.m.0.0 12:54 p.m.2.47:14 p.m.-0.6 1 :44 a.m.2.78:11 a.m.0.1 1:59 p.m.2.28:16 p.m.-0.4 Friday Saturday S unday 2 :50 a.m.2.79:20 a.m.0.1 3 :06 p.m.2.19:19 p.m.-0.3 3:54 a.m.2.710:26 a.m.0.1 4 :11 p.m.2.110:21 p.m.-0.3 4 :53 a.m.2.711:24 a.m.0.0 5 :10 p.m.2.111:17 p.m.-0.3 MARINEFORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. ABACO ANDROS CAT ISLAND CROOKED ISLAND ELEUTHERA FREEPORT GREAT EXUMA GREAT INAGUA LONG ISLAND MAYAGUANA NASSAU SAN SALVADOR RAGGED ISLAND Today:E at 8-16 Knots4-8 Feet10 Miles73F Tuesday:ESE at 10-20 Knots4-7 Feet10 Miles73F Today:NE at 10-20 Knots2-4 Feet10 Miles74F Tuesday:ESE at 12-25 Knots3-6 Feet10 Miles76F Today:ENE at 10-20 Knots4-8 Feet5 Miles74F Tuesday:E at 12-25 Knots4-7 Feet7 Miles74F Today:ENE at 12-25 Knots3-5 Feet7 Miles77F Tuesday:E at 12-25 Knots4-8 Feet7 Miles77F Today:ENE at 10-20 Knots4-8 Feet10 Miles74F Tuesday:ESE at 10-20 Knots4-8 Feet10 Miles73F Today:E at 8-16 Knots3-5 Feet5 Miles74F Tuesday:SE at 10-20 Knots2-4 Feet10 Miles74F Today:NE at 12-25 Knots1-3 Feet5 Miles73F Tuesday:E at 12-25 Knots2-4 Feet7 Miles73F Today:ENE at 10-20 Knots3-5 Feet7 Miles77F Tuesday:E at 12-25 Knots4-7 Feet7 Miles77F Today:ENE at 12-25 Knots2-4 Feet10 Miles77F Tuesday:E at 12-25 Knots3-5 Feet7 Miles76F Today:ENE at 12-25 Knots6-10 Feet7 Miles78F Tuesday:E at 12-25 Knots6-10 Feet7 Miles78F Today:ENE at 8-16 Knots1-3 Feet10 Miles73F Tuesday:ESE at 10-20 Knots2-4 Feet10 Miles73F Today:NE at 10-20 Knots2-4 Feet10 Miles76F Tuesday:E at 12-25 Knots4-7 Feet10 Miles76F Today:NE at 10-20 Knots3-5 Feet10 Miles74F Tuesday:E at 12-25 Knots3-5 Feet10 Miles74F UV INDEXTODAYThe higher the AccuWeather UV IndexTMnumber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.F orecasts and graphics provided by A ccuWeather, Inc. AccuWeather.com H A tlanta A t l a n t a Highs: 52F/11C H i g h s : 5 2 F / 1 1 C Kingston K i n g s t o n Highs: 86F/30C H i g h s : 8 6 F / 3 0 C Caracas C a r a c a s Highs: 89F/32C H i g h s : 8 9 F / 3 2 C Panama City P a n a ma C i t y Highs: 90F/32C H i g h s : 9 0 F / 3 2 C Limon L i m o n Highs: 84F/29C H i g h s : 8 4 F / 2 9 C Managua Ma n a g u a Highs: 93F/34C H i g h s : 9 3 F / 3 4 C Cozumel C o z u m e l Highs: 82F/28C H i g h s : 8 2 F / 2 8 C Belize B e l i z e Highs: 81F/27C H i g h s : 8 1 F / 2 7 C C harlotte C h a r l o t t e H ighs: 42F/6C H i g h s : 4 2 F / 6 C Charleston C h a r l e s t o n Highs: 56F/13C H i g h s : 5 6 F / 1 3 C Savannah S a v a n n a h Highs: 58F/14C H i g h s : 5 8 F / 1 4 C Pensacola P e n s a c o l a Highs: 60F/16C H i g h s : 6 0 F / 1 6 C Daytona Beach D a y t o n a B e a c h Highs: 66F/19C H i g h s : 6 6 F / 1 9 C Tampa T a m p a Highs: 67F/19C H i g h s : 6 7 F / 1 9 C Freeport F r e e p o r t Highs: 68F/20C H i g h s : 6 8 F / 2 0 C Miami Mi a m i Highs: 73F/23C H i g h s : 7 3 F / 2 3 C Nassau N a s s a u Highs: 77F/25C H i g h s : 7 7 F / 2 5 C Havana H a v a n a Highs: 80F/27C H i g h s : 8 0 F / 2 7 C Santiago de Cuba S a n t i a g o d e C u b a Highs: 82F/28C H i g h s : 8 2 F / 2 8 C San Juan S a n J u a n Highs: 83F/28C H i g h s : 8 3 F / 2 8 C Santa S a n t a Domingo D o m i n g o Highs: 87F/31C H i g h s : 8 7 F / 3 1 C Trinidad T r i n i d a d Tobago T o b a g o Highs: 89F/32C H i g h s : 8 9 F / 3 2 C Port-au-Prince P o r t a u P r i n c e Highs: 90F/32C H i g h s : 9 0 F / 3 2 C C ape Hatteras C a p e H a t t e r a s Highs: 33F/1C H i g h s : 3 3 F / 1 C Aruba Curacao A r u b a C u r a c a o Highs: 86F/30C H i g h s : 8 6 F / 3 0 C Antigua A n t i g u a Highs: 84F/29C H i g h s : 8 4 F / 2 9 C Barbados B a r b a d o s Highs: 85F/29C H i g h s : 8 5 F / 2 9 C Bermuda B e r m u d a Highs: 59F/15C H i g h s : 5 9 F / 1 5 C A tlanta Highs: 52F/11C Kingston Highs: 86F/30C Caracas Highs: 89F/32C Panama City Highs: 90F/32C Limon Highs: 84F/29C Managua Highs: 93F/34C Cozumel Highs: 82F/28C Belize Highs: 81F/27C C harlotte H ighs: 42F/6C Charleston Highs: 56F/13C Savannah Highs: 58F/14C Pensacola Highs: 60F/16C Daytona Beach Highs: 66F/19C Tampa Highs: 67F/19C Freeport Highs: 68F/20C Miami Highs: 73F/23C Nassau Highs: 77F/25C Havana Highs: 80F/27C Santiago de Cuba Highs: 82F/28C San Juan Highs: 83F/28C Santa Domingo Highs: 87F/31C Trinidad Tobago Highs: 89F/32C Port-au-Prince Highs: 90F/32C Cape Hatteras H ighs: 33F/1C Aruba Curacao Highs: 86F/30C Antigua Highs: 84F/29C Barbados Highs: 85F/29C Bermuda Highs: 59F/15C INSURANCEMANAGEMENTTRACKINGMAP Showers Warm Cold Stationary Rain T-storms Flurries Snow IceShown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's highs and t onight's lows. N S EW E E E E W 7 -14 knots N S EW E E E E W 8 -16 knots N S EW E E E E W 7 -14 knots N S EW S E 10-20 knots N S EW S E 12-25 knots N S EW S E 12-25 knots N S EW S E 10-20 knots N S EW S E 10-20 knots TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net T he College of the Bahamas Caribs continued to make a playoff push and padded their winning record by recording another win against the league's bottom feeders. The Caribs placed three scorers in double figures in the 5 7-44 win over the Sentinel All-Stars Saturday night at the D.W Davis Gymnasium. Natiska Silver led the way with a double double, 16 points and 11 rebounds, Gabrielle McKinney also posteda double double with 10 points and 10 rebounds, while Shadell Williams finished with 10 points and five r ebounds. A full balanced scoring effort for the Caribs included Deandra WIlliams with eight points, Delesia Mackey withs even points and eight rebounds, while Alexis Maycock came off the bench to finish with four points. G ariece Butler led the All-Stars and was the lone player in double figures with 13 points and 10 rebounds and two blocks. B rittany Greenslade added six points and seven rebounds while Tonya Stubbs added five points and six r ebounds. The Caribs opened the game on a 10-0 run and shot 5-7 from the field in the game's first two minutes. T hey took a 21-8 lead at the end of the first quarter but the All-Stars would respond. L ed by Butler, who shot 9-13 from the free throw line the young All-Star squad crawled their way back into the game and outscored the Caribs 17-9 in the second quar-t er. Th Caribs led 30-25 at the half despite shooting just 27 percent from the field, 12 percent from beyond the archa nd 55 percent from the free throw line. More aggressive on the offensive end of the floor, led b y a stellar defensive effort, the Caribs attempted 44 shots whole the All-Stars were limited to just 25. The second half was all Caribs as they outscored the A ll-Stars 27-19 in the second half to hold on for the win. League play continues Tuesday at the D.W Davis Gymn asium at 7:30pm Caribs record another win STEVE DOUGLAS, AP Sports Writer L ONDON Blackburn moved provisionally into seventh place in the Premier League by beating West Bromwich Albion 2-0 on Sunday, courtesy of goals in a seven-minute spell either side of halftime. A spectacular own goal by Romania defender Gabriel Tamas put Rovers ahead in the 41st minute, and the win was secured in the 47th when Canadian forward David Hoilett thumped a 25-yard drive past goalkeeper Boaz Myhill for his first league goal. It means a lot, I've been waiting for it for a long time," said the 20-year-old Hoilett, w ho made his debut for the c lub last year but has only previously scored in the cup com-p etitions. It was the third home victory i n a row for Blackburn under new manager Steve Kean. We knew it was going to be a tough game, but we reallys tuck at it and I thought we w ere excellent," Kean said. West Brom, which has now l ost home and away to Blackburn in the space of four weeks, h as won once in seven league matches and is only three points a bove the relegation zone. "At 1-0 down at halftime we w ere still in the game, but the way we came out in the second half was very disappointing," W est Brom manager Roberto Di Matteo said. T wenty-two different nationalities participated in the matcha t Ewood Park, a Premier League record. N inth-place Bolton plays C helsea, which is fourth, on Monday. M anchester United is still top of the standings after a 5-0 win a t home to Birmingham on Saturday. Arsenal beat Wigan 3-0t o move into second, overtaking Manchester City, which lost 1-0 at Aston Villa. Arsenal is two points behind U nited having played a game more, and a point clear of City. A fter a slow start, Blackburn made most of the running int he first half and West Brom was indebted to Myhill for k eeping the score level before T amas' gaffe. The visitors' only chance b efore the break fell to top scorer Peter Odemwingie, after j ust 30 seconds. Norway international Morten Gamst Peder-s en lost possession in midfield, allowing Odemwingie to pounce and smash a 25-yard v olley that was pushed away by P aul Robinson. Swedish winger Martin Olsson and Christopher Samba, twice, had low shots saved by M yhill as Blackburn started to dominate. But the goalkeeper could do nothing to prevent Tamas' header flying past him. U nited States midfielder Jerm aine Jones, making his debut for Rovers following his sixmonth loan move from Schalke, slipped a ball through to David D unn, whose angled cross was powered into his own net by Tamas from eight yards out. West Brom has now concede d at least one goal in 21 s traight league games. Hoilett made it 2-0 when he picked the ball up 35 yards out, cut inside and unleashed a swerving effort that powered t hrough the attempted save of Myhill for his first Premier L eague goal. West Brom finished the better of the sides, with Robinson saving shots by Jerome Thomas and Chris Brunt, but Blackburnh ad few problems seeing out the win. Q ueens Park Rangers beat Coventry 2-1 on Sunday to e xtend the London team's lead in the second-tier League Championship to five points. Winger Wayne Routledge scored the winner in his firstg ame since rejoining QPR on loan from Premier League sideN ewcastle. Blackburn beat West Brom 2-0 in Premier League n E NGLISHSOCCERROUND-UP ( AP Photo/Tim Hales) S PECTACULAROWNGOAL: W est Bromwich Albion goalkeeper Boaz Myhill reacts after conceding an own goal against Blackburn Rovers during their English Premier League soccer match at Ewood Park, Blackburn, England, Sunday Jan. 23, 2011.

PAGE 19

INTERNATIONALSPORTS PAGE 8E, MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 2011 TRIBUNE SPORTS TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM CHRIS JENKINS, A P Sports Writer CHICAGO There was one Monster of the Midway in the NFC championship game and his name was Aaron Rodgers. H e wasn't even at his best and, still, he was better than the first, the second and the third quarterback used in vain by theC hicago Bears against their bitter rivals. Rodgers ran for a score and made a TD-saving tackle in leading t he Green Bay Packers into the Super Bowl with a bone-jarring 2114 victory Sunday over Chicago. "It's an incredible feeling," Rodgers said. "I'm at a loss for words." Rodgers played well enough to keep the Bears off balance all afternoon, Green Bay punter Tim Masthay kept Devin Hester under wraps and the Packers' superb defense took care of the r est in knocking the Bears out of the playoffs. It was the 182nd meeting in the league's most historic feud, a nd the stakes had never been bigger. Now the Packers (13-6 w hat happens in the Super Bowl on Feb. 6, the Packers and their fans hold ultimate bragging rights over their foes to the south. Green Bay will play the winner of Sunday night's AFC title game between the New York Jets and Pittsburgh Steelers. "We made a play to win the game and that's all that matters," P ackers linebacker Clay Matthews said. "Keep playing defense the way we know how, and it's going to be tough for teams to beat us." A ll Jay Cutler could do was watch, having left the game with a knee injury early in the third quarter. Even before the injury, C utler was having trouble moving the ball. Worse, he was getting booed by the home fans. Primary backup Todd Collins replaced Cutler and was jeered even worse. Then little-known backup Caleb Hanie and the Bears (12-6 Chicago's third-string quarterback rallied the Bears for a touchdown drive to cut the lead to 14-7 after Chester Taylor's 1-yard t ouchdown run early in the fourth quarter. Hanie had a chance to tie the game after the Bears' defense finall y got a few stops, but threw a ball straight to Packers defensive lineman B.J. Raji, who lumbered 18 yards into the end zone for a touchdown to give the Packers a 21-7 lead. But Hanie wasn't finished. He threw a 35-yard touchdown pass to Earl Bennett to again cut the lead to seven points with 4:43 left. The Bears forced a punt and got the ball back with under 3 minutes left. Hanie drove the Bears to the Green Bay 29-yard line, then t hrew a fourth-down interception to Sam Shields the rookie's second of the game. N ow all those Pro Bowl voters who didn't think Rodgers was worthy can relax. They're off the hook. Rodgers will be headed to the Super Bowl instead. Rodgers proved ready for the biggest day of his brief but impres sive career as the successor to Brett Favre, even if his final