The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01760
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: 12/22/2011
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Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
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General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:01760

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N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R WikiLeaks: Anna Nicole havoc in the Bahamas C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 107 No.27WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2010 PRICE 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER PLENTYOF SUNSHINE HIGH 78F LOW 65F F E A T U R E S S EETHEARTSSECTION S P O R T S Giving art for SEESECTIONE Christmas Mullings wins title B y AVA TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Report aturnquest@ tribunemedia.net T HE turbulent time spent in the Bahamas by the latem odel Anna Nicole S mith was compared to Hurricane Betsy in leaked US cables from the whistleblower website WikiLeaks. In a 2006 US cable, then a mbassador John Rood documented the series of scandals that surrounded former Playboy model and reality TV star's Bahamian residency application and the death of her son. The cable read: "Not since Category 4 Hurricane Betsy m ade landfall in 1965 has one woman done as much dam age in Nassau. Lying i n disarray in her wake are Doctor's Hospital, the Coro ner's Court, the Department of Immigration, localm ega-lawyers Call enders and Co., formerly popular Min ister of Immigration S hane Gibson, and possibly Prime Min ister Christie's PLP government." I n the cable sent on November 15, titled Hurricane Anna Nicole WreaksH avoc in the Bahamas, Mr Rood followed the fast tracking of Ms Smith's residency status through personal McCOMBO OF THE DAY N E W The Tribune THEPEOPLESPAPER BIGGESTANDBEST L ATESTNEWSONWWW.TRIBUNE242.COM BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E B y MEGAN REYNOLDS T ribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A TRIBUNE article highlighting the plight of a single mother evicted from h er home weeks before C hristmas has sparked a chain of donations that will impact hundreds of lives. T he unprecedented wave of charity that could generate up to $20,000 fort he Salvation Army this h oliday season was gener ated by the story of There s a Gibson who was forced out of her home last week Late models time in the nation compared to Hur r icane Betsy HEARTBREAKING TRIBUNE STORY SPARKS WAVE OF KINDNESS MEDAL WINNER: Fresh from her bronze medalwinning swim at the FINA World Short Course Championships, a triumphant Arianna VanderpoolWallace returned to the Bahamas yesterday. Reflecting on her race, the 20-year-old said: Before the final of the 50 freestyle, my start was pretty good. Diving into the final, it wasnt as good as I thought it would be and basically coming off the last turn, I just swum my heart out. I didnt want to come fourth and I ended up coming third. SEESPORTSSECTION MEDAL-WINNINGARIANNABACKHOME By AVA TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter aturnquest@tribunemedia.net FEARING for his sons life, a former police officer is calling for immediate action into an unresolved feud that has plagued his family for seven years. Reno Deveaux Sr, 45, of Reno Water Sports (RWS his longstanding disputew ith an officer of the Cen tral Detective Unit who is also a family member has become increasingly severe after his employee was beaten while in police cus tody last week. SEE page 10 FORMER OFFICER FEARS F OR SONS LIFE IN FEUD POLICE are appealing for information which may lead to the return of a teenage girl who has been missing for nearly a month. Shandice Ferguson, 13, of Pigeon Plum Street, was last seen in the area of the Nassau Harbour Club on East Bay Street on November 29. Police were said to have very little information concerning her disappearance. Meanwhile, two missing teenagers have returned home. Terrinique Thompson, 14, who was last seen near her home in the Bacardi Road area on Friday, APPEAL FOR INFORMATION OVER MISSING TEENAGE GIRL SEE page 11 SEE page 10 WHEN prominent Greek Bahamian John Mosko fired the fatal shot which killed Clayton Dean, there was another victim that fateful day. Sophia Mae Dean gained notoriety from the controversial death of her father as the nameless little girl mentioned in newspapers. She was just 12 months old girl at the time. Now, 21 years later, Sophia Mae is ironically behind bars on weapons-related charges. TURN TO PAGE SIX TO READ HER STORY. A LIFE OF REGRET: CLAYTON DEANS LITTLE GIRL LATEMODEL A nna Nicole Smith SEE page 11

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net VERNAY Gilbert, one of the claimants to a plot of land in San Salvador under which pirate treasure is rumoured to be buried, called on Dorothy Black-Beal to stop a ll excavation efforts. Ms Gilbert said she feels her childhood friend Ms Black-Beal is being given bad advice by persons that surround her. There is enough money there to take this country out of its national debt, Ms G ilbert said, but I believe that persons have tampered w ith the survey maps and are e ssentially trespassing on my fathers property. M s Gilberts claim stems from the fact that her fathers home is situated almost exactly on the spot which is b eing excavated at Fortune H ill. Even if her fathers title to the land is not clear, MsG ilbert said the fact that he lived there for more than 90 years entitles him to squatt ers rights. My mother is still alive, shes 93. The pear tree that they s peak of (near a cave thought to contain the treasure) she planted that. So I dont know why the g overnment wont stop and l isten to us. They should at least sit down and hear what w e have to say. And Dorothy should know better. We played together as children. My mother used to send me to sit with her when s he was sick. But if the gov ernment continues to allow this to go through, we have no choice but to sue them a nd all of these persons who have trespassed on our land, she said. M s Gilbert said that as c hildren, she and her siblings were told stories about the mysterious cave by theirf ather, who spoke of writing on the cavern walls and tunnels that burrow deep into t he hill, and perhaps out to s ea at the other end. S he said her father never explored further because he b elieved a curse would befall whoever disturbed the treasure. T o this day, many islanders b elieve that before any treasure is removed, blood must be spilt at the site to cleanse the appetite of the spirits that guard the ill-gotten loot. Apparently unmoved by t hese rumours, excavators were reportedly hard at work on the site yesterday. T here has been no confir mation of when the crew is expected to break through the now-buried entrance of t he cave. The Tribune will continue to update the public on thisd eveloping story as it hap p ens. Buried treasure land claimant calls for stop to excavation work T T h h e e r r e e i i s s e e n n o o u u g g h h m m o o n n e e y y t t h h e e r r e e t t o o t t a a k k e e t t h h i i s s c c o o u u n n t t r r y y o o u u t t o o f f i i t t s s n n a a t t i i o o n n a a l l d d e e b b t t , b b u u t t I I b b e e l l i i e e v v e e t t h h a a t t p p e e r r s s o o n n s s h h a a v v e e t t a a m m p p e e r r e e d d w w i i t t h h t t h h e e s s u u r r v v e e y y m m a a p p s s a a n n d d a a r r e e e e s s s s e e n n t t i i a a l l l l y y t t r r e e s s p p a a s s s s i i n n g g o o n n m m y y f f a a t t h h e e r r s s p p r r o o p p e e r r t t y y . Vernay Gilbert

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By RUPERT MISSICK Tribune Chief Reporter CONFIDENTIAL disp atches released to the public through the Wikileaks diplomatic cables leak reveal that former foreign affairs minister Fred Mitchell told US Embassy officials in Nassau that thel ack of a serious CARIC OM effort to prevent d irect UK rule over Turks and Caicos was a result of a surprising ambivalence a mong TCI government and opposition officials. The cables emanating from the US Embassy in N assau, marked confidential and sensitive, also d escribed comments made b y Prime Minster Hubert Ingraham and Mr Mitchell on a possible Bahamas-TCI federation as rhetoric. I n March of last year, a U K-initiated Commission of I nquiry found evidence of a high probability of systemic corruption or other serious d ishonesty" among government officials in TCI. T he commissions findings f orced then Premier Michael Misick to resign and make way for a new unified government. Politicians were accused of selling Crown land for personal gain and misusing public funds. Mr Mitchell, who is shado w foreign affairs minister for the PLP, led a delegation to TCI last year to explore ways to rally CARICOM against London resuming direct rule overt he island nation. However, the cables sugg est the political parties in TCI were too fractured to launch a credible opposition to UK rule, and in August 2009 the Governor, on the i nstructions of the UK Fore ign Office, imposed direct r ule on the islands. T he Wikileaks documents say the fractured nature o f TCI politics was reinforced by Mr Mitchell him-s elf. A ccording to the cables, M r Mitchell told the Charge d'Affaires they found surprising ambivalence among T CI government officials a nd that the opposition Peoples Democratic Party ( PDM) refused even to meet with the Bahamian delegation. Mitchell said this explained the lack of serio us Caribbean-wide efforts, at least for now, against the r esumption of direct UK rule, the cable said. Mr Mitchell, speaking to The Tribune yesterday, said t he cables leaked by Wik ileaks are just a joke and cannot be taken seriously in response to his alleged commentary concerning TCI and their current situa t ion. M r Mitchell said: I am not aware of the cable links nor do I know whether theya re authentic or not. The only important view is that of the people. He stressed that the Progressive Liberals Partys stance has been very clear on the matter. Some information cont ained in the cables was already in the public domain. F or instance, they refer to the fact that Misick announced his belief that the people of TCI were interested in becoming an autonomous state of The Bahamas, a comment he made during an exclusive interview with The Tribune i n September of last year. The former premier, who resigned in March in the face of corruption allegations, said such an arrangement would be mutually beneficial, as the Turks andC aicos islands have attracted huge investments, and Providenciales could serve as the New Providence of the southern Bahamas. Misicks comments came i n the same month as Turks a nd Caicos lost their right to self-rule for two years after Britain suspendedp arts of its constitution in response to findings of systemic corruption in the i slands government headed by Misick. The former premier has d enied any wrongdoing. P rime Minister Hubert Ingraham said he would be happy to discuss a federa-t ion, but only when the con s titutional crisis was over. The PM reported being involved in diplomatic ini tiatives, including consulting with CARICOM, to work toward a quick reso l ution of the crisis. He said any future discussions about a federationw ould have to be in accordance with the wishes of the people of The Bahamas and TCI. M r Mitchell also appeared to support the idea of a federation callingt he proposal a fascinating idea worth exploring," but also conditioned hisr esponse to TCI resolving i ts current situation. However, the embassy seems to have dismissed b oth government and opposition statements on federation as rhetoric designed to placate a historical neigh bour during uncertain times. The cable said: Mitchell w as careful to note that the times in which the two countries were united,m ost recently from 1965 to 1 973, were not entirely happy." If the UK is able to quickly stabilise conditions in the country and restore govern-m ent confidence, little is likely to materialise from t he federation suggestion. However, if economic conditions worsen, there could be increased calls for The Bahamas to take action; calls the Bahamas is unlikely to heed. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2010, PAGE 3 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Mirror 1 pc Mirror 2 pc Nightstands 2 pc Nightstands 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest Queen 8 Pc Queen 8 Pc $3,730 $3,730 King 8 Pc Set King 8 Pc Set $3,940 $3,940Solid Wood Solid WoodT T h h e e T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWongs Plaza Wongs Plaza Madeira Street Madeira Street (242 (242 2335 2335Financing Available Through Commonwealth Bank L L a a F F r r o o n n t t e e r r a a L L a a F F r r o o n n t t e e r r a a Wikileaks:Mitchell reinforced view of fractured Turks and Caicos politics Confidential and sensitiv diplomatic cables from US Embassy in Bahamas released FORMER Foreign Affairs Minister Fred Mitchell. FORMER Turks and Caicos P remier Michael Misick. A MAN was shot in the chest after armed gunmen robbedh im of his vehicle Monday afternoon. Sometime around 4.30pm, police received information of a shooting at 21st Century Hardware on Carmichael Road. At the scene police were informed that a man was on Cowpen Road when he was approached by two men armed with handguns. It is reported that the gunmen robbed theman of his green 2000 Suzuki Avatar Jeep and shot him in the chest. The victim was taken to hospital where his condition is listed as serious. It is further reported that during the incident the gunmen robbed another man of his 2006 grey Suzuki Liana and fled the area in an unknown direction. Sometime around 7.40 pm on Monday police recovered the green 2000 Suzuki Jeep on Leeward Drive, Carmichael Road. Police investigations into the incident continue. Police are also investigating an armed robbery that occurred at Mega Wholesale, Robinson Road and Charles Vincent Street. According to reports, police were alerted of the armed rob bery around 12.50pm on Monday. At the scene police were informed that a male wearing a green plaid shirt, brown shorts and a dark cap entered the establishment demanding cash. The gunman robbed the store of an undetermined amount of cash and cellular phone cards before fleeing the area on foot in an unknown direction. R OBBERS SHOO T MAN STEAL CAR

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E DITOR, The Tribune. My neighbour told me of a n incident that occurred December 11th that has left me very sickened about our country! A car accident happened r ight across the street around 10pm. A car with one person in it, lost control and hit a tree. The driver was badly hurt a brokenl eg I was told. My neighbour went outs ide to help having just come home from hospital after a car accident herself. While waiting for the ambu lance, two young locals approached and someone asked what they were doing, they said they came to help, but they proceeded to steal whatever they could from the damaged car of the helpl ess victim lying injured in the street! They ran away with whatever they managedt o carry! This country is sadly beyond reproach. Where is the police pres ence? A major problem in our country is that heinous crimes happen and there is little or no repercussion. There should be a vastp olice force visible every where, and at all times. Let t hese little thugs know they will not be allowed to carry on like hooligans and that they will be punished harsh ly for each and every crime a nd not just sent to Fox Hill Prison for a period of time until they can get out on bailt o do it all over again! Lets take off the kid gloves and take control back from these people who have taken over the country. Letsa t least try to provide a safe environment for the people who deserve to live without fear of such horrific crime. To the police force I s ay...get out there please! Serve and protect us p lease! J M JOHNSON Nassau, December, 2010. EDITOR, The Tribune. It is evident that law enforcement agencies have increased vigilance in our country and are being rewarded with the much needed success in the war on crime. Caribbean nations are hoping that with gun legislation and increased vigilance they can combat crime, in particular violent crime, a regional menace which is threatening the tourist industry. Some of the islands have enacted legislation that denies bail for firearm crimes, with quick tri als and mandatory prison sentences of three years minimum. Trinidad & Tobago is about to enact legislation of life imprisonment for a third conviction for crimes involv ing the use or possession of firearms. It is accepted by the leaders and residents of these Caribbean counties that crime impacts on the perception of safety, a crucial element influencing a person's decision to travel. Unless travellers feela certain sense of security in making a trip, they will not embark on a journey. An upsurge in crime, a growing trend in the Caribbean within the last few years, should be of grave concern for regional tourism and hotel officials. Many are worried that declines in tourist arrivals to their respective countries will result, unless measures are taken to reduce the growth of violent crimi nal activity. Recent attacks on tourists in small island nations in the South Caribbean have been alarming. Some islands are looking towards Canada and the UK to supplement their Police Services with the much needed expertise. As Caribbean countries are so dependent, to a large extent on the foreign e xchange generated by the t ourism industry, negative developments such as i ncreased violent crimes could have devastating consequences for individual economies in the region. In The Bahamas we are fortunate that violent crimes against visitors are occasional and our Police Force has successfully investigated and have brought the criminals to justice. We are fortunate toh ave a Police Service that is well trained and equipped with vehicles, communication systems, modern technology and most importantly the management qualifications and technical expertise which are tops in the region. The problem in The Bahamas is Guns, Big Guns, Small Guns, all sorts of Guns. If we can eradicate the guns, violent crimes would be reduced. The Police are doing remarkably well with the number of arrests for firearms possession and recovery, the present system is frustrating the efforts as those violent criminals are granted bail and are on the streets with other guns. This is a fact the Police find themselves engaging the same criminals in battle. There are those who have been killed in gun battles with the Police who were out on bail for gun crimes. There is a dire need for legislation that would: (a)Authorise a special court for gun cases. (b)Deny bail for persons charged with gun crimes. (c)Mandatory imprisonment for those convicted of gun crimes. In addition to the forgoing, our private sector through the Chamber of Commerce should start a fund to pay for information leading to the arrests and conviction of per sons importing or in possession of guns and ammunition in our country. The Public, through the media, in particular the Talk Shows must lobby to get Government to consider this legislation. We served with honour. We remember with pride. Mr. Paul Thompson Sr. Former Assistant Commissioner of Police, December 15, 2010. Cc. Minister of National Security Minister of Tourism Attorney General Commissioner of Police C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2010 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 WEBSITE w ww.tribune242.com updated daily at 2pm C RIME IS taking its toll on Harbour Island. A worried resident told us this week that this is the first in a long time that he has seen Valentines Marina so bare of yachts. The resident talked with a dock hand whoc onfirmed that his impression of the scarcity of visiting boats was a fact. Business wasi ndeed below the radar. Also at this time last year, we were told, t here were so many private planes at the airport that it was almost impossible to count them. This year there were only two or three. The reason? Crime. Not only are Harbour Island residents c onvinced that crime is their undoing, but residents from mainland Eleuthera agreew ith them. Persons go before the courts. They delay, d elay, delay until the case is eventually thrown out. We have completely lost confidence in the courts and the whole judicial system, another resident commented. They believe that if the culprits were puni shed, it would be a deterrent to others who might not be so anxious to sneak into theirh omes, tip-toe past the bed of sleeping homeowners and steal their valuables. But, a ccording to these residents, that is not happening. The culprits, they claim, walk away from the court and the crime. The satisfied chuckle is theirs while fear stalks the small community. At the mercy of criminals, abandoned by the courts, not only are long time residents leaving because they no longer feel s afe, but Brilanders themselves are despairing. As a result they are trying to under s tand why the court system is failing them. Each man has his own theory, and right or wrong, devoid of answers they are coming to the same conclusion they believe that the bench and the defence appear to be too friendly when they are on the island. It is a small island and so it is under s tandable that when two lawyers from Nassau make their Harbour Island circuit they w ill probably dine together, possibly even live in the same hotel but when residents see them in court on opposite sides of the Bar, then eyebrows are raised. We are not suggesting that there is anything wrong, but as we all know perception is nine tenths of the law and, unfortu n ately, this is the perception of Brilanders. BTC staff should protect their future Mr. William Carroll, who heads the Public Managers Union, is angered by what he calls Prime Minister Ingrahams threat that i f BTC union members walk off their jobs, there is no guarantee that they can return. We see this as good advice rather than a threat. What, Mr Ingraham was saying is a reali ty, not a figment of a politicians imagination. So until all the stages have been com-p leted for a legal strike vote, a strike under present circumstances is illegal. A lso anyone walking off the job now would be taking their final walk, and union leaders could face the courts to explain what part they might have played in an illegal strike. S o with the courts ruling that no unlawful industrial action can be taken against BTCu ntil it has an opportunity early next year to consider the unions application to have the i njunction lifted, BTC staff would be well advised to listen to Mr Ingraham. We would contend that by walking off the job they would have quit in other words fired themselves. A s for a demonstration, they would also be well advised to get the permission of thep olice before they contemplate another walk down Bay Street. A s for Mr Carrolls reply to Mr Ingrahams comments that hundreds of layoffs would be the consequence of reduced cell phone rates, we would suggest that he con sider the consequences of losing the monopoly that protects those rates. Prices have been reduced before and it d id not significantly reduce revenue, there are studies that show that, said Mr Carroll. N o, of course, it wouldnt reduce revenue, because the long suffering public had nowhere else to turn. Regardless of prices BTC was the only show in town. Wrapped in its own protective cocoon, Bahamians were forced to do busi ness with BTC. They had to accept its medi o crity. When we make such sweeping statements, w e hasten to say that BTC does have first class staff who are cooperative and give superior service. Unfortunately, there are not enough of them to carry the company to a new level. When BTC loses all its monopolies, it will collapse. It is the purchasing power,b usiness strength and international contacts of the $2.5 billion C&W (LIME save the day for this country and for the BTC staff who choose to be a part of the new group. N ot only will the consumer benefit, but all Bahamians will have an opportunity to purchase shares in what is hoped to be a profitable company. Dire need for legislation in gun crime fight LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Crime is taking its toll on Harbour Island Sickened as young locals steal fr om accident victim s car

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POLICE are seeking the publics assistance in locat-i ng the person they want to question in connection witha recent burglary, armed robbery and attempted rape. A composite sketch has been released showing what police believe the suspect to l ook like. T he man wanted for ques t ioning in this case is of dark brown complexion, around6 tall and weighing about 1 50 lbs with a slim build. The Central Detective Unit is also searching for Jasper Curry, alias Buck,w ho they want to question in connection with an armed robbery. C urry, 33, is described as b eing of dark brown complexion, standing 5 tall and weighing around 120 lbs with a medium build. His last known address is #101 Lightbourne Avenue, Yellow Elder. B oth suspects are considered armed and dangerous. Persons with any infor mation regarding the where a bouts of these men are a sked to contact the police emergency line at 919/911; CDU at 502-9930/9991; thep olice control room at 3223333; Crime Stoppers at 3288477, or the nearest police station. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2010, PAGE 5 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM %4+2674'*17)*6 POLICE are investigating a shooting that h as left one man in hospital. S hortly before 6am yesterday, police received a report of a shooting at Peter Street off East Street. Witnesses at the scene said a 21-year-old man was on Peter Street in the area of the government complex when he was approached by a man armed with a handguna nd wearing a black hooded jacket. I t is reported that the gunman fired shots in the direction of the 21-year-old which resulted in him sustaining gunshot injuries to the legs. The victim was taken to hospital by private vehicle where he is detained in stable condition. A handgun and ammunition was retrieved from a bushy area off Kemp Road on Monday. According to police reports, sometime around 1.30pm on Monday officers of the N ortheastern Division acting on information r eceived made a check of a bushy area at Strachans Alley off Kemp Road and recovered a handgun with ammunition. No arrests have been made but police investigations continue. TWO guns and a quantity of marijuana w as confiscated by police after a search warrant was executed on a Pinewood Gardens residence yesterday. Sometime around 2.50am officers of the Southeastern Division searched a residence on Buttonwood Avenue, Pinewood Gard ens. T hey recovered a shotgun, a handgun with ammunition and a quantity of marijuana. A 37-year-old man was taken into custody. POLICE say the man who was found dead in Pinewood Gardens on Saturday has been identified as 37-year-old Darren Rolle of Cowpen Road West. Rolle was the countrys 94th homicide for the year. Early Saturday, police found his body lying in frontof an apartment off Button wood Avenue, Pinewood Gardens. Rolle had suffered an injury to the abdomen. T HEBAHAMAS VERYOWNSTREETPHILOSOPHER Man in hospital after shooting TWO MEN WANTED FOR QUESTIONING WANTED: The composite sketch ( left) and Jasper Curry (right) POLICE IDENTIFY L A TES T HOMICIDE VICTIM

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By NOELLE NICOLLS Tribune Staff Reporter nnicolls@tribunemedia.net HER life is not regret-free: so much she would change if she could. For now, her one aim is freedom from Her Majestys Prison, where she has been on remand for seven months. She was the innocent shadow in the fatal shooting of Clayton Dean by prominent Greek Bahamian John Mosko in 1991. She gained her notoriety from the controversial death of her father, as the nameless little girl mentioned in newspapers. She was a one-year old baby at the time. Twenty-one years later, Sophia Mae Dean is all grown up. She is behind bars for charges of illegal possession of ammunition, and she misses her boyfriend Antoine Mackey and their two year baby girl, Antoniqua. She was living with a friend, when police raided the place of residence and found a bag with 700 rounds of ammunition, according to Tribune sources. Mr Mosko was formally accused of the murder of Sophias father, but the case never went to trial. He was released of all charges on a successful nolle prosequi application. In the days leading up to Mr Deans death, homeowners in the Eastern Road area were living in fear following a spate of break-ins. Many still mark Mr Dean as a thief, although the fatal shot robbed him of the opportunity to confirm his innocence. But ask residents who remember this horrific incident, and theyll say the crimewave died that day, along with Mr Dean. The incident left his little girl $50,000 richer, from a civil suit that was settled. The suit was filed against Mr Mosko on behalf of Sophia by Sir Lynden Pindling, representing Sophias mother, Esther Grant. According to documents filed in the Supreme Court, damages were claimed under the Fatal Accidents Act in respect of the death of (Dean by reason of the wrongful act and/or negligence of (Mosko Mr Moskos attorney would not confirm the details of the settlement. Mr Mosko could not be reached for comment. Ms Grant first administered the trust fund, having access to money allocated for education expenses. She died when Sophia was six years old, having suffered with HIV. Hardened by the pain and shame of her loss, Sophia had little security as a young orphan. If her heart is bitter over her lifes regrets, it is not immediately recognisable. Her spirit is not easily broken, said Antoine. She likes her family bad. She is defensive when it comes to her family. She is outgoing. She likes to smile. She likes to be happy. That is her spirit right there. To stay happy, he said. Sometimes her biggity nature rears it head. Like the last minute request for pepper steak and combination rice from a Chinese restaurant that she shouted when being escorted from the visiting room in the Womens Prison. Sometimes her rowdy personality is on show, like the oh no, she shouted, as if to say, who the hell is that? when she caught sight of the other woman sitting next to her boyfriend in the visiting room. Memory of her past is still sharp enough to make her emotional. Sophia wiped tears from her eyes before they had a chance to trickle down her face when she answered questions about her life. I wish Mr Mosko would have cared more. I cant bring my father back; he cant bring him back. The money cant compensate for the loss, said Sophia, speaking of her father from Fox Hill. She has never made a serious attempt to contact Mr Mosko, but she said she wished he took more of an interest in her life after the fatal shooting. Family members claim, Mr Dean was a construction labourer who worked for Mr Mosko, and often would go and hail him. They claim Mr Mosko had promised to build C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM A LIFE OF REGRET: Clayton Deans little girl CROSSHAIRS INTHE SEE page 13 SOPHIA MAE DEAN is now behind bars.

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B yLARRY SMITH JUST before the 2007 general election, the Christie government made a secret deal to sell 49 per cent of BTC on credit to an unknown foreign entity c alled Bluewater Ventures. The electorate wasn't aware a deal had been struck and didn't know the terms, although official talks had been ongoing for two years. B luewater described itself a s "a private equity firm spec ializing in turnarounds and investments in the mediaa nd telecommunications sect ors." It was set up in 2003 b y John Gregg, an Americ an who worked for a couple o f European cable companies. Based in the Channel Islands, an offshore financial centre, its actual shareholders have never been identified. S oon after the election, e x-finance minister James S mith urged the new FNM government to close the Bluewater deal, arguing that there would never be a better one. According to a conf idential Bluewater docum ent relating to the sale, B TCs own business plan for 2 007-2009 valued the comp any at $333 million, meani ng that a 49 per cent stake should have been worth about $163 million. But as has since been r evealed, the net cash to gove rnment from the secret PLP d eal would have been only $150 million. Bluewater would have paid another $40 million (interest-free after the sale, but this money w ould have come from B TCs own revenues. The d eferred payments were a s ignificant and hidden disc ount on the price to this u nknown foreign entity. It is common knowledge that BTCs value as a mobile monopoly has been heavily e roded by poor management and new technologies. For e xample, it took just a few years for voice over internet services like Vonage to turnB TCs long-distance calling into a losing business. O ther providers now control most of the local VoIP market despite the facesaving introduction in 2006 of BTCs competing Vibe service. And experts have l ong predicted that WiFi phones connected to a computer with Internet access will disrupt BTCs still-lucrative mobile business over t ime. A ccording to the confid ential 2007 Bluewater document, other factors that affect BTCs value include exorbitant rates that would be impossible to maintain in a competitive market; the high risk of hurricanes crippling the network; and capital spending that is far greater than earnings. "A true valuation analysis of BTC must assume that rates, and hence (earnings w ill have to be lowered in t he near term," the document said. "And just two y ears ago BTC saw its cash f low for the year virtually w iped out and submitted insurance claims close to $50m illion. It is our unders tanding that insurers refused to honour many of these claims. "BTC's capital expenditures have historically been higher than comparable companies. In fact the BTC business plan for 2007-2009 p uts capex at a rate significantly higher than (earnings). From an investor's perspective, the need for such high spending to maint ain the network is a red f lag." S everal years ago, former BTC president Leon Williams boasted that the corporation had spent $353 million on capital development over a five-year period, and Bluewater reported that BTCs business plan called for another half-billion-dollar spend over the ensuing three years, compared to $429 million in projected earnings. I n spelling out the ration ale for the proposed acquisition, the 2007 Bluewater d ocument painted a dismal p icture of BTC, calling the c orporation's business plan inconsistent, contradictory,l acking in detail and offeri ng nothing for its three main stakeholders consumers, the government and employees. Bluewater pointed out that BTC doesn't even consider improving its lousy serv ice or cutting its outrag eously high prices, and fails t o justify in any way the i ntroduction of costly new p roducts and services. In f act, BTCs plans assumed no dividends at all for the government just a neveremptying cookie jar for management, union leaders and staff. Why would Bluewater p ay for a minority stake in such a poorly-run state operation? Well, principally because the PLP deal wouldh ave extended BTCs profi table cellular monopoly for up to six years while let ting it offer equally profi table extra services like video. In other words, BTC would have continued as a government-owned monop o ly for a very long time. A nd the Bluewater sale was a smoke-screen trying to hide that fact. The deal was that a 49 per cent stake in BTC would be priced at $260 million, butB luewater would pay only $ 220 million up front while k eeping all of BTC's cash in the bank (about $70 million at the time). At the end of the five-year cellular monop oly, Bluewater would have paid a further $35 million, and a final $5 million in the sixth year after the sale. This was what Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham referred to shortly after taking office as "selling BTC on credit." Even a horse's ass can see there is absolutely no comparison between a secretive instalment plan concocted with an unknown buyer with no financial or operating his tory, and the $210 million (plus taxes chase price agreed with Cable & Wireless a longestablished telecoms firm with revenues of over $1 bil lion and a long-standing operating record in several countries. So the astonishing propaganda emanating from PLP leaders on this issue should be taken with a large bicarbonate of soda. Their strategy is simply to repeat enough rubbish frequently enough so that the rubbish starts to seem believable. That, unfortunately, is the standard of political dis course in this country. There is no other differ ence between the PLP and the FNM record on this issue. Both parties while in government have said they wanted to sell BTC to a for eign entity as a matter of policy to help pay down the national debt, and to modernise the Bahamian telecoms sector. The only difference has been the architecture of the deal. You be the judge. What do you think? Send comments to larry@tribunemedia.net Or visit www.bahamapundit.com (Tough Call will be back on January 5) C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM The secret deal to steal BTC

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By LLONELLA GILBERT C OCKBURN TOWN, San S alvador Minister of State f or Finance Zhivargo Laing took the opportunity during a recent town meeting on the island to highlight some of the advantages persons can expect w ith the new Business Licence A ct 2010 that passed in the House of Assembly. Mr Laing explained to residents that with the new Act, which will come into Force in January 2011, businesses are going to be taxable every year,a nd a business owner would only need to send in the simple form explaining how much they made. Once I know how much y ou made, I will be able to assess your taxes, and it is going to be a business licence t ax. If you are making $250,000 or less a year, for the next two y ears, you will have no business license tax to pay because you are exempt under this new law. Before it used to be $ 50,000, but now it is $ 250,000, Mr Laing said. T he Act will also remove the power to issue business licences from Family IslandD istrict Councils, he explained. I n New Providence, the Secr etary for Revenue, resident i n the Business License Unit, will have that responsibility. On the Family Islands, w herever there is a Business Licence Office that office will be responsible, where there is n o Business License Office, the Treasury Office will be responsible, or the administrator will be responsible, acti ng on the power of the Secret ary for Revenue, Mr Laing said. F urther, the State Minister noted that every year thou sands of businesspersons in the country are required to renewt heir licence. That is going to be finished under the new law, he said. Under the new law, in 90 days time, you will have to reapply, re-register your busi-n ess. M r Laing said with this new process, a business is registered forever unless the owner sendsi n a form stating that the busi n ess has closed. If that form is not sent in t hen the government assumes the business is still in existence. The forms are also very flexible, he said. With one form you can change the name of your business, the location of your business, and pay your tax. Attached to that form will be instructions on how to fill it out. It will also ask what kind of business you are seeking to go into, and will tell you whatt he pre-requisites are for applying for that business. I ndividuals will be told up front what they are required to do, so that they when they carry in the application form they would have all the corre-s ponding documentation and will not be given the run around, he said. No one will be given a negative answer unless something is found untoward about thep roposed business, in which case, the Secretary for Revenue or the Administrator canr efuse or reject your applica tion, Mr Laing said. The new Act has also s topped individuals from havi ng to apply for several separ ate licences. For example, before if persons wanted to o pen a restaurant, they had to apply for a business licence, shop licence, music and dancel icence and liquor licence. P ersons can now apply for t heir business licence and once they have been successful the licence will state that they are hereby licensed to do X, Y, and Z without having to runa round applying for several licences, Mr Laing said. While businesspersons may not have to renew their licence every year, they still have to file their returns, which will be d ue March 31, Mr Laing said. If you do not do so, you will not have a Certificate of Good Standing from us, hea dded. Many times I am not able to collect money from you, butt he information is important for me to know what is happening in this economy, Mr Laing said. What is happening with San Salvadors economy and if you fail to give me that information then I do not know how to make proper policy decisions on your behalf. W ith the new Act, if an individual objects to a decision that has been made by the Sec r etary to the Revenue concerning a business, they can go before an Appeals Board and not a licencing authority, he said. In New Providence it will be comprised of seven persons, but in the Family Islands it is g oing to be made up of five persons, Mr Laing explained. The chairman and two persons will come from New Providence while two localc ouncil members will sit on the Board and hear the appeal ont he island where the complaint is being made, he said. The government has also decided to simplify the process of calculating the businessl icence fee, he said. Now we assess business licence tax only on turnover. T here will be no deductions, just that top line revenue, whaty ou make, we will take a percentage of that, Mr Laing said. Most of you will most likely be paying less than what youa re paying now, the same as y ou are paying now, or if you are paying more, it is really very small in comparison to what you were paying before. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2010, PAGE 9 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Laing highlights advantages of new Business Licence Act BUSINESSACT: Minister of State for Finance Zhivargo Laing explains to residents of Cockburn Town, San Salvador the amendments that were made to the Business License Act 2010 during a recent town meeting. Llonella Gilbert /BIS

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 7KH$QJOLFDQ&HQWUDO(GXFDWLRQ$XWKRULW\7 KH$QJOLFDQ&HQWUDO(GXFDWLRQ$XWKRULW\LQYLWHVDSSOLFDWLRQVIRUWHDFKLQJ SRVLWLRQVDYDLODEOHDW 6W-RKQV&ROOHJHDQGW$QQHVFKRRO RQHZ 3URYLGHQFH %LVKRSLFKDHO(OGRQFKRRO RQ*UDQG%DKDPDDQG $QGUHZV$QJOLFDQFKRRO (QJOLVK/DQJXDJHDQG/LWHUDWXUSRVLWLRQVf 0DWKHPDWLFVSRVLWLRQVf 3K\VLFV&KHPLVWU\SRVLWLRQVf %LRORJ\+HDOWKFLHQFHSRVLWLRQVf +LVWRU\RFLDOWXGLHVSRVLWLRQVf *HRJUDSKSRVLWLRQVf 5HOLJLRXVWXGLHVSRVLWLRQVf )UHQFKSRVLWLRQf 6SDQLVKSRVLWLRQVf 0XVLFSRVLWLRQVf $UWSRVLWLRQVf +RPH(FRQRPLFVSRVLWLRQVf 3ULPDU\/LEUDULDQSRVLWLRQVf /RZHUULPDU\DGHV.SRVLWLRQVf 8SSHUULPDU\SRVLWLRQVf ,QIRUPDWLRQHFKQRORJ\*UDGHVSRVLWLRQVf $FFRXQWV&RPPHUFH(FRQRPLFVSRVLWLRQVf 3K\VLFDO(GXFDWLRQ*UDGHV.SRVLWLRQVf *XLGDQFHt&DUHHU&RXQVHORUDGHV.SRVLWLRQVf 7HFKQLFDO'UDZLQJSRVLWLRQf 6FKRROXUVHSRVLWLRQVf 4XDOLFDWLRQV &DQGLGDWHVPXVWSRVVHVV DWOHDVW D %DFKHORUV'HJUHH IURPDQDFFUHGLWHGQLYHUVLW WRJHWKHUZLWK D 7HDFKHU &HUWLFDWHIURPDQDFFUHGLWHG 7HDFKHUV&ROOHJH $SSOLFDWLRQVPD\EHFROOHFWHGIURPWKH(GXFDWLRQ'HSDUWPHQWORFDWHGRQDQGV 5RDGRIIRI(DVWWUHHW &RPSOHWHGDSSOLFDWLRQIRUPVZLWKWKHUHTXHVWHGVXSSRUWLQJGRFXPHQWVPXVWEH UHFHLYHG E\WKH$QJOLFDQ(GXFDWLRQ'HSDUWPHQWE\)ULGD\QG DQGPXVWEHDGGUHVVHGWR7KH'LUHFWRURI(GXFDWLRQ $QJOLFDQ&HQWUDO(GXFDWLRQ$XWKRULW\ 1DVVDX%DKDPDV3URYLGLQJTXDOLW\HGXFDWLRQLQD&KULVWLDQHQYLURQPHQWE\GHYHORSLQJWKHZKROH FKLOGVSLULWXDOO\DFDGHPLFDOO\SK\VLFDOO\DQGVRFLDOO\WKXVSUHSDULQJWKHFKLOGIRU OLIH by landlords she could not afford to pay. Ms Gibson, a freelance l egal assistant, has suffered from financial hardship since her partner of almost 18 years, lawyer and human rights activist Eliezer Regnier,d ied of a heart attack in Febr uary, and she has been u nable to secure steady work. Her story tugged at the heartstrings of Baha Mar executive Richard English, a selfless father of three who pledged to pay for Ms Gib-s on and her 17-year-old daughter to move into a new home within hours of reading T he Tribune s tory. The senior vice-president o f sales and marketing from W inter Park, Florida, told his wife the donation was all he w anted for Christmas this year, and he agreed to publi-c ise the act of charity in a bid t o inspire others. W hen Baha Mar chairman Sarkis Izmirlian read of the donation on the front page of F ridays T ribune h e told Mr English he was touched by the act and wanted to do some-t hing on behalf of the company. He asked Mr English to identify a charity for Baha Mar to give to this Christmas, a challenge that led him to the office of the Salvation A rmys divisional commander Major Lester Ferguson where he spent Saturday afternoon learning about the drastic drop in donations to t he charity this year and working out ways Baha Mar c ould help. The result is the launch of The Baha Mar Challenge, ap ledge by the hotel develop m ent corporation to match up to $10,000 in donations made to The Salvation Army in ther un-up to Christmas. W ith just days to go before the holiday, Mr English, Mr Izmirlian and Major Fergu-s on hope the Baha Mar Chal lenge will inspire everybody to dig deep and give as much as they can to help those lessf ortunate this Christmas. The reason I agreed to go public was to help engender s ome support and to get people to do it, Mr English said. Who would have thought that the chairman would haves aid lets do $10,000? The Salvation Army has set up specially dedicated ket tles in the lobbies of Baha M ars Wyndham Nassau Resort and Sheraton Nassau Beach Resort in Cable Beach t o collect donations for the challenge and people have already started to support the effort, Mr English said. Its kind of selfish in a way because it makes you feel s o good, but in the end I am going to help people, he told The Tribune Its very rewarding, very satisfying, and it renews faithi n human nature; people just need a couple of examplesl ike that to spur them on. The response has been great, and I am just hoping the money will come in. Our chairman said they b est thing that can happen is that we write a cheque for $10,000. Proceeds generated by the Baha Mar Challenge are e xpected to be used for the S alvation Army's Welfare and Feeding programme, and the School for the Blind andV isually Impaired Children programme. Ms Gibson, who said she w ould use her good fortune t o help others, is delighted by the seemingly contagious acts of charity. Im lost for words, she said. Its so wonderful its overwhelming! I dont know what to say; I m smiling from ear to ear. Donations to the Baha Mar Challenge can be made i n cash or by cheque payable to the Salvation Army at the Salvation Army kettles in theB aha Mar hotel lobbies, or at t he Salvation Army's Nassau office, 31 Mackey Street, PO Box N-205, Nassau. Alternatively you can make a wire transfer by the following instructions. D estination: CHASUS33 (IBK Bank, New York ABA: 021000021P ay to Bank: 0011188448 (BBK Beneficiary Account Numb er: 057451575034 Account Name: The Salva tion Army. returned home yesterday. D anielle Miller, 16, of Joe Farrington Road, returned h ome on Friday. D anielle was last seen at her high school, Hope Academy, on Prince Charles Drive on November 15. Anyone with relevant information about Shandice is asked to contact their nearest police station, Crime Stoppers at 328-8477 the police emergency line at 919/911 CDU at 5029 930 or the police control room at 3 22-3333 APPEAL FOR INFORMATION OVER MISSING TEENAGE GIRL FROM page one Heartbreaking Tribune story sparks huge wave of kindness FROM page one DONATION: A tearful Theresa Gibson with Baha Mar executive Richard English.

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i nvolvement and allegations o f special favours by Mr G ibson. The cable read: "In response to concern overthe timing of the approval residency approval typicallyt akes years in the Bahamas Gibson and PM Christie sought to reassure the public. They said that Anna Nicole was treated as any o ther applicant, noting glibly that the Ministry of I mmigration should not be criticized for improved efficiencies in government for which it deserves praise.'" T he cable continued: "At the heart of Gibson's problems are the fact that Anna N icole received residency in a matter of days, when the p rocess normally takes many months or years. His reported direct receipt of the $10,000 cheque for residency represents anotherf lagrant violation of the normal process, leading to bitter denunciations of the whole process by which residency is granted to persons for buying property here." It added: "The resulting public furor over Gibson'sf avouritism has been strong. Before Anna Nicole came to Nassau, Minister of Immigration Gibson enjoyed strong public supp ort as a result of his aggressive anti-immigrant p olicies. His midnight raids of Haitian communities and restriction of residency o ptions for Haitians was widely applauded by a B ahamian public fearful of losing Bahamian opportunities to illegal immigrants. The Anna Nicole scandal has recast Gibson as pup-p et of the privileged rather than defender of the common people of The Bahamas." During his report, Mr Rood also noted the international media storm following the death of her sona nd the subsequent international criticism of his treatment at Doctor's Hospital and the Coroner's Court untimely classification of his d eath. The cable read: "The q uality of care at Doctor's came under fire for its treatm ent or more pointedly i ts complete lack of treatm ent of Anna Nicole's son while in Doctor's. For the record, he added, Doctor's Hospital is regarded as the finestm edical institution in the c ountry and has enjoyed an excellent reputation among the expatriate community. It added: "The criticism of the hospital was nothing compared to the criticism oft he Bahamas Coroner's C ourt. The Court, which served to review death cases and determine cause, was under heavy fire for its inability or unwillingness to provide a cause of d eath for Anna Nicole's s on." Mr Rood explained that before the Coroner's Court could complete its inquest, it was disbanded by the government. T he cable read: "The C oroner's Court was origin ally created to speed up a process of making a legal determination for cause of death that could take years. The elimination of the courtw ill literally affect every B ahamian citizen an effect caused by Anna Nicole and the bright lights of the international media. The cable added: "Not since Wallace Simpsond ethroned a King and came t o Nassau has an American femme fatale so captivated the Bahamian public and dominated local politics. Gossip in the Bahamas is an art form called "sip sip" and the Anna Nicole saga h as been quite a show for connoisseurs." SEEMORE WIKILEAKSNEWSON PAGETHREE C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2010, PAGE 11 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM T he employee, William Cantor, 31, was arrested last week Tuesday for questioning into a break-in at Mr Deveaux Srs mothers house on December 7. Mr Deveaux Sr believes the break-in was staged in an attempt to gain custody of his son, Reno Jr, 19, who police also wish to question in the matter. S ince then, Mr Deveaux Sr has lobbied to top police officials, A ssistant Commissioner of Police Glenn Miller on Friday, and Police Commissioner Ellison Greenslade. Mr Deveaux Sr said: "I told Mr Miller about it so he could intervene and stop the beating, to save a life. I told him that my strong belief is that they wanted my son, they wanted to beat him in custody to the extent of killing him. M r Deveaux Sr added: I still wasn't satisfied because the whole problem the root of the problem was not dealt with. S o I went to the commissioner I told him and his board members that this is the end of the road, where we can't take this terrorist act that was shielded upon us for the past seveny ears. We can't take it no more, I told him I'd been making c omplaints to the complaints unit from 2003 and nothing was done." Mr Cantor, an employee at RWS for more than five years, said police beat him for some 45 minutes with a roll of shrink w rap, baseball bat, and broomstick, while alternately suffoc ating him with a plastic bag. M r Cantor said: "I got picked up on Tuesday and they carried me in the cell, Wednesday night they took me upstairs and beat me. They lay me on the ground, handcuff my hand to o ne of the desk legs, handcuffed my next hand to another leg and started hitting me in my belly with a baseball bat. The l ast hit was on my pelvis bone and the bat broke. Then anothe r one came and started hitting me with a broomstick." A ccording to Mr Cantor, the officers demanded that he confess to the December 7 break-in throughout the beating, however he refused. As it appeared that he had stopped breathi ng, Mr Cantor was taken to hospital by ambulance after he had been returned to his cell. Mr Deveaux Sr added: Every single letter and complaint I w rite into the police, this dude get it, and he carry it and show t o all the gangsters. The only way they can really investigate this matter properly is to remove him from CDU, because the rest of my family are all scared of him. A ssistant Commissioner of Police Hulan Hanna confirmed Mr Deveaux Srs meeting with Mr Greenslade on Monday and the police chiefs mandate to review the level of progresso n all complaints filed. Although he could not speak on specific details or outcomes, Mr Hanna expressed confidence that all issues brought forward were investigated. M r Hanna said: Every complaint filed has been investigated, the status of the investigation or the outcome I do not have that information, and the commissioner instructed that efforts w ould be made to determine the status of the investigations. Speaking generally, Mr Hanna also explained that in some cases although an investigation has been completed personsw ill renew their complaint if dissatisfied by the outcome. M r Hanna added: We know that this is a matter between family members so we understand that these things sometimes take on a life of their own. So were mindful of these things, butt hat has not in any way impeded the objectivity of the investigation. F ROM page one FORMER OFFICER FEARS FOR SONS LIFE IN FEUD FROM page one WikiLeaks: Anna Nicole havoc in the Bahamas

