The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01701
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: 11/9/2010
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Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
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General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:01701

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N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Critically ill baby in hospital or deal C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 106 No.292TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2010 PRICE 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNY AND BREEZY HIGH 83F LOW 71F F E A T U R E S SEEWOMANSECTION S P O R T S 6th Annual Wedding Professionals Conference SOFTBALLNEWSON1E Star pitcher milestone By AVA TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter a turnquest@tribunemedia.net HORRIFIED by what could have been a fatal error on behalf of medical staff at the Princess Margaret Hos pital, a grandmother told The Tribune of her harrowing experience seeking medical care for her two-monthold granddaughter. In a crowded Accident and Emergency over whelmed by shooting and other violent crime victims, 62-year-old Vianna Pinders ays she waited for more than five hours with her daughter and the sick infant Kyannah Bootle only to b e turned away by health workers who allegedly found no sign of illness. M s Pinder said: They say t hey are doing better, they a int doing no better. I thank God, I dont really have to go there because I have my F amil y hits out over care at PMH emer g ency room McCOMBO OF THE DAY N E W www.fidelitygroup.comCall 356.7764today! Get out of Debt Fast with a Fidelity Fast Track Debt Consolidation loan. Decisions Fast Money Fast Plus Visa Credit Card FastGetoutofdebt Fast! B AHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E SEE page 12 By NOELLE NICOLLS Tribune Staff Reporter nnicolls@tribunemedia.net SOUTH Abaco MP Edison Key is challenging a residents claim to ownership of almost six acres of land in Marsh Harbours Pigeon Pea community. I cleared the land where the Pigeon Pea settlement is. My broth er-in-law, Morton Sawyer, and I, we started our farm on that area. We cleared about six acres of land back in 1967. We paid for the bulldozer and operated on that property. Ricky Albury wasnt born yet I bet, said Mr Key. It had pine trees on it and we cleared the land. We called our selves Key and Sawyer Farms. (Family members who from time to time have claimed rights to land) had some documents made up with signed affidavits, but they are not even relevant. I could do the same thing and say I owned the same plot. I am a Key; I come down from THE GOVERNMENT unveiled its plans to strengthen and expand information technology infrastructure in the coun try yesterday an ambitious initiative that if executed correctly could herald a complete revitalisation of the public sector. Under the guidance of the government of Singapore a country renowned for its groundbreaking use of information technology to drive economic success the Bahamian government hopes to launch the first phase of new online services in less than eight months. SEE STORY, PAGES TWO AND THREE GOVT UNVEILS PUBLIC SECTOR INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY PLANS ORDEAL: Little Kyannah Bootle is recovering at Princess Margaret Hospital. By TANEKA T HOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@ t ribunemedia.net A T LEASTtwo of the straw vendors who werep unished by a New York c ourt for trafficking counterfeit goods are "happy" to be back to work in the Bay Street market but have little to say on the matter. Straw vendor associa t ion president Telator Strachan said her friends and fellow vendors JudyD uncombe and Shamone T hompson returned to the market not long after their sentencing, but have not spoken of their experience. They didn't discuss anything about the situation there but they did sayt hat they were happy to be at home, said Ms Strachan. I encouraged them that e verything was going to be o kay and that was about the size of it. They really didn't want to get caught up in a situation like that,t hey are distraught about it, but I think that they are trying to cope. As far as I know they are back at their business places and doing business at usual but they didn't say anything about their ordeal except to say that they are happy to be at home." The two women were part of the group of nine straw vendors arrested in New York on September 18 and later charged with Claim of Pigeon Pea land ownership challenged by MP SEE page 11 CHALLENGE : Edison Key STRAW VENDORS PUNISHED IN NEW YORK HAPPY TO BE BACK AT WORK SEE page 12 By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net THREE men appeared before a magistrate yesterday in connection with the drive-by shooting death of a Fox Hill woman. THREE CHARGED IN CONNECTION WITH SHOOTING DEATH OF WOMAN SEE page 11 The Tribune THEPEOPLESPAPER BIGGESTANDBEST BAHAMASEDITION www.tribune242.com

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The government unveiled its plans to strengthen and expand the countrys information technology infrastructure yesterday an ambitious initiative that if execut-e d correctly could herald a complete revitalisation of the public sector. Under the guidance of the government of Singapore a country renowned for its g roundbreaking use of inform ation technology to drive economic success the Bahamian government hopesto launch the first phase of new online services in less than eight months. B y AVA TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter aturnquest@tribunemedia.net THE HIGHLY anticipate d modernisation of the public service sector could elimin ate a number of inadequacies that have become syno nymous with the culture of t he Bahamas, according to o fficials. D rawing from the Information and Communications Technology (ICT o f Singapore whose prodigal j ourney from an estimated $ 966 million GDP at independence in 1965 to an estim ated $235.7 billion GDP in 2010 has received internat ional notoriety Minister of F inance Zhivargo Laing is c onfident the country is ready t o embrace the 21st Century. Mr Laing said: The advent of the Internet has changed the way we communicate and share information. This is truen ot only for social networking and keeping in touch with family and friends but also for commerce, learning, banking and all facets of everyday life.T his undertaking is a fundam ental one for us in the B ahamas. It will change the culture of doing business and providing public services in our nation. It will involve a substantial investment on ourp art but the gains will be sign ificant. The infrastructure initiative e-Government was unveiled to parliamentarians and senior government offi-c ials yesterday, and with it, projections of a public service sector that could be engageda t anytime, from anywhere. Mr Laing said: e-Governm ent refers to the use of i nformation and communicat ions technology by government agencies to interact with employees, citizens, businesse s and others agencies. The activities of which can be categorised as: publishing con-t ent is published to the Intern et; interacting two-way communication is established; and transacting transactions are conducted online. The firm partnering with the government on this sub s tantial improvement initiative is IDA International a subsidiary of IDA Singapore, the government agency dedicated to guiding Singapores vision for economic growth through the Information and Communications industry. Mr Laing said: To advance o ur e-Government efforts and i mprove our online service d elivery strategy, the government of the Bahamas has engaged the government of Singapore, through its technology arm, IDA Interna-t ional, to recommend a way f orward that will employ the best practices, and follow a model that would yield the most for our endeavour. The government will seek t o lay the technical foundation and governance structure in the Singapore Model to dri-v e the Bahamase-Government agenda, and by early int he next financial year, will b e launching the government o nline services portal, govNet.bs, with several services that will cater to citizens and b usinesses. During the presentation, IDA executives illustratedp ossibilities that are now a r eality for the tiny island country of Singapore, and explained that these benefits were also within grasp for the Bahamas. The first batch of online s ervices are expected to be launched in July of next year, and include: the payment of business licence fees, payment of real property tax, payment of fines, renewal of a drivers l icence, application for new b usiness licenses, vendor inquiries (payments, invoices and purchase orders) and ser-v ice-wide customer service. R epresentatives illustrated how the Bahamas could also be freed from the archaic sys-t em to which it has become accustomed, using Singapore as evidence of the latent ben e fits possible through improved ICT infrastructure. Long queues, data backlogs and the frustrations that a ccompany them for both public servants and their cus tomers also encroached upon the quality of life of the people of Singapore but this was almost 30 years ago. Post-independence, the t echnology infrastructure giant was struggling with minuscule land mass, overwhelming population growth, a nd a labour intensive economy. After effecting a total shift in economic and manpower strategies towards the culti vation and implementation of i nformation technology by the government, Singapore is now experiencing the results of successive national ICT plans. Now in its sixth plan, the country, which had a total of 850 IT professionals in 1980, h as established a globally competitive Infocomm Indus try and has been ranked number one in ease of doing busi n ess for five consecutive years. Mr Laing said: The Bahamas is seeking to do the same. In the long term we would like to use technologyt o make the Bahamas the best place to work and live in the Caribbean. We envision a Bahamas w here technology is the driver in all sectors in our society: tourism, education, financial s ervices, government, health care, transportation, and com merce. In the medium term we see e-Government as the enabler of true public sector reform as it will provide the b aseline for measuring gov ernment agencies performance; introduce online customer service and encourage response; provide easy access to government service; clarify government processes; improve efficiency and transform the way the government collects revenue. The successful implementation of e-Government is expected to engender an effi cient and responsive govern ment, with increased transparency through equal oppor tunity to government services and contracts. A n integrated public service sector, armed with func tional information technology tools, promises an education s ector where online classes and video conferences are the norm, health services that can be accessed and managed remotely, an e-Commerce marketplace which wouldo ffer inclusion of local busi nesses, a transparent financial services sector and most importantly an improved jus-t ice system. Mr Laing said: We imag ine the possibilities wherel awyers can file documents online, court documents are digitised and readily available t o authorised persons, the backlog is no more and cases are adjudicated in record time. H owever as the sixmonth-long study by IDA International concluded the Bahamas must make great leaps to close the gaps in cur rent infrastructure before public service in the country can effectively progress into the 21st century. In addition to obvious limitations due to the current state of online services, which C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM NASSAU INSURANCE BROKERS AND AGENTS LIMITED Atlantic House,2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue P.O.Box N-7764 Nassau Tel.677-6422 www.nibaquote.comThe best value home insurance has a surprisingly calming effect!Do not underestimate the cost of storm damage and make sure your insurance cover will meet the bills.NIBA can help assess your insurance needs so that you are adequately protected.And the calming effect? That comes when you see the price.Home insurance costs less with NIBA.Its time to pay less for insuring your home! Tel.677-6422 or visit www.nibaquote.com Open Saturdays10.00am2.00pm INDEX MAIN/SPORTS SECTION Local News.....................P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9,10 Local News...................P11,12,13,14,15,16 Editorial/Letters........................................P4 BUSINESS/WOMAN SECTION Business...........................................P1,2,3,4 W oman............................................P5,6,7,8 SPORTS SECTION Spor ts....................................P1,2,3,4,5,7,8 Comics.....................................................P6 CLASSIFIED SECTION 28 P AGES E-Government could revitalise New online services to be launched under guidance of Singapore govt SINGAPORE (above m ated $235.7 billion GDP in 2010. The country once suffered long queues, data backlogs and the frustrations that accompany them in the public service (belowwith great success. 2 0 1 0 I D A I n t e r n a t i o n a l A l l r i g h t s r e s e r v e d SEE page thr ee

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w ere found to be duplicative with limited automation and t o lack transactional services, core inefficiencies were found in the governments vision and strategy, organisation and capacity for information tech-n ology. The report cited scarce ICT manpower, low morale among staff and noted that the existing data centre and government network needed t o be enhanced to meet the a nticipated increase in demand. The study also concluded t he lack of governance structure in the current system would not allow for the defin ite strategic direction needed to implement the proposed w idespread p olicy changes. Mr L aing said: lot of work must be done in terms of trying to get people to understand what e-Gove rnment is, to understand the b enefits that e-Government c an provide. We really want t o have a significant launch of it and then to take subseq uent opportunities to meet w ith even smaller groups to t alk about it as we implement i t. It means change of workflow, change of attitude, change of skills for some people so what they didp oint out to us and what is going to be our own efforts is t raining, giving people as much training as possible so that they feel comfortable with the tech, comfortable with the programme, and feel as if its making a difference in their o wn lives and the service that t hey provide. What is going to be import ant is not learning the tech nology as in accessing the i nternet for instance but h ow to operate in an envir onment where technology is d riving what you do. In the following weeks the government will embark on a national public education campaign to keep the popu l ation its customers abreast of the huge changes e xpected in the months going forward. Mr Laing added: We seek to have the fullest possible b uy-in by our society. Similar meetings will be held for civil ser vants, busin esspersons, educators, religious l eaders and the public at large throughout the nation. It is our hope to ensure t hat as full an understanding o f what we are doing is a chieved and that we will w ork together as a nation to make this important endeavo ur work. I invite all to part icipate. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2010, PAGE 3 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Bahamas public sector VISION: A connected Bahamas, maximising technology. 2010. IDA International. All rights reserved. E -GOVERNMENT: M inister of Finance Zhivargo Laing speaks to parliamentarians and senior government officials yesterday at the presentation of the new e-Government initiative. FROM page two