stat line didn't look impressive after an ugly, hard-fought game. He threw for 244 yards with two interceptions a disappointment, given how well he had played lately. But his play in the first half was good enough to put the Bears in a two-touchdown hole, boggling a good defense that suddenly seemed to fall for every playaction fake. Chicago was ready for a championship party under sunny skies and 20-degree temperatures, and went wild from the national anthem on. But Rodgers quieted them down quickly, marching the Packers on an opening drive then ended with Rodgers scram bling for a score. The Bears went with a heavy dose of running back Matt Forte early on, with limited success. Early in the second quarter, Brandon Jackson faked Brian Urlacher out for a long gain on a screen pass, and Rodgers' pass to Jordy Nelson set up James Starks' 4-yard touchdown run to give Green Bay a 14-0 lead. It was the latest in a series of big moments for Rodgers, who has earned near-universal praise for the way he has played this season especially since sitting out the Packers' Dec. 19 loss at New England because of a concussion. Rodgers has been on a hot streak ever since, and doing it under pressure. The Packers would have been out of the playoffs with a loss in either of their last two regular-season games, including the regular season finale against Chicago. With the Packers leading 14-0 at halftime, Green Bay's defense forced a three-and-out to begin the second half, and Rodgers went back to marching the Packers down the field. With the Packers poised to put the game away, Rodgers instead tossed the ball to Urlacher on third-and-goal. He took off and ran down the Bears linebacker near midfield, barely preventing him from running it back for a touchdown when he grabbed him. "I don't think he saw me," Urlacher said. "He threw it to me then he tackled me." Rodgers' play almost certainly saved a score and might have saved the game. "I don't get paid to tackle, but that was probably one of my bet ter plays of the game," Rodgers said. Urlacher, who said earlier in the week that he voted for Rodgers for the Pro Bowl, walked away impressed. "Great quarterback, no doubt about that," Urlacher said. But after Urlacher's interception, the Bears couldn't make anything happen with Collins in for Cutler, and appeared to be headed for a blowout until Hanie took over. Packers players were surprised Cutler didn't come back. "You know if he doesn't come back it had to be serious, not to come back and play in this game," Charles Woodson said. Matthews wasn't sure when Cutler got hurt. "Kinda wish they would have had Jay in there the whole time the way things were going," Matthews said. Bears coach Lovie Smith grew testy after being asked several questions about Cutler's injury. "He hurt his knee and he was out, all right?" Smith said. "There's nothing else for me to tell you on that. I don't know exactly when it happened, he couldn't go and that was that." Rodgers leads Pack to Super Bowl as they beat Chicago Bears 21-14 (AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato PASSTIME: Chicago Bears quarterback Jay Cutler (663 ers during the first half of the NFC Championship NFL football game Sunday, Jan. 23, 2011, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast TOUCHDOWN: Chicago Bears quarterback Caleb Hanie (12 brates a touchdown with Earl Bennett (80 the NFC Championship NFL football game against the Green Bay Packers Sunday, Jan. 23, 2011, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast DEJECTED: Chicago Bears Charles Tillman reacts after the NFC Championship NFL football game against the Green Bay Packers Sunday, Jan. 23, 2011, in Chicago. The Packers won 21-14. OFF THE FIELD: Chicago Bears quarterback Jay Cutler walks off the field after the NFC Champi onship NFL football game against the Green Bay Packers Sunday, Jan. 23, 2011, in Chicago. INTERCEPTION: Green Bay Packers Sam Shields (37 an intercepted pass in front of Chicago Bears Roberto Garza (63 the final minute of the second half of the NFC Championship NFL football game Sunday, Jan. 23, 2011, in Chicago. The Packers won 21-14. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh


University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2011 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated May 24, 2011 - Version 3.0.0 - mvs