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WASHINGTON (AP Republican-leaning states will gain at least a half dozen House seats thanks to the 2010 census, which found the nation's population growing more slowly than in past decades but still shifting to the South and West. The Census Bureau announced Tuesday that the nation's population on April1 was 308,745,538, up from 281.4 million a decade ago. The growth rate for the past decade was 9.7 percent, the lowest since the Great Depression. The nation's population grew by 13.2 percent from 1990 to 2000. Michigan was the only state to lose population during the past decade. Nevada, with a 35 percent increase, was the fastest-growing state. The new numbers are a boon for Republicans, with Texas leading the way among GOP-leaning states that will gain House seats, mostly at the Rust Belt's expense. Following each once-a-decade census, the nation must reapportion the House's 435 districts to make them roughly equal in population, with each state getting at least one seat. That triggers an often con tentious and partisan process in many states, which will draw new congressional district lines that can help or hurt either party. In all, the census figures show a shift affecting 18 states taking effect when the 113th Congress takes office in 2013. Texas will gain four new House seats, and Florida will gain two. Gaining one each are Arizona, Georgia, Nevada, South Carolina, Utah and Washington. Ohio and New York will lose two House seats each. Losing one House seat are Illi n ois, Iowa, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Florida will now have as many U.S. House members as New York: 27. California will still have 53 seats, and Texas will climb to 36. In 2008, President Barack Obama lost in Texas and most of the other states that are gaining House seats. He car ried most of the states that are losing House seats, including Ohio and New York. Each House district repre sents an electoral vote in the presidential election process, meaning the political map for the 2012 election will tilt somewhat more Republican. If Obama were to carry the same states he won in 2008, they would net him six fewer electoral votes under the new map. Some states Obama won, such as Florida, tilted Republican in last month's election and the electoral votes they will gain could further help GOP candidates in 2012. White House press secre t ary Robert Gibbs said he did not expect the census results to have a "huge practical impact" on national politics. For the first time in its his tory, Democratic-leaning Cal ifornia will not gain a House seat after a census. Since 1940, 79 House seats h ave shifted to the South and West, mainly from the North east and Midwest, census officials said. Starting early next year, most state governments will use detailed, computer-gener ated data on voting patterns to carve neighborhoods in or out of newly drawn House districts, tilting them more to the left or right. Sometimes politi cians play it safe, quietly agreeing to protect Republican and Democratic incumbents alike. But sometimes the party in control will gamble and aggressively try to reconfigure the map to dump as many opponents as possible. Last month's elections put Republicans in full control of numerous state governments, giving the GOP an overall edge in the redistricting process. State governments' ability to gerrymander districts is somewhat limited, however, by court rulings that require roughly equal populations, among other things. The 1965 Voting Rights Act protects ethnic minorities in several states that are subject to U.S. Justice Department oversight. The average population of a new U.S. House district will be 710,767. But each state must have at least one district.S o Wyoming, the least popu lous state with 563,626 resi dents, will have a representative with considerably fewer constituents. Six other states will have one House member. Each state has two U.S. sena tors, regardless of population. The U.S. is still growing q uickly relative to other developed nations. The population in France and England each increased roughly 5 percent over the past decade, while in Japan the number is largely unchanged, and Germany's population is declining. China grew at about 6 percent; Canada's growth rate is roughly 10 percent. The South had the fastest growth since 2000, at 14.3 percent, the Census Bureau said. The West was close behind at 13.8 percent. The Northeast had 3.2 percent growth while the Midwest had 3.9 percent. The declining U.S. growth rate since 2000 is due partly to the economic meltdown in 2008, which brought U.S. births and illegal immigration to a near standstill compared with previous years. The 2010 count represents the number of people citizens as well as legal and illegal immigrants who called the U.S. their home on April 1. States losing political clout may have little recourse to challenge the census numbers. Still, census officials were bracing for the possibility of lawsuits seeking to revise the 2010 findings. North Carolina just missed picking up the last House seat,f alling short by roughly 15,000 people. The release of state apportionment numbers is the first set of numbers from the 2010 census. Beginning in Febru ary, the Census Bureau will release population and race breakdowns down to then eighborhood level for states to redraw congressional boundaries. Louisiana, Virginia, New Jersey and Mississippi will be among the first states to receive their redistricting data in February. The 2010 census results also are used to distribute more than $400 billion in annual federal aid and will change each state's Electoral College votes beginning in the 2012 presidential election. C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL NEWS PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Census shows slowing US growth, brings GOP gains C ENSUS DIRECTOR R obert Groves announces results for the 2010 U.S. Census at the National Press Club, T uesday, Dec. 21, 2010 in Washington. (AP

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2010, PAGE 13 Sophia a house and make sure she straight. In between times speaking about her life story, Sophia caught up on family and community news with her boyfriend. She whispered to him through the plexiglass window that separated them in the visitors room. Pumpkin, she calls him. With her lips pressed close, their sounds travelled through the perforated holes in the glass. Her daughter did not make the trip that day, as she was home asleep. Usually, the guards allow her to hold the baby. Life was abusive, said Sophia, speaking about the time she lived with her maternal grandmother, Salvatia Knowles. There were constant arguments and fights, she said. She was schooled in old time ways, said Antoine.She is elderly with those back in the day laws. If you diss me you get chap off, he said. Sophia is learning that hard lesson again today. It has been one month since her grandmother visited the prison. She used to be oneof the three people who visited regularly, at least oncea week. They argued last month over a white linen suit Sophia wanted to wear to court. She took it the wrong way, said Sophia, of the argument. She said she doesnt have any children in prison. She doesnt have to come visit me, she said, fearing her grandmother might opt out of the special ly organised Christmas visit. T ears do not come as fre quently now, but prison life was much harder when Sophia was first admitted. At that time she was overcome by tears every night. Several months ago, Sophia was granted bail, but she has had a hard time pro d ucing acceptable sureties to the court. The original $20,000 bail was brought down to $9,000 with two sureties. The five individuals presented so far do not have enough assets, said Sophia, speaking about statementsmade by a judicial officer. The bail saga has made Antoine feel defeated. I just want her to come out and see if we can live on this positive vibe. Make a positive movement to set an example for our daughters, said Antoine. His daughter Hailly, from a previous relationship, is like a child to Sophia. Hailly does not visit the prison, although she cries to go visit her, he said. Sophia has little to show for the $37,000 that was released to her at 18 from the court settlement. She said she bought some things and gave some to her uncle and grandmother. The money was originally allocated for school expenses, but those instalments stopped coming when home became the Willamae Pratt School for Girls at age 14. Friends claim, older family members who hung around when she was young treated her as a blank cheque, begging to borrow money and never paying back. Lend me this and that. I gonna pay you back. Every one knew she had money. But she was small. The old er family had more use for the money than her, said Antoine. While her fathers death was the first big blow, Sophia has had a number of obstacles to overcome in her life. Her boyfriend says he has a message for the Mosko family that we are all human and should show some kind of love. This is a real world with real people. They know within themselves that $50,000 could not have given her a real future. They took a major part of her life away from her, said Antoine. They should have had some kind of heart to know she was in the struggle basi cally all by herself. We are all human, we can show some kind of concern for each other; some kind of love. The bottom line is always money, but you could also show concern, he said. A life of regret: Clayton Deans little girl FROM page six

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C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL NEWS PAGE 14, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM PAISLEY DODDS, Associated Press LONDON A large-scale terror attack was aimed at British landmarks and public spaces, security officials said Tuesday as more details emerged and police searched the homes of 12 British suspects being held for questioning. The men whose ages range from 17 to 28 were arrested Monday in the largest counterterrorism raid in nearly two years. At least five were of Bangladeshi origin. Lord Carlile, the government's independent watchdog for terror legislation, said Tuesday the alleged plot appeared sig nificant and involved several British cities, but he did not identify the targets. Police have up to 28 days to either charge the men or release them. Possible targets that were scouted include the Houses of Parliament in London and shopping areas around the U.K., according to a security official who spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymi ty because the investigation was ongoing. The plot, however, was unconnected to a larger European plot uncovered in the fall involving a Mumbai-style shooting spree in cities across Britain, France or Germany, the official said. Monday's arrests were also unrelated to last week's suicide bombing in Sweden and the plot did not appear to be timed for the holidays, he said. Scotland Yard Assistant Commissioner John Yates said police searches of the men's homes could take days, and officers were seen Tuesday removing computers from their homes. The men were arrestedin the cities of London, Cardiff, Stoke-onTrent and Birmingham. European officials typically step up security around the holidays, but this year espe cially after a Nigerian man with explosives taped to his underwear tried to blow up a plane on Christmas Day last year as it approached Detroit. Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab, who had studied in London, had boarded the North west Airlines flight to Detroit from Amsterdam. The 24-year-old is accused of trying to blow up the flight. A judge in a federal court in Detroit has entered a not-guilty plea on Abdulmutallab's behalf. There have been growing concerns in Europe about holiday season attacks fol lowing a suicide bombing in Sweden and security services' fears of an assault on a European city modeled on the deadly shooting spree in Mumbai, India. Christmas Iraqi officials claimed last week that captured insurgents believed the Stockholm bombing was part of a series of Christmas season attacks. Britain's terror alert has remained unchanged at "severe" while Germany upped its terror alert Nov. 17 in response to an increased threat from Islamic extremists. Berlin's Interior Minister Ehrhart Koerting said recently the threat has eased but said it was necessary to remain vigilant. Italian officials were on Tuesday investigating whether an explosive device found in a subway car in Rome was terror-related. The device, full of powder and wires, was found Tuesday inside a train at the Rebibbia station, on the outskirts of Rome. The train was at the end of the line and empty when the package was found. Bomb-disposal experts checked the powder and concluded the device could not have exploded, Rome Mayor Gianni Ale manno said. French Interior Minister Brice Hortefeux, in a newspaper interview Sunday, said for the holidays he's ordered plainclothes police patrols in "the most sensitive sites" in France. For New Year's Eve, Hortefeux said he has ordered 71 extra police units to be on call 6,000 more police than normal. "All the means have been mobilized so that everyone can go about their holiday season in total peace of mind," he was quoted Sunday in an interview with Le Parisien newspaper. In October, the United States warned its citizens living or traveling in Europe to be wary after details emerged of a larger European terror threat. Monday's raid, a joint operation by Britain's domestic spy agency MI5 and police, was the largest since April 2009, when 12 men were detained over an alleged al-Qaida bomb plot in the northern city of Manchester. All were released without charge and ordered to leave Britain. One, Abid Naseer, was later re-arrested at the request of the U.S., which says he was involved a plot to bomb the New York City subway. He is in jail awaiting extradition. In 2006, U.S. and British intelligence officials thwarted one of the largest plots yet, a plan to explode nearly a dozen transAtlantic airliners. Europe has been the target of numerous terror plots by Islamist militants. The deadliest was the 2004 Madrid train bombings, when shrapnel-filled bombs exploded, killing 191 people and wounding about 1,800. A year later, suicide bombers killed 52 rush-hour commuters in London aboard three subway trains and a bus. UK terror plot aimed at British landmarks and public spaces LARA JAKES, A ssociated Press R EBECCA SANTANA, Associated Press BAGHDAD I raq seated a freely elected government Tuesday after nine months of haggling, bringing together the main ethnic and r eligious groups in a fragile bala nce that could make it difficult to rebuild a nation devastated by war as American troops prepare for their finalw ithdrawal. One of the government's first priorities will be to decide whether to ask the Obama a dministration to keep thous ands of U.S. soldiers in Iraq after their scheduled departure in December 2011. Prime Minister Nouri alM aliki's new government solidifies the grip that Shiites have held on political power since Saddam Hussein's ouster. It leaves open the question of whether the country's disgrun-t led Sunni minority will play a meaningful role. D espite tortuous negotiations that threatened to unravel the c ountry's tenuous democratic gains, the public face of the new government will look remarkably like the outgoing one. The prime minister, president andf oreign minister will remain the same. The outcome was a hugev ictory for al-Maliki, who has made more than his share of e nemies as prime minister since May 2006. Parliament original l y tapped al-Maliki as a compromise candidate to lead Iraq following tumultuous elections in December 2005 during the height of the war. T he new government was sworn in Tuesday immediatelya fter the Iraqi parliament voted to approve 34 Cabinet minis t ers including al-Maliki. The remainder of the 44-member Cabinet is made up of acting ministers who will be replaced at a later date because of ongoi ng disputes among coalition partners. P resident Barack Obama praised Iraq for building an i nclusive coalition that he described as "a clear rejection of the efforts by extremists to spur sectarian division." Al-Maliki hailed what he c alled a unified but diverse government, the creation of which w as "the most difficult task in the world." B ut even as he praised the new government, al-Maliki hinted at its weakness: the need to include all the major political factions as a way to preserve s tability at the expense of effi ciency. "There were people w hose parties have only one or two seats and even they were demanding a ministry," al-Maliki said. "So I know that nobody is satisfied with me." Indeed, two groups blasted the new Cabinet even before it was sworn in. The Kurdish splinter Goran party, which has only eight lawmakers, said it should have gotten more than the one Cabinet p ost it was offered and threatened to boycott the govern-m ent. And women lawmakers jeered the male-dominated p olitical parties for largely excluding them from the Cabin et though they make up a quarter of parliament. "This government is not a strong one because it is built on sectarian divisions and selfi nterests," said Hassan alAlawi, a leading member of the S unni-backed Iraqiya coalition that won bragging rights by narr owly edging al-Maliki's bloc in the March 7 parliamentary election. "It is a fragile government." Doing the work of the gov e rnment ultimately may prove as hard as putting one together. E xperts said Iraq's top pri ority over the next few years is t o control its vacillating levels of violence and protect itself from foreign threats. Sandwiched between Shiite majority Iran and Sunni Arab states, Iraq is a Mideast fault line for sectarian tensions and has weak borders. B aghdad University political analyst Hadi Jalo said that fac t or alone should help al-Maliki gain the necessary support from p arliament to ask U.S. troops to remain in Iraq past the December 2011 deadline outlined in a security agreement between Washington and Baghdad should he choose to do so. "Stability is the backbone for a ny other progress," Jalo said. "Al-Maliki knows that he cannot overcome any challenges while the security problem is not solved. This is the only way to win the trust of the people and the foreign investors." The clock is already ticking on that decision: A senior U.S. m ilitary official said plans will be approved by early April tos tart sending troops and 1.75 million pieces of equipment b ack to the U.S. next summer. The official spoke on condition o f anonymity due to the sensi tivity of the ongoing discussions. Neither Obama nor alMaliki has shown any enthusiasm for keeping U.S. soldiers i n Iraq. More than 4,400 American troops and tens of thous ands of Iraqis died in a war that has yet to bring stability a nd prosperity to this oil-rich Middle Eastern nation. On Tuesday, al-Maliki maintained his commitment to keeping "the pact of the foreign t roops' withdrawal, according to the announced schedule." S aying otherwise, however, amounts to political suicide b efore he is firmly ensconced in his second term. A slew of other top concerns must be settled quickly to satisfy Iraqis who have been frus trated with the lame-duck gov ernment since the March elec t ions. The government has been dithering for years over a pack a ge of laws that would streamline oversight of the country's o il wealth and make it more quickly available to investors. Iraq holds the world's fourth largest oil reserves, valued at $11 trillion according to current oil prices. Electricity and water shorta ges, too, have been a major source of anger across Iraq especially during the sweltering summers. Iraqis have been furious with lawmakers who collected cushy salaries and perks for doing light work while the rest of the country suffered. "We hope that this governm ent will offer something to the people," said Deputy PrimeM inister Saleh al-Mutlaq, a lawmaker with the secular Iraqiya b loc who only last week was allowed to return to political l ife after being accused of hav ing links to Saddam's former regime. Although Iraqiya won two more seats than al-Maliki's bloc d id in the March elections, the prime minister was able to hang o nto his job by making admit tedly uneasy allies during m onths of backroom deals. Iraqiya's leader, former prime minister Ayad Allawi, agreed to join al-Maliki's government in exchange for head i ng a council that will oversee the government's security and f oreign policies. It was still unclear how much power the c ouncil will have. Al-Maliki also had to accommodate the hardline Shiite followers of anti-American cleric Muqtada al-Sadr. Al-Maliki and the Sadrists reached an uneasy detente several months a go after years of fighting each other. A senior Sadrist said his4 0-member political coalition was pressured by Iranian offic ials and Iraq's top Shiite cleric to fall in line behind al-Maliki. He spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss the sensitive negotiations. The competing demands within the new democracy will h elp foster Iraq's stability, said Joost Hiltermann of the International Crisis Group. Still, "it's going to be a gov ernment that is beset by problems," Hiltermann said. "It's going to take a long time for Iraq to rebuild itself." Stark challenges ahead for Iraq's new government (AP Photo/Karim Kadim C HALLENGINGTIMES: I raqs Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki sits, before submitting his new government for approval to the Iraq parliament in Baghdad, Iraq, Tuesday, Dec. 21, 2010. Iraqi lawmakers unanimously a pproved on Tuesday a new government to be headed by incumbent Shiite Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, ending nine months of political deadlock that threatened to stall economic development and suck the country back into sectarian violence. J EFF BARNARD, Associated Press GRANTS PASS, Oregon For weeks, three kayakers e xploring a series of rivers through the heart of Africac ame together in a close for mation designed to ward offh ippo and crocodile attacks whenever they paddled the q uiet green glides between thundering stretches of white water. The boaters two Ameri cans and a South African t raveled some 1,000 miles (1,609 kilometers w ay, through some of the densest concentrations of m an-killing wildlife in the world. They were on a quiet s tretch of the Lukuga River in Congo, paddling just 4 feet (1.22 meters) or 5 feet (1.52 meters) apart, when a croco dile slipped up from behind a nd ripped trip leader Hendri Coetzee from his red plasticb oat. With no time to do any t hing but say "Oh, my God!" Coetzee was gone, hauled beneath the green water never to be seen again. "The crocodile just pulled h im right underwater," Chris Korbulic told The AssociatedP ress in a telephone interview Tuesday from Nevada, where h e was visiting his brother. "I think we both were just in complete shock and disbelief, a nd absolutely horrified at what had just happened." B en Stookesberry, 32, of California, and Korbulic, 24, o f Oregon, are world-class kayakers who have gone where no boat has gone before to navigate the melting snows of the Himalayas in Northern Pakistan and India, towering waterfalls in Brazil, and boulder-stewn creeks in Costa Rica, California and British Columbia. Guide With primary sponsorship from Eddie Bauer Inc.'s First Ascent line of outdoor gear, they had partnered with Coet zee, a top whitewater guide based in Uganda, to document the whitewater of the White Nile and Congo, and be the first to boat the whitewater of the Lukuga River. They also hoped to bring attention to the crisis of millions of people dying from poor water quality in a region overflowing with water. Though they knew Coetzee's giant reputation in the tiny world of extreme kayaking, and spent months plan ning their expedition together, Korbulic and Stookesberry didn't meet Coetzee until they flew into Entebbe, Uganda, in October. From his base in Jinja, he started showing them the ropes of African kayaking. "He wanted to take us from the snowcapped peaks into the deepest, darkest, steamiest jungle," said Stookesberry. "He wanted to prove to us that in this place considered by Western media as one of the most dangerous places on Earth, we would find some of the nicest, most hospitable people we ever met." For two days Coetzee took them down the Murchison Falls section of the White Nile. He taught them to tap their boats to make noise, stay out of the eddies where hippos might attack them, and keep clear of the banks where crocodiles sunned themselves. Kayakers recount deadly crocodile attack in Congo MARI YAMAGUCHI, Associated Press TOKYO Residents of southern Japanese islands scrambled to community centers early Wednesday when a strong offshore quake briefly triggered a tsunami alert, but the 7.4-magnitude temblor prompted only a mild swelling of waves. There were no immediate reports of damage from the quake, which struck at 2:20 a.m. (1720 GMT Tuesday about 80 miles (130 kilometers) off the southern coast of Chichi Island in the Pacific Ocean and was felt as far away as Tokyo. "It shook quite violently. I'm sure everyone was scared," said Kenji Komura, principal at a high school on Chichi Island. Japan's Meteorological Agency issued an alert for a tsunami of up to 6 feet (2 meters) for Chichi and nearby islands and warned of a milder tsunami for the southern coasts of the main Japanese island. It later lifted all warnings and said a minor swelling of about 1 foot (30 centimeters observed on Chichi's shore lines about 40 minutes after the quake. Scores of residents of Chichi, which is about 600 miles (1,000 kilometers south of Tokyo, and nearby Haha islands rushed to com munity centers and school buildings before the warn ings were lifted. Island fisheries official Tomoo Yamawaki said fishermen moved boats from the coast "to protect them from the tsunami." The quake took place at a depth of 6 miles (10 kilometers), the Meteorological Agency said. The U.S. Geological Survey put the quake's magnitude at 7.4. Japan is one of the world's most earthquake-prone countries. In 1995, a magni tude-7.2 quake in the west ern port city of Kobe killed 6,400 people. Strong earthquake hits of f souther n Japan (AP Photo/Eddie Bauer First Ascent, Chris Korbulic) STILLWATERS: In this undated photo provided by Eddie Bauer First Ascent, South African kayaker Hendri Coetzee paddles along a quiet stretch of the Lukuga River in Congo. On Dec. 7, 2010, Coetze was ripped from his kayak, never to be seen again, while he paddled within a few feet of two Americans on a first descent of whitewater sections of the river. GILLIAN FLACCUS, Associated Press LOS ANGELES Forecasters expected heavy rains across California going into Wednesday, and authorit ies began evacuations late T uesday as concern grew about potential mudslides in the wildfire-scarred foothills across the southern part of the s tate. Officials ordered evacuation of 232 homes in La Canada Flintridge and La Crescent a, foothill suburbs of Los Angeles, because of forecasts of more heavy rains on already saturated mountainsides. San Diego police evacuated dozens of homes and businesses but no structural damage was reported in the city, s aid Lt. Andra Brown. A commuter rail station was closed in the city's Sorrento Valley area due to heavy r ains. About a dozen homes were evacuated in a cul-de-sac south of downtown. A mudslide closed one street in the La Jolla area ofS an Diego. Farther inland in Riverside, a surge of water swept through a homeless camp n ear the banks of the Santa Ana River. Three people suffered minor injuries and about 50 lost all their belong-i ngs in the flood, Ruth R ecord, with Come as You Are Homeless Ministries, told the Riverside Press Enter prise. O ther inconveniences have so far been relatively minor:R escuers had to pluck some stranded motorists from rains wollen creeks. Shoppers dodged puddles while buying last-minute Christmas gifts. Disney resorts canceled a plan to shower visitors with artific ial snow. "We'll keep our fingers c rossed, but the more rain that comes, the possibility of m udslides is definitely real," said Jim Amormino, spokesman for the Orange County sheriff's office, which has rescued nine people from the flooding in the past 24 hours. LA evacuations ordered; Calif prepares for more rain

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C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2010, PAGE 15 KINGSTON, Jamaica A NEWLY revealed U.S. cable portrays American diplomats inthe Caribbean as being so conc erned about bribery and money-laundering rumors related to Texas financier R. Allen Stanford that they warned embassy officers to steer clear of him as earlya s 2006, a ccording to Associated Press. The behind-the-scenes diplomatic assessment from May 2006 was marked "confidential" a nd written three years before U.S. regulators announced they were investigating Stanford and his Caribbean bank for allegedly bilking investors out of $7 billioni n a global Ponzi scheme. The cable, apparently written by the former top diplomat in the U .S. Embassy in Barbados, Mary E. Kramer, warned that Stanford's companies were rumored to engage in "bribery, money l aundering, and political manipulation." Embassy officers do not "reach out" to Stanford due to the rumors, it said. That U.S. diplomats in the Caribbean heed-e d the rumors and gave Stanford the cold shoulder years before his 2009 indictment is surprising. At the time, Stanford was one of the m ost prominent businessmen in the region, with investment advisers around the world helping him grow a personal fortune once estimated at $2.2 billion by Forbesm agazine. Stanford's businesses on the nearby islands of Antigua and B arbuda, where he had been knighted and addressed as "Sir Allen", included two restaurants,a newspaper, cricket grounds, a d evelopment company, a threebranch local bank and the headquarters of his offshore bank. The WikiLeaks cable, which first appeared late Monday on thew ebsite of the British newspaper The Guardian, describes Kramer's efforts to avoid being photographed with Stanford at an A pril 2006 breakfast in Barbados with political leaders and cricket stakeholders. Stanford, a huge cricket aficionado, was pushing his Stanford Twenty-20 CaribbeanC ricket Tournament held in Antigua. WikiLeaks: US diplomats warned about Stanford

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C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2010 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $4.36 $4.58 $4.61 InternationalInvestmentFund [L earn more at royaldelity.com] BAHAMASNassau:242.356.9801 Freeport:242.351.3010BARBADOSSt.Michael:246.435.1955 By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor By spending an estimated $2 billion per year on healthcare in Florida, Bahamians are one of the biggest culprits when it comes to hindering development of this nations medical industry, a leading doctor said yesterday, adding that it would be fantastic to retain 10 per cent of such expenditure. Describing Bahamians as $2BN FLORIDA SPEND HARMS MEDICAL SECTOR DEVELOPMENT Leading doctor says Bahamians one of the biggest culprits, and fantastic if just 10% of that spend stays in this nation* Urges nation to exploit tremendous potential for medical tourism, with prostate cancer service acting as prototype for economic benefits* Princess Margaret replacement might cost $500-$700m SEE page 7B B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor Bahamian technology developers are being bound b y a ball and chain, particularly when it comes to devel-o ping applications for interna tional markets, by this n ations outdated telecommu nications technology and services, one company yesterday saying there was no comparison with what was available in the rest of the Caribbean. Onan Bridgewater, chief e xecutive of Bahamas-based Dream Soft Studios, which for t he past two years has been working on the first Caribbean-developed mobile (cellular specifically for the region, Lucayan Sky, explained that the company was effectively having to beta test its product outside this nation because the necessary technology was not available here. Explaining that Lucayan Sky could not be offered in its entirety in the Bahamas because technology/data platforms such as SMS, binary and MMS were not available here, Mr Bridgewater said that while Bahamians would be able to access its news and text products, they would cur rently be unable to use imaging and other high-end applications. Pointing out that the GPRS system in the Bahamas was slow, Mr Bridgewater sug gested that the Bahamas Telecommunications Companys (BTC the associated liberalisation of this nations communications market, would prove a godsend for entrepreneurs and businesses in the technology development field, as compe tition should lead to the development of the necessary infrastructure platform they require to flourish. Entrepreneurs being bound by ball and chain Bahamian technology developers being hampered by inadequate communications services and infrastructure Developer of first Caribbean-specific mobile application forced to beta test in Barbados, as not all services will be available in Bahamas* Says that BTC needs to evolve or will become fossilised dinosaur hampering economic growth No comparison between Bahamas and what available elsewhere in region SEE page 5B By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor Bahamas Wastes $303,403 net income for the first nine months of 2010 is some 35 per cent below what the BISXlisted company forecast it would earn at the start of this year, Tribune Business was told yesterday, its performance havBahamas Waste 35% below its profit forecasts Performance that saw 53% net income fall boosted by $ 116,679 profit from acquired Waste Not business Hit by 30% rise in fuel prices, but BISX-listed company anticipating better 2011 from Baha Mar plus biodiesel p roduction start No dividend anticipated for 2010 Accounts receivables bane of our existence SEE page 6B B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor T he Government is awaiting a $20 million proposal from an Italian-based r esort operator for a four-phase, highend boutique hotel development at Orange Creek in Cat Island, TribuneB usiness can reveal, which will be targeted at the European travel market. Michael Scott, the attorney and Hotel Corporation chairman, told this newspaper that the Government wasa waiting details of Equinox SAs plans for what is likely to be a 40-room small hotel, plus a small attached real estatec omponent featuring 45 high-end villas and cottages. P ledging that there would be sufficient spin-off and trickle down for Cat Island in terms of business opportun ities for Bahamian-owned businesses and entrepreneurs, Mr Scott said E quinox SAs plans for which a formal proposal is now awaited tied in perfectly with the Governments visiono f high-end, low density tourism development in the Family Islands. There is a group out of Italy looking a t Orange Creek in Cat Island, Mr Scott told Tribune Business. Equinox S A are taking a look at it in phases, four phases, which will happen over the next four years. They are in the $20m resort proposal awaited for Cat Island ONAN BRIDGEWATER Italian developer eyeing Orange Creek project of 4 0-room hotel and 45-strong real estate component Sufficient trickle down for Bahamians from fourphase development targeting European tourist market Another Italian developer looking at 80-120 room resort in Eleuthera S EE page 4B By ALISON LOWE Business Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net The Bahamas Chamber of Commerces president yesterday backed the International Monetary Funds (IMF Tax (VAT dent move for the Govern ment, saying this nation will either die economically without it or hurt for a while but emerge with life. In its latest report, the IMF suggested that the Government will need to run fiscal surpluses equivalent to a collective 13.5 per cent of GDP over the next six years, or Chamber chief backs VAT calls But others say IMF should have focused on cutting Bahamian government spending SEE page 3B KHAALIS ROLLE

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process of fashioning a proposal. Its likely to be in the v icinity of a $20 million investment, but theyre in the process of fashioning a proposal for the Govern-m ents consideration. The Minister of Tourism and I had lunch with the principals a couple of weeks ago, but the details have to be fleshed out. T he developers were eyeing a low density, high-end operation with associated real estate component of villas and cottages, Mr Scotta dding that they were looking at the 40-room hotel and 45 villas and cottages targeting the European mar-k et. Equinox SAs focus, Mr Scott said, would be on an environmentally friendly set-up, creating almost a vill age and ensuring Bahamians have various commercial opportunities, such as setting up bonefishing oper-a tions. There is sufficient spin-off and trickle down for Cat Island. Explaining that Equinox SA had been in the tourismb usiness since 1986-1987, Mr Scott said the company had also operated as a tour promoter. Specialising in deluxh otels and yacht charters, the company currently manages three high-end hotelsi n Italy. Theyre philosophy is o ne which highlights environmentally-friendly, ecosensitive projects, Mr Scott told Tribune Business. In the Out Islands, therell be no more Atlantiss and Baha Mars. The focus in the Out Islands, outside of NewP rovidence and Grand Bahama, is low density, high-end boutique operations, with or without real estate components involved. Equinoxs projects, Mr Scott said, emphasised complete respect for the environment, the nature ofC at Island, the architectural and cultural history of the B ahamas, coupled with five-star service and hospit ality quality. Its the construction of boutique hotels, villas and h omes that interact with the land and environment, using l ocal materials and local tradesmen and contractors, Mr Scott told Tribune Busi-n ess. Meanwhile, the Governm ent is also looking at another Italian-based developer, the Mira Group, which i s proposing to do another boutique resort development, this time on Hotel Corporation-owned land at Winding Bay in Eleuthera. Were waiting for a proposal from them, Mr Scott said. Theyre engaging local architects, and were waiting to hear from them. Miras proposal, he said, involved a boutique resort o f between 80-120 keys, and an associated real estate component. Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, minister of tourism and aviation, previously con-f irmed that Mira, which took over the Rocco Forte resort brand, was among those interested in developing the 3,500 acres of land in the Winding Bay area of Eleuthera. "They are among others who have expressed ani nterest," the minister confirmed, adding that "the s ame principles" laid down with respect to the Lighthouse Yacht Club & Marina would apply. T he Government, he added, was "steadfast" in its determination that any development at Winding Bay focus on a core, highend, luxury boutique resort first before the surrounding real estate was built-out. D evelopment, though, w ould not happen "until we find a group to do precisely what I've described in Andros". C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 1 2 7 & ( (662(;3/25$7,21$1''8&7,21 &21*2'((3:$7(5f/,0,7(' B BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB 1 2 7 & ( ,6 +(5(%<*,9(1DVIROORZV Df (662(;3/25$7,21$1''8&7,21&21*2 '((3:$7(5f/,0,7(' LV LQ GLVVROXWLRQXQGHUWKH SURYLVLRQVRIWKH,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV&RPSDQLHV$FW 7KHGLVVROXWLRQRIWKHVDLG&RPSDQ\FRPPHQFHGRQ WKHWKGD\RI'HFHPEHU$UWLFOHVRI 'LVVROXWLRQZHUHVXEPLWWHGWRDQGUHJLVWHUHGE\WKH 5HJLVWUDU*HQHUDO 7KH/LTXLGDWRURIWKHVDLG&RPSDQ\LV&DURO**UD\ RUWKFKDVH'ULYH+RXVWRQ7 'DWHGWKHWKGD\RI'HFHPEHU+ $55< / 2%26.<$1$*(0(17&2/7' $ WWRUQH\VIRUWKHDERYHQDPHG&RPSDQ\ 1 2 7 & ( (662,*(5,$+2/',1*( ,19(670(176f/,0,7(' BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB &UHGLWRUVKDYLQJGHEWVRUFODLPVDJDLQVWWKHDERYH QDPHG&RPSDQ\DUHUHTXLUHGWRVHQGSDUWLFXODUV WKHUHRIWRWKHXQGHUVLJQHG3%R[ 1DVVDX%DKDPDVRQRUEHIRUHGD\RI-DQXDU\ ,QGHIDXOWWKHUHRIWKH\ZLOOEHH[FOXGHGIURP WKHEHQHRIDQ\GLVWULEXWLRQPDGHWKH/LTXLGDWRU 'DWHGWKHWKGD\RI'HFHPEHU &DURO**UD\ /LTXLGDWRU RUWKFKDVH'ULYH +RXVWRQ 1 2 7 & ( (662,*(5,$+2/',1*( ,19(670(176f/,0,7(' BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB &UHGLWRUVKDYLQJGHEWVRUFODLPVDJDLQVWWKHDERYH QDPHG&RPSDQ\DUHUHTXLUHGWRVHQGSDUWLFXODUV WKHUHRIWRWKHXQGHUVLJQHG3%R[ 1DVVDX%DKDPDVRQRUEHIRUHGD\RI-DQXDU\ ,QGHIDXOWWKHUHRIWKH\ZLOOEHH[FOXGHGIURP WKHEHQHRIDQ\GLVWULEXWLRQPDGHWKH/LTXLGDWRU 'DWHGWKHWKGD\RI'HFHPEHU &DURO**UD\ /LTXLGDWRU RUWKFKDVH'ULYH +RXVWRQ 1 2 7 & ( (662,*(5,$+2/',1*( '((3:$7(5($67f/,0,7('BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB 1 2 7 & ( ,6 +(5(%< *,9(1DVIROORZV (662,*(5,$+2/',1*( '((3:$7(5($67f/,0,7(' LV LQ GLVVROXWLRQXQGHUWKHSURYLVLRQVRIWKH ,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV&RPSDQLHV$FW 7KHGLVVROXWLRQRIWKHVDLG&RPSDQ\ FRPPHQFHGRQWKHWKGD\RI'HFHPEHU $UWLFOHVRI'LVVROXWLRQZHUH VXEPLWWHGWRDQGUHJLVWHUHGE\WKH 5HJLVWUDU*HQHUDO 7KH/LTXLGDWRURIWKHVDLG&RPSDQ\LV&DURO **UD\ +RXVWRQ7 'DWHGWKHWKGD\RI'HFHPEHU+$55< /2%26.<$1$*(0(17&2/7' $WWRUQH\VIRUWKHDERYHQDPHG&RPSDQ\ 1 2 7 & ( (662(;3/25$7,21$1''8&7,21 &21*2'((3:$7(5f/,0,7(' B BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB & UHGLWRUVKDYLQJGHEWVRUFODLPVDJDLQVWWKHDERYH QDPHG&RPSDQ\DUHUHTXLUHGWRVHQGSDUWLFXODUVW KHUHRIWRWKHXQGHUVLJQHG3%R[ 1DVVDX%DKDPDVRQRUEHIRUHGD\RI-DQXDU\$ ,QGHIDXOWWKHUHRIWKH\ZLOOEHH[FOXGHGIURP W KHEHQHRIDQ\GLVWULEXWLRQPDGHWKH/LTXLGDWRU DWHGWKHWKGD\RI'HFHPEHU &DURO**UD\ / LTXLGDWRU RUWKFKDVH'ULYH +RXVWRQ 8 1 2 7 & ( (662,*(5,$+2/',1*( '((3:$7(5($67f/,0,7('BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB&UHGLWRUVKDYLQJGHEWVRUFODLPVDJDLQVWWKHDERYH QDPHG&RPSDQ\DUHUHTXLUHGWRVHQGSDUWLFXODUV WKHUHRIWRWKHXQGHUVLJQHG3%R[1DVVDX %DKDPDVRQRUEHIRUHGD\RI-DQXDU\ ,QGHIDXOWWKHUHRIWKH\ZLOOEHH[FOXGHGIURP WKHEHQHRIDQ\GLVWULEXWLRQPDGHWKH/LTXLGDWRU 'DWHGWKHWKGD\RI'HFHPEHU &DURO**UD\ /LTXLGDWRU RUWKFKDVH'ULYH +RXVWRQ FROM page 1B $20m resort proposal awaited for Cat Island Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are m aking news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps y ou are raising funds for a g ood cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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one of the top health tourists there is, Dr Robin Roberts, a urologist and director of the University of West Indies (UWI of Clinical Medicine and Research, said there was a good reason why the Cleveland Clinic and Mayo Clinic spent so heavily in marketing their services in this nation. Its estimated that we Bahamians spend $2 billion a year on healthcare in Floridaout of our hard earned money, Dr Roberts said yesterday. If we could get 10 per cent of that in Nassau, that would be fantastic. Dr Roberts was speaking in advance of his presentation to next months Business Outlook conference, in which he plans to examine health tourism and its potential economic benefits for the Bahamas. Arguing that health travel, rather than health tourism, was a better moniker to describe the industry because the former conjured up images of persons coming to the Bahamas to relax on the beach and in casinos, rather than key treatments, Dr Roberts said a prostate cancer treatment service he was associated with had establishedi tself as a prototype of what the sector could do for the Bahamian economy. Topical Health tourism is very topical today. Its a big market, and for us in the Bahamas the issue is whether it is real in terms of being beneficial, or are we being conned? Dr Roberts asked. Coming down emphatically on the beneficial side, Dr Roberts said the prostate cancer treatment service he had joined was very successful and having a tremendous economic impact in the Bahamas. He added that his Business Outlook presentation would also show that it was providing good medical care with a high degree of medical professionalism, resulting in better outcomes for patients. We have a service here that we have found is a prototype of what health tourism could do for the Bahamas, Dr Roberts said. And, given that this nation was next door to the largest medical tourism market in the world, the US, the sector held tremendous potential in terms of expansion and enhanced economic opportunities for this nation. Pointing out that more than 750,000 Americans travelled abroad for healthcare in 2008, Dr Roberts said it was projected then that within twothree years this number would expand to five million, with the US market growing at a rate of 35 per cent per annum. We are right next door, so that should be a natural extension for us, he said, adding that the Bahamas needed to assess why Americans and other foreign nationa ls, such as Europeans, frequently travelled abroad to seek healthcare in foreign fields. A key determinant, Dr Roberts said, was because healthcare costs in their chosen destination were cheaper than at home, although when it came to Americans, the Bahamas did not fall into that category, because our costs of care are not much cheaper. S till, US-based health insurance companies were now actively encouraging clients to seek treatment from over-s eas providers due to everincreasing costs at home, and Dr Roberts said: It behooves us to put ourselves in that position in the Bahamas. Accessibility was another key issue, Dr Roberts pointing to the frequently long waiting times for specialist treatments in the UK and Canada as one key medical tourism driver. The quality of its resident medical professionals was another area where the B ahamas scored highly, Dr Roberts pointing as an example to Doctors Hospital becoming the first Caribbean facility to achieve Joint Commission International (JCI accreditation. I have no doubt that our health care professionals are as equally as qualified, Dr Roberts said, comparing Bahamian medical professionals to their counterparts in the US, UK and Canada. Doctors Hospital should be commended as the first hospital in the English-speaking Caribbean to get that accreditation. H ealthcare It tells us we have the skills and capacity as healthcare professionals to provide care at the same standard as in the US, and we are much more accessible and readilya vailable. And, while some services in the US might be awaiting Federal Drug Administration (FDA Bahamas could exploit this by offering them with thea ppropriate safeguards under the licensing and regulatory qualifications of other countries, such as the UK and Canada. This, Dr Roberts said, would still provide the qualityc are and outcomes provided by the US. Elsewhere, Dr Roberts said that given the $500-$700 million investment required to construct a new, state-of-theart public hospital to replace the current Princess Margaret facility, a phased, planned approach to its successor might be necessary. He acknowledged that the current hospitals infrastructure was downtrodden, and that it was not meeting the Bahamian publics needs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is hereby given that KAYSTALCAMPBELLOF 982 L ISKEARD AVE., FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, a nd that any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 1 5th day of DECEMBER, 2010 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.NOTICE $2BN FLORIDA SPEND HARMS MEDICAL SECTOR DEVELOPMENT FROM page 1B

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ing been boosted by the $116,679 net profit generated by the WasteNot garbage collection business it acquired in May. Hinting that there was room to grow margins by bringing the prices on WasteNots garbage collection business into line with the companys existing fee structure, Disa Campbell, Bahamas Wastes chief financial officer, said 2011 promised to be a better year due to the business prospects set to be generated by the $2.6 billion Baha Mar project. Acknowledging that the BISX-listed waste collection services provider was way off from its 2010 budget forecasts, Ms Campbell said the 53.2 per cent drop in net income for the nine months to September 30, 2010, compared to the $650,730 generated for the same period in 2009, was largely attributable to a 30 per cent increase in fuel costs. These had risen year-overyear by almost $100,000, she added, with the prices of other fuel-related items, such as tyres and engine oils, also rising in line with global oil prices. Bahamas Wastes cost of sales rose by 6.2 per cent to $3.913 million, compared to $3.685 million in 2009. Operating expenses were also up almost 4 per cent at $1.473 million. Ms Campbell added that Bahamas Waste was also carrying the increased cost and salaries associated with its cardboard recycling business segment, which had failed to generate the revenues anticipated. Explaining that the company was way off on Budget forecasts, Ms Campbell said: We are about 35 per cent off on what we anticipated for the bottom line. Our sales are off slightly because the cardboard business has been slow in going. The cardboard side has not taken off as anticipated, so the expense is being covered by core revenue streams. Sales Sales for the first nine m onths of 2010 were off by 1.1 per cent compared to 2009, standing at $5.709 million compared to $5.776 million, but Bahamas Wastes r evenue streams have remained consistent during the fourth quarter to date, although there is no sign of a major pick-up. The fourth quarter is going to be pretty much the same as the first three quarters, Ms Harper said. Well probably end the year under budget, way behind what we forecast at the beginning of the year, but well still have a small profit. When we started this year, we anticipated it would not be as good as last year, but were still off from what we anticipated. Of the contribution made by the business acquired from Waste Not, Ms Campbell said: Thats really turned out to be a good investment for us. Its going to be interesting to see how we can grow that portfolio, because were already the market leader in terms of pricing, and that business in terms of existing margins is not as good as our existing customer base. Telling Tribune Business that Bahamas Waste had been able to finance a lot of expansion from its existing operations and cash resources, Ms Harper said it was unlikely that the company would declare a dividend to shareholders for 2010. I dont anticipate therell be any dividend declared for this year, although I cant speak for the Board, she said yesterday. We paid one in 2009, so Im certain that the directors, provided were able t o, will look forward to giving t he shareholders some kind of return next year. Bahamas Waste, Ms Campbell added, was definitely optimistic on its prospects for 2011, due to both the $2.6 billion Cable Beach redevelopment and the possibility that its biodiesel operation would mitigate rising dieself uel prices. The kind of margins that we can achieve is going to depend on the main thing that drives costs, which is fuel, Ms Campbell told Tribune Business. That depends on how the market holds in terms of diesel, and also how were able to use biodiesel. We do intend in early Janu ary to have the biodiesel plant up and running. Were still in the testing phase, but are looking forward t0 full scale production in early Jan uary. It depends on what blend we can achieve; the closer to B100, the better, because B100 totally eliminates outside fuel products, provided we can keep costs below the market. is going to be interesting to say the least. Were excited about it. We still dont know what the Government is doing about privatising waste collection. Weve been chasing it for years and years. The last prospect, they kind of shelved it. While optimistic that Bahamas Waste would pick up waste construction material and portable toilet provision contracts from Bahamian contractors engaged on Baha Mar, Ms Campbell said the company was less certain about whether it would get any business from the main Chinese contractor, having not obtained what it anticipated from the National Stadium work. Adding that Bahamas Wastes cardboard recycling business was also likely to doa lot better in 2011, Ms Campbell said volumes in this segment were starting to increase, even though it slowed down towards the end of the year, the last export shipment leaving in November. While accounts receivables had remained steady at $1.658 million, Ms Campbell described them as the bane of our existence. Bahamas W aste had made strenuous efforts to work with customers, offering them discounts and making arrangements for past due balances to be reduced over time. We would like to see a bigger decrease in the accounts receivables balance, she said. Its a large number of customers with small balances. For the most part, its smaller customers. Most of our customers are $80-$150 a month customers, and thats generally where we see most of the problems small businesses. Its a difficult economic time for all concerned, and theyre trying very hard to manage their cash flow. Bahamas Waste had paid staff their first salary increment for two years in July, with the company focusing on r estraining discretionary s pending and controllable costs. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 5 2wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y P revious CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.260.97AML Foods Limited0.970.970.000.1500.0406.54.12% 10.759.67Bahamas Property Fund10.6310.630.000.0130.200817.71.88% 6.184.50Bank of Bahamas4.904.900.000.5980.2608.25.31% 0.580.18Benchmark0.180.180.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00%3 .492.70Bahamas Waste2.702.700.000.1680.09016.13.33% 2 .152.14Fidelity Bank2.172.170.000.0160.040135.61.84% 12.509.62Cable Bahamas10.4610.460.001.0500.31010.02.96% 2.842.36Colina Holdings2.402.400.000.7810.0403.11.67% 7 .005.40Commonwealth Bank (S1)6.956.950.0017,1530.4220.26016.53.74% 3.651.63Consolidated Water BDRs1.791.830.040.1110.04516.52.46% 2.551.60Doctor's Hospital1.601.600.000.1990.1108.06.88% 6.995.94Famguard6.076.070.00-0.0030.240N/M3.95% 10.207.23Finco7.237.230.000.2870.52025.27.19% 11.408.77FirstCaribbean Bank9.399.390.000.6450.35014.63.73% 5.513.75Focol (S)5.465.460.000.3660.21014.93.85% 1 .001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 5.595.00ICD Utilities5.595.590.000.0120.240465.84.29% 10.509.82J. S. Johnson9.829.820.000.9710.64010.16.52% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.9910.80010.18.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 99.4699.46Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029BAH2999.460.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 1 00.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +FBB13100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.00 52wk Hi 52wk Low Symbol Bid$ Ask$ LastPrice DailyVol EPS$ Div$ P/E Yield BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:7% Interest 7%RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)29 May 2015 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-232019 October 2022 Prime + 1.75% Prime + 1.75% 6 .95%20 November 2029TUESDAY, 21 DECEMBER 2010BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,487.57 | CHG 0.04 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -77.77 | YTD % -4.97BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basis)Maturity 19 October 2017FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%30 May 2013 52wk Hi 52wk Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Daily Vol EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield 10.065.01Bahamas Supermarkets5.016.0114.00-2.9450.000N/M0.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.350.400.550.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 Months %NAV 3MTH 1.51221.4076CFAL Bond Fund1.51795.51%6.90%1.498004 2.92652.8300CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.91871.10%3.13%2.919946 1.56681.4954CFAL Money Market Fund1.56974.15%4.18%1.551550 3.20252.8522Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund2.7108-13.03%-4.96% 13.638813.0484Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund13.2825-0.63%-0.14% 114.3684101.6693CFAL Global Bond Fund114.36849.98%12.49%109.392860 106.552899.4177CFAL Global Equity Fund106.55284.75%7.18%100.779540 1.14151.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.14154.74%5.21% 1.11011.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.11013.94%7.60% 1.14281.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.14284.78%5.90% 9.74859.1005Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 19.79504.85%5.45% 11.236110.0000Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 210.6417-1.20%0.50% 10.00009.1708Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 39.6635-3.37%-3.37% 8.16434.8105Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund Equities Sub Fund7.94422.94%6.47% BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/MNot Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/200730-Nov-10BISX Listed Mutual FundsNAV Date 30-Nov-10 30-Nov-10 30-Nov-10CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752530-Nov-10 30-Sep-10 30-Sep-10 3-Dec-10 30-Nov-10MARKET TERMS30-Nov-10 NAV 6MTH 1.475244 2.911577 1.532712 107.570619 105.776543 30-Jun-10 30-Nov-10 30-Nov-10 30-Nov-10 /281$%/$1&RI/8'/2: 675((73%2;1$66$8%$+$0$6 127,&( 2UDQMHDVVDX*U\SKRQ+ROGLQJV/WG 3XUVXDQWWRWKH3URYLVLRQVRI6HFWLRQRIWKH ,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV&RPSDQLHV$FWQRWLFH LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG&RPSDQ\KDV EHHQGLVVROYHGDQGVWUXFNRIWKH5HJLVWHUSXUVXDQW WR&HUWLILFDWHRI'LVVROXWLRQLVVXHGWKH5HJLVWUDU *HQHUDORQWKH WK GD\RI'HFHPEHU 'HODQR$UDQKD /LTXLGDWRU RI 2UDQMHDVVDX*U\SKRQ+ROGLQJV/WG FROM page 1B Bahamas Waste 35% below its profit forecasts

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one of the top health tourists there is, Dr Robin Roberts, a urologist and director of the University of West Indies (UWI of Clinical Medicine and Research, said there was a good reason why the Cleveland Clinic and Mayo Clinic spent so heavily in marketing their services in this nation. Its estimated that we Bahamians spend $2 billion a year on healthcare in Floridaout of our hard earned money, Dr Roberts said yesterday. If we could get 10 per cent of that in Nassau, that would be fantastic. Dr Roberts was speaking in advance of his presentation to next months Business Outlook conference, in which he plans to examine health tourism and its potential economic benefits for the Bahamas. Arguing that health travel, rather than health tourism, was a better moniker to describe the industry because the former conjured up images of persons coming to the Bahamas to relax on the beach and in casinos, rather than key treatments, Dr Roberts said a prostate cancer treatment service he was associated with had establishedi tself as a prototype of what the sector could do for the Bahamian economy. Topical Health tourism is very topical today. Its a big market, and for us in the Bahamas the issue is whether it is real in terms of being beneficial, or are we being conned? Dr Roberts asked. Coming down emphatically on the beneficial side, Dr Roberts said the prostate cancer treatment service he had joined was very successful and having a tremendous economic impact in the Bahamas. He added that his Business Outlook presentation would also show that it was providing good medical care with a high degree of medical professionalism, resulting in better outcomes for patients. We have a service here that we have found is a prototype of what health tourism could do for the Bahamas, Dr Roberts said. And, given that this nation was next door to the largest medical tourism market in the world, the US, the sector held tremendous potential in terms of expansion and enhanced economic opportunities for this nation. Pointing out that more than 750,000 Americans travelled abroad for healthcare in 2008, Dr Roberts said it was projected then that within twothree years this number would expand to five million, with the US market growing at a rate of 35 per cent per annum. We are right next door, so that should be a natural extension for us, he said, adding that the Bahamas needed to assess why Americans and other foreign nationa ls, such as Europeans, frequently travelled abroad to seek healthcare in foreign fields. A key determinant, Dr Roberts said, was because healthcare costs in their chosen destination were cheaper than at home, although when it came to Americans, the Bahamas did not fall into that category, because our costs of care are not much cheaper. S till, US-based health insurance companies were now actively encouraging clients to seek treatment from over-s eas providers due to everincreasing costs at home, and Dr Roberts said: It behooves us to put ourselves in that position in the Bahamas. Accessibility was another key issue, Dr Roberts pointing to the frequently long waiting times for specialist treatments in the UK and Canada as one key medical tourism driver. The quality of its resident medical professionals was another area where the B ahamas scored highly, Dr Roberts pointing as an example to Doctors Hospital becoming the first Caribbean facility to achieve Joint Commission International (JCI accreditation. I have no doubt that our health care professionals are as equally as qualified, Dr Roberts said, comparing Bahamian medical professionals to their counterparts in the US, UK and Canada. Doctors Hospital should be commended as the first hospital in the English-speaking Caribbean to get that accreditation. H ealthcare It tells us we have the skills and capacity as healthcare professionals to provide care at the same standard as in the US, and we are much more accessible and readilya vailable. And, while some services in the US might be awaiting Federal Drug Administration (FDA Bahamas could exploit this by offering them with thea ppropriate safeguards under the licensing and regulatory qualifications of other countries, such as the UK and Canada. This, Dr Roberts said, would still provide the qualityc are and outcomes provided by the US. Elsewhere, Dr Roberts said that given the $500-$700 million investment required to construct a new, state-of-theart public hospital to replace the current Princess Margaret facility, a phased, planned approach to its successor might be necessary. He acknowledged that the current hospitals infrastructure was downtrodden, and that it was not meeting the Bahamian publics needs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is hereby given that KAYSTALCAMPBELLOF 982 L ISKEARD AVE., FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, a nd that any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 1 5th day of DECEMBER, 2010 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.NOTICE $2BN FLORIDA SPEND HARMS MEDICAL SECTOR DEVELOPMENT FROM page 1B

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C M Y K C M Y K TASTE PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM T h e T r i b u n e J ust a few images of what we the Bahamas looked like 40...50...60... years in the past A Pirates Fashion Show at Fort Charlotte The observant among you may notice it was before they decided to paint it white. Flash Back BY ROLANDROSE B y TRIBUNE FEATURES W HILE Christmas is t he holiday favoured for gift giving, it is also known for f ood that characterises the season. And while the origins of the traditional Christmas food is not traced to a specific place, each country has had it's influence on Christmas meals. According to www.christmascar nivals.com preparation began well in advance for the holiday. "Preparation for the grand Christmas dinner starts much ahead. In the Medieval times, the table was laid with soups, different baked, boiled and roasted dishes and desserts. The poor people had to do with a much simplified fare, feast ing depended on one's pocket. The tenants gave their landlord a hen and the landlords gave their tenants a meal of two meat dishes, bread and cheese. Over the years, new additions have been made to the Christmas menu." In the Bahamas, families come together and prepare for the big meal a day in advanced. The Christmas staples such as ham, turkey, stuffing, peas and rice, cake and other delectable are made the Bahami an way. Some people might say that there is no Christmas dinner without the staples, because Christmas dinner revolves around those food items. As stated on the website www.allthatwomenwant.com: "Meat has always been featured at the centre of traditional Christmas feasts, although it has not always been in the form of turkey. The act of serving a large roasted joint of meat at Christmas is believed to originate from ancient sacrificial rites to appease the gods and hopefully ensure a sufficient harvest in the fol lowing year," the website stated. Meats that were also used during celebrations included beef, mutton, pork, peacocks and swans. When it comes to Christmas pastries, in the Bahamas, fruitcake is the most popular. It is believed that fruit cake came to the Bahamas when the British came. They brought the tradition of fruitcake and tea and soon the locals began making their own batch of fruitcake. "In Europe, a ceremonial type of fruitcake was baked at the end of the nut harvest and saved and eaten the next year to celebrate the beginning of the next harvest, hoping it will bring them another successful harvest. After the harvest, nuts were mixed and made into a fruitcake that was saved until the following year. At that time, previous year's fruitcakes were consumed in the hope that its symbolism would bring the blessing of another successful harvest," according to www.whatscookingamerica.com Preparing for a big Christmas meal FEAST FOR THE EYES: Christmas dinner is no Christmas dinner without the staples such as turkey and ham.

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C M Y K C M Y K ENTERTAINMENT THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2010, PAGE 9B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM T h e T r i b u n e things 2 DO EVERY WEDNESDAY M IC CHECK 1242 Da Bridge hosts Mic Check 1242, a weekly showcase for artists with comedy, poetry, music, games, trivia, prizes and good food and drink specials. Telephone: 393-5728. DECEMBER 23 THURSDAY ALL WHITE E VERYTHING C HRISTMAS PARTY Hypermedia Entertainm ent presents an All White Everything Christmas party at Club Luna where the dress code is white only! Tickets available at Jukebox. DECEMBER 27 MONDAY B OXING DAY J UNKANOO PARADE Celebrate Christmas the right way with the annual Boxing Day Junkanoo parade which promises to bea s exciting as ever! Parade k icks off at exactly 12.01am with Roots up first followed by the Prodigal Sons, Valley Boys, Saxons Superstars, Music Makers and One Family. Come out to support your favourite group ort o simply listen to the sweet sounds of Bahamian Junkanoo! DECEMBER 24 FRIDAY BLACKOUT 6 Once again the nightlife fades to black for the sixth time ever, this Friday night KO Productions, BTC and Absolut Vodka present The Black Out 6 at the Club Luna Night Club, West Bay Street, Saunders Beach. By ALESHA CADET Tribune Features Reporter TRIBUNEmedia group DJs cleaned up at the 7th annual DJ awards, taking home a number of top awards including best male and female personalities, best countdown show and best radio DJ. Presented by Future Entertainment, the Bahamas' 7th Annual DJ Awards show had an excellent turnout at the Shirley Street Performing Arts Center last weekend. The company has since 2003, devoted its energy to paying homage to the many great men and women responsible for the jams jumping through our speakers bestowing awards and honourable mention upon the elite group of mediamoguls. Future Entertainment and Team TAGG joined forces to create forty categories, eighteen of which were given to Radio Personality DJ's. In each division, the winners were selected by online voting only, to assure the absolute best results possible. The show was hosted by DJ Clean Cuts, "alongside DJ Pama on the ones and twos, the event was light hearted, comical and was truly a treat for patrons as some of the country's big name stars were in the house." The audience was entertained by special musical performances by recording artists Lady Millz and Mad Van, Slim Fidell, DJ Runks and Mr Munks. The event also featured Bahamian artist, Sammi Starr, the Bahamas' pick for Miami's annual Best of the Best' concert earlier this year. He assisted by presenting awards to the winning DJs. Jah Nyne affiliate, Jah Ian, and recording artist Tada was also among the many seated in the crowd. The popular dance crew 'Juice Unit' performed a thrilling King of Pop themed dance. The event was sponsored by Five Star Film, Phil's Food Services, Max imumbass, Bahamia,242 Party, Hard core Security, Pink Butterfly, Blue bird, Florida Naturals and Bacardi. By ALESHA CADET Tribune Features Reporter O NCE AGAIN, Sebas B astian of Sebas Events held his annu al Christmas Party at the W yndham Nassau & Crystal Palace Casino, Grand Ballroom, on December 17. The original line up of performers f or the party was dancehall artist Vybz Kartel and American artist DJ Kahled and Rick Ross, but due to schedulingm ishaps the first two were replaced with popular culture reggae artist Richie Spice and reggaes long time heartthrob Jah-Cure. T he Vendetta Group told T ribune Entertainment: Due to Sebass good w orking relationship with the two additional major stars he was able to give his patrons the same if not even more entertainment bang for their buck. In classic Sebas fashion, he had the grand ball room transformed into av ery plush concert site with a huge stage at the front with extensive light r igging, speakers which filled the room with a clean robust sound. There were fully stocked bars avail able with their many bar tenders wait i ng to serve, this was one of the first things guests saw as they walked into the area. Extending from the stage on both sides were two double platinum sitting areas which were equipped with their own bar area with glasses and a finger food buffet area. Also, down from the stage area was the platinum sitting areaw hich resembled a swank upscale lounge and on the right hand side of the room was the skybox sitting area. At the rear of the room with a great mass of space and a clear view of the stage was the general admission area. The room kept a low lighting scheme to give the whole concert area a mellow feel to it. The night of entertainment began with Selector Chronic and DJ Flex entertaining the crowd with their musical selections. Once the crowd began to hit peak levelsthe man of the hour made his appearance to the stage to do what has become a staple of Sebas Christmas parties which is his on stage rants, the Vendetta Group stated. Sebas got to the business at hand and introduced the first artist to the stage Richie Spice, who with a flurry of applause and cheers as he got straight into his performance. He performed his hit songs; Brown Skin, The Plane Land and many more. His performance was very soulful and confident. After Richies perfor mance, came reggaes top crooner JahCure. The minute Cure stepped onto the stage, the crowd instantly erupted into cheers and screams. He performed his hit songs Two Way Street, Sunny Days, Unconditional Love and many more. His performance was truly amazing and his sound was almost CD quality or better. Coming next to the stage was one of the biggest rappers in the world presently the man called Rick Ross. He came to the stage with his May bach music affiliates and brought the house down with the great energy theyc ame with. Rick Ross performed his hit songs Hustlin, Mc Hammer, B.M.F. and much more. The fans got a rare treat w hich was the premier of a brand new song by Jah-Cure and Rick Ross. The performance was thoroughly enter taining. Overall the entire night will be one to remember and full of amazement. Most that attended can say they partied till sun came up. This was yet another feather in the hat of the reigning King of parties in the 242 Sebas Bastian. For those who missed it join The Vendetta Group on facebook to get a glimpse of the all access photos and videos. Nassaus 2010 DJ awards LIST OF WINNERS 1. BEST COUNTDOWN SHOW Bahama Hot Ones, Randy C 100 Jamz 2. BEST LIVE EVENT RADIO REMOTE COVERAGE STATION 100 Jamz 3. BEST PRODUCE COMMERCIAL PERSONALITY Reality, 100 Jamz 4. BEST TALK SHOW Free Your Mind, Natural Empress, 100 Jamz 5. BEST MALE PERSONALITY Reality, 100 Jamz 6. BEST FEMALE PERSONALITY 100 Jamz, Natural Empress 7. BEST SOFT SHOW Jatonde, 100 Jamz 8. BEST RADIO DJ Extra Large 100 Jamz 9. BEST CONCERT SYSTEM Zamar 10. BEST DJ SOUND SYSTEM Powerhouse DJs 11. FUTURE TRENDSETTERS / UPCOMING DJS DJ Article 12. BEST LATE NIGHT SHOW RADIO SHOW KP Golden Oldies, Star 106.5 13. RADIO WEBSITE OF THE YEAR Star 106.5 14. BEST DANCE GROUP / PERSON Juice Unit 15. BEST DRESS SELECTOR / MIC MAN DJ Chronic 16. BEST BAHAMIAN MIX SHOW MV Express, Sweet Island Gal, 102.9 17. BEST BOAT CRUISE DJ Pow erhouse DJs 18. BEST HIGH SCHOOL DJ DJ Spuddy 19. BEST GOSPEL SHOW Spirit 92.5, Sunday Program 20. BEST FEMALE GOSPEL PERSONALITY (NEW Sister C, Joy 101 21. BEST MALE GOSPEL PERSONALITY (NEW Giles Well, Spirit 92.5 22. BEST MORNING SHOW Naughty Niggs, 94.9 23. BEST RADIO NEWS AWARDS More 94.9 24. BEST PARTY DJ DJ Tank 25. BEST CD / TAPES DJ Chronic & Zion Sounds 26. BEST HYPEST DJ DJ Chronic 27. BEST REGATTA DJ (NEW Lil Dwight & DJ Tank 28. BEST FLYER DESIGN (NEW Riddim Designs 29. BEST REMIX DJ DJ Ignite 30. BEST DRESS DJ Supa Mario 31. BEST ORGANIZE DJ CREW Powehouse DJs 32. BEST CONTEMPORARY SHOW Kirk Johnson, 104.5 33. BEST CLUB / SPORTS BAR DJ DJ Chronic 34. BEST RADIO MIX SHOW DJ CRX X in the Mix w/ Big L, More 94.9 35. BEST HOST / HOSTESS Selector Jimbo 36. BEST SELECTOR MIC MAN DJ Chronic 37. PROMOTER OF THE YEAR Supa Mario Entertainment 38. NIGHT CLUB OF THE YEAR Charlies Nightclub 39. RADIO STATION OF THE YEAR More 94.9 40. DJ OF THE YEAR Extra Large NEW YORK Associated Press THE1993 killing of a man outside a housing complex was a cold case for years until a suspect appeared on detectives' doorstep last week. Apparently haunted by his secret, once-promising rapper G. Dep walked into a police precinct to confess to the shooting, authorities said. The rapper is being held without bail after surprised investigators matched the details he provided to the unsolved slaying of John Henkel. Initially charged with murder, he was indicted Tuesday on a charge that won't be disclosed until a court date next month. For the 36-year-old G. Dep, the case marks a nadir in his long fall from rapper on the rise. After scoring a couple of hits in the early 2000s, he has been mired in drug and legal problems in recent years, though he was attempting a comeback with an album released online this year. But the shooting case also represents his determination to turn a troubled life around, his lawyer said Tuesday. "He's trying to remake his life," attorney Michael Alper stein said. Guided by a sub stance-treatment program, "he was making amends," Alperstein said. The bearded rapper said nothing during a brief appear ance Tuesday in a Manhattan court, looking back at about a dozen relatives and supporters as he was led away. They declined to comment after ward. Henkel was shot in the chest three times outside an East Harlem apartment com plex early on Oct. 19, 1993, well before G. Dep's brief heyday. The rapper told a detective last week he pulled a .40-caliber handgun to rob the victim and fired when he resisted. Authorities: Rapper confesses to 1993 NYC murder Sebas does it again with the hypest Christmas party of the year ENTERTAINERS: Award winning dj, DJ chronic along with Dj Flex takes time to pose for photo before the show started. POWER COMBO: Rick Ross performs a new song with Jah Cure for the crowd. SOUL: Jah Cure giving the crowd a piece of soulful music. THE MAN: Sebas Bastian poses with Rick Ross.

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C M Y K C M Y K ARTS PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM ACCORDINGto the website Davidlcke.com the seven basic symbols used are 1. Mazoa (crops, fruits and vegetables) These represent the fruits of our collective labor. 2. Mkeka (straw mat ic of tradition and history. The ground of which we stand and on which we build. 3. Kinara (seven lamp candle holder) Symbolic of the parent stalk-continental Africans. Represents our ancestors as a collec tive whole. 4. Mishumaa Saba (seven candles: 3 red, 3 green 1 black) These represent the seven principles of NGUZO SABA. They are placed in the Kinara with the black can dle representing Umoja placed in the center. 5. Muhindi (ears of corn represent the children (watato Each ear represents a child in the family and the potential of the offspring to become stalks them selves, reproducing and insuring the immortality of the people. 6. Zawadi (gifts Rewards given in love and appreciation to children and adults for acts of com mitment to the "family, commu nity, nation and race. Gifts are given for merit and should enhance personal growth and "connection to the community. 7. Kikombe Cha Umoja (unity cup) It is used to pour Tambiko (libation those who have gone before us, our ancestors. THE KWANZAA RITUAL The symbols are placed on a low table Spread out the Mkeka and place the Kinara in the cen ter. The Muhindi should be placed around the sides of the Kinara. As they become available the Zawadi should be placed on the Mkeka in an artistic arrangement. The Mishumaa should all be placed at the far right of the Mkeka so that they are available for lighting each day. The Kikombe Cha Umoja and the Mazoa should be creatively and conveniently placed. Each day the celebration of Kwanzaa should include but not necessarily be limited to the following: 1. An explanation of Kwanzaa: The African roots and contemporary meaning and significance of the celebration should be made clear to all who have gathered together. 2. An explanation of the NGU ZO SABA: A presentation of the importance of a Black value system and a brief review of all the seven principles. 3. Lighting of the candles: The black candle is lit for the first day representing Umoja. Each day after the first day the black candle is 1 it first and then the candle is lit for that particular day and the days preceding it. For example,on the third day, Ujima, the first candle lit will be the black Umo ja candle. Then alternating from left to right the first red candle would be lit for Ujima. On the seventh and last day of Kwanzaa six candles would be lit before "lighting the last (green symbolising Imani: 4. Description of symbols: A presentation describing the mean ing and importance of the seven basic symbols of Kwanzaa. 5. Libation to ancestors (Tam biko): In traditional African societies expressions of homage were paid to ancestors through the pouring of libation. We pour libation during Kwanzaa in remem brance of those who have made sacrifices and prepared a way for us. Through libation rituals we are bonded to those who have gone before us and to those who will come after. Our commitment to the liberation of African peo ple is strengthened. As the libation is poured a tamshi la tam biko (libation statement be made as pouring gestures are made in the direction of the four winds: north, south, east, and west. Unfermented wine (grape juice)' should be used for the liba tion. 6. Elucidation of the Principle for the day: The principle for the day should be made fully clear. Participants in the ceremony should be led to have a full (spir it/mind/body) experience of the principle. Use of such things as arts and crafts, poetry readings, music, plays, chanting, singing, dancing, drumming, dialogue, etc. can be used to heighten the par ticipants' experience. 7. The Call: A person should be designated to lead the gathered participants in seven spirited shouts of "Harambee" which means "We are pulling together." The seventh "Harambee" should be held for an extended length of time to symbolise unity and harmony among our people. The Kwanzaa Karamu: The evening of December 31 has been designated as the time for the Karamu which means feast. Cel ebrants participate in an evening of eating, drinking, dancing and gaiety in an atmosphere of communal fellowship and oneness. Exchanging of gifts: On Janu ary 1, the day of Kwanzaa, gifts in the spirit of the meaning of Zawadi may be enchanted. Gift giving MUST NOT become commercialised and the purchase of gifts should not place excessive eco nomic strain on the giver. Gifts should educate and inspire the receiver. By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL T ribune Features Editor A n art teachers love of all things Afrocentric has leadh er to oragnise the first ever Bahamian public observance of the Kwanzaa celebration to be heldn ext week. Carla Campbell, who teaches at CR Walker is also a professional artist is planning the event to bring awareness of the celebration which has its roots in African history. According to www.Kwanzaa.com, Kwanzaa comes from the Kiswahili word for the first fruits of the harvest and is observed from December 26th through January 1st. Its focus is to pay tribute to the rich cultural roots of People of the African Diaspora. Though first inspired by African-Americans, many of African descent celebrate this occasion today. Its reach has grown to include all whose roots are in the Motherland. Its concept is neither religious nor political, but is rooted strongly in a cultural awareness. This is not a substitute for Christmas; however, gifts may be exchanged with the principles of Nguzo Saba always in mind. Gifts are given to reinforce personal growth and achievement which benefits the collective community. THE PRINCIPLES OF KWANZAA ARE: Umoja (unity Kujicahgulia (self determination CHA-GU-LIA Ujima (collective work and responsibility U-JI-MA Ujamaa (cooperative economics MA Nia (purpose Kuumba (creativity Imani (faith Ms Campbell explained that the idea for the local Kwanzaa celebration came after a recent trip to a book store. I wanted to buy some Afrocentric cards and I asked the sales clerk if they had any Kwanzaa cards and she didnt know what it was. So she asked me to explain the celebration to me and she was really interested. I went home and created a Kwanzaa Bahamas facebook page and the response I got was very favourable. What she found was that there many Bahamian families who were quietly observing Kwanzaa in the privacy of their homes. In fact I learnt that the late Dr Thaddeus McDonald held a Kwanzaa celebration for years. Thus the idea to provide a venue where everyone could come and observe the celebration was born. A Kwanzaa Celebration will be held on Wednesday December 29 at the Adrastra Gardens from 5.30 -8pm at a cost of $10 a person. This will be the first major public event that focuses on Kwanzaa and I want people to walk away having been both educated and entertained. The programme will begin at 5.30 and we will have a different performance for each of the seven principles. Additionally, people will be able to buy food and drinks and art and craft works in keeping with Kwanzaas theme of simplicity. Ms Campbell pointed out that the beauty of the celebration is that it does not have religious or racial overtones. It is not the Black Christmas. It just embraces positive values, anyone can celebrate it, just like you dont have to be Irish to celebrate St Patricks Day or Chinese to enjoy the Chinese New Year. It is all very inclusive. Kwanzaa stresses the importance of making gifts or giving books as gifts. She said she has undertaken the planning of the Kwanzaa event strictly from the heart without corporate sponsorship, but hopes that it will become an annual event. The spirit of Kwanzaa Rituals Kwanzaa

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C M Y K The Tribune SECTIONB I N S I D E Preparing for a big Christmas meal See page eight W W E E D D N N E E S S D D A A Y Y , D D E E C C E E M M B B E E R R 2 2 2 2 , 2 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 B y JEFFARAH GIBSON Tribune Features Writer I NSTEAD of opting for jewelry, cloth ing or electronics purchasing a gift that has meaning, is impressionable, and long lasting can be the better choice for Christmas. GREAT GIFTS: Purchasing art could be a better choice for a Christmas gift as the value of art appreciates with time. TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM One reason why art can be a great selection, is because it represents something personal and the thought process that actually goes into selecting an art piece can be appreciated. But picking any ole art piece is not a good idea simply because there are things that should be taken into consideration before making a purchase. Tribune Arts spoke with Jackson Burnside, owner of Doongalik Art Gallery & Studios who said that before getting a piece of artwork you want to consider the persons likes, dislikes, and their tastes. The first thing you should do if you are buying a piece of art for someone, think about who the person is and then decide whether the work speaks to you, because chances are if the work speaks to you it will speak to the person you are buying it for, he said. Mr Burnside said when you see a perspective art piece consider if the art piece is something that you would love having in your space, or if the art piece speaks to you, or if it gives you a good feeling. If you are not moved by it, then he said you should not purchase it. Another thing that is also important to take note of is the amount you are willing to spend on the artwork. At Doonaglik Art Gallery we have a myriad of art work for a variety of good prices. If you are looking to purchase original pieces of work we have a variety from a number of Bahamian artists. But if you dont have to have an original, we also have a variety of reproduction that are just as good, he said. Mr Burnside also said that while you might find a piece of work breath taking, another person might not. You dont want to purchase an incredible piece of art for someone who does not appre ciate it. You want to purchase an art piece for someone who can value it, he said. Additionally, Mr Burnside said buying art is better than the usual fare because it is real estate. Art is real estate. It doesnt depreciate, it appreciates with time and it becomes extremely valuable. You can give someone an original today and a few years from now its value will multiply with time. Any good real investment appreciates and it justifies the investment, he said. Doongalik Art Gallery & Studio has an assortment of artwork ranging from paintings to ceramics, sculptures, wood turning, and tile works just to name a few. D oongalik Art Gallery & Studios offers an alternative Christmas gift ideas Art images by Doongalik Studios & Art Gallery Rick Ross to headline Christmas party See page nine


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