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E DITOR, The Tribune. We would appreciate the p ublication of the following l etter that was sent to the Bahamas Ministry of T ourism. Dear Sir, On our recent trip to Nassau, Bahamas we encountered some concerns that lead my husband and I compelled to w rite to your department. We are owners at Harborside R esort and frequent The B ahamas twice a year. We consider it our second home and have been travelling to your country for more than 30 years. We are very familiar with your island and feel very c omfortable coming there with our family and friends. Upon our arrival to the airport on October 25, 2010, t hree airplanes arrived simultaneously. There were three immigration officers on duty to process all passengers passports. Needless to say, the lines backed up all the way up the escalators. By the time we got through the lines, the l uggage carousel was overf lowing with suitcases. Lugg age was falling all over the floor. My suitcase got jammed u p on top of the carousel, out of my reach. I asked an attendant if he could assist me inr etrieving my suitcase. His r esponse was, get someone younger. I thought to myself, Welcome to The Bahamas! O n October 30th, we attended The Bahamas Arts Festival at Arawak Cay. Wee njoyed looking at the local Bahamian crafts, listening to the bands and of course sampling true home-cooked local food. When we were ready to leave, we grabbed a ride with a female taxi driver and nego t iated our fare to take us back to Harborside. She pulled out o nto West Bay Street and stopped for a large group of intoxicated tourists in the h opes of adding them to our taxi. We were not interested in driving with these other peop le and let her know. She continued to work out a price w ith them. We jumped out of h er cab, hopped on a jitney t o downtown and picked up a nother taxi to take us back to Harborside. We felt we had hired her, obviously, the fare she agreed to charge us was not enough and she was looki ng to get more out of her travels at the expense of us. We truly enjoy our time s pent in The Bahamas, but f elt that sometimes you need t o hear directly from the tourists their experiences. Thank you for your time. STEVEN & JUDY PHILLIPS, Nassau, November 7, 2010. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2010 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., ( Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama TELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising A dvertising Manager (242 Circulation Department (242 Nassau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 Freeport fax: (242 WEBSITE w ww.tribune242.com updated daily at 2pm WASHINGTON The Republican gains in Tuesday's midterm elections say a lot about how the American public wants the government to rule here at home, but very little about what it should do abroad. Unresolved wars in Iraq and Afghanistan are taking their toll in American lives and capital, nuclear tensions are simmering with North Korea and Iran. But voters weren't asked to either approve or reject President Barack Obama's view of the United States' role in global affairs. It wasn't on the ballot. "I can't think of an instance in recent times in which foreign policy was less prominent," said Andrew Kohut, president of the Pew Research Centre. The president, meanwhile, was in India on Saturday, opening a 10-day Asia trip to pro mote U.S. policy and commerce and to meet with foreign leaders. Terror strikes from abroad are the clear and present danger, as shown by the discovery of two package bombs headed to the U.S. from Yemen. But across the country, candidates offered little of substance on how the U.S. should respond to those threats. There was little discussion during the campaign of a landmark arms control deal with Russia, which the Senate must ratify to take effect. Nor was there serious debate about the wisdom of withdrawing remaining U.S. forces from Iraq or starting the with drawal of U.S. troops from Afghanistan next July. Richard Haass, president of the Council on Foreign Relations, a New York-based think tank, said "foreign policy hardly mattered" in the campaign and election. "The principal reason," he said in an interview, is that "most Americans are preoccupied with their economic circumstances. People voted on the basis of butter, not guns." Haass said a major crisis might restore the prominence of foreign policy in national affairs, but it would have to be "something big and bad," such as a war with Iran or the collapse of Afghanistan or North Korea. The Senate is considering a treaty with Russia to reduce stockpiles of U.S. and Russian long-range nuclear weapons, the first major arms control deal in years between the world's two leading nuclear powers. The treaty still needs to be ratified by the Senate, where Republicans have balked at supporting it. Now with the Democrats' Senate majority eroded, the treaty's fate is in question. But it never became a major issue in the campaign. It wasn't always like this. President Lyndon Johnson's pursuit of the war in Vietnam turned the public against him and he ultimately decided not to run for re-election. Aaron David Miller of the Woodrow Wilson Centre said that unlike Johnson, Obama is perceived as trying to end the conflicts he inherited. "It can change if the president becomes risk-ready rather than risk-averse," Miller said, though the Republicans will be looking for stumbles in Afghanistan, Iraq, Iran or the Israeli-Palestinian dispute. The voters have decided, perhaps, that their vote carries little weight on national security issues, especially in a congressional election. Overall, Congress has given a free hand to Obama in this area, as it did to Pres ident George W. Bush. This could change if, as some predict, Republican legislators hold hearings to question a broad range of White House policies. But if the GOP challenges Obama's war strategy, it won't be because voters asked them to do so. The Republicans made an issue of big spending. But in general, they are eyeing cuts in domestic programmes, not the huge cost of maintaining and deploying the Unit ed States' military might abroad. Travelling in the South Pacific the day after the election, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said a shift in congressional power will not affect U.S. foreign policy goals because politics stop at the nation's borders. Clinton, no stranger to politics she was a U.S. senator for eight years and com peted with Obama for the presidential nom ination reminded reporters travelling with her that she was in the Senate minority for six of her eight years. She said Republicans and Democrats can build coalitions and find allies on issues that are in America's interests. (This article was written by Barry Schweid, AP Diplomatic writer). Concerns encountered during trip to Nassau LETTERS l etters@tribunemedia.net US Election campaign ignored foreign policy MEETING DATES & VENUESNorthern New Providence 7 p.m.,Tuesday, November 9, 2010 at the Ministry of Health Cafeteria, Meeting Street Southern New Providence 7 p.m.,Wednesday, November 10, 2010 at C V Bethel School Eastern New Providence 7 p.m.,Wednesday, November 17, 2010 at Dame Doris Johnson SchoolRegistration forms will be available and refreshments will be served. Youre invited to attendMinister of HealthThe Hon. Dr. Hubert Minnis, M.P.and members of the Drug Plan Team will be in attendance to answer your questions.A Series of PUBLIC MEETINGSonTHE NATIONAL PRESCRIPTION DRUG PLAN EDITOR, The Tribune. Please allow me to piggyback on the article entitled Time for Change in Straw Market, written by Sheena Thompson, published in your edition on November 8, 2010. I concur with the authors sentiments. A few weeks ago, I took a friend of mine (a tourist Straw Market, as well as to purchase a gift. To my surprise and disappointment, it appears as though the majority if not all of the vendors are sellingn on-Bahamian products knock off included. When I inquired about a particular items Bahamian a uthenticity (although the word Bahamas was printed on it), the vendor did not hesitate to admit to me (after noting my Bahamian accent) that the item was not locally produced. W hen will we as a people ever get it together? The Straw Market is one of our popular local attrac t ions. So then, how and why is it possible for straw vendors to sell non Bahamian products? Shouldnt tourists feel like theyve experienced the Bahamian life after visiting the Straw Market? THEREZE L GIBSON Nassau, November 8, 2010. Why is it possible for straw vendors to sell non-Bahamian products? E DITOR, The Tribune Re: Gun terror in Montagu, witnesses claim police used' excessive force'. T he Tribune, 28 October, 2010. Surely there are kinder, gentler ways for our police to disarm gun-wielding sus-p ects. F or instance, a hoodlum might be coaxed into discus sion whilst sharing a caff latte, perhaps with just a touch of Madagascar ginger, to be followed by a word of prayer. Then the gunman could be invited into the cruiserw here the soothing strains of FM 98.1 are playing. If fur t her persuasion is necessary, a bullet could then be administered between his eyes, all the while being very careful to only injure, of course. Ken. W. Knowles, M.D. Nassau, October 31, 2010 Be kinder to gunwielding hoodlums

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THE appeal hearing of a man on death row had to be a djourned yesterday. D eath row inmate Godfrey Sawyer, 30, is appealing his conviction and sentence fort he murder of Sterling Eugene during an armed robb ery at Quality Discount S tore in 2005. A t his sentencing hearing l ast November, Senior Justice Anita Allen described the c rime as the "worst of the worst." Mr Eugene was shot in the b ack and buttocks as he was trying to get off the ground f ollowing a struggle in which the victim and another employee tried to stop the robber making his escape with the store's cash trays. S awyer appeared in the Court of Appeal yesterday, however his appeal hearing c ould not proceed as his attor ney Jerone Roberts had informed the court by way ofl etter that he was ill. The appeal hearing has been adjourned until a new d ate can be fixed. I n mid-February, the Ministry of National Security announced that the Adviso-r y Committee of the Prerogative of Mercy had met and d etermined that Sawyer's case w as not one that warranted m ercy and that the law should t ake its course. It was subsequently a nnounced that Sawyer had filed an appeal that would delay his execution. L orna Longley-Rolle and Eucal Bonaby appeared for t he Crown. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2010, PAGE 5 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM T HE Department of Marine Resources has announced that the waters surrounding High Cay off the coast of Central Andros will b e designated a protecte d area from December 1 2010 to February 28, 2011. During this period, all forms of fishing will be prohibited. T he protected area is b ounded in the north by latitude 24 40'N, in the south by latitude 243 7.8'N, in the east by longitude 77 44'W, and encompasses an area of about seven square m iles. Grouper The department also reminded the public that once again this year, taking, landing, p rocessing or possessing N assau Grouper will be p rohibited between D ecember 1, 2010 and F ebruary 28, 2011 t hroughout the Bahamas. In addition, any fish commonly known as "grouper" which is landed during this period must be brought to s hore with its head, tail and skin intact. The Department of M arine Resources requests the co-operat ion of all fishermen and the general public in this regard. Persons found in vio lation of the above will be prosecuted to the full extent of the law, thed epartments statement s aid. Waters set to be designated a protected area B y NOELLE NICOLLS Tribune Staff Reporter nnicolls@tribunemedia.net A S the influenza season comes into full swing, theM inistry of Health is set to receive flu vaccines later thism onth. Dr Hubert Minnis, Minister of Health, said he does not anticipate a repeat of last years supply shortage,w hen the ministry for the first time distributed its com-p lete supply of 10,000 vaccines. D r Minnis said the worldw ide outbreak of the H1N1 v irus in 2009 created heighte ned concern about the risks of flu. The government is sup plied flu vaccines by the Pan A merican Health Organisa t ion (PAHO This year, the standard flu v accine will also include a vaccine for the H1N1 virus. Last time was the first time in our history that all t he vaccines were given out. S wine Flu made Bahamians very cognisant of the flu, said Mr Minnis. Flu season is from November to April. I t is a highly contagious v iral infection of the respir atory tract with symptoms including fever, chills, h eadache, muscle ache, dizziness, loss of appetite, t iredness, cough, sore throat, runny nose, nausea or vomiting, weakness, ear pain and diarrhoea. T he annual vaccines a dministered in Dr Minnis' Killarney constituency is a part of an independent com munity project. Those vaccines are purchased from private pharmaceutical companies, such as Lowes and Nassau Agencies, he said. Health Ministry to receive flu vaccines this month By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT Copper thieves have struck again on Grand Bahama, this time stealing a large quantity of copper wire from the GrandB ahama Power Companys substation in Freeport. This is the second incident within a week and p olice are warning persons not to purchase the stolen goods as they will be prosecuted for the offence. ASP Hector Delva reported that about 250 f eet of copper wire was stolen from the substation on West Atlantic Drive. The companys project m anager reported the incident to police around 1 0am on Friday. Mr Delva said the stolen copper is valued at about $1,300. Pipes A week ago, thieves stole nearly $5,000 worth o f copper pipes and fittings from the government c onstruction site on the Mall Drive. Thieves broke into a trailer on the construction site of the new government complex sometimeb etween October 28 and 29. Copper thefts have also been reported in New Providence. In September, copper wire was stolen from a ZNS transmission site in South Beach, resulting in the temporary shut-down of the AM 1540 radio station. T he copper was said to be valued at $1,314. A nd just last week, thieves attempted to steal t he newly installed copper wiring at the transmission site but their attempt was foiled by security guards. Asst Supt of Police Hector Delva said p olice are asking anyone who may have any inform ation regarding these latest incidents on Grand B ahama to call 911 or the Central Detective Unit a t 325-9774/5. Copper thieves strike Wire stolen from Grand Bahama Power Company substation F REEPORT D R. HUBERT M INNIS Appeal hearing of death row inmate adjourned In brief

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THE Bahamas Conference of Seventh-day Adventists was recognised for its contributions to nation building at i ts Third Quadrennial Session o n Sunday. Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs and Immigration Brent Symonette, in his address, expressed the governments a ppreciation for the good work that the conference has d one and continues to do. The emphasis which you place on good neighbourli n ess, good citizenship, strong f amily life and wholesome lifestyles is of particular rele-v ance to our country today where too often civility is disappearing from social disc ourse and where disagreem ents are too often settled violently, Mr Symonette said. H e also acknowledged the contribution of Adventists to the education system. Your role in helping to i nstil good work ethics and a desire to succeed in our youth will assist in a meaningful way t oward their development into productive, useful members of our communities. Thisa ctivity is invaluable and I e ncourage you to continue to increase your various life a ffirming activities, Mr Symonette said. The government is responding to the extent pos s ible in an effort to soften the blow of the economic crisis and to its social consequences, he added. The complementary assis tance extended by churches such as the Seventh-Day Adventists, to members oft heir congregations in need o f assistance and to other needy members in our communities is especially comm endable, Mr Symonette said. The Seventh-day Adventist C hurch is composed of 50,000 congregations in 210 countries and has over 12 million members. The Bahamas Conference of Seventh-day Adventists is the fourth largest religious d enomination in the Bahamas. With a history of more than 100 years, it con sists of 36 churches through o ut the central and southern Bahamas, and has a membership of 9,935. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2010, PAGE 7 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM ANDROS The Coast Guard evacuated an ill man from a container ship about 200 miles northeast of Nassau on Friday. W atchstanders at the Coast Guard 7th District Command Centre received notification from the Panamanianflagged motor vessel Jin Zhou Hai, of a 25-year-old male crew member sufferingf rom internal bleeding at around 11.30am. I n response, an MH-60 Jayhawk Helicopter crew was launched from Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Centre (AUTEC the scene at 2.30pm. A fter lowering a rescue swimmer and hoist litter to the deck of the ship, the Jayhawk crew safely hoisted crew member Qin Qingbin, a Chinese national, to the helicopter. Q ingbin was flown to Nassau in stable c ondition and transferred to waiting emergency medical personnel. We were able to safely hoist the ill m an despite heightened sea and wind conditions, and obstacles aboard the vessel, said Petty Officer 2nd Class Jon G eskus, the crew's rescue swimmer. Our lift elevation had to be approxi mately 90 feet because of cranes a board the vessel, which when comb ined with the 30-knot winds and 10 t o 15-foot seas, made for a challenging rescue. G eskus and the Jayhawk helicopter c rew are based at Coast Guard Air Stat ion Clearwater, in Clearwater, Florid a. USCoast Guard evacuate man from container ship Adventists are recognised for nation building contribution COAST GUARD IN ACTION: The man is taken from the freighter in the Bahamas. ADDRESS: Deputy Prime M inister and Minister of Foreign Affairs and Immigration Brent Symonette.

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By DENISE MAYCOCK T ribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT Ambassadors of One Bahamas visited the Freeport Primary S chool on Friday spreading t he message of One God, O ne People, One Bahamas to hundreds of students. Terrance Gape, co-chairman of One Bahamas, and members of the One Bahamas Foundation Cecil Thompson and Churchill T ener-Knowles have visited s ome 10 schools on the island. The objective of One Bahamas, which has been celebrated for the past 18 y ears, is to foster unity and love among all Bahamians and emphasise the import ance of national symbols. In November, various a ctivities are planned, including school visits, a flag-raising ceremony, a church service and essay competition. The theme for 2010 celebrations is Love and Unity. M r Gape said it is import ant that young students a ppreciate what it means to be a Bahamian. I think it is very important for kids, especially in t heir youth, to appreciate all t he manifestation of being B ahamian. The flag and national a nthem are what binds us t ogether as one people in love, unity and respect for each other. Mr Gape believes that the f lag-raising ceremony is something that young people will always remember. The flag-raising ceremony will be held at the Independence Park on November 19. Students throughout t he island will be in attend ance as Governor-General S ir Arthur Foulkes delivers his address to the nation. Cecil Thompson, a former co-chairman of One B ahamas, said the message o f One Bahamas is prof ound. I strongly believe in the n oble message and ideals of O ne Bahamas. This message has done so much good for the country over the years, he said. H owever, Mr Thompson said that the One Bahamas message must be something that we live by every day and not just once every year in November. If we can live in love and u nity, I am convinced that t he difficulties facing the c ountry today regarding crime could be avoided. Mr Thompson commended Bahamians such as Sir A lgernon Allen, who was o ne of the people who came u p with the idea for One B ahamas, and former Gove rnor General Orville Turnq uest, who in 1995 visited every school in the country promoting the One Bahamas message. C hurchill Tener-Knowles, member of One Bahamas Foundation and former cochairman, said the Bahamas is a very blessed nation in his view. The kids are our future a nd we have been to every s ingle school in Grand B ahama, from Sweetings Cay to West End and Bimini, over the years promoting the One Bahamas conc ept, he said. We need to instill pride in our children and we must s how love for one another, realising that whether we come form Inagua or Eleuthera we are all one people, and love for our country by appreciating our wonderful heritage. I have been around the w orld and there is no other c ountry like the Bahamas. We are blessed tremendously and that is the message we want to send to our y oung people, said Mr Tene r-Knowles. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM One God, One People, One Bahamas message for students Foundation members visit Grand Bahama schools PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti HEALTH OFFICIALSsaid Monday that they are examining at least 120 suspected cases of cholera in Haiti's capi tal, the most significant warning sign yet that the epidemic h as spread from outlying areas to threaten as many as 3 mil lion people, according to Associated Press. Samples from patients in Port-au-Prince are being tested in a laboratory to confirm the presence of vibrio cholera bac teria, which has already killed at least 544 people in Haiti, Health Ministry Executive Director Gabriel Timothee told The Associated Press. If confirmed, the bacteria could imperil an estimated 2.5 to 3 million inhabitants, nearly half of whom have been living in tents or under tarps in easily flooded encamp ments since their houses were destroyed in the Jan. 12 earthquake. "We are working on the cases. ... We don't have confir mation yet," Timothee said. He said many of the hospitalized patients are believed to have recently arrived from parts of Haiti such as the Arti bonite Valley, where the epidemic was first registered and has done its most ferocious damage. More than 6,400 of the known 8,138 cases to date have been in the agricultural region, clustered around the Artibonite River. At least 114 of the people suspected of having the disease in the capital are in the Cite Soleil slum, the expansive oceanside shantytown at the capital's far northeastern edge and its closest point to the valley. Since its discovery in late October, the disease has spread to half of Haiti's 10 administrative regions, or departments. More than 200 people have been hospitalized in the West department, where Port-au-Prince is located, but no cases of cholera have yet been confirmed within the limits of the capital city. Cholera had never been documented in Haiti before its sudden appearance last month. In little more than three weeks it is suspected of infecting tens of thousands of people, though only about a quarter of people infected normally develop symptoms of serious diarrhea, vomiting and fever. Nearly 4 percent of the thousands hospitalized have died, most from extreme shock brought on by dehydration. Officials are concerned that floods triggered by Hurricane Tomas on Friday and Saturday could exacerbate the spread of the disease, which is transmitted through the consumption of fecal matter contained in contaminated water or food. The release of a dam on the Artibonite River caused the infect ed waterway to swell Monday, but there were no reports of major flooding. An analysis by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has found that the cholera outbreak in Haiti most closely matches a strain of the disease found in South Asia. Public health experts including U.N. Deputy Special Envoy to Haiti Paul Farmer have called for an aggressive investigation into the origin of the outbreak. An unconfirmed theory is that the disease was introduced to Haiti by U.N. peacekeepers from Nepal who are based ona tributary to the Artibonite River. A WOMAN holds a serum bag as she helps a relative with cholera symptoms at the the St. Nicholas hospital in Saint Marc, Haiti, Monday. After at least 20 people died when Hurricane Tomas brushed pastH aiti, officials are now turning their attention back to a worsening cholera epidemic that has killed more than 500 people and hospitalized more than 7,300. (AP HAITIGOVT SUSPECTS CHOLERA HAS ENTERED PORT-AU-PRINCE

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2010, PAGE 9 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM A 31-YEAR-OLDGuana Cay man is being questioned in connection with the shooting death of a 29-year-old Marsh Harbour resident who was shot in the head during a hunting trip at Matthew Point Pond on Sunday evening. According to press liaison officer Sgt Chrislyn Skippings, police in Abaco first received reports that the body of a caucasian man was at the Marsh Harbour Clinic at around 1.15pm. Police responded and discovered the lifeless body of a male, clad in a white t-shirt and camouflage pants, on the back of a white GMC truck L/P 1401, with gunshot injury to the head. It is reported that the deceased was on a hunting trip with others at Matthew Point Pond, near Lee Waterways, when the incident occurred. The 29-year-old victim of Marsh Harbour was taken to the local clinic where he was pronounced dead, she said. Police investigations into this matter continue. Meanwhile in New Providence, officers discovered the decomposing body of a man inside a white F-150 truck in a bushy area off Cowpen Road on Sunday. Sgt Skippings said police do not suspect foul play at this time, but are continuing to investigate the matter. Police also reported that an armed robbery occurred shortly after 8pm on Sunday at Harp Close near Joe Farrington Road. Police responded and information received that a female on arrival to her residence was approached by a masked male wearing dark clothing, allegedly armed with a handgun. The culprit robbed the female of her red 2008 Honda Accord, L/P 220002, and fled the area in an unknown direction. Police are investigating, she said. Police have also identified the victim of Sundays traffic fatality that occurred on East Street and Coconut Grove Avenue as 21-year-old Marvin Navado Sears Jr, of Toote Shop Corner. The victim of another fatal traffic accident, which occurred on Bernard Road east of Monastery Park, has been identified as Tamico Tate, 34, of Wilford Lane, Fox Hill. Man questioned in connection with hunting trip shooting death

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By DENISE MAYCOCK T ribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net F REEPORT Four World War II veterans living on Grand B ahama will be honoured at the 1 2th Annual Remembrance Day Parade at the Columbus Theatre this Sunday. W orld War II veterans James Roker of West End; Gerald Wildgoose of Hunters; Neville Simm ons of Freeport; and Cecil Hepburn of Eight Mile Rock were among the hundreds of Bahamia ns who fought to defend democr acy. Remembrance Day is held in commemoration of the millions of men and women that fought to d efend, protect and preserve d emocracy during the First and S econd World Wars. C eremony Cecil Thompson, Deputy Director of Education, said the official opening ceremony for the Remembrance Day Parade startsa t 3pm in the theatre parking lot. Kenneth Russell, Minister of Housing and Member of Parliament for High Rock, will be the guest speaker. M r Thompson said every youth o rganisation on the island of Grand Bahama every school,c hurch-based and communitybased youth organisation, every u niformed youth organisation and every marching band has been i nvited to participate in the parade. The parade will begin following the official opening ceremony. It will travel east on Adventurers Way, west on Poinciana Drive, south on East Beach Drive, andw est on East Sunrise Highway, ending in the parking lot of Mary S tar of the Sea Roman Catholic Church. R emembrance Day, also known as Poppy Day or Armistice Day or Veterans Day is a holidayo bserved in all Commonwealth c ountries except Mozambique to c ommemorate the sacrifices of members of the armed forces and o f civilians in times of war, specifi cally since the First World War. I t is observed on November 11 to recall the end of World War I, on that date in 1918 major hos-t ilities of World War I were formally ended at the 11th hour oft he 11th day of the 11th month of 1918 with the German signing of the armistice. Armistice Common British, Canadian, South African, and Anzac tradit ions (in Australia and New Z ealand) include two minutes of silence at the eleventh hour of thee leventh day of the eleventh month (11am on November 11 a s that marks the time (in the United Kingdom) when armistice b ecame effective. The Service of Remembrance in many Commonwealth countries generally includes the sounding of Last Post, followed by the two minutes of silence, followed by the sounding of Reveille or, morec ommonly, The Rouse, and finished by a recitation of the Ode o f Remembrance. The Flowers of the Forest, O V aliant Hearts, I Vow to Thee, My Country and Jerusalem are often played during the service.S ervices also include wreaths laid t o honour the fallen, a blessing, a nd national anthems. ACTING appropriately i n the workplace and having the ability to get along with others are essential s kills to securing a future i n the job market, Elma G arraway, Permanent Secretary in the Ministry ofE ducation, told the stud ents at the Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute (BTVI Mr Garraway was the f irst participant in the spe cial speakers series at BTVI. Making her presentation o n Enhancing Interpersonal and Communication Skills, she said that thes tudents interpersonal s kills and the manner they use to communicate will determine how they are perceived, the extent oft heir happiness at work and the future of their careers. S he encouraged the stu dents to strive to be the leader of self, or what image consultant Stacia Williams termed the CEO of you incorporated. This concept, Mrs Garr away said, requires an i ndividual to set their own h igh standards and follow them rather than followingo ther peoples principles. M rs Garraway also told the students that if they are not able to get along with people, despite theiro ther professional abilities, their careers will be short-lived. S he said that many large companies when they downsize base their decis ions on who to let go on a n employees ability to b ehave appropriately in the workplace. T he speaker series at B TVI is designed to provide students with access to business professionals who can offer tips and bestp ractices for performing in the workplace. War vets on Grand Bahama to be honoured DR. IVA DAHL Manger/Consultant at BTVI, and Elma Garraway, Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Education. Permanent Secretary provides BTVI students with tips for workplace Shar e your news The T ribune wants to hear fr o m people who are making news in their neighbour h oods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the ar ea or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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medical card. Its really ridiculous to see how our system is working. It isnt working. The head people h ave to be there to know w hats going on. They dont b e there only the people working there is be there. T he infant began showing s igns of illness last week M onday, according to Ms P inder, whose daughter lives i n Abaco. When the Family Island clinic could not treat thei nfant, who appeared be wheezing, she was directed to Nassau with documentation requesting her treatm ent at the hospital. When I picked them (daughter and baby f rom the airport the flight w as late the baby was w heezing so bad we went straight to the hospital, theg randmother said. O nce at PMH, Ms Pinder said they gave the clinics paperwork to attending staff however it was mandated that the baby be registered first. I thought this was s trange because the child is s o young and she was having so much trouble breathing. B ut I said to my daughter g o through, I will register w hile you take her back there. However, the sick baby and her mother were nota llowed admittance into the back area of Accident and Emergency until registrationw as complete. Ms Pinder said: I went back to the window, I said this baby came from thei sland and is really sick. She n eeds to be tended to, we dont know whats wrong thats when they let her through. The mother and her baby were allowed through, howe ver Ms Pinder said she was n ot allowed to accompany them because staff said it was too overcrowded. It wasnt until just after midnight Ms Pinder said, t hat her daughter returned to the front area and told her that medical staff said t hey did not hear any w heezing. B ewildered by what she felt was clearly an immenseo versight, Ms Pinder said s he returned to the registration window seeking answers. Ms Pinder said: I went back to the window and said Miss, this baby is wheezing. She told me that I would h ave to wait as they are curr ently changing shifts so there was no one that could h elp at this time. I asked her what kind of foolishness is t his? and she told me mam Im just a nurse. Exhausted and without recourse, Ms Pinder said they decided to take the baby home and monitor her. She cried all night, w heezing as if she just couldnt catch her breath. I put olive oil on a brown paper b ag and put it on her chest b ut that didnt help, she just c ried and cried, Ms Pinder said. E arly Wednesday morni ng, the family took the infant whom they would learn was critically ill to a private doctor whom uponi nspection, immediately wrote a letter to PMH mandating her admittance. Ms Pinder said: He said she could have died. She was crying so much shes only two months old to see her wheeze like that as if she just c ouldnt catch. Last night [ Wednesday] she was hooked up to all these machines. Up to press time, the infant was said to be in stab le condition. During her time spent waiting in Accident and E mergency, Ms Pinder said s he heard of the seemingly h opeless plight of persons awaiting care at the publich ealth facility. S he said: They take a whole hour to serve one person. They call one name every hour. One woman with a broken foot had been there since 1pm, and when we were leaving at midnight s he was just going in to be s een. They talking about since they put that new wing i n, the system working it a int working not what I s aw there. An investigation into the matter may be launched, pending co-operation from the family. When briefed of the incident, hospital administrator C oralie Adderley said: We have heard their side of the story, but we cant move forw ard and look into this issue u ntil they come forward. T he matter follows recent remarks made by Ministero f Health Dr Hubert Minn is towards the dramatic rise of violent crime in Nassau, where he admitted the emergency room of theP rincess Margaret Hospital had evolved into a makeshift trauma centre. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL N EWS PAGE 12, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM trafficking counterfeit goods. When The Tribune visited the market yesterday, Ms Duncombe was busy stitching a design on to a straw bag near her stall. She said she was "happy to be back to work" but declined to say anything else. Meantime, despite the publicity surrounding the arrests, some shelves in the market were still stocked with counterfeit handbags and wallets bearing the logos of designer brands like Coach, Gucci and Juicy Couture yesterday. However, Ms Strachan believes most vendors will forgo the risks of arrest by importing the goods from the United States as in the past. "I have my doubts, you may find someone who may want to I don't know I'm sure that the majority of per sons I have spoken to it doesn't make sense (to them)". Duty She said the majority of the market sees the nine women as scapegoats and chastised authorities for not fully explaining the ramifications of the counterfeit bag trade while they collected duty on the goods. "I think the general consensus was that they were sort of scapegoats because they felt that what they were doing was something being done not only by those ladies but other persons in the community they have those same bags in the RM Bailey park, in some of the shops on East street they are being sold all over the place. "I've been on cruises (and seen Caribbean islands selling them right off the docks and we are concerned that the US itself did an injustice to those young women because, as far as they are con cerned and we are concerned, if that is against the law why hasn't it been published in the seaport and the airport warning persons coming in that these things are prohibited and if found with them what would happen. "Persons paid their monies bought tickets, went in with a valid passport they didn't smuggle themselves in the States and they come back home bring their receipts to customs officers and pay their duties," said Ms Strachan. Seven of the nine vendors have been sentenced to time served and released on probation. The two awaiting sentencing, Marva and Marvette Ferguson, are expected to appear in court today. Critically ill baby in hospital ordeal FROM page one Straw vendors punished in Ne w Y ork happy to be back at work FROM page one

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2010, PAGE 13 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM NEW DELHI PRESIDENTBarack Obama said Monday that he was ready to play "any role" requested by India and Pakistan to foster peace between them as he moved delicately to address tensions between the nuclear-armed neighbors, according to Associated Press. On the third and final day of his trip to India, Obama said that while both India and Pakistan have an interest in reducing tensions in the region, the U.S. "cannot impose a solution to these problems." "We are happy to play any role the parties think is appropriate," Obama said at a joint news conference with India's Prime Minister Manmoham Singh. Muslim-dominated Pakistan and Hindu-majority India have gone to war before and still hold deep suspicions. Indian officials accuse Pakistan's intelligence service of helping orchestrate the 2008 Mumbai attacks that killed 166 people and say Islamabad has not done enough to crack down on the Pakistan-based extremists held responsible. Pakistan views India's ties with the U.S.-backed government in Afghanistan as an effort by its old rival to encircle it. Obama treaded carefully when asked about what role the U.S. could play in resolving India and Pakistan's longstanding dispute over Kashmir, a Himalayan region where rebels have sought independence from India or incorporation with Pakistan. The president quickly sought to broaden his answer, saying a reduction in tensions would not only benefit the region, but also the security of the U.S. Kashmir has been the main source of friction between the nuclear-armed neighbors since they won independence from Britain in 1947. Pakistan has frequently sought outside intervention to resolve it but India vehemently opposes such involvement, and the United States has traditionally stayed above the fray. Obama declined to veer from that stance. Singh said that while he believes a strong, moderate Pakistan is in the interest of India and the wider region, India can't engage in talks as long as Pakistan's "terror machine is as active as ever before." However, he deflected a reporter's question about whether he would call Pakistan a terrorist state. Singh is seen as a driving force behind Indian efforts to make peace with Pakistan. He called off peace talks following the November 2008 Mumbai attacks, carried out by Pakistani militants, but was generally restrained in his reaction and never threatened military retaliation. The two countries have resumed periodic "trust-building" talks between foreign ministers and foreign secretaries in recent months. After the news conference, Pakistani Foreign Minister Shah Mehmood Qureshi reiterated that his country was willing to talk to India and was committed to eliminating terrorism and dismantling any networks operating from his country. "We condemn terrorism. We do not and will not allow Pakistani soil to be used against anyone and that includes India," he told India's CNN-IBN news channel. "We have taken considerable steps in the last two years to deal with this situation." Obama: US ready to help India, Pakistan make peace PRESSCONFERENCE: U.S. President Barack Obama, left, and Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh at Hyderabad House in New Delhi, India, Monday. (AP

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 14, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2010 THE TRIBUNE RED ROSE BALLON November 6, this year's Red Rose Ball black-tie event took place in Freeport, Grand Bahama under the theme: "All Things Bahamian Homecoming". The event was held in the Grand Ballroom of the Radisson at Our Lucaya Resort and the proceeds went to the Grand Bahama AIDS Awareness Committee and its work on HIV/AIDS prevention. The ball was held under the patronage of Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham and Mrs Ingraham.SCENES FROMTHE

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2010, PAGE 15 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

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C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL NEWS PAGE 16, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM HARRY R. WEBER, A ssociated Press JOHN FLESHER, Associated Press MIAMI T he world's thirst for crude is leading oil exploration com p anies into ever deeper waters and ventures fraught w ith environmental and politi cal peril, a ccording to Assoc iated Press T he days when the industry could merely drill on land and wait for the oil and the p rofits to flow are coming to an end. Because of that, companies feel compelled to sink wells at the bottom of deep oceans, inject chemicals i nto the ground to force oil t o the surface, deal with unsa v ory regimes, or operate in some of the world's most environmentally sensitive and inaccessible spots, far from p orts and decent roads. All those factors could make it d ifficult to move in equipment and clean up a spill. From the Arctic to Cuba to t he coast of Nigeria, avoiding c atastrophes like BP's Gulf of Mexico spill is likely to become increasingly difficult and require cooperationa mong countries that aren't u sed to working together. An Associated Press review o f oil ventures around the world found plans to punch t hrough layers of salt more t han three miles (4.8 kilome t ers) beneath the ocean floor off the coast of Brazil, drill s even exploratory wells off Cuba and extract oil from c rude-soaked sands on the C anadian prairie. Drilling is p roceeding in countries with e xtremely weak regulations and a lack of skilled opera tors, and in geological settings much like the northern Gulf of Mexico, with high pressure and weak rock formations ripe for blowouts. C ompanies are seeking the n ew frontiers amid warnings from some analysts that worldwide oil production will peak and then decline as onshore wells dry up. It's not that oil itself is scarce global reserves are estimated at 1.2 trillion barrels but getting to it requires large invest ments in treacherous places. "It's just getting harder to find this stuff. You're having to go to the end of the Earth or the bottoms of very deep oceans now," said Randy Udall, director of the nonprofit Community Office for Resource Efficiency in Aspen, Colorado. BP CEO Bob Dudley argued last week that deepwater drilling is necessary despite the dangers because the world could be consuming 40 percent more energy by 2030. BP and other major oil companies say they are preparing for the risks and trying to find common solu tions. Also, the International Association of Oil and Gas Producers, a trade group, is talking with other industry organizations in the U.S., Australia, Brazil and Britain about preventing and r esponding to disasters, said e xecutive director Michael E ngell-Jensen. B ut so far, little has been done globally to come up with a universally accepted set of standards and response procedures. Diplomatic tensions could prevent effective coope ration among countries, and s ome projects already under way such as a deep-water c ontainment system that U.S. oil companies are building in the Gulf are meant onlyf or a particular area. In the meantime, the indust ry is pursuing some auda cious projects. E xploration companies h ave discovered huge oil f ields in the South Atlantic o ff Brazil, with deposits believed to exceed 8 billion barrels. Reaching them willr equire drilling not only in waters nearly two miles (3.2 kilometers) deep, but throughs alt layers up to three miles b elow the ocean floor. The BP well that blew out was in w ater a mile (1.6 kilometers deep. The U.S. Geological Survey estimates the Arctic region holds up to one-quarter of the world's undiscov ered conventional oil and nat ural gas, including 90 billion barrels of crude most of it offshore. Companies in the U .S., Russia, Norway, Den mark and Canada are step ping up preparations to drill t here. Sued Environmental groups have sued to prevent it. Cold and ice would hamper cleanup of a spill, they say, by making it hard to get people and equip ment to the scene. And the r egion lacks the sunlight and abundance of microbes that are helping break down the oil in the Gulf. A major spill could injure or kill whales, polar bears, seals, walruses and many types of fish. Shell Oil, which plans to drill exploratory wells off Alaska, will have a response fleet constantly on hand with helicopters, boom, skimmers and other equipment for dealing with spills. "In the unlikely event of a discharge, they would be deployed and recovering oil within an hour," spokesman Curtis Smith said. In the western U.S., com panies are targeting what the Energy Department says are billions of barrels of recover able oil trapped within deposits of shale rock, which is composed of layers of clay like, fine-grain sediments. Mining and processing shale oil are a big source of greenhouse gas emissions. Environmentalists also worry about the huge volumes of water and chemicals pumped deep underground at high pressures to break loose the shale. Similar issues have arisen in the Canadian province of Alberta, where companies are extracting sticky black bitu men oil from mixtures of sand and clay known as tar sands a process that consumes vast quantities of water in an arid climate. In Nigeria, where major oil companies like Royal Dutch Shell and others explore the oil-rich Niger Delta, regulators ostensibly demand adherence to international standards. But enforcement is another matter in a country with a reputation for some of the worst corruption in the world. Uneven environmental standards are a big concern in developing countries such as Nigeria, Angola and Kazakhstan places where "a major spill would be an absolute nightmare to man age, politically and logistical ly," said Matthew Halle, a recruiting manager at the energy consulting firm NES Inc. Environmentalists estimate as much as 550 million gal lons of oil have poured into the Niger Delta and its surrounding waterways during 50 years of crude production. That is roughly comparable to one Exxon Valdez disaster per year. The pitfalls of doing business with certain regimes were brought into sharp focus when questions were raised about whether BP tried to procure a $900 million exploration agreement with Libya by seeking the release of the man convicted of bombing Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland. Agreement The 1988 attack killed 270 people. BP says it urged the British government to sign a prisoner transfer agreement with Libya but did not specify Abdel Baset al-Megrahi's case. As the Gulf oil spill illustrated, even multinational oil companies with solid experi ence have their own shortcomings. In the U.S., it could be another year before a bet ter cap-and-siphon contain ment system is developed to choke off underwater leaks. Experts have said the industry needs better technology and more thorough testing to pre vent blowouts from happen ing in the first place. Exxon Mobil's Lloyd Guil lory, the senior project manager for the U.S. industry containment system initiative, said he is confident that enough attention is being paid to safety. "The starting point one has to understand is that prevention is the predominant focus safe drilling operations and prevention," he said. Plans for drilling off the Cuban coast have made many people uneasy in Florida, which depends heavily on tourism to drive its economy. Jorge Pinon, an oil expert at Florida International Uni versity, said a Spanish com pany and others are expected to drill seven exploratory wells in Cuban waters. The first well at a depth of 5,600 feet (1,700 meters is to be located 22 miles (35 kilometers) north of Havana and 65 miles (104 kilometers south of Key West, he said. BP's ill-fated well was about 40 miles (65 kilometers Louisiana. Because of the U.S. trade embargo, U.S. companies could be barred from assisting the Spanish company with equipment and other resources in the event of a blowout in Cuban waters. Pinon said he was part of a recent delegation that met in Washington to discuss breaking down barriers so that the U.S. and Cuba can work together on prevention and response. Rep. Kendrick Meek, a Florida Democrat, said he worries about drilling off Cuba because of how long it took to stop BP's runaway well from gushing oil into the Gulf. Before it was over, some 200 million gallons of oil spewed from the well. Just as governments around the world cooperate to keep air travel safe, "there has to be rules and regulations glob ally to protect our waters because we're all connected by water," Meek said. World's oil thirst leading to risks C ATASTROPHE: T his April 21, 2010 file photo shows the Deepwater Horizon oil rig burning after an explosion in the Gulf of Mexico, off t he southeast tip of Louisiana. O FFSHORE PLATFORM: This Thursday, Oct. 28, 2010 file photo shows a view oft he Petrobras offshore ship platform FPSO Cidade de Angra dos Reis, on the day the first oil sample was taken from the pre-salt layer of Tupi field in Santos Bay off the coast of Rio de Janeiro, B razil. The worlds thirst for crude is leading explorers into ever deeper waters and ventures fraught with envi ronmental and political peril, heralding an end to an easier era when companies could m erely drill on land and wait for the oil and the profits to flow. (AP Photo/ Felipe Dana, File) A P P h o t o / G e r a l d H e r b e r t F i l e F ROMTHE A RCTICTO C UBATOTHE N IGERIACOAST AVOIDINGSPILLSISLIKELYTOBECOMEMOREDIFFICULT E. EDUARDO CASTILLO, Associated Press MERIDA, Mexico President Felipe Calderon warned Monday that organized crime has become the biggest threat to press freedoms in Mexico, according to Associated Press Calderon said Mexico, which emerged from a system of virtual oneparty rule a decade ago, has made strides against government censorship. He noted that under his government, defamation and slander have been decriminalized. But now many newspapers are sti fling their coverage for fear of drug gangs, he said."You can openly criticize the president or the government ... In this administration, there has never been gag laws or censorship," Calderon said at the annual meeting of the Inter American Press Association, a Miami-based organization that groups newspapers across the West ern Hemisphere. "Now the great threat to freedom of expression in our country, and other parts of the world, without a doubt, is organized crime," Calderon added. Many small newspapers in the most violent regions of Mexico, especially the northern areas bordering the Unit ed States, acknowledge that they no longer cover drug-gang violence because their reporters have been threatened or killed. At least 11 journalists have been killed in Mexico this year, according to the press association, known as IAPA. The country has become the most dan gerous in the Americas for journalists. Calderon said his government has promised to create a security proto col for journalists, and has already taken some steps, including creating a special prosecutor for crimes against freedom of expression. However, that prosecutor's office has been criticized for failing to resolve most attacks on reporters. Mexican journalists have also said that official influence over news coverage remains a problem in this country because government advertising is a major source of revenue for many publications. IAPA Vice President Gonzalo Mar roquin urged Mexican media to unite and create their own strategy to pro tect themselves against traffickers. "We've found there is great com mon interest but little common action" among Mexican journalists, Marro quin said. Diana Carolina Duran, of the Colombian daily El Espectador, said newspapers in her country confronted criminal gangs by conducting joint investigations that would run at the same time in numerous publications. At a recent forum in Mexico, journalists discussed adopting such a plan. IAPA President Alejandro Aguirre, meanwhile, criticized Cuba for its lack of freedom of expression. "Cuba remains the dark point in the map of the Americas, and it still won't wake up," Aguirre said in a speech at formal inauguration of the meeting. "This is one of the biggest embarrassments of our humanity. It should not be tolerated. A half-century of dic tatorship. It's enough," Aguirre said. Mexican leader: Drug gangs biggest threat to press

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C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2010 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69T he information contained is from a third p arty and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $4.25 $4.42 $4.26 f)%%*+/-!##*.!+ +&#& *#!-!*%&,* *)&&$*t ."!+ *+&,* *)&&$* ',!&')+$%+.!+ "!+%++'&&'&*!+. !+ nt!)&#/r&+/*+/&$+ [Learn more at royaldelity.com] Royal Fidelity Margin Loans Santa has anearly Gi for You! 7.5% OFFER VALID through December 31st, 2010*SpecialtermsandconditionsapplyBAHAMASNassau:242.356.9801 Freeport:242.351.3010BARBADOSSt.Michael:246.435.1955 By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The Bahamas consistent slippage in the World Banks Ease of Doing Business report could turn away investors in the increasingly competitive for eign direct investment market, the Chamber of Commerces president warned yesterday, adding that there were a whole host of issues that need to be addressed when it came to cumbersome regulatory/permitting processes. Responding to the annual reports latest findings, which dropped the Bahamas another Investor turn-off fears from World Bank rankings KHAALIS ROLLE DECEMBER S OFT-OPENING: The Elizabeth on Bay Marketplace & Marina. The Nassau shopping plaza is set for a December soft-opening, with six new retail stores and a cafe ready to launch. Chamber chief says report s perception that doing business in B ahamas becoming harder could deter foreign investors in increasingly competitive market Warns whole host of issues that need to be addressed in government s regulatory and permitting processes, although start now made Says cause for concern if Bahamas falling due to status quo, while all other nations improving SEE page 2B By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A senior Cable Bahamas executive yesterday told Tribune Business the company remained very hopeful that its multi-million dollar merger/acquisition of fellow telecoms operator, Systems Resource Group (SRG would ultimately receive full regulatory approval even as a 90-day in-depth investiga tion was launched to determine if the deal would substantially lessen competition in the market. Anthony Butler, the BISXlisted utility groups presi dent/chief executive, in a brief interview with Tribune Business following the Utilities Regulation & Competition Authoritys (URCA announcement that it wanted to assess whether the pro posed merger could have adverse effects on sustain able competition in the Bahamian communications market, continued to laud the benefits the tie-up would bring Bahamian consumers. Well assist the regulators with any further information Competition fears lead to Cable/SRG deal probe Cable chief still very hopeful merger will go through, as URCA l aunches 90-day in-depth investigation into antitrust implications Lauds potential benefits to Bahamian consumers* But rival describes deal a s spoiling manoevere that further concentrates Bahamian telecoms assets in hands of few players SEE page 3B B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The Governments fiscal deficit for its 2009-2010 financial year came in some 6.5 per cent or $23.6 million below the previous 12-month period, pre liminary estimates released yes t erday revealed, yet there was still some $339.4 million worth of red ink on the public sector income statement. The Central Bank of the Bahamas report on monthly economic and financial devel opments for September 2010 indicated, based on Tribune Businesss calculations, that the fiscal deficit for 2009-2010 came in at around 5 per cent of gross domestic product (GDP something not entirely unexpected, as a $43.6 million fall in spending failed to compensate for a further $20.7 yearover-revenue fall. Provisional estimates of governments operations for Fiscal deficit hits $339.4m for 2009/2010 A 6.5% or $23.6m decline on previous year, but spending decline not enough to compensate for revenue weakness SEE page 3B B y ALISON LOWE B usiness Reporter a lowe@tribunemedia.net Elizabeth on Bay, the red eveloped former Moses Plaza, is now set for a December soft-opening, with six newr etail stores and a cafe ready t o launch. Charles Klonaris, co-chair o f the Downtown Nassau $14M PLAZAS DECEMBER SOFT OPEN SEE page 3B By ALISON LOWE Business Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net Inspired and aided by Singapore, a world leader in e-government, the Bahamas will launch its first such portal in July, marking a significant step towards a fundamental shift in the culture of doing business in the Bahamas and providing public services in our nation, the Minister of State for Finance said yesterday. Business license applications, payment of business license fees, real property taxes, various fines, drivers license renewals, government vendor inquiries and public service-wide customer service will be dealt with and paid for for the first time online once the portal www.govnet.bs goes live. Each Bahamian citizen will be provided with a unique citiz en identifier number, and the Government will implement an e-payment gateway to facilitate online payments for the ser vices. A survey will be implemented to see which other services E-govt s fundamental cultural shift SEE page 2B By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The Bahamian commercial banking industry is hopeful that Septembers 1.6 per centd ecline in its collective $1.153 b illion bad loans could indi cate a bottoming out and t hat the worst has passed, but one leading executive told Tribune Business that the sect or wanted to see a consistent trend, and that any recovery would take a good 18 m onths. Speaking to this newspaper after the Central Bank of the Bahamas, in its monthly economic and financial developments report for September, revealed that loan write-offsh ad resulted in total private s ector loan arrears falling by $ 18.9 million during that month, Paul McWeeney, Bank of the Bahamas Internationals managing director, said it was too early to d etermine if this was an emerging trend. One months improvement is no trend, Mr McWeeney told Tribune Business. We need to see a trend. Were optimistic itc ould be a bottoming out, but i ts still too early to tell. Its s till too early to take that Bottoming out hope on $1.15bn bad loans n Commercial banks anxiously waiting for Septembers 1.6% bad loan fall to become trend and show worst is over n Bank chief says a good 18 months before commercial bank asset quality gets back to normal once recovery starts, and process will not be swift n Describes high level of mortgage delinquencies as new phenomenon, with industry in uncharted territory SEE page 4B

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should be prioritised for online availability. Consultants from the information technology arm of the Singaporean government are in the process of guiding the Bahamas as it lays the technical foundation and governance structure necessary to move towards a Bahamas where technology is the driver in all sectors of our society, Zhivargo Laing told a handful of MPs who attended a presentation on the e-government initiative yes terday at the Sheraton Nassau Beach Resort. With 30 years of experience in developing and delivering egovernment, consultants from IDA International have recommended a raft of steps to be taken by the Bahamian government as it begins its journeyto catch up. Apart from benefits to the ease of doing busin ess, the Government believes that the movement of key services online will enhance every sector from education and health, to tourism and financial services, transportation and jus tice. Speaking of the private sec tor benefits, Mr Laing said: The idea of having a sound egovernment programme is that it all helps to make your economy and offerings better. It becomes easier to do business, and that creates opportunities for both domestic and interna tional companies to come here to do business. Theres that incentive, and it creates momentum for generating new and expanded business oppor tunities, which means more jobs. It is conceivable that any number of people seeing what we have done may find opportunities to provide the services that this effort requires, he added, noting, for example, there will be a need for a great deal of digitisation of public records which will be contracted out. As well as their findings and recommendations relative to the Bahamas, IDA International chief executive, Seah Chin Siong, and deputy director, Serene Ho, provided an impressive presentation to Par liamentarians on The Singapore Story. This outlined how the Asian economy left behind bureaucratic inefficiency, exemplified by long queues for government services, court case backlogs, and unending paperwork in the 1980s, and moved to an Internet-oriented system of government service delivery that has seen the time and cost associated with accessing government services drop to zero in some cases. Some 1,600 e-services and 30,000 different business-related applications are accessible online, with applicants able to get notice of the status of their applications via e-mail and SMS messages. Businesses can be registered in between 20 minutes to an hour. The pay-offs attributed to efficiency in this area have been great, with Singapore ranked top for ease of doing business by the World Bank for five years in a row, and commonly rated first for quality of life globally. With a population of two million in the 1960s grow ing to almost five million today, its GDP has swelled over the same period to $235 billion (The Bahamas has a GDP of around $6.8 billion). Mr Laing said it is the Bahamian governments expec tation that IDA International will recommend a way forward for the Bahamas that would employ best practices and follow a model that would yield the most for our effort Singapore, one of the worlds leaders in delivering egovernment, over some 30 years has successfully used technology to improve the lives of its citizens, expand its economy and made itself one of the best countries in the world in which to work and live. The Bahamas is seeking to do the same. In the long term we would like to use technology to make the Bahamas the best place to work and live in our region. The Minister of State said the long-term government ini tiative will involve substantial investment on our part, but the gains will be significant. A nationwide public education programme is planned, as the Government says it desires and requires the fullest possi ble buy-in by our society into e-government. In a six-month study conducted this year, IDA International determined that the Bahamas currently lacks gov ernment-wide information and communications (ICT an ICT governance structure,a unified government-wide citizen identifier system or a government-wide e-payment gate way (permitting payment for government services online). There is also a scarcity of ICT manpower spread thinly across ministries, and a lack of integration between government agencies back-end sys tems in terms of the capacity to share data held within each online. Initial recommendations from IDA International for the Bahamas include the launch ofa Department of Information Technology and an Information Communications Technology (ICT with a focus on developing and pursuing a national ICT vision with defined strategic outcomes and measurable performance outcomes. IDA International proposes that a Department of IT will play a part in developing the manpower necessary to resource the e-government effort. An ICT Committee will bring together key individuals from each government ministry and beyond, with the govern ment advised to appoint a Chief Information Officer for each ministry, who is responsible for that ministrys IT needs and meeting the strategic objectives set out by the national committee. The benefits of doing gov ernment business online, said Ms Ho, include reduced duplication of information and efforts throughout agencies, cross-agency efficiencies through sharing and aggregat ing data, easy access to govern ment any time or any where, enhanced customer service and increased transparency. six places from 71 to 77 out of 183 nations, Khaalis Rolle told Tribune Business that benchmarking exercises such as this, which compared the attractiveness of this nations business envi ronment with those of others, could have a pro found impact on foreign investor perceptions of this nation. And he warned that if other nations, including Caribbean competitors and other small island developing states, were improving their regulatory processes while the Bahamas was essentially standing still, that was cause for concern. Crediting the Government for moving to improve the ease of business conduct, via regu latory reforms such as the new Business Licence Act and impending e-government initiative, Mr Rolle said it was no secret that permitting/approvals processes had to improve, the key being the speed with which the Ingra ham administration could effect change. Warning that perception was everything when wealthy foreign investors decided to place their money, and that reports such as Ease of Doing Business could determine whether capital flowed into or away from the Bahamas, Mr Rolle said it was vital that this nation start to move up this benchmarking exercises standings. It is very critical, he told Tribune Business. When you start to be ranked against other countries on attractiveness for doing business, that has an impact on how you are viewed globally by investors. Because the country has a high dependency on foreign direct investment, we want to be held in a positive light. If you are an investor, you want to be comfortable that its easy to do business in that country, your money is safe and that doing business is predictable and transparent. Of the need to improve the Bahamas position in the world standings, Mr Rolle added: Its critical, and Ill tell you why its critical. Everyone is competing for foreign direct investment now, and the market is not as robust as it used to be. In evaluating where to place your money, a lot of reputational factors are involved in the process.A lot of reputation comes from global sources, such as this report. The Bahamas fell in every category in the World Bank/International Finance Corporations (IFC from the ease of enforcing contracts, where its ranking remained unchanged 120 out of 183. The Bahamas slipped from 60th to 66th posi tion on the ease of starting a business; from 100 to 107th on dealing with construction permits; from 151st to 154th on registering property; from 69th to 72nd on gaining credit; from 108th to 109th on investor protection; from 43rd to 50th on paying taxes; and from 41st to 45 on trading across borders. When it came to closing a busi ness, the Bahamas fell from 31st to 34th. Mr Rolle said of the findings: It just goes to show we have a ways to go in the reform process. Public sector reform is one of those issues the Government has been talking and talking about for a while, and that goes to the root of how we do business in the Bahamas; how its perceived that we do business in the Bahamas. There are some changes the Government has made that will start to address the problem, but there are a whole host of issues we need to address with new legislation. The new Business Licence Act will address that issue in a substan tial way, because its consolidating the process, but thats not scheduled to take effect until next year. There are other reforms the Government has on the drawing board, the Chamber president added, the Small and Medium-Sized Enterpris es legislation, which will make it easier to do business. Drafting Drafting the correct legislative reforms was only one part of the battle, though. Mr Rolle explained: The Government must not only get the content of these Bills right, but the execution side, the implementation side, has to be right for us to see measurable improvements in the ways we do business and the ease of doing business. Theres two things in play here. One, how seriously competitor countries are taking this and the moves they are making to improve the environment for doing business, and their busi ness processes. It may not mean were getting increasingly worse; it could mean that were stuck in the status quo and everyone else is improving. If thats the case, its cause for concern. Mr Rolle suggested that the priority area for the Bahamas to tackle was the Governments bureaucratic processes, based on the volume of complaints received. Apart from Business Licence processes, another key concern for the private sector was the Customs Department. Theres been this huge fight between some of the retailers and wholesalers, and the Customs Department, on their requirements for doing business, the Chamber president said. Im hearing a lot of complaints about Customs processes. There has to be some consideration taken and review done. All these things the Government is aware of, because we talk about it on a regular basis. Licensing and permitting were the main contentions, but Mr Rolle credited the Government for being a bit proactive and taking steps to start the reform process with the new Business Licence Act. I dont believe its a surprise or secret. Theres no secret to this, he added. Everyone knows what the issues are. Its the speed at which those issues can be resolved. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM The Bahamas Financial Services Boards (BFSB Student of the Year award winner has visited CFAL to meet the investment adviser a ssigned to him for a full y ear, part of the Investment Account honour he won with his award. Edmund Bain (BBAAccounting) was selected as the College of the Bahamas g raduate who would wear the Student of the Year hat f or 2010. T he BFSB, in collaborat ion with the Professional Industry Associations,l aunched the Financial Services Student of the Year award in 2002 as part of an ongoing Financial Centre Focus (FCF The FCF is designed to f acilitate the growth and d evelopment of the financial services industry by raising the profile of key components considered essential for the Bahamas continued success as an intern ational financial services centre. This award prog ramme recognises an outs tanding graduating student f rom within the School of Business, College of theB ahamas, with specific focus on financial services disciplines: economics, banking & finance, accountancy and law. Marketing It also extends to computer information systems, marketing and management. In addition to the collaboration with industry asso-c iations, the BFSB also partners with the COB and the Central Bank of the Bahamas on the annual stud ent award programme. Corporate sponsors of the $5,000 student award are S ociete General Private B anking and CFAL. This year, Colina and CFAL coll aborated to jointly sponsor h alf the award. Mr Bain with student award sponsors at C FALs offices prior to his f irst meeting with his investment manager. BFSB student winner meets account adviser STUDENTOFTHEYEAR: Pictured from left to right: Renee Barrow, human resources manager at Societe Generale Private Bank; Edmund Bain (recipientm ents, CFAL; Sophia Thurston, vice-president-operations and pension administration, CFAL. Investor turn-off fears from World Bank rankings FROM page 1B E-governments fundamental cultural shift FROM page 1B TECHNOLOGYINITIATIVE: Zhivargo Laing

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2009-2010 indicated that the overall deficit narrowed by 6.5 per cent ($23.6 million $339.4 million, the Central Bank said. Expenditures fell by $43.6 million (2.6 per cent billion, explained by declines in current outlays (1.9 per cent or $27 million), and net lending( 27.3 per cent or $33.7 million), which outstripped an expansion in capital outlays (12.2 per cent or $17 million). The Central Banks report said the Governments total revenues for 2009-2010 fell by $20.1 million or 1.5 per cent, compared to fiscal year 2008-2 009, to $1.303 billion. There was a $19.3 million or 1.7 per cent fall in tax receipts, year-over-year, as taxes on international trade (import and Excise taxes, plus Stamp duties) contracted by 4.8 per cent or $28.8 million. Non-tax revenues were marginally lower by $0.8 million or 0.4 per cent at $193.5 million. Tribune Business reported last month how the weakness in the Governments finances had carried over into the current 2010-2011 fiscal year, which started on July 1, 2010. The fiscal deficit increased year-over-year by 37.5 per cent or $17.4 million during the first two months, hitting $63.8 mil lion, as both revenues and spending continued to move in the wrong direction. Depressed economic activity resulted in a drop in both import demand and real estate transactions during the JulyAugust 2010 period, causing a $4.9 million or 2.6 per cent decline in total revenues to $182.8 million. And, on the other side, the Government's combined recur rent and capital spending increased year-over-year by 5.3 per cent or $12.4 million to hit $246.6 million. Outlining just how weak gov ernment revenue was due to the recession, the Central Banks August report said: "Depressed import demand and a reduction in taxes related to property sales led to a 1.5 per cent fall in tax revenue to $169 million. A steeper fall off in non-tax inflows by 15 per cent to $13.8 million was broad ly based across the major categ ories. "In terms of expenditure, the growth in capital outlays of 67.4 per cent to $28.3 million was associated with an $8.5 million hike in land purchases to $8.8 million, alongside higher spend ing on infrastructure projects of 24.6 per cent to $18.4 mill ion." Meanwhile, the Central Bank warned yesterday that weak domestic demand conditions will continue to constrain the Governments abil ity to improve its fiscal positioni n the near term. It added that the fragile glob al economic recovery was set to support stability in the Bahamian economy, with modest growth anticipated in 2011. Among the key risks, though, was uncertainty over the US economic recoverys sustainability, which could impact consumer spending in the Bahamas and the prospects for reducing unemployment. While the tourism showed some improvement in September, the construction sector remained weak due to the absence of local new-builds and foreign direct investment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f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estaurant managers needed for leading fast food franchiseRequirements : Please submit resume to: Human Resources Department North they require, but were still very hopeful well get a positive response from them, Mr Butler told Tribune Business, hinting that the two companies had been expecting URCA to launch its inves tigation, as it is empowered to do under last years Communications Act. We truly believe it will be good for the Bahamian telecom munications market, Mr Butler told Tribune Business of the Cable Bahamas-SRG tie-up. He declined to comment further,not responding to this newspapers questioning on whether the 90day investigation would disrupt or delay Cable Bahamas business plans and strategy for incorporating SRG into its business model. Mr Butler would only say: Were just really focused on getting this review out of the way. Paul Hutton-Ashkenny, president of SRG, which trades as IndiGo Networks, the main competitor to the Bahamas Telecommunications Company (BTC bune Businesss calls seeking comment. In announcing its 90-day review yesterday, URCA said that it may open an in-depth investigation where it considers that thereis a significant prospect that the change in control, consequential to the proposed merger, is likely to have adverse effects which will substantially lessen competition in the market. The regulator said other considerations determining the launch of its investigation were the fact that neither Cable Bahamas nor SRG had proposed remedies to address the anti-competitive con cerns, and that these fears were not outweighed by substantiated efficiencies. Determining whether to approve the Cable Bahamas/SRG merger is the first big test of URCAs abilities as a standalone regulator on the competition side, and observers will be watching keenly for confirmation that it truly is independent from the Government. The regulators announcement yesterday, while saying it was not pre-judging the issue, indicates that it does share the competition concerns raised by rival operators, including BTC, about the implications of the Cable Bahamas/SRG merger. URCA will decide by February 5, 2011, whether to approve the deal. One rival telecoms operator, speaking to Tribune Business on condition of anonymity, described Cable Bahamas move to acquire SRG as a spoiling manoevere which has no place in a vibrant, competitive market, arguing that it would increase the concentration of major Bahamian telecoms assets into the hands of relatively few operators and squeeze out smaller players. Pointing out that Cable Bahamas had already been designated by URCA as an operator with Significant Market Power (SMP the areas of Internet and cable TV, the rival operator said the SRG deal was not a creative move by Cable Bahamas, designed to enhance service, but an effort to attain further concentration of the current communications assets. Arguing that Cable Bahamas and BTC had not served the Bahamian digital market well, the rival operator also pointed out that by virtue of the Columbus Communications buyout, the Government through the National Insurance Board and the Treasury would control the largest stake in Cable Bahamas, while still enjoying a substantial shareholding of 49 per cent in BTC. Thus the Government would still enjoy control and influence over a substantial portion of the Bahamian telecoms market, exchanging 100 per cent BTC ownership for a smaller stake, plus the largest equity interest in Cable Bahamas the two largest players. According to its accounts, Cable Bahamas has already invested $4.243 million in its purchase option to acquire SRG, with the lat ter likely to be run as a fully-owned subsidiary if the deal is approved, acting as the BISX-listed companys telecoms arm. It would make Cable Bahamas an instant player in the fixed-line voice market, the firm having made no secret of its intentions to begin such service in 2011. Cable Bahamas' purchase option can be traced back to 2003 and 2004, when the former Christie government was attempting to privatise BTC. SRG was awarded its licence to compete with BTC in the fixed-line market at the same time, and attempted to raise $7 million from Bahamian investors in a private placement to finance the build-out of its network infrastructure. Yet URCA's predecessor, the Public Utilities Commission (PUC then-PLP government, changed the 'rules of the game' in relation to leasing interconnection circuits when SRG was in the middle of its capital raising. This forced SRG to return the raised funds to the investors, since its business model and financial projections had been thrown out of whack. To prevent the new operator from becoming 'stillborn', it was Cable Bahamas that financed the build-out of SRG's network in return for the purchase option. And Cable Bahamas' desire to consummate the relationship and make SRG its telecoms arm was also behind the $85 million buyout of its former controlling shareholder, the Canadian-owned Columbus Communications. As previously revealed by Tribune Business, Cable Bahamas tried to execute the purchase option back in late 2007, just after the Ingraham administration returned to office. It was able to block the transaction because of Cable's foreign ownership component in the shape of Columbus, denying the necessary Investments Board approvals and Central Bank exchange control approval. Competition fears lead to Cable/SRG deal probe F ROM page 1B F ROM page 1B F F i i s s c c a a l l d d e e f f i i c c i i t t h h i i t t s s $ $ 3 3 3 3 9 9 . 4 4 m m f f o o r r 2 2 0 0 0 0 9 9 / / 2 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 Partnership, who together with his two brothers has financed the $14 million re-development of the plaza, said the grand opening of the shopping and dining attraction would now wait until around February next year. We will wait until the two restaurants are ready. At that time t here will also be more yachts in the marina. We expect in December to have the stores and the courtyard cafe up and runn ing, said Mr Klonaris. In September, Mr Klonaris had suggested that this month would be the right time to open the $14 million Elizabeth on Bay development. The plaza includes a total of 12 retail and three restaurant spaces, as well as a marina. Y esterday, Mr Klonaris said fashion stores La Rose, Lacoste, U rban Myth, Tempo and an Italian boutique, as well as a b ranch of the Friendly Pharmacy and a courtyard cafe, will be o n offer in November at the plaza. A Mediterranean-style restaurant has signed up to operate o ut of one of the waterfront restaurant spaces, while negotiations are still underway over who will occupy the third restau-r ant space. T HE PLAZATOBE: T he Elizabeth on Bay Marketplace & Marina. $14M PLAZAS DECEMBER SOFT OPEN FROM page 1B By ALISON LOWE Business Reporter a lowe@tribunemedia.net Questions, recommendations and suggestions on new Bills relating to land reform in the Bahamas have been g athered over a six-week consultation period, and will be forwarded to the Law Reform Commission to inform the continued drafting, the ministerr esponsible for land and local government said yesterday. B yron Woodside said the Bar Counc il, Bahamas Real Estate Association, C learing Bank Association Land Surv eyors Association and private citizens in New Providence and the Family Islands had made comments and raised concerns relative to the Land Adjudic ation Bill during a six-week period in w hich meetings were held between September 20 and October 28. The questions, recommendations a nd suggestions, which focused on the d efinition of generational land, the lack of appeal against a decision made by t he Ajudication Officer and the amount of land that can be claimed (one acre to one and a quarter acres have been noted and will be conside red by the Law Reform Commission to inform the continued drafting of the Bill, said a statement from Mr Woods ide. E arlier this year, the Government t abled the Land Ajudication Bill, Registration of Land Bills and Law ofP roperty Bill, which intend to reform the legal framework relating to the ownership and registration of land in the Bahamas, including generational land. In recent weeks, attorney Sharlyn S mith was among a number of people who have raised concerns about some of the provisions of the draft Bills, sugg esting that if they are to result in fair o utcomes certain changes would need t o be made prior to their passage into law. Mr Woodside said recent meetings hosted to discuss the Bills allowed ford iscussions which indicated the importance of land ownership to Bahamians. It was generally accepted that land l aws in the Bahamas are outdated; therefore the public fora were welc omed, he said. No indication of when the land reform Bills will be debated in Parliament has yet been given. T he Bills can be viewed at www.bahamas.gov.bs under the Bills, Laws and Acts section. Land Bill feedback goes to Commission It was generally accepted that landl aws in the Bahamas are outdated; therefore the public fora were welcomed. Byron Woodside

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EILEEN SULLIVAN, Associated Press WASHINGTON New U.S. security rules are in effect banning all cargo from Yemen and Somalia and prohibiting toner and ink cartridges weighing more than one pound (half a kilogram ger flights, Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano said Monday. The new rules are a direct response to the thwarted terror plot that could have taken down two cargo planes over the U.S. last month. Terrorists in Yemen had hidden two pow erful bombs inside printers and shipped them to addresses in Chicago. As the packages made their way to the U.S., Saudi Arabia tipped off intelligence officials to the plot, providing the FedEx and UPS tracking numbers that allowed officials to pinpoint where the packages were en route. "The threats of terrorism we face are serious and evolving, and these security measures reflect our commitment to using current intelligence to stay ahead of adversaries," Napolitano said in a statement. The U.S. immediately banned cargo from Yemen after the bombs were inter c epted. Other countries includ ing Britain and Germany which the bombs traveled through followed suit. Somalia was added to the U.S. ban, despite a lack of intel ligence pointing to a similar plot to detonate bombs on cargo planes, said a senior adminis t ration official who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak publicly. C M Y K C M Y K LOCALAND INTERNATIONALBUSINESS PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 5 2wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y P revious CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.261.00AML Foods Limited1.011.010.000.1500.0406.73.96% 1 0.759.67Bahamas Property Fund10.6310.630.000.0130.200817.71.88% 6 .184.50Bank of Bahamas4.904.900.000.5980.2608.25.31% 0.580.18Benchmark0.180.180.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.492.84Bahamas Waste2.842.840.000.1680.09016.93.17% 2.152.14Fidelity Bank2.172.170.000.0160.040135.61.84% 12.509.62Cable Bahamas10.4710.470.001.0500.31010.02.96% 2.842.36Colina Holdings2.402.400.000.7810.0403.11.67% 7.005.40Commonwealth Bank (S1)6.506.500.000.4220.23015.43.54% 3.651.63Consolidated Water BDRs2.042.060.020.1110.04518.62.18% 2 .551.60Doctor's Hospital1.601.600.000.1990.1108.06.88% 6 .995.94Famguard6.076.070.00-0.0030.240N/M3.95% 1 0.207.26Finco7.267.260.000.2870.52025.37.16% 11.408.77FirstCaribbean Bank9.749.740.000.6450.35015.13.59% 5.513.75Focol (S)5.465.460.000.3660.21014.93.85% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 5.595.00ICD Utilities5.595.590.000.0120.240465.84.29% 10.509.90J. S. Johnson9.909.900.000.9710.64010.26.46%1 0.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.9910.80010.18.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 9 9.4699.46Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029BAH2999.460.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 1 00.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00100100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +FBB13100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Bid$ Ask$ LastPrice DailyVol EPS$ Div$ P/E Yield BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:7% I nterest 7%RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)29 May 2015 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-232019 October 2022 Prime + 1.75% Prime + 1.75% 6.95%20 November 2029M ONDAY, 8 NOVEMBER 2010BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,488.09 | CHG 0.02 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -77.29 | YTD % -4.94BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basis)M aturity 19 October 2017FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%30 May 2013 52wk Hi 52wk Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Daily Vol EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield 10.065.01Bahamas Supermarkets5.016.0114.00-2.9450.000N/M0.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.350.400.550.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%L ast 12 Months %NAV 3MTH 1.50561.4076CFAL Bond Fund1.50564.65%6.96%1.482477 2.92652.8300CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.91871.10%3.13%2.919946 1.56251.4954CFAL Money Market Fund1.56253.67%4.49%1.543785 3.20252.8522Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund2.8624-8.16%-7.49% 13.638813.0484Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund13.56421.47%2.95% 114.3684101.6693CFAL Global Bond Fund114.36849.98%12.49%109.392860 106.552899.4177CFAL Global Equity Fund106.55284.75%7.18%100.779540 1.13181.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.13183.85%5.22% 1.09691.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.09692.71%6.44% 1.13201.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.13203.79%5.71% 9.74859.1005Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 19.74584.35%5.22% 11.236110.0000Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 210.6000-1.59%4.26% 10.00009.1708Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 39.5037-4.96%-4.96% 8.16434.8105Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund Equities Sub Fund8.16435.79%9.42% BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/MNot Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/200731-Oct-10BISX Listed Mutual FundsNAV Date 31-Oct-10 30-Sep-10 30-Sep-10CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752530-Sep-10 30-Sep-10 30-Sep-10 29-Oct-10 31-Aug-10MARKET TERMS30-Sep-10 NAV 6MTH 1.460225 2.911577 1.527368 107.570619 105.776543 30-Jun-10 30-Sep-10 31-Oct-10 31-Oct-10 NEW YORK O il prices edged higher Monday on positive news on U.S. jobs data suggesting demand for crude is growing, trumping the effects of a stronger dollar. Benchmark oil for December delivery settled up 21 cents at $87.06 a barrel on the N ew York Mercantile Exchange a high for the year. Analysts think oil prices could climb to $90 a barrel by year's end. Oil prices reached $87.49 earlier Monday, eclipsing the previous intraday high of $ 87.15 a barrel in early May. The price has risen more than 16 percent since early Sep tember. "For now, it's all about crude and it's all about the perception that crude is one of the greatest (investment places to park your money," s aid Tom Kloza, publisher and chief oil analyst at Oil Price Information Service. Oil fell back in later trading as the firmer dollar made commodities more expensive and less attractive for investors holding other currencies. T he dollar mostly bounced higher against the euro Mon day, building on Friday's gains as debt woes in Ireland reawakened concerns about the euro area's economic prospects In late trading in New York, the euro dropped to $ 1.3923 from $1.4045 late Friday. NEW YORK Expanding its online retail empire, Amazon.com Inc. said Mon day that it is buying Quidsi, the owner of Diapers.com and Soap.com, for $500 million in cash. Amazon said that privately held Quidsi will continue to operate independently after the acquisition, which is expected to close in D ecember. Amazon plans to assume about $45 million in debt and other obligations as part of the deal, which has been approved by Quidsi's shareholders. Soap.com sells health, beauty and cleaning products online, while Diapers.com sells baby-care items, including food and maternity wear. And Quidsi recently launched BeautyBar.com, which sells higher-end skin care, makeup and other products online. NEW YORK Investors looking for safer places to stow their assets pushed gold to a record price above $1,400 an ounce Monday as they become more worried about the global economy. A combination of issues have created fresh worry among investors: Ireland's debt difficulties and two key global summits where leaders of major industrial and developing nations are dis cussing currencies, free trade and ways to help the world economy. Also in the back of investors' minds is the prospect of inflation stemming the Federal Reserve's multi-billion bond-buying pro gram. "People are really concerned again and so I think we're seeing safe-haven buying," IG Markets Inc. CEO Dan Cook said. "Whether you're holding dollars or euros or whatever you're holding, gold is that one kind of go-to product, a commodity as well as a currency type of trade," he said. "Nobody seems to be that willing to sell out of it." Oil rises above $87 even as dollar gains Amazon to buy Diapers.com owner Quidsi for $500m In brief US issues security rules for air cargo Gold sets record high amid economic fears A ssociated Press HIGH ALERT: Police officers check passengers waiting for a flight at the Linate Airport in Milan, Italy, Saturday, Oct. 30, 2010. A suspicious package originating in Yemen containing a toner cartridge with wires a nd powder was found during routine screening of air cargo in the United Kingdom, prompting authorities to scour three planes and a truck in the United States on Friday Oct. 29 2010. month as a sign the worst is over. M r McWeeney said the collective $1.153 b illion bad loan portfolio, a figure that is equivalent to 18.4 per cent of all outstanding loans (worth $6.356 billion holds and businesses almost one in five could drag along the bottom for some time before we see an improving trend. A ny improvement, the Bank of the B ahamas International managing director added, would not be a sharp rise but a gradual return to normal levels of delinquent and non-performing loans. Mr McWeeney told Tribune Business that such a process wouldl ast a good 18 months. H e expressed hope that Septembers trend would carry through October and November,but warned that December was typically a bad month for asset quality, as consumers adjusted their spending habits to focus on Christmas. During September 2010, delinquentl oans between 31-90 days past due fell by $9.7 m illion or 1.8 per cent to $522.4 million, reducing these as a percentage of the commercial banking industrys total loan portfolio by 0.21 percentage points to 8.3 per cent. Non-performing loans, which are 90 days past due and upon which Bahamian bankss top accruing interest, fell by $9.3 million or 1.5 per cent to $6309.7 million, a figure equivalent t o 10.1 per cent of total loans meaning that m ore than one in every 10 loans to Bahamian consumers and businesses is non-performing, or at least 90 days past due. Mortgage delinquencies fell by $9.2 million or 1.5 per cent to $622.6 million in September, following g five consecutive months of expan-s ion, due to a $9.6 million or 2.8 per cent falloff in mortgages 31-90 days past due. This offset a minor $0.4 million or 0.1 per cent rise in the non-performing mortgage loan segment. Mr McWeeney described the high level of mortgage delinquencies, which account for more than 50 per cent of all defaulted loans, as a new phenomenon and uncharted territory for all Bahamian commercial banks. Thats the big question; its a new phenomenon for us, in that mortgages were the c rown jewels for any debt portfolio Mr M cWeeney told Tribune Business, when asked to explain why mortgage loan defaults accounted for such a high proportion of bad loans. Theres been a lot of discussion about this, and one suggestion has been that the public has got wind that the banks dont want to forecloseu nless they absolutely have to, that its an option of last resort. Knowing that they could stay in a property until a bank was forced, reluctantly, to repossess by power of its mortgage or foreclose, Mr McWeeney said the theory was that persons were taking advantage of that and stretchingt he asset, not updating the mortgage until the last minute. Thats a new phenomenon were still trying to dissect. The Bank of the Bahamas International chief also suggested that, with the recession now having lasted beyond two years and persons unemployed for the same duration, manyB ahamians had exhausted their savings in m eeting continuing obligations. As a result, they no longer had the funds to meet their largest payment the mortgage and Mr McWeeney said: Persons are stretched beyond capacity and cannot make ends meet. M r McWeeney said Bahamian commercial b anks were in uncharted territory for all of us, as regards loan delinquency and asset quality, forcing institutions to re-examine their stress testing. The contracting Bahamian economy, and reduction in available jobs, meant that a r obust lending environment was absent. The b anks want to lend, but the economy does not support it, Mr McWeeney said. For September, consumer loan arrears fell by $8.8 million or 3.1 per cent to $276.2 million, as the 31-90 day past due and non-performings egments fell by $2.7 million (2.2 per cent a nd $6.1 million (3.8 per cent C ommercial bad loans also fell by $0.9 million to $254.3 million, with a $2.6 million or 4.2 per cent rise in the 31-90 days past due component cancelled out by a $3.6 million or 1.9 per cent reduction in the non-performing cat-e gory. Bottoming out hope on $1.15bn bad loans FROM page 1B

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AS Aveterinarian, the most common medical complaint we see in dogs is skin or ear related. Unlike humans who react to allergens with nasal symptoms, dogs react with skin problems. Their problems may range from poor coat texture or length, to itching and chewing, to hot spots and self mutilation. Allergies may also play a major role in chronic ear infection because the ear is continuation of the skin. Always remember, your best source of information is your vet. One must always remember though that the success or failure of treatment will rest mainly with you, the dog owner. There is no magic pill to deal with these problems. Unfortunately there is also no cure, and only systematic treatment options. Inhalant Allergies Substances, which can cause an allergic reaction in dogs, are much the same as those which cause reactions in people including pollen, dust, mites and mold. A clue to diagnosing these allergies is to look at the timing of the reaction. Does it happen year round? This may be mold or dust. If the reaction is seasonal, pollen may be the culprit. The clinical signs of inhalant allergies include: scratching, biting, chewing at feet and constant licking. The itching may be most severe on feet, flaps, groin, and armpits. Dogs rub their face on the carpet. Earflaps may become red and hot. Chronic ear infection may follow. The skin becomes thickened, greasy and has a strong odour. Hot spots may develop due to irritation from constant chewing or scratching. Allergies have also been implicated as a possible cause of acral lick granulom., a frustrating, treatment resistant condition whereby the dog creates a sore on his skin from constant licking. During the rainy season in the Bahamas, and because the fact we are an island nation, the humidity is usually high. This causes an increase in mold production. Outdoors, mold plays a part in nature by breaking down dead organic matter such as a fallen leaves and dead trees, but indoors, mold growth should be avoided. Molds reproduce by means of tiny spores that are invisible to the naked eye and float through the air. Allergic reactions to molds are common to humans and their pets. It is almost impossible to get rid of all mold spores in the air. However, the mold spores will not grow if moisture is not present. If there is mold growth in your home, you must clean up the mold, and fix the water problem, if you clean up the mold and don't fix the water problem then most likely, the mold problem will come back. This mold problem is seen in areas that are close to the sea, lakes, swampy areas and canals and also people who live in old buildings and high raise buildings with old plumbing are predisposed to this problem. I am of the opinion that a lot of inhalant allergies are as result of mold. Malassezia Infection With Malassezia, in dogs, the skin lesions are most often seen at anatomic sites that create a relatively warm, moist skin environment. Thus the interdigital skin, ventral, neck, lip region, ear canal, axilla, groin and folded areas are most often affected. Itching is normally reported. Intense reddening of skin, alopecia, skin thickening and hyper pigmentation of the skin occurs. It has been documented that a seasonal increase in numbers have been seen in veterinary hospitals in geographic region where a noticeable change to warm, humid, climatic, conditions is present. Unfortunately, this is our climate year round in the Bahamas. GREEN SCENE By Gardener Jack C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM What are we really passing on to our children? HOW many times have you caught yourselves looking at each other and saying, 'That's your child' or 'He takes after you'? As parents, we may pat ourselves on the back when they are qualities considered admirable or virtuous. We beam in the afterglow of being recognised as having 'done good', feeling that we are on the right track, and our journey as parents is going according to plan. But, what happens when you are jolted into selfrecognition when you see undesirable behaviour? It is a hard pill to swallow, or at least admit, that your own disagreeable behaviour has been passed on to your child. If we expect our children to be little sponges and to soak up everything they are fed at school, then surely we cannot be that na•ve to think that they will not do the same at home. We can prepare or educate ourselves on parenting skills with self-help information, but the reality is that it is harder to put it into practice. The long and the short is that if we want to be proud of our children, then we need to teach by example. We need to be proud of our own behaviour, to then become a person of integrity. When we let ourselves down, and in so doing our children, it is important to be brave enough to admit we made a mistake. Owning up and acknowledging without excuses and apologising to those around us is extremely important. Not only does it represent honesty, but wanting to live a life without hypocrisy. It teaches our off spring that we understand about being flawed, but that it is not alright to walk around creating chaos without repairing the damage. If we chose to live our adult life, without thought or concern towards our children, then we should not be surprised if they develop a tainted view of life. Instead of youthful optimism, they may approach life and people with a lack of interest and distrust. Trailing along, not far behind that lack of energy, is often a sense of self-pity and entitlement. Are these really the most attractive qualities to present to the world as a young adult? Taking time to really recognise the value, and the importance of our mentoring role, reveals two sides of a coin. On one side is the simplicity of 'just being ourselves', and leading by example. On the flip side, it is the relentless and time-consuming job that has no end in our lifetime it is a job that, unless you do not possess a conscience, you cannot quit. Often, it is not until we enter this role that we truly understand the importance of family planning and contraception. Timing the arrival of a newborn shows not only forethought, but also kindness to all involved. A disadvantaged start makes the journey together even more bumpy than it needs to be. Putting all these views aside, we can appreciate that there are certain personal attributes that are extremely admirable. They are the very same qualities that we know are common in healthy relationships. Dependability, ambition, respect, and self-control head the student's list. Of course, these are easily translated into schoolwork and preparation towards the higher work force. Once these characteristics are established at an early age they are then drawn on as 'values' throughout our lives. No matter how we may be side tracked from them, we inevitably are reminded of them from time to time. In our ever-changing world, perhaps the importance of family has become a distant cry. Learn to understand the importance of having people to lean, and even fall on. Discover the joy of conversation and the world of story telling, at the dinner table. It is often at this very place that we understand our sense of worth, and position within the family. Surely it is this ability to create, and nurture a new generation that is the most important lesson to pass on to our children. Maggie Bain is an individual and couples relationship therapist. She is a registered nurse and a certified clinical sex therapist. Listen to 'Love on the Rock' with Maggie Bain every Thursday 5pm-6pm on Island FM 102.9. For appointments call 364-7230, e-mail relatebahamas@yahoo.com or visit www.relatebahamas.blogspot.c om. By MAGGIE BAIN Cucumbers and squash Skin and allergy problems in dogs By DR BASIL SANDS CUCURBITS members of the cucumber and squash family are some of the most rewarding crops we can grow in the cool seasons of the year. Summer squash in particular grows abundantly and can often overwhelm our needs. One feature shared by cucumbers, squash, melons and pumpkins is the production of separate male and female flowers. Generally, male flowers are produced first and in greater numbers so when a female flower comes along there is pollen enough to deal with the situation. Pollination is assisted by bees but can be done by hand using a cotton swab or artist's paintbrush. The female flower is usually much larger than a male flower and the base is a miniature fruit. The main cucumber grown in The Bahamas is the American or Ridge cucumber. It can be 6 inches to 10 inches long, two to three inches in diameter, and bears small spines along its sides at the unripe stage. Other types of cucumber that can be grown are English much longer and thinner and Asian. English and Asian cucumbers are best grown on trellises. There is also Armenian cucumber but this is really a squash and lemon cucumber, a softball-sized oddity that originated in the Caribbean. One of the problems associated with growing cucumbers is their tendency to spread and exceed the bounds of your garden. There are patio' types of cucumber that produce their fruits near to the parent plant and do not send out long vinous growth. The cucumbers produced are the same size as regular vines. Cucumbers and squash are traditionally grown in hills', specially prepared areas that do not necessarily have to be raised. A hill is made by digging circular area of soil about 18 inches wide and enriching it with cow manure or compost and fertiliser. The cucumber seed are sown in an equilateral triangle, each about 8 10 inches apart. As long as fertiliser and water are added as needed, all three plants will grow happily and produce well. There is no virtue in a large, fat cucumber. The longer a cucumber is left on the vine the larger the seeds will grow and the flesh will become slightly corky. Ridge cucumbers should be picked when the spines can be rubbed off lightly with one's fingertips. Always cut a cucumber away from the parent plant. Summer squash encompasses crookneck and straightneck yellow varieties as well as zucchini. Instead of growing in a vinous fashion, the fruits are produced from the base of the plant. Cut the fruits away when they are approaching full size but still have juvenile seeds. Any zucchini fruits that have a bump' in them are over mature. Cut and come again is the rule for cucumbers and summer squash. The quicker you pick your ripe fruits the more productive the plants will be. Winter squash is so named because the skin of the fruits is quite hard and once picked they can be stored for a considerable time. Favourites in The Bahamas are Butternut and Acorn. Winter squash take longer to develop than summer squash and the fruits can be allowed to reach the mature stage. Store them in a refrigerator and they may last for months. Pumpkin is a great Bahamian favourite, but not the field pumpkin we use for Hallowe'en purpose. The type used by Bahamians is the Cuban or Calabaza pumpkin. You can obtain the seeds by buying a wedge of Calabaza from a food store or wayside fruit vendor. Make sure the seeds are full and plump. Calabaza pumpkin needs a lot of room to grow in and has a tendency to put down roots along its length and walk out of the garden. Allow 8 feet between plants. The mature fruit is usually straw yellow with olive green markings. The shape varies considerably from almost round to bottle gourd shape. Excess crops can be utilised in many different ways such as zucchini bread, pickled cucumbers and pumpkin pie. gardenerjack@coralwave.com BEAUTY: The flower of a butternut winter squash fades away after being pollinated. READY: A Ridge cucumber is ready to pick when the spines cab be lightly rubbed away.

PAGE 21

AS Aveterinarian, the most common medical complaint we see in dogs is skin or ear related. Unlike humans who react to allergens with nasal symptoms, dogs react with skin problems. Their problems may range from poor coat texture or length, to itching and chewing, to hot spots and self mutilation. Allergies may also play a major role in chronic ear infection because the ear is continuation of the skin. Always remember, your best source of information is your vet. One must always remember though that the success or failure of treatment will rest mainly with you, the dog owner. There is no magic pill to deal with these problems. Unfortunately there is also no cure, and only systematic treatment options. Inhalant Allergies Substances, which can cause an allergic reaction in dogs, are much the same as those which cause reactions in people including pollen, dust, mites and mold. A clue to diagnosing these allergies is to look at the timing of the reaction. Does it happen year round? This may be mold or dust. If the reaction is seasonal, pollen may be the culprit. The clinical signs of inhalant allergies include: scratching, biting, chewing at feet and constant licking. The itching may be most severe on feet, flaps, groin, and armpits. Dogs rub their face on the carpet. Earflaps may become red and hot. Chronic ear infection may follow. The skin becomes thickened, greasy and has a strong odour. Hot spots may develop due to irritation from constant chewing or scratching. Allergies have also been implicated as a possible cause of acral lick granulom., a frustrating, treatment resistant condition whereby the dog creates a sore on his skin from constant licking. During the rainy season in the Bahamas, and because the fact we are an island nation, the humidity is usually high. This causes an increase in mold production. Outdoors, mold plays a part in nature by breaking down dead organic matter such as a fallen leaves and dead trees, but indoors, mold growth should be avoided. Molds reproduce by means of tiny spores that are invisible to the naked eye and float through the air. Allergic reactions to molds are common to humans and their pets. It is almost impossible to get rid of all mold spores in the air. However, the mold spores will not grow if moisture is not present. If there is mold growth in your home, you must clean up the mold, and fix the water problem, if you clean up the mold and don't fix the water problem then most likely, the mold problem will come back. This mold problem is seen in areas that are close to the sea, lakes, swampy areas and canals and also people who live in old buildings and high raise buildings with old plumbing are predisposed to this problem. I am of the opinion that a lot of inhalant allergies are as result of mold. Malassezia Infection With Malassezia, in dogs, the skin lesions are most often seen at anatomic sites that create a relatively warm, moist skin environment. Thus the interdigital skin, ventral, neck, lip region, ear canal, axilla, groin and folded areas are most often affected. Itching is normally reported. Intense reddening of skin, alopecia, skin thickening and hyper pigmentation of the skin occurs. It has been documented that a seasonal increase in numbers have been seen in veterinary hospitals in geographic region where a noticeable change to warm, humid, climatic, conditions is present. Unfortunately, this is our climate year round in the Bahamas. GREEN SCENE By Gardener Jack C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM What are we really passing on to our children? HOW many times have you caught yourselves looking at each other and saying, 'That's your child' or 'He takes after you'? As parents, we may pat ourselves on the back when they are qualities considered admirable or virtuous. We beam in the afterglow of being recognised as having 'done good', feeling that we are on the right track, and our journey as parents is going according to plan. But, what happens when you are jolted into selfrecognition when you see undesirable behaviour? It is a hard pill to swallow, or at least admit, that your own disagreeable behaviour has been passed on to your child. If we expect our children to be little sponges and to soak up everything they are fed at school, then surely we cannot be that na•ve to think that they will not do the same at home. We can prepare or educate ourselves on parenting skills with self-help information, but the reality is that it is harder to put it into practice. The long and the short is that if we want to be proud of our children, then we need to teach by example. We need to be proud of our own behaviour, to then become a person of integrity. When we let ourselves down, and in so doing our children, it is important to be brave enough to admit we made a mistake. Owning up and acknowledging without excuses and apologising to those around us is extremely important. Not only does it represent honesty, but wanting to live a life without hypocrisy. It teaches our off spring that we understand about being flawed, but that it is not alright to walk around creating chaos without repairing the damage. If we chose to live our adult life, without thought or concern towards our children, then we should not be surprised if they develop a tainted view of life. Instead of youthful optimism, they may approach life and people with a lack of interest and distrust. Trailing along, not far behind that lack of energy, is often a sense of self-pity and entitlement. Are these really the most attractive qualities to present to the world as a young adult? Taking time to really recognise the value, and the importance of our mentoring role, reveals two sides of a coin. On one side is the simplicity of 'just being ourselves', and leading by example. On the flip side, it is the relentless and time-consuming job that has no end in our lifetime it is a job that, unless you do not possess a conscience, you cannot quit. Often, it is not until we enter this role that we truly understand the importance of family planning and contraception. Timing the arrival of a newborn shows not only forethought, but also kindness to all involved. A disadvantaged start makes the journey together even more bumpy than it needs to be. Putting all these views aside, we can appreciate that there are certain personal attributes that are extremely admirable. They are the very same qualities that we know are common in healthy relationships. Dependability, ambition, respect, and self-control head the student's list. Of course, these are easily translated into schoolwork and preparation towards the higher work force. Once these characteristics are established at an early age they are then drawn on as 'values' throughout our lives. No matter how we may be side tracked from them, we inevitably are reminded of them from time to time. In our ever-changing world, perhaps the importance of family has become a distant cry. Learn to understand the importance of having people to lean, and even fall on. Discover the joy of conversation and the world of story telling, at the dinner table. It is often at this very place that we understand our sense of worth, and position within the family. Surely it is this ability to create, and nurture a new generation that is the most important lesson to pass on to our children. Maggie Bain is an individual and couples relationship therapist. She is a registered nurse and a certified clinical sex therapist. Listen to 'Love on the Rock' with Maggie Bain every Thursday 5pm-6pm on Island FM 102.9. For appointments call 364-7230, e-mail relatebahamas@yahoo.com or visit www.relatebahamas.blogspot.c om. By MAGGIE BAIN Cucumbers and squash Skin and allergy problems in dogs By DR BASIL SANDS CUCURBITS members of the cucumber and squash family are some of the most rewarding crops we can grow in the cool seasons of the year. Summer squash in particular grows abundantly and can often overwhelm our needs. One feature shared by cucumbers, squash, melons and pumpkins is the production of separate male and female flowers. Generally, male flowers are produced first and in greater numbers so when a female flower comes along there is pollen enough to deal with the situation. Pollination is assisted by bees but can be done by hand using a cotton swab or artist's paintbrush. The female flower is usually much larger than a male flower and the base is a miniature fruit. The main cucumber grown in The Bahamas is the American or Ridge cucumber. It can be 6 inches to 10 inches long, two to three inches in diameter, and bears small spines along its sides at the unripe stage. Other types of cucumber that can be grown are English much longer and thinner and Asian. English and Asian cucumbers are best grown on trellises. There is also Armenian cucumber but this is really a squash and lemon cucumber, a softball-sized oddity that originated in the Caribbean. One of the problems associated with growing cucumbers is their tendency to spread and exceed the bounds of your garden. There are patio' types of cucumber that produce their fruits near to the parent plant and do not send out long vinous growth. The cucumbers produced are the same size as regular vines. Cucumbers and squash are traditionally grown in hills', specially prepared areas that do not necessarily have to be raised. A hill is made by digging circular area of soil about 18 inches wide and enriching it with cow manure or compost and fertiliser. The cucumber seed are sown in an equilateral triangle, each about 8 10 inches apart. As long as fertiliser and water are added as needed, all three plants will grow happily and produce well. There is no virtue in a large, fat cucumber. The longer a cucumber is left on the vine the larger the seeds will grow and the flesh will become slightly corky. Ridge cucumbers should be picked when the spines can be rubbed off lightly with one's fingertips. Always cut a cucumber away from the parent plant. Summer squash encompasses crookneck and straightneck yellow varieties as well as zucchini. Instead of growing in a vinous fashion, the fruits are produced from the base of the plant. Cut the fruits away when they are approaching full size but still have juvenile seeds. Any zucchini fruits that have a bump' in them are over mature. Cut and come again is the rule for cucumbers and summer squash. The quicker you pick your ripe fruits the more productive the plants will be. Winter squash is so named because the skin of the fruits is quite hard and once picked they can be stored for a considerable time. Favourites in The Bahamas are Butternut and Acorn. Winter squash take longer to develop than summer squash and the fruits can be allowed to reach the mature stage. Store them in a refrigerator and they may last for months. Pumpkin is a great Bahamian favourite, but not the field pumpkin we use for Hallowe'en purpose. The type used by Bahamians is the Cuban or Calabaza pumpkin. You can obtain the seeds by buying a wedge of Calabaza from a food store or wayside fruit vendor. Make sure the seeds are full and plump. Calabaza pumpkin needs a lot of room to grow in and has a tendency to put down roots along its length and walk out of the garden. Allow 8 feet between plants. The mature fruit is usually straw yellow with olive green markings. The shape varies considerably from almost round to bottle gourd shape. Excess crops can be utilised in many different ways such as zucchini bread, pickled cucumbers and pumpkin pie. gardenerjack@coralwave.com BEAUTY: The flower of a butternut winter squash fades away after being pollinated. READY: A Ridge cucumber is ready to pick when the spines cab be lightly rubbed away.

PAGE 22

Mentors can have a profound impact on any organisation or group. They serve to ensure present and future continuity through building current and future leaders, they impart operational knowledge and can perpetuate the kind of organisational culture designed to ensure future growth. If mentors are good for succession and seamless continuity why don't more companies invest time and other resources into mentoring? There are several factors that can create obstacles or derail both formal and informal mentoring programs. They can happen either in isolation or concurrently: THE PERSONS deemed repositories of institutional knowledge may not feel comfortable releasing information because the organisation is not demonstrating that it values long tenured employees. Instead the organisation highly rewards younger employees with up-to-date skills and limited experience. As a result, the long tenured employees have the experience that can improve the performance of the inexperienced highly skilled employees but the willingness, trust and the feeling of being valued are not present. THERE ARE ORGANISATIONS that exist predominantly in the present, directing their energies toward immediate issues because of a subconscious notion of immortality or a reality of not having enough time. If the state of being busy is perpetual, it forces decision makers to habitually adopt a view predominantly centered on microcosms instead of a visionary or long term perspective. A LIMITED BUDGET is often a reason why talent development plans are delayed. Executives and owners often have competing financial priorities that require attention so training and development plans are postponed, sometimes indefinitely. NEGATIVE ATTITUDES toward employees based on past experiences can also obstruct the development of talented employees. While there are cases where the attitude may be justified because risks are high, there are cases where unforgiving attitudes stall the careers of strong performers who eventually leave the organisation and flourish elsewhere. Mentoring doesn't only have to be about succession and the future career of the mentee. It can be focused on the present from the following perspectives: InformationalMentoring This type of mentoring helps the mentee to focus on correct procedures and processes, both formal and informal. Friend This type of mentor interacts with the mentee in social situations to help the mentee understand how to navigate social interactions. This is particularly useful in highly political work environments. ReciprocalMentor ing This type of mentoring relationship is one where persons with complementary strengths collaborate on projects. Each person learns from the other through mutual exchange. We tend to focus on the benefits of mentoring to the mentee and the organisation but there are tangible benefits for mentors. Here are a few examples: BY INTERACTING closely with persons from lower levels of the organisation, the mentor is being exposed to information directly from a level of employee they may not connect with under normal circumstances. The direct access allows executives to skip a level of people leaders that may be providing a biased interpretation of circumstances. It can also bring a deeper understanding of diversity and how to harness differences to positively impact the performance of the organisation. MENTORING helps leaders to develop their coaching, counseling, listening, leadership and modeling skills. MENTORING helps to create an impression of accessibility, connectivity and humanity between junior employees and executives. Building credibility through creating positive connections and valuing employees can also serve to build trust in organisations where trust is impaired. Here is what organisations can consider when developing a mentoring program: AS A MENTOR, decide why you want to mentor, what you want the mentoring to achieve in the present and future and who would be the best person for you to mentor. If there is no formal mentoring program, you can select someone to mentor informally. AS AN EMPLOYER, understand if you have persons within the company who can mentor your employees and if not, determine if there are possible mentors, external to the company, who have the time, interest and skills. DETERMINE if talent should be mentored by more than one mentor. AS A DECISION MAKER, get buy in and participation from the business. As a best practice, companies that treat mentoring as an organisation wide priority and not only an HR priority get more out of the process. AS AN HR PROFESSIONAL, support mentoring with an improved recruitment process. No amount of training and development opportunities will improve bad hires. MATCH THE RIGHT MENTORS AND MENTEES. Once you identify desired outcomes of the mentoring relationships, decision makers should consider the strengths and weaknesses of the mentor. CREATE AN ORIENTATION program for mentors and mentees. It should include a guide or letter outlining roles, time commitment etc. A formal mentoring agreement can also capture this type of information. TRACK THE PERFORMANCE OF PERSONS being mentored and determine if the mentoring match is the right one. SOME ORGANISATIONS use training as a primary development tool for top talent but there are some things a seminar won't achieve that mentoring can. For instance, mentoring aligns an experiential foundation with academic training. Academic training is theoretical and does not always give the individual the opportunity to apply knowledge, make mistakes and experience variations on a theme. CULTIVATE AN ENVIRONMENT of collaboration where employees experience a sense of being valued. Otherwise your mentoring program will be perceived as a farce. What distinguishes good mentors from great mentors isthe best mentors don't focus on creating clones of themselves, they focus on developing the individual's inherent strengths, guiding the individual to go beyond their perceived limits. Many companies are so entrenched in survival mode that they postpone the need for preparing for long term realities until it is too late to develop the right people. Instead, I encourage decision makers to think about ways you can match the right mentors with top talent who will represent the vision and values of the organisation in the future. Yvette Bethel is CEO of Organizational Soul, an HR Consulting and Leadership Development company. If you are interested in exploring how you can create a higher performing organization, you can contact her at info@orgsoul.com. C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2010, PAGE 7B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Seize the opportunity to mentor By YVETTE BETHEL (ARA) Setting aside a day of beauty for yourself before or during the busy holiday season could be your key to not only looking good, but keeping yourself safe and healthy for the rest of the year. Think of cooler weather as the essential season for good skin care. Go about it naturally by crafting your own toxic-free skin care products that feature the benefits of pure, plant-derived essential oils. STEP 1: Start your new yearly routine by examining and evaluating your skin. Everyone should periodically perform a thorough skin examination. First, get naked, and then use a handheld mirror in a well-lit room to look over your entire epidermis. Map out the location, size, color and form of any mole, scar, birthmark or discoloration. Make a note of any troubling changes that occur in any of these permanent skin features, such as blemishes, moles or lesions that are or become persistently itchy, bleeding, waxy, translucent, and hard or clustered together. Pay special attention to any blemish that increases in size and has an irregular edge. Make an appointment with your doctor or dermatologist if you note anything out of the ordinary. STEP 2: Adjust your skin care routine. Now is the time to help your skin recover from summer sun and wind as well as get yourself ready to look your best for the parties, family, friends (and photos) of the holiday season. To that end, the most effective approach isn't premium cosmetics simply get adequate rest, good nutrition and hydration. Here are some lifestyle tips to promote great skin: Minimize caffeine. Get at least eight hours of sleep every night. Eat right you already know what to avoid. Eat whole, fresh fruits and colorful vegetables. Beta carotene-rich carrots, pumpkin and sweet potatoes can even skin color and help prolong your summer glow. Drink pure, clean water instead of coffee, soda or sweetened juices. Get exercise and fresh air 20 minutes every day is adequate and easy. Expensive cleansers are mostly water with a small percentage of "active ingredients" thrown in, while high-end lotions and creams are mostly water emulsified with a bit of oil. Both of these types of formulations are inherently unstable and must be preserved and stabilized with a whole host of potentially toxic and irritating ingredients that have everything to do with maintaining the product on the store shelf and nothing to do with maintaining your healthy skin. Why pay for what you don't need or want? STEP 3: Create your own safe and natural skin care products. What's not in your skin care products is perhaps more important than what is in your skin care products. You can control what goes on your body by making and using a few essential skin care products yourself. Aromatherapy expert Tom Havran offers cleanser, moisturizer, and hydrating mist recipes that call for lavender and geranium essential oils which are toning, calming and adaptable to all skin types. Cleanser. A gentle, natural liquid soap created when an alkaline mineral salt is combined with a natural vegetable oil such as sweet almond is the cleanest clean you can use. Soap can be drying for sensitive individuals, so don't overdo it and make sure you follow up with a moisturizer. INGREDIENTS: 1 cup unscented liquid vegetable oil based soap 2 tablespoons water or unflavored green tea 1/4 teaspoon lavender essential oil 1/4 teaspoon geranium essential oil DIRECTIONS: Combine soap, water (or tea) and essential oils in a small bottle. Apply about 1 tablespoon to a soft, wet washcloth and gently scrub damp skin in a circular buffing motion (not too long or with too much force). Rinse with warm water and follow with moisturizer below. Moisturizer. We need a moisturizer to re-fat the skin after cleansing. Washing with soap lifts away dirt, make-up and dead skin and keeps skin bright and pores clear, but it also strips our skin of its natural, protective (and wrinklefighting) oil known as sebum. A light-bodied and absorbent, non-clogging oil such as grapeseed or jojoba applied to still-damp skin after rinsing away your liquid soapbased cleanser will perform the same function as costly lotions and creams but at a fraction of the price. INGREDIENTS: 1/2 cup grapeseed oil 1/2 cup jojoba oil 1/4 teaspoon lavender essential oil 1/4 teaspoon geranium essential oil Directions: Combine all ingredients in a small squeeze bottle, apply a teaspoon to the palm of hand, rub hands together and smooth over damp, freshly cleansed skin, pat dry any excess water or oil. Toning and hydrating mist. As the day goes on, you'll inevitably lose that fresh glow of the morning. Some areas of your skin might become increasingly dry while others might be oily. A simple mixture of pure water and toning lavender and geranium essential oils can help diminish an oily appearance while moistening dry areas. INGREDIENTS: 1 cup water 1/4 teaspoon lavender essential oil 1/4 teaspoon geranium essential oil Small spray mister bottle Directions: Combine water and essential oils in a bottle. Shake vigorously and apply two to three spritzes of the mist to skin. Smooth over surface if needed. For more information and valuable skin care tips, visit www.auracacia.com. 'Tis the essential season for good skin car

PAGE 23

C M Y K C M Y K TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM THETRIBUNE SECTIONB HEALTH: Body and mind TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2010 By ALESHA CADET Tribune Features Reporter IT'S a dream many women have from their earliest childhood, a dream that evolves through the years with the details ever-changing. And when the time finally comes and Mr Right is found the dream hopefully becomes reality … the dream of the perfect wedding.In recent times, delivering that dream wedding to the fashion conscious ladies out there who follow the trends and have an exact idea of what they want has become big business. So much so, that regular seminars and conferences are held around the world to cater to the needs of the booming industry. Last week, it was the Bahamas's turn to host such an event. Celebrity wedding planner Colin Cowie, along other industry leaders including Mary Dann and Peter Merry were in attendance at this year's Wedding Professionals Conference which took place in Nassau from November 1-5. The conference was sponsored by and held at Sheraton Nassau, Breezes Bahamas and Sandals Royal Bahamian. The 6th Annual Wedding Professionals Conference quickly generated buzz in the industry as perhaps "the best wedding professionals conference yet!" The conference was created in 2004 and has since become a go-to resource for wedding professionals from across the world. In a statement, The Wedding Professionals told Tribune Woman that with weddings being a trend-based business, its professionals must stay abreast of the ever-changing industry in order to expand their business and keep it relevant, regardless of their reputation or years of experience. The conference, which focuses on business and marketing tactics, also featured additional celebrity and industry-renowned professional speakers including Mary DannMcNamee, the celebrity event coordinator and star of "Whose Wedding Is It Anyway". Sonny Ganguly, marketing guru for Wedding Wire, Jung Lee, one of New York's top wedding planners and star of Wedded to Perfection, and Peter Merry, the International Wedding Marketing Speaker and author of The Best Wedding Reception was also in attendance. Josh Brooks, the corporate brain behind New York's Fete and Wedded to Perfection and Tom Haibeck, world renowned emcee and author of the best-selling Wedding Toasts Made Easy made appearances as well. The Wedding Professionals Awards featured categories such as Best Wedding Over $50K, Best Themed Wedding and Best Eco-Chic Wedding. The off-shore island tours were provided by the Bahamas Ministry of Tourism and the Wedding Planners Institute of Canada. The vendor fairs, book signings and a Closing Gala were hosted by Sandals Resorts and according to the wedding professionals, there were a "vast number of Wedding Professionals who will return home equipped with the most up-to-date knowledge to further their wedding business." 6th ANNUAL WEDDING PROFESSIONALS CONFERENCE CELEBRITIES: 6th annual Wedding Professionals Conference Colin Cowie and the cast of "Unveiled". INCREDIBLE: 6th annual Wedding Professionals Conference's wedding CAKE on display. STAR POWER: Bahamas Minister of Tourism, Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace and Richard Emmanuel (Renowned Boutique-style Photographer) BEAUTIES: Speaker Mary Dann-MacNamee, the cast of "Unveiled" with Danielle AndrewsSunkell, Producer,The Wedding Professionals Conference and Tracey Andrews Manailescu. ALL SMILES: Guests enjoying opening night Richard Emannuel Photography /Photos


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