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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01679
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: 10/14/2010
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Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:01679

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N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R ZNS staff vent fury at Minister C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 106 No.270THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010 PRICE 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER CLOUDY AND T-STORM HIGH 86F LOW 78F P olice on aler t as workers try to storm Churchill Building The Tribune THEPEOPLESPAPER BIGGESTANDBEST BAHAMASEDITION McCOMBO OF THE DAY N E W www.tribune242.com YOURSOURCEFOROBITUARIES N N O O B B O O D D Y Y B B U U T T N N O O B B O O D D Y Y B B E E A A T T S S T T H H E E T T R R I I B B U U N N E E I I N N S S I I D D E E T T O O D D A A Y Y C C A A R R S S ! C C A A R R S S ! C C A A R R S S ! L L O O A A D D S S O O F F J J O O B B S S A A N N D D H H E E L L P P W W A A N N T T E E D D ! T T H H E E T T R R I I B B U U N N E E S S C C L L A A S S S S I I F F I I E E D D S S T T R R A A D D E E R R Felip Major /Tribune staff GRIEF-STRICKEN: Keith Nixons mother Gina Nixon is held by family members at the scene yesterday. By NOELLE NICOLLS Tribune Staff Reporter nnicolls@tribunemedia.net ANGRY ZNS employees attempted to storm the Churchill Building yesterday to seek an audience with Minis ter of National Security Tommy Turnquest. Police officers had to brace themselves behind metal barricades on Bank Lane as protesters tried to barrel through. Mr Turnquest was attending a Cabinet meeting at the time, and was fully informed as to what was happening at all times, according to secretary to the cabinet, Mrs Anita Bernard. Mrs Bernard said Cabinet ministers could hear the demon strators outside, but no plan to address protesters was disc ussed as a cabinet matter. SEE page two F AMIL Y TRAGED Y: F A THER F OUND SHO T DEAD TAKENAWAY: The body of Keith Nixon is shown being taken out of his house yesterday. By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter n mckenzie@tribunemedia.net ATTORNEY General John Delaney argued yes-t erday that a judicial review application brought on behalf of business owners affected by the Baillou Hill Road and Market Street one-way system should be dismissed. Mr Delaney, who repres ents Public Works and Transport Minister Neko Judicial review bid over one-way system should be dismissed AG SEE page 14 F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f SCENE OFTRAGEDY: Detectives take a gun away. By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net POLICE launched an investigation yesterday after a loving father was found shot dead in his home. Stunned neighbours in the quiet community gathered together as police cor doned off the home where Keith Nixon, 53, was found dead with a fatal gunshot wound to his head just after 10.30am. Police press liaison officer Sgt Chrislyn Skippings said a shotgun was recov ered by crime scene investigators who have yet to officially classify the death. SEE page 12 By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net A GROUP of Malaysian investors has placed a bid of up to $4 billion to buy Kerzner International Holdings Ltd, the company which built and operates Atlantis, saying that it finds the Atlantis properties attractive, according to news reports late last night. $4 BILLION BID F OR A TL ANTIS LATEBREAKINGNEWS SEE page two

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Members of the Bahamas Communications and Public Officers Union (BCPOU the Bahamas Communications and Public Managers Unions (BCPMU union leaders from leaving the protest to enter the Churchill Building demanding that the minister come to face them. Protesters sang We Shall Overcome and other church hymns on the march from ZNS to the Churchill building. After waiting for about an hour with no show from the minister, they returned to ZNS to conduct a sit-in for the rest of the day. We will not stop whether they come down here or not. We are in a fight for our lives. We will not stop until justice is served, said Denise Wilson, BCPOU secretary general. The unions plan to call for reinforcement today, from the National Congress of Trade Unions (NCTU pledged their support. The march downtown happened a few hours after someone tripped the fire alarm, on two occasions, at the Broadcasting Corporation of the Bahamas (BCB spark a protest in the parking lot. Workers filed out of the office around 9am after the fire alarm went off. They were greeted by union leaders. Only a couple of workers remained on the job, according to Edwin Lightbourne, BCB general manager. As much as you think you are safe, there is no safe haven here. We want to send a clear and concise message that we are in this thing together. We are prepared to stand together to the end, said Ms Wilson on the steps of ZNS. Police officers and fire marshals investigated the scene and declared the building safe for work to resume, however employees remained outside to protest the disengagement process currently under way. A heated exchange was reported between union leaders and the general manager. Workers refused to listen to Mr Lightbourne, who asked them to return to work immediately or face disciplinary action. Some workers returned to work, but at least 60 remained on strike. There are proper procedures for strike action, if this is in fact a strike, those procedures were not followed, said Mr Lightbourne. An investigation is underway as to who tripped the fire alarm on both occasions. Mr Lightbourne said he was surprised by the unions actions as it had been granted a meeting with Chairman Michael Moss that day. Doubtful Both presidents, Bernard Evans of the BCPOU and William Carroll of the BCPMU, said they were doubtful any meeting would take place today unless the minister inter v ened. Mr Evans said the union wanted word from the minister that he reviewed and accepted their proposal for more sweetener in the disengagement packages. In their latest proposal, the BCPOU asked for an additiona l six months pay for employees who qualify for full retirement; e ight months pay for employees who qualify for early retire ment; 12 months pay for employees who served 25 to 19 years; and six months pay for e mployees who served less than 25 years. Mr Evans said they are also looking for the minister to honour his original pledge to redeploy workers. He said the Prime Minister informed them in September t hat the government does not have anywhere to place diseng aged workers, contrary to what they claim were original commitments from the minister. More than 30 employees accepted voluntary separation or early retirement packages by t he Tuesday afternoon deadline. A board meeting schedu led for today will determine the fate of the remaining employees to be let go. Mr Lightbourne said he was not aware of any plans at the board meeting to discuss changes to the terms of separ ation currently on the table. List We want the list of names: who do they want to go and who do they want to stay. We want them to fill in the slots in the new organisational chart today, said Mr Carroll. The majority of workers are staying on the job, but you cant be selfish because you believe you are straight. We have to ensure those who leave get their just due. If you allow them to go home with pittance then when it is time for you to go you will get less than pittance, he said. Mr Lightbourne said the pri mary focus of the board meet ing will be to finalise the new organisational structure. Employees set to be disengaged will be informed, and those set to keep their jobs will learn of their new positions and respon s ibilities. Mr Evans said they were informed that cheques would be available for workers being disengaged on Friday. Most of the news team remained on the job throughout the day, according to Tribune sources, so the nightly news broadcast was expected up to press time. H owever, there were reports of sabotage at the station. Tribune sources said footage gathered for an hour-long show about the fatal plane crash last week was mysteriously erased from a computer hard drive. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM w ww.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbeanTrademark of Royal Bank of CanadaThe Lion & Globe symbol and RBC are registered trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada.Behold the magic!Win a Magic Minut at any RBC Royal Bank or RBC FINCO ATM in New Providence or the Family Islands. Enter RBCs abraCARDabra ATM Card contest between October 4 and November 30, 2010 and get a chance to win up to $1,500!*The more you use your card, the more chancesyou have to win! Make long lines disappear! Allyou need is an RBC ATM Card. Make cash withdrawals, transfer funds, pay bills and more. Enjoy the 2 4-hour convenience of banking when it suitsyou best. No need to wait in line! Enjoy instant wait reduction! Use your RBC Client Card today for a chance to WIN A MAGIC MINUTE! Create MORE for yourself. Conditions apply. Limited-time offer. Nassau Collins Ave 242 322 2341 Thompson Blvd 242 325 8776 Soldier Rd North 242 393 6286 Family Islands Freeport 242 352 7119 Abaco 242 367 2688 Exuma 242 336 2420www.jsjohnson.com RALLY: ZNS Staff members held a rally outside the building after the smoke alarm went off. ZNS STAFF VENT FURY AT MINISTER Police on alert as workers try to storm Churchill Building FROM page one B y DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport R eporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT The entire staff at ZNS held a peaceful demonstration at the Gove rnment Office Complex on the Mall to protest the voluntary separation packages that are being offered to employees there. Employees assembled in front of the building during the lunch hour from noon to 1pm on Wednesday. D arren Meadows, area vice president of the BCPMU, said the packages offered by the government pales in comparison to similar offers that were made to other government employees. We are not threatening the government; w e are peaceful people and we want them to hear and take our plight into consid eration just like the others, he said. We decided to stage a lunchtime demonstration to show that we dont accept the packages that were offered to our m embers who are being dis engaged. Mr Meadows stated that the packages offered to the Police, Customs, Immigra tion, and BTC were significantly higher than the two months incentive that is being offered to ZNS e mployees. When we looked at what was offeredin similar exercises, it pales in comparison. The police, customs, immi gration and BTC employees got a minimum of one year incentive. We want the powers that b e, whether it is the minister or chairman, to take another look at the packages being offered to our members, he said. Meadows explained that many of their members who are near retirement were looking forward to receiving a pension. He noted that some of the employees who would be affected have been employed for 26, 27, and 28 years at ZNS. ZNS staff hold peaceful demo F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f The Bloomberg news agency reported that BMB Group, a firm which manages money for wealthy families in Brunei, Malaysia and the Persian Gulf, made the $3.4 billion to $4 bil lion cash offer for the hotel and casino company in an October 11 letter sent to Kerzner International founder, Sol Kerzner. Bloomberg claims that it has obtained a copy of the letter. It is not yet clear how Mr Kerzner viewed the bid. A spokesperson was said to have declined to respond to calls on the matter, according to the Bloomberg report. Rayo With anage, 32, a co-founder of the six year-old BMB Group along with Bruneis Prince Abdul Ali Yil-Kabier, a nephew of the Sultan of Brunei, told Bloomberg that the BMB Group sees Kerzner International and Atlantis as a very powerful brand. If theres going to be anoth er Atlantis, its going to be in Asia, said Mr Withanage. Kerzner International also owns the One&Only resorts, which exist in The Bahamas, the Maldives and Mauritius, among other locations. The company was taken private in 2006 for $3.2 billion, plus debt, by a group led by Sol Kerzner himself. BMB Group is based in the Cayman Islands and has offices in New York, London, Kuala Lumpur and Beijing. BID F OR A TL ANTIS FROM page one

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B y AVA TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter aturnquest@tribunemedia.net AS a result of a mothers determination that her son s hould have a vital cornea t ransplant, three-year-old Tavi Collins now has a fresh look at the world. Following the surgery on Tavis right eye at Westch-e ster Medical Centre in New Y ork, doctors believe Tavi experienced true sight for the first time. Mrs Erma Collins eyes filled with tears as she told T he Tribune o f her deep emot ions when she was allowed t o remove the bandages from her sons eyes. His attitude has changed so much, hes so much happ ier, she said, her voice w avering with emotion. Loud noises dont bother him anymore. When they let me take the b andage off his eyes, there was an instant change in his w hole attitude. Thats one thing I can seriously say for myself because I saw it with my owne yes it works the change w as instant. For one month, Mrs Collins and a skeleton crew of five supporters, appealed e very day to the general publ ic to donate "at least one dol lar" to Tavis medical expens es. The street donations totalled just under $4,000, and combined with private dona tions and support from familyand friends, Mrs Collins was a ble to make a $14,000 down payment on the $20,000 cornea transplant for Tavis right eye. Pr iv ate T hough still unemployed, Mrs Collins has now set her sights on affording private d evelopment care for her son a nd raising the money to make the down payment for the transplant on his left eye. M rs Collins said: Now that he can see, our next goal is finding the right environment for him. Im so happy for him. Its just a start, just a starting point for him. He plays more he plays with all his toys now, not anyone in particular, but hes tak ing a closer look. He likes to examine everything. Its like hes looking for the first time, a fresh look. During Tavis visit to The Tribune yesterday, the mother-of-three beamed with pride as she watched her son examine pencils and smaller objects. Mrs Collins married Tavis father last month, and could barely contain her enthusiasm over her sons progress and her optimism for what she considers to be his fresh start. Although the five-hour surgery at the medical centre in New York was a success, there is still a chance for rejection. Doctors plan to monitor Tavi for six months before he can receive a transplant on the other eye. Mrs Collins said: We went in for surgery on Thursday, and were able to take the bandages off the next day, and it was such a relief that he didnt need any pain medication. He was still groggy on Friday, but by Saturday evening he was running around like nothing happened. They told me its only a matter of time if I get him in the right environment that he would catch up. Its only finding it I dont know where to go, I dont even know where to start. After seeking publiclyfunded care, she was told Tavi would not be able to attend a government programme untilhe was four years old. However, she is deter mined not to give up on her sons chances for a healthy and normal childhood. When he was born, Tavi's eyes were completely white, and the opaque tissue that covered most of his eye balls was identical to the symptom experienced by adults suffer ing from glaucoma, a disease i n which the optic nerve is d amaged. Doctors concluded that while in his mother's womb,T avi's eyes failed to develop fully for unknown reasons and he was diagnosed with Peter's Anomaly, a rare form of dama ge to the eye's cornea. In July during her initial interview with The Tribune t he 30-year-old Carmichael Road resident was visibly dis tressed over her sons increas i ngly pronounced developmental setbacks and the incalculable debt the family has already incurred from medi cal expenses. At eight months old, Tavi underwent surgery, costing $75,000, that widened his cornea and removed some of the dead tissue from his eyes however his sight was still severely limited. Then, Tavi was already three months behind his developmental timetable, and at three years old, he still could not speak or walked. It was as if he were just learning. Now, although still not s peaking, Tavi is walking norm ally and shows greater con fidence in his surroundings. In the period leading up to t he surgery, Mrs Collins said a source of comfort for her wasa success story from a father whose son had suffered the s ame condition as Tavi. Son After learning of Tavis condition, the father reachedo ut to her about his sevenyear-old son who had had the t ransplant done on one of his eyes. Mrs Collins said the fathers story gave her a considerable amount of hope for Tavis future, as his son was described as unstoppable and enjoys a thriving academic and athletic life. Over the next six months as doctor's monitor Tavi's eye for tissue rejection, Mrs Collins is determined to resume the Dollar Day fundraiser every Friday and Saturday at Marathon Malla nd the East Street roundabout, in hopes to get enough funds to make a down payment for the second trans plant. She said: People were so p atient, and sometimes it was t he same people giving over and over and over. Its so many people. Some p eople donated everyday when they passed. Please know how grateful I am. We are so grateful for those people that called and met with us, met Tavi, andg ave us their support. He's going to be fine, once he gets in the right environ-m ent, he's going to be just fine. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010, PAGE 3 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Tavi enjoys fresh view of the world F elip Major / Tribune staff IMPROVING: Three-year-old Tavi Collins stares inquisitively at the camera, as his mother Erma Collins watches proudly. Mrs Collins t old the Tribune of how Tavis physical capabilities have drastically improved since he received a cornea transplant in his right eye. Doctors believe Tavi suffers from a rare form of damage to the eye-' s cornea called Peters Anomaly. D OCTORSBELIEVETHREE YEAR OLDEXPERIENCESTRUESIGHTFORFIRSTTIMEAFTEREYESURGERY H is attitude h as changed so much, hes so much h appier. Loud noises d ont bother him anymore. When t hey let me take the b andage off his eyes, there was an instant change inh is whole attitude. Thats one thing I can seriously say form yself because I saw i t with my own eyes it works the change was instant. T HEWAYHEWAS: A file photograph of Tavi Collins pictured w hen he came to the Tribune.

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EDITOR, The Tribune. I t is amazing to see the number of letters written toy our newspaper regarding t he saga of the knock off bags being sold in the present Straw Market. Frankly, let me say that t he Gucchi, Fendi, Prada a nd all the other big names i n handbags that are sold in the legitimate stores on Bay S treet are not the bags that m ost people could afford. If they didn't have those famous names stamped on them, would we even looka t them twice, they are not a ttractive bags at all. Check them out. If they were not being s old in the fancy stores in New York, Paris and Lon don at such ridiculous prices and they were bags made by Shanika Rolle or WandaP ratt in The Bahamas would y ou be spending $1,500 for their handbags? I don't think so. T he trend to purchase s traw bags of Harl Taylor started some years ago when B ahamians found out that O prah had a bag made by him and that his bags were being sold at one of the high end department stores in the USA like Lord & Taylor. O f course, as fashion usu ally takes off because some-o ne famous is wearing it, Taylor's straw bags were considered very trendy and sales soared for him here in Nassau. S ome 20 years ago, no Bahamian woman would be caught dead with a Bahamian straw bag at a function or at the office. But look at us today, there are handbags made by other Bahamians besides Harl Taylor which are just as nice as his, and carry names as Rolle, Knowles or Pratt. I look at these beautifully handcrafted bags and see the potential for our local ladies who are so skilled but c annot get the attention of the so-called knock off bags sold illegally in the Straw Market here. I believe that these skilled Bahamian women could be assisted by the Bahamian Government to have a proper workshop and manufact ure their straw goods. There would be no need for the women in the Straw Market to travel out of The B ahamas to buy goods made in China or knock o ff bags. This would be a winwin situation. Straw could be used from our Family Islands, Bahamian women could create fabulous designs here in The Bahamas and there wouldb e lots of competition so the prices would be reasonablef or tourists, as well as Bahamians. Recently I have seen t hese exquisite Straw bags i n stores in Nassau for over $150. Of course that is a bit excessive, if we would like t o sell these beauties in the New Straw Market in 2011. T hey would have to be lowe r in price if they want to make money. The Govern ment could help these s killed Bahamians with small loans to set up a goodw orkshop. These ladies could stock t he new Straw Market with bags and other straw articles MADE IN THE BAHAMAS, with Bahami-a n straw, by Bahamian peop le and feel proud when they tell the tourists, No,t his is not made in China, t his is made right here in T he Bahamas. Bahamian straw work could start a new fashion trend and the tourists could be the ones who could spread the trend of the beautiful straw work all over the world. W ouldn't that be a boost t o our economy with jobs for many people and exports for our country. There are o ther articles that can be s old in the Straw Market, m ade right here in The Bahamas. There are Bahamian candies, pepper sauces, shellwork, paintings, wood carv ings, post cards, pottery, spices and so many other beautiful articles that are right here under our noses. We need to support our own and boost our econo my. I t would be nice to start the New Straw Market next y ear on the right foot, with at least 90 per cent of goods, MADE IN THE BAHAMAS. What do you think? MARGO GONGORA Nassau, O crober 7, 2010. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., ( Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama TELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising A dvertising Manager (242 Circulation Department (242 Nassau Fax: (242 WEBSITE www.tribune242.com updated daily at 2pm THE last of the Chilean miners, the foreman who held them together when they were feared lost, was raised from the depths of the earth Wednesday night a joyous ending to a 69-day ordeal that riveted the world. No one has ever been trapped so long a nd survived. Luis Urzua ascended smoothly through 2,000 feet of rock, completing a 22-hour rescue operation that unfolded with remarkable speed and flawless execution. Before a crowd of about 2,000 people, he became the 33rd miner to be rescued. When Urzua stepped out of the capsule, he hugged Chilean President Sebastian Pine ra and shook hands with him and said they had prevailed over difficult circumstances. With the last miner by his side, the president led the crowd in singing the national anthem. One by one throughout the day, the men had emerged to the cheers of exuberant Chileans and before the eyes of a transfixed globe. The operation picked up speed as the day went on, but each miner was greetedw ith the same boisterous applause from res cuers. "Welcome to life," Pinera told Victor Segvia, the 15th miner out. On a day of superlatives, it seemed no overstatement. They rejoined a world intensely curious about their ordeal, and certain to offer fame and jobs. Previously unimaginable riches awaited men who had risked their lives goingi nto the unstable gold and copper mine for about $1,600 a month. The rescue was planned with extreme care. The miners were monitored by video on the way up for any sign of panic. They had oxygen masks, dark glasses to protect their eyes from the unfamiliar sunlight and sweaters for the jarring transition from subterranean swelter to chilly desert air. T he miners emerged looking healthier than many had expected and even cleanshaven. Several thrust their fists upwards like prizefighters, and Mario Sepulveda, the second to taste freedom, bounded out and led his rescuers in a rousing cheer. Franklin Lobos, who played for the Chilean national soccer team in the 1980s, briefly bounced a soccer ball on his foot and knee. N o one in recorded history has survived as long trapped underground. For the first 17 days, no one even knew whether they were alive. In the weeks that followed, the world was captivated by their endurance and unity. News channels from North America to Europe and the Middle East carried live coverage. Pope Benedict XVI said in Spanish that he "continues with hope to entrust to God's goodness" the fate of the men. Iran's state English-language Press TV followed events live for a time. Crews from Russia a nd Japan and North Korean state TV were at the mine. Estimates for the rescue operation alone have soared beyond $22 million, though the government has repeatedly insisted that money is not a concern. Mining is Chile's lifeblood, providing 40 per cent of state earnings. The rescue went so well that its managers abandoned a plan to restrict images of t he rescue. That included the surreal moment when the capsule dropped for the first time into the chamber, where the bare-chested miners, most stripped down to shorts because of the underground heat, mobbed the rescuer who emerged to serve as their guide to freedom. "This rescue operation has been so marvelous, so clean, so emotional that there wasn o reason not to allow the eyes of the world which have been watching this operation so closely to see it," a beaming Pinera told a news conference after the first miner safely surfaced. Chile has promised that its care of the miners won't end for six months at least not until they can be sure that each man has readjusted. P sychiatrists and other experts in surviv ing extreme situations predict their lives will be anything but normal. Since August 22, when a narrow bore hole broke through to their refuge and the miners stunned the world with a note, scrawled in red ink, dis closing their survival, their families have been exposed in ways they never imagined. Miners had to describe their physical and m ental health in detail with teams of doctors and psychologists. In some cases, when both wives and lovers claimed the same man, everyone involved had to face the conse quences. As trying as their time underground was, the miners now face challenges so bewildering that no amount of coaching can fully prepare them. Rejoining a world intensely c urious about their ordeal, they have been invited to presidential palaces, to take allexpenses-paid vacations and to appear on countless TV shows. Book and movie deals are pending, along with job offers. (This article was written by Michael War ren, Associated Press writer). Bahamian straw work could start fashion trend LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Last of miners is raised safely to surface E DITOR, The Tribune. Just returned to the island, and the immigration line was out past the bathrooms. Booths one through 12 unmanned, leaving booths 13 through 18 for visitor processing and (1920 Not a good first impression for tourists. PIETER HALE Nassau, October 8, 2010. Not a good first impression for tourists

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By DENISE MAYCOCKTribune Freeport Reporterdmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT Randal Evans Brown surrendered to police late Monday evening after a wanted bulletin was issued for him in connection with Friday's murder in the Arden Forest area. Brown, 24, accompanied by lawyer Carlson Shurland, turned himself in at the Central Police Station. According to Asst Supt Hector Delva, investigations are continuing into the shooting death of 37year-old Denny Rolle. Rolle and a man were involved in an argument at Cora's Place on Sergeant Major Road around 4pm. Rolle was shot in the "upper body" according to police. He was taken by ambulance to Rand Memorial Hospital, where he was pronounced dead on arrival. Rolle's death is the seventh homicide for the year on Grand Bahama. ASP Delva said police have discontinued the wanted bulletin for Brown. He thanked members of the public and the media for their assistance. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010, PAGE 5 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Murder suspect surrenders to police THE Cabinet Office has announced that Daylight Saving Time will end at 2am on Sunday, November 7, at which time the Bahamas will revert to Eastern Standard Time. The extension of Daylight Saving Time to the first Sunday in November is in keeping with the policy adopted in October 2006. Accordingly, Daylight Saving Time is expected to begin the second Sunday in March, 2011.DAYLIGHT SAVINGTIME ENDS A NATIONAL Memorial service will be held tonight at Clifford Park to honour the lives of the nine men who died in the plane crash in Lake Killarney on October 5. Organised by Mark Cartwright and Edison Sumner, the event is scheduled to begin at 7pm. "In memory and in honour of these men, let us burn our automobile headlamps all day on Thursday, October 14, 2010 and remember to say a prayer for the families of the fallen nine," their press statement read. The deceased are: Lavard Curtis Cory Farquharson Nelson Hanna Chet Johnson Junior Lubin Sascha Mildor Devon Storr Delton Roderick Taylor Clarence Nat' Williams With thousands expected to attend, the event is slated to feature some of the country's top musical and cultural performers. Members of Parliament have also been invited to attend.Memorial planned for plane crash victims

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By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune FreeportR eporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT Grand Bahamas economy will geta boost next month when more than 500 visitors are expected to visit Freeportf or the annual Junkanoo Jam Basketball tournament, injecting an estimate d $400,000 into the local e conomy. G rand Bahama Port Authority president Ian R olle commended Basketb all Travellers Inc for its c ontinuing commitment to m ake Grand Bahama the d estination of choice for the annual NCAA tournament. T he tournament takes p lace on November 25-29 and features some of the b est women collegiate basketball players in the United States. Eight teams will be competing in the tournament. The Grand Bahama Port Authority Limited is one oft he major sponsors of the e vent, which has been held in Freeport since 2003. M r Rolle noted that the tournament has been very beneficial to the economy. H e said that it also provides opportunities to build partnerships that benefit resi-d ents here on the island. This event brings in excess of 500 visitors to our island each year, which has a t remendous positive impact on our economy, he said. Many businesses, such as hotels, car agencies, restaur ants, tour operators, etc, benefit from their presence. In fact, an estimated $400,000 has been spent onisland annually by the partners, stakeholders and par-t icipants, he added. Significant The event has also played a significant role in sports t ourism on Grand Bahama. R osalyn Pinder Manager o f Sports Development, M inistry of Tourism & Aviation, said since the introduction of Junkanoo Jam, G rand Bahama has successf ully hosted more than 5,000 a rriving visitors directly a ssociated with the tourna m ent. S he noted that the tour n ament was embraced as an opportunity to further develop the destinations sports t ourism objectives. The aim was to increase revenue by attracting visi-t ors to the island by means of hosting intriguing sporting events with the hopes ofa ttracting large numbers of tourists in the form of fan followings, she explained. Sean McShane, Director o f Junkanoo Jam with B asketball Travellers Inc, was pleased by the tremendous support for the tour-n ament in Grand Bahama. We are grateful for the s upport, he said. Over the last eight years weve been so fortunate to partner with some of the industry leaders here on Grand Bahama w ho share the vision of not only bringing a fantastic basketball tournament downf or young players to aspire to, but to also generate funds into the local econo-m y, he said. According to McShane, the tournament is a signifi cant event in the US. I t is a sought after event i n the United States, with a reputation that is second to none, he stated. O f the eight teams travel ling to Grand Bahama, three are returning participants, accompanied by five newt eams. McShane said live media coverage of the individual NCAA games will provide added exposure for GrandB ahama. David Morley, former president of the Grand B ahama Basketball Feder ation, who was instrumen-t al in bringing the event to Grand Bahama, said the event will spur interest in w omens basketball by local high school students. A lot of our young female players come out to the games, with some even travelling from Nassau. And visiting college players are able to interact with our local players and talk with them and offer advice on how they can better their basketball skills, he said. Mr Morley is encouraging the public to support the event. He is especially urging Physical Education teachers to bring their teams out to the games so they can observe the fundamentals of the game. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM %4+2674'*17)*6 Hopes high of economic boost from Junkanoo Jam Basketball tournament JUNKANOO JAM BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT RETURNS: Junkanoo Jam, the popular sporting event on the NCAA and local basketball calendars, returns to Grand B ahama, November 25 to 29. On hand for a press conference to announce the 8th annual event were (left to right): Geneva Rutherford, Director of Community Relations, GBPA; Ginger Moxey, Vice President, GBPA; Sean McShane, Director of Junkanoo Jam with Basketball Travellers Inc; Ian Rolle, President, GBPA; Rosalyn Pinder, Manager of Sports Development, Ministry of Tourism & Aviation; David Morley, former president of the Grand Bahama BasketballF ederation; and Delroy Boothe, Assistant Director of Junkanoo Jam with Basketball Travellers Inc. More than 500 visitors expected to visit Freeport Over the last eight years weve been so fort unate to partner with some of the industry leaders here on Grand Bahama who share t he vision of not only bringing a fantastic b asketball tournament down for young playe rs to aspire to, but to also generate funds into t he local economy, I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s Sean McShane

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WOMEN who undergo routine mammograms at Doctors Hospital now have the latest in diagnostic technology available to them through Digital Mammography, obtainable through the Hospitals Comprehensive Breast Diagnostic Imaging Centre featuring Breast MRI, 3-D Breast Ultrasound and Digital Mammography. With its Comprehensive Breast Diagnostic Imaging Centre, Doctors Hospital has developed for its patients one of the most comprehensive approaches to womens breast health with physicians and health care professionals who strive to offer timely and comprehensive diagnostic care.The top priority is to help patients access high quality breast care services as easily as possible, ina timely manner, with the latest technology. The first healthcare provider in the Region to feature the state-of-the-art system, Sele-nia digital mammography together with the breast cushion, MammoPad from Hologic, Doctors Hospital now offers the latest in digital mammography screening technology. Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death among women, exceeded only by lung cancer. Statistics indi cate that one in eight women will develop breast cancer sometime in her life. The stage at which breast cancer is detected influences a womans chance of survival. If detected early, the five-year survival rate is 97 per cent. October is Breast Cancer Awareness month; all women over the age of 40 are encouraged to get their mammograms. It is now very little discomfort, more convenient, and is completed in shorter examination time. Selenia digital mammogra phy incorporates revolutionary imaging technology that provides incredibly sharp breast images, said a Doctors Hos pital spokesperson. The images appear on the technologists monitor in a mat ter of seconds, there is no wait ing for film to develop, which means less time in the breast imaging suite for patients. Digital mammography is different from conventional mammogra phy in how the image of the breast is acquired and, more importantly, viewed. The radiologist can now magnify the images, increase or decrease the contrast and invert the black and white values while reading the images. These features allow the radiologist to evaluate micro calcifications and focus on areas of concern. Selenia digital mammography offers a number of other practical advantages and patient conveniences lower radiation dose, shorter exam time, less repositioning, immediate results, and computer aided detection. Because there is no waiting for film to be devel oped, it significantly reduces the need for repeat exams due to under or over exposure. Digital images are easily stored and transferred electronically, elim inating the dependency on one set of original films, which can be misfiled or lost in transit. In addition to offering superior mammography technology, Doctors Hospitals Comprehensive Breast Diagnostic Imaging Centre offers a softer, warmer mammogram by using the MammoPad breast cushion for every patient. Mam moPad has been clinically demonstrated to reduce discomfort, associated with mammograms, for most women. Because the breast cushion is invisible to X-rays, it does not interfere with the image quality of the mammogram. By offering women a softer mammogram, Doctors Hospital hopes to increase the number of women who follow recommendations with regular screenings. JCI Accredited Doctors Hospitals Comprehensive Breast Diagnostic Imaging Centre maintains a high standard of clinical quality. Services are dedicated to women and centred on their needs and con cerns. Doctors Hospital, said the spokesperson, is committed to the fight against breast cancer. In offering digital mammography, 3-D Breast Ultrasound and Breast MRI as well as percutaneous core needle biopsy and wire localization of non palpable lumps the hospital provides the latest in imaging technology in the region. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010, PAGE 7 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM OfferavailableatparticipatingU.S.locations.Discountappliestobaserateonly.Taxes, insurance&optional itemsareextra.Rentermustmeetstandardageandcredit requirements.24-houradvancereservationrequired.Blackoutdatesandcapacitycontrols mayapply.Maynotbecombinedwithotherdiscountsorpromotions.Termsandconditions subject to changewithout notice.alamo.com OFF $15 USADDAPRICEBREAKTOYOURNEXTVACATIONS. 5HVHUYHD&RPSDFWWKURXJK)XOOVL]HFDU0LQLYDQRU SUV in the US. 9DOLGRQUHQWDOVRIGD\VRUPRU %HVXUHWRXVHWRUHTXHVWFRXSRQFRGH AD4974JDO 2IIHUH[SLUHV December 15, 2010 F or reservations, please contact Destinations at ( 242) 393.6900 or at (786 HIGH QUALITYCARE: Pictured left to right: Andin Edwards, Doctors Hospital Imaging Department with a patient. D OCTORS H OSPITALANNOUNCESCOMPREHENSIVEBREASTDIAGNOSTICIMAGINGCENTRE Latest technology available for women who undergo routine mammograms

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM PROSPECTUS THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS BAHAMAS REGISTERED STOCK 2015, 2017, 2019 AND 2030 ISSUE OF B$100,000, 000.00 CUSTOM Computers officially launched its annual scholarship in partnership with the Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute, identifying the first winner as student Trevon King. The announcement was made during an awards ceremony attended by Minister of Education Desmond Bannister at Custom Computers on Cable Beach. The company's co-owner and marketing director Pia Farmer said the scholarship was offered in memory of Theodore Ted' Nutt, a long serving employee who died earlier this year. Mrs Farmer said the scholarship will be awarded each year to a promising BTVI student in need of financial aid who shows great enthusiasm and facility with computers. "Custom Computers has decided to create an annual scholarship at BTVI because we support BTVI and their efforts. We also know that practical training is very important," Mrs Farmer said. "Unfortunately one of our dear Know How team members, Ted Nutt, passed away this year. He was very young and we loved Ted very much as a person. He was always a great worker and he loved passionately what he did. So we decided how best to honour Ted's memory and also continue the tradition of Custom Computers to support education." Mrs Farmer said that as a part of the scholarship award, Mr King will also be given an opportunity to intern at Custom Computers during vacations to gain in knowledge and practical experience. On hand for the presentation were Ted Nutt's brother, Niven Nutt, and his son Jesse Nutt, who both said they were moved and honoured by the gesture. Minister Bannister commended Custom Computers for its generosity and support of excellence in education. He admonished Mr King to continue to excel in his academic pursuits and advised him to take full advantage of this opportunity. C C o o m m p p a a n n y y c c r r e e a a t t e e s s s s c c h h o o l l a a r r s s h h i i p p i i n n m m e e m m o o r r y y o o f f f f o o r r m m e e r r e e m m p p l l o o y y e e e e WINNER: Pictured (l-r) are: Niven Nutt and Jesse Nutt, Minister of Education Desmond Bannister, Custom Computers co-owner Pia Farmer, BTVI student and scholarship winner Trevon King, BTVI financial aid officer Tommy Ferguson. DEREK SMITH JR /Impact Images & Designs

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THE Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation's 13th BahamArts Festival will be held the entire weekend beginning October 29 at the Arawak Cay Culture Centre, executive chairman Edison Key confirmed. The Festival brings together artisans and artists from throughout the Bahamas in a craft village' setting to show off Bahamian-made products, souvenirs and gifts. Arts, crafts, clothing, accessories, jewellery, packaged and processed foods will be displayed across one hundred booths during the threeday event. There will be Bahamian entertainment featuring the popular Falcon Band. This year's theme is Endless Possibilities', Mr Key told a press conference on Wednesday. A week of activities has been organised to underscore the role of handicraft in the economy of the Bahamas, beginning Monday, October 25 with a twoday workshop on specialised and refined plaiting. A highlight of the week will be the honouring of 98year-old veteran Bahamian artisan Louise Titta' Bullard during church services at Holy Family Catholic Church, Robinson Road on October 27 at 7pm. The Bahamas National Craft Association's two-day annual general meeting opens that Wednesday morning at SuperClub Breezes, Cable Beach. Delegations from 30 Family Island handicraft associations are expected to participate. On Friday, Acting Prime Minister Brent T Symonette will officially open the annual Festival at the Arawak Cay Cultural Centre. Saturday will feature a mini C' class regatta, the popular Battle of the Bands' marching band contest, and a Junkanoo Rush-out. The highlight on Sunday will be the Gala Tea Party, which will showcase the best in tea party dŽcor and table settings. This will be followed by the Bahamian Gospel Explosion featuring praise teams, gospel choirs, youth choirs and individual artists. "These are exciting times to be a part of the growing handicraft industry of the Bahamas estimated to be valued in the hundreds of millions of dollars," said Mr Key "That is what is spent to import souvenirs and other items for our tourist and for domestic use. Many of these items can be produced right here at home by Bahamians. "So, through our Handicraft Development and Marketing Department, and armed with the best trainers, we have been throughout the islands conducting courses in the fine art of Bahamian handicraft, utilising in the main ingredients found in the local environment. It has been a huge success." Several hundred Bahamians have taken advantage of the opportunity to be trained in straw work, shell work, wood work and other forms of artistic expression, he said. "Based on the products coming out of the various islands, Bahamian handicrafts have indeed risen to that next level of expression whereby our ladies' hand bags, for example, are designer led. "We take note that the multi-million dollar Straw Market downtown Nassau is moving towards completion. Already debate swirls as to what kind of products should be sold there. We are firmly on the side of Bahamian artisans. It is our hope and we pledge to do our best to ensure that our Straw Market be a show-piece to the world of things Bahamian." C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010, PAGE 9 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Practical or Luxury? C-CLASS ML-CLASS E-CLASS Tyreflex Star MotorsCall us today for your new Mercedes-Benz at 325.4961Wulff Road, P. O. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas  Fax: 323.4667 You may ask the question: Is it practical to own a Mercedes-Benz or is it a luxury? Well, Mercedes-Benz would like to ask you a question. Are excellent gas mileage, top safety standards and superior driving technology considered a luxury? Mercedes-Benz doesn’t think so and you shouldn’t either. You deserve to get the most out of your gas dollar. You and your family deserve to be safe and comfortable when maneuvering through our nation’s less-than-perfect roadways. That’s why these features and so much more come standard in every class and model of Mercedes-Benz. So do something practical while still enjoying the best of life – become an owner of a beautiful new Mercedes-Benz today. Anentrepreneurialspirit,originalthinking,andapassiontosucceed. If you haveit,wewant you We are growing! Fidelity Bank invites applications for the position of:ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE SUBMIT BEFORE October 22nd, 2010 to: HUMAN RESOURCES Re:AutomationSpecialist, 51FrederickStreet P.O.BoxN-4853|Nassau|F:328.1108 careers@fidelitybahamas.comDuties & Responsibilities:Reporting directly to the Manager, Information Technology, the successful candidates main duties and responsibilities will be: Preparing procedures manuals for the automated functions Requirements / Qualifications: A competitive compensation package will be commensurate with relevant experience and qualification. Fidelity appreciates your interest, however, only those applicants short listed will be contacted.AUTOMATIONSPECIALIST 13th BahamArts Festival to begin on October 29 PLANNING: BAIC executive chairman Edison M Key lays out plans for the BahamArt Festival scheduled for the weekend beginning October 29. Pictured from left are Arnold Dorsett (assistant general manager), Benjamin Rahming (general manager), Mr Key, and Donnalee Bowe (Handicraft Development and Marketing Department). DEREK SMITH /BIS photo

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A S THE latest cycle of t he Department of Youths Fresh Start Programme enters its third week, participants lauded the job-readiness initiative and its role in preparing young Bahamians for the workforce. This is a great experience t hat I have had, one that m ost young people in the Bahamas should go through, said 21-year-old Felecia Williams. Maybe if more young people would t ake part, we would have b etter customer service and attitudes. It also teaches usa bout writing resumes, cove r letters and what is expected of us on the job, espec ially work ethics and teamw ork. Ian Green Jr, 18, said he learned a lot from the programme from the import ance physical appearance to sexual harassment and how to go out and grab the j ob that you want. It also makes me feel g ood to be here because the B ahamas is lacking young m en who want to go out and g rab their jobs, Mr Green said. He added that it was encouraging to see a balance of men and women taking part and to note that his fellow male participants were s howing an interest. We have 47 excited and highly-motivated young B ahamians in this cycle, who a re driven to learn what they c an to be ready to shine in t he Bahamas workforce, s aid co-ordinator Lionel E lliott. Successful M inister of Youth, Sports a nd Culture Charles Maynard said Fresh Start is one o f the Department of Youths more successful programmes, yielding a high e mployment rate for partici pants. We want to do our best t o help to ensure that young p eople go into the business w orld being productive, Minister Maynard said. The Fresh Start programme was created in 1999 C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Participants praise Fresh TABLETALK: Lionel Elliott (centre SEE page 11

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010, PAGE 11 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM A nentrepreneurialspirit,originalthinking,andapassiontosucceed. If you haveit,wewant you W e are growing! F idelity Bank invites applications for the position of:A BSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS P LEASE SUBMIT BEFORE October 22nd, 2010 to: HUMAN RESOURCES Re:AssistantNetworkAdministrator, 51FrederickStreet P.O.BoxN-4853|Nassau|F:328.1108 careers@fidelitybahamas.comD uties & Responsibilities:R eporting directly to the Manager, Information Technology, the successful candidates main duties and responsibilities will be: Ensuring LAN backups are performed daily Maintaining inventory of all PCs, hardware, software and related equipment on a regular basis Creating network and exchange profiles for authorized users Troubleshooting technical and operational problems of users Performs general maintenance on equipment weeklyR equirements / Qualifications: Associates degree in Computer Science or related field MCP qualification Proven database management skills Basics of IP technology & PBX integration Ability to support AS/400A competitive compensation package will be commensurate with r elevant experience and qualification. Fidelity appreciates your interest, however, only those applicants short listed will be contacted.ASSISTANTNETWORKADMINISTRATOR Start Programme to address the rising level of unemployment a mong the nations youth, following the f indings of a 1993 committee appointed to study the special needs of the young people i n the Bahamas and make recommendations to the government. In an effort to continue to address the c oncern of long-term unemployment, lack of j ob search skills and the lack of work place e xperience among our youth, the Fresh Start Programme was introduced, Mr Elliott said. It was designed to provide training to young persons between the ages of 16 and 25 years with job search and job retention skills. Mr Elliott who has more than 26-years o f experience in youth programmes and employment training said the objectives of the Fresh Start Programme include: preparing young persons for employm ent identifying potential employment opportunities encouraging proactive job search techn iques encouraging greater public/private sector collaboration in youth training sponsorship developing a tracking system to mea sure the effectiveness of Fresh Start Persons wishing to participate in the pro gramme can collect an application form f rom the Youth Department, Department of Labour, Department of Social Services, any Urban Renewal Office or at various comm unity and youth centres in New Provid ence. Mr Elliott said that upon the comp letion of the community service aspect of the programme, each participant is assigneda six-week internship with a participating p rivate sector company. Effective Participants are required to perform all t ask assigned to them in an effective and efficient manner, Mr Elliott said. We hope that at the end of internship, companies would grant permanent employment to each of the participants. However, if they are not granted permanent employment, the participants n ames are kept in a database and are a dvised of additional employment opportunities. M inister Maynard said: The whole prog ramme is designed to give the young par t icipants some basic tips on how to get a job and stay employed, with some training in the various areas of employment. Because of the programmes reputation, over the years, and because of the various businesses that partner with this ministry,m ost of the young people end up becoming p ermanent at various establishments. Temika Davis said that she met several interesting young people in the class and appreciated the various instructors. I learned about entrepreneurship and I would like to have my own business one day, she said. The whole programme wasa fun experience and all the participants benefited from being a part of this. GROUP SHOT: Mr Elliott (centre F ROM page ten

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Anentrepreneurialspirit,originalthinking,andapassiontosucceed. I f you haveit,wewant you We are growing! Fidelity Bank invites applications for the position of:ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE SUBMIT BEFORE October 22n d, 2010 to: H UMAN RESOURCES Re:SystemAdministrator, 51FrederickStreet P.O.BoxN-4853|Nassau|F:328.1108c areers@fidelitybahamas.comDuties & Responsibilities:Reporting directly to the Group CIO, the successful candidates main duties and responsibilities will be: administering securityRequirements / Qualifications: Minimum 2 years experience in application support in a financial institution A competitive compensation package will be commensurate with r elevant experience and qualification. Fidelity appreciates your interest, however, only those applicants short listed will be contacted.S YSTEMADMINISTRATOR A life has been lost and we want to give the matter a thorough and proper investigation, Sgt Skippings said. So we dont want to rule anything out at this point. Relatives shocked by the death said they were unable to make any sense of the possi-b ility of either suicide or homicide yesterday. Its a shock because hes such a loving person, said Mr Nixons 52-year-old sister, Mrs Lenora Dean. He was very kind, and very loving. She said Mr Nixon had worked for Tropical S hipping for 26 years before he was let go two y ears ago. I t is reported that he raised two young children, aged seven and nine, at their home in Misty Gardens, off Cowpen Road, without the help of their mother. Dedicated A neighbour, Mrs Carolyn Hanna, said Mr Nixon appeared to be a dedicated father who took the youngsters to and from school everyd ay without fail. He seemed to have been such a good father, she said. Any man who would take care of his children like that is a good man. I n addition to the young son and daughter who lived with him, Mr Nixon and his wife had two adult daughters and a son. T he two older daughters and son ran to their fathers house at around 12.30pm, stopping their car just short of the police cordon. One of his daughters bolted towards her fathers house, wailing in grief. Im not going no further; dont touch me, she told police trying to hold her back as shec ried out and then doubled-over in tears. An officer gently escorted the young woman back to the other side of the cordon whereh er aunt hugged and consoled her, and her grandfather, Mr Nixons father, stood by with his wife. M r Nixons mother, Mrs Regina Nixon J ohnson, joined them around an hour later, weeping as she watched as her sons body was carried to the hearse. S he and other relatives were comforted by Sister Cecilia Albury of St Martins Convent, an aunt of the deceased, who provided coun selling for the family. He was a quiet person, very unassuming, Mrs Hanna said. Its so sad. Although police did not confirm Mr Nixons i dentity, nor classify his death yesterday, offi cers speaking off the record said the death a ppeared to be suicide. Relatives and friends speculated about the difficulties with which he might have strug-g led, but not expressed to those who knew and loved him. This is a small neighbourhood where e verybody gets to know everybody, said n eighbour Devaughn Williams, 53, a psychiatric nurse at Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre. This will be a huge shock to the commu nity. Theres a thing called smiling depression, w hen people may appear well but you dont k now whats lurking underneath the surface and the emotions they are dealing with. We all have problems, but its how we cope. If someone is feeling like that the best thing to do is to talk, confide in someone, because its even more difficult when you keepi t bottled up. Police inquiry after father found shot dead FROM page one S HAREDPAIN: F amily members hug each other at the s cene. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R ZNS staff vent fury at Minister C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 106 No.270THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010 PRICE 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER CLOUDY AND T-STORM HIGH 86F LOW 78F P olice on aler t as workers try to storm Churchill Building The Tribune THEPEOPLESPAPER BIGGESTANDBEST BAHAMASEDITION McCOMBO OF THE DAY N E W www.tribune242.com YOURSOURCEFOROBITUARIES N N O O B B O O D D Y Y B B U U T T N N O O B B O O D D Y Y B B E E A A T T S S T T H H E E T T R R I I B B U U N N E E I I N N S S I I D D E E T T O O D D A A Y Y C C A A R R S S ! C C A A R R S S ! C C A A R R S S ! L L O O A A D D S S O O F F J J O O B B S S A A N N D D H H E E L L P P W W A A N N T T E E D D ! T T H H E E T T R R I I B B U U N N E E S S C C L L A A S S S S I I F F I I E E D D S S T T R R A A D D E E R R Felip Major /Tribune staff GRIEF-STRICKEN: Keith Nixons mother Gina Nixon is held by family members at the scene yesterday. By NOELLE NICOLLS Tribune Staff Reporter nnicolls@tribunemedia.net ANGRY ZNS employees attempted to storm the Churchill Building yesterday to seek an audience with Minis ter of National Security Tommy Turnquest. Police officers had to brace themselves behind metal barricades on Bank Lane as protesters tried to barrel through. Mr Turnquest was attending a Cabinet meeting at the time, and was fully informed as to what was happening at all times, according to secretary to the cabinet, Mrs Anita Bernard. Mrs Bernard said Cabinet ministers could hear the demon strators outside, but no plan to address protesters was disc ussed as a cabinet matter. SEE page two F AMIL Y TRAGED Y: F A THER F OUND SHO T DEAD TAKENAWAY: The body of Keith Nixon is shown being taken out of his house yesterday. By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter n mckenzie@tribunemedia.net ATTORNEY General John Delaney argued yes-t erday that a judicial review application brought on behalf of business owners affected by the Baillou Hill Road and Market Street one-way system should be dismissed. Mr Delaney, who repres ents Public Works and Transport Minister Neko Judicial review bid over one-way system should be dismissed AG SEE page 14 F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f SCENE OFTRAGEDY: Detectives take a gun away. By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net POLICE launched an investigation yesterday after a loving father was found shot dead in his home. Stunned neighbours in the quiet community gathered together as police cor doned off the home where Keith Nixon, 53, was found dead with a fatal gunshot wound to his head just after 10.30am. Police press liaison officer Sgt Chrislyn Skippings said a shotgun was recov ered by crime scene investigators who have yet to officially classify the death. SEE page 12 By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net A GROUP of Malaysian investors has placed a bid of up to $4 billion to buy Kerzner International Holdings Ltd, the company which built and operates Atlantis, saying that it finds the Atlantis properties attractive, according to news reports late last night. $4 BILLION BID F OR A TL ANTIS LATEBREAKINGNEWS SEE page two

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Members of the Bahamas Communications and Public Officers Union (BCPOU the Bahamas Communications and Public Managers Unions (BCPMU union leaders from leaving the protest to enter the Churchill Building demanding that the minister come to face them. Protesters sang We Shall Overcome and other church hymns on the march from ZNS to the Churchill building. After waiting for about an hour with no show from the minister, they returned to ZNS to conduct a sit-in for the rest of the day. We will not stop whether they come down here or not. We are in a fight for our lives. We will not stop until justice is served, said Denise Wilson, BCPOU secretary general. The unions plan to call for reinforcement today, from the National Congress of Trade Unions (NCTU pledged their support. The march downtown happened a few hours after someone tripped the fire alarm, on two occasions, at the Broadcasting Corporation of the Bahamas (BCB spark a protest in the parking lot. Workers filed out of the office around 9am after the fire alarm went off. They were greeted by union leaders. Only a couple of workers remained on the job, according to Edwin Lightbourne, BCB general manager. As much as you think you are safe, there is no safe haven here. We want to send a clear and concise message that we are in this thing together. We are prepared to stand together to the end, said Ms Wilson on the steps of ZNS. Police officers and fire marshals investigated the scene and declared the building safe for work to resume, however employees remained outside to protest the disengagement process currently under way. A heated exchange was reported between union leaders and the general manager. Workers refused to listen to Mr Lightbourne, who asked them to return to work immediately or face disciplinary action. Some workers returned to work, but at least 60 remained on strike. There are proper procedures for strike action, if this is in fact a strike, those procedures were not followed, said Mr Lightbourne. An investigation is underway as to who tripped the fire alarm on both occasions. Mr Lightbourne said he was surprised by the unions actions as it had been granted a meeting with Chairman Michael Moss that day. Doubtful Both presidents, Bernard Evans of the BCPOU and William Carroll of the BCPMU, said they were doubtful any meeting would take place today unless the minister inter v ened. Mr Evans said the union wanted word from the minister that he reviewed and accepted their proposal for more sweetener in the disengagement packages. In their latest proposal, the BCPOU asked for an additiona l six months pay for employees who qualify for full retirement; e ight months pay for employees who qualify for early retire ment; 12 months pay for employees who served 25 to 19 years; and six months pay for e mployees who served less than 25 years. Mr Evans said they are also looking for the minister to honour his original pledge to redeploy workers. He said the Prime Minister informed them in September t hat the government does not have anywhere to place diseng aged workers, contrary to what they claim were original commitments from the minister. More than 30 employees accepted voluntary separation or early retirement packages by t he Tuesday afternoon deadline. A board meeting schedu led for today will determine the fate of the remaining employees to be let go. Mr Lightbourne said he was not aware of any plans at the board meeting to discuss changes to the terms of separ ation currently on the table. List We want the list of names: who do they want to go and who do they want to stay. We want them to fill in the slots in the new organisational chart today, said Mr Carroll. The majority of workers are staying on the job, but you cant be selfish because you believe you are straight. We have to ensure those who leave get their just due. If you allow them to go home with pittance then when it is time for you to go you will get less than pittance, he said. Mr Lightbourne said the pri mary focus of the board meet ing will be to finalise the new organisational structure. Employees set to be disengaged will be informed, and those set to keep their jobs will learn of their new positions and respon s ibilities. Mr Evans said they were informed that cheques would be available for workers being disengaged on Friday. Most of the news team remained on the job throughout the day, according to Tribune sources, so the nightly news broadcast was expected up to press time. H owever, there were reports of sabotage at the station. Tribune sources said footage gathered for an hour-long show about the fatal plane crash last week was mysteriously erased from a computer hard drive. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM w ww.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbeanTrademark of Royal Bank of Canada The Lion & Globe symbol and RBC are registered trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada.Behold the magic!Win a Magic Minut at any RBC Royal Bank or RBC FINCO ATM in New Providence or the Family Islands. Enter RBCs abraCARDabra ATM Card contest between October 4 and November 30, 2010 and get a chance to win up to $1,500!* The more you use your card, the more chancesyou have to win! Make long lines disappear! Allyou need is an RBC ATM Card. Make cash withdrawals, transfer funds, pay bills and more. Enjoy the 2 4-hour convenience of banking when it suitsyou best. No need to wait in line! Enjoy instant wait reduction! Use your RBC Client Card today for a chance to WIN A MAGIC MINUTE! Create MORE for yourself. Conditions apply. Limited-time offer. Nassau Collins Ave 242 322 2341 Thompson Blvd 242 325 8776 Soldier Rd North 242 393 6286 Family Islands Freeport 242 352 7119 Abaco 242 367 2688 Exuma 242 336 2420www.jsjohnson.com RALLY: ZNS Staff members held a rally outside the building after the smoke alarm went off. ZNS STAFF VENT FURY AT MINISTER Police on alert as workers try to storm Churchill Building FROM page one B y DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport R eporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT The entire staff at ZNS held a peaceful demonstration at the Gove rnment Office Complex on the Mall to protest the voluntary separation packages that are being offered to employees there. Employees assembled in front of the building during the lunch hour from noon to 1pm on Wednesday. D arren Meadows, area vice president of the BCPMU, said the packages offered by the government pales in comparison to similar offers that were made to other government employees. We are not threatening the government; w e are peaceful people and we want them to hear and take our plight into consid eration just like the others, he said. We decided to stage a lunchtime demonstration to show that we dont accept the packages that were offered to our m embers who are being dis engaged. Mr Meadows stated that the packages offered to the Police, Customs, Immigra tion, and BTC were significantly higher than the two months incentive that is being offered to ZNS e mployees. When we looked at what was offeredin similar exercises, it pales in comparison. The police, customs, immi gration and BTC employees got a minimum of one year incentive. We want the powers that b e, whether it is the minister or chairman, to take another look at the packages being offered to our members, he said. Meadows explained that many of their members who are near retirement were looking forward to receiving a pension. He noted that some of the employees who would be affected have been employed for 26, 27, and 28 years at ZNS. ZNS staff hold peaceful demo F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f The Bloomberg news agency reported that BMB Group, a firm which manages money for wealthy families in Brunei, Malaysia and the Persian Gulf, made the $3.4 billion to $4 bil lion cash offer for the hotel and casino company in an October 11 letter sent to Kerzner International founder, Sol Kerzner. Bloomberg claims that it has obtained a copy of the letter. It is not yet clear how Mr Kerzner viewed the bid. A spokesperson was said to have declined to respond to calls on the matter, according to the Bloomberg report. Rayo With anage, 32, a co-founder of the six year-old BMB Group along with Bruneis Prince Abdul Ali Yil-Kabier, a nephew of the Sultan of Brunei, told Bloomberg that the BMB Group sees Kerzner International and Atlantis as a very powerful brand. If theres going to be anoth er Atlantis, its going to be in Asia, said Mr Withanage. Kerzner International also owns the One&Only resorts, which exist in The Bahamas, the Maldives and Mauritius, among other locations. The company was taken private in 2006 for $3.2 billion, plus debt, by a group led by Sol Kerzner himself. BMB Group is based in the Cayman Islands and has offices in New York, London, Kuala Lumpur and Beijing. BID F OR A TL ANTIS FROM page one

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B y AVA TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter aturnquest@tribunemedia.net AS a result of a mothers determination that her son s hould have a vital cornea t ransplant, three-year-old Tavi Collins now has a fresh look at the world. Following the surgery on Tavis right eye at Westch-e ster Medical Centre in New Y ork, doctors believe Tavi experienced true sight for the first time. Mrs Erma Collins eyes filled with tears as she told T he Tribune o f her deep emot ions when she was allowed t o remove the bandages from her sons eyes. His attitude has changed so much, hes so much hap-p ier, she said, her voice w avering with emotion. Loud noises dont bother him anymore. When they let me take the b andage off his eyes, there was an instant change in his w hole attitude. Thats one thing I can seriously say for myself because I saw it with my owne yes it works the change w as instant. For one month, Mrs Collins and a skeleton crew of five supporters, appealed e very day to the general publ ic to donate "at least one dol lar" to Tavis medical expens es. The street donations totalled just under $4,000, and combined with private dona tions and support from family and friends, Mrs Collins was a ble to make a $14,000 down payment on the $20,000 cornea transplant for Tavis right eye. Pr iv ate T hough still unemployed, Mrs Collins has now set her sights on affording private d evelopment care for her son a nd raising the money to make the down payment for the transplant on his left eye. M rs Collins said: Now that he can see, our next goal is finding the right environment for him. Im so happy for him. Its just a start, just a starting point for him. He plays more he plays with all his toys now, not anyone in particular, but hes tak ing a closer look. He likes to examine everything. Its like hes looking for the first time, a fresh look. During Tavis visit to The Tribune yesterday, the mother-of-three beamed with pride as she watched her son examine pencils and smaller objects. Mrs Collins married Tavis father last month, and could barely contain her enthusiasm over her sons progress and her optimism for what she considers to be his fresh start. Although the five-hour surgery at the medical centre in New York was a success, there is still a chance for rejection. Doctors plan to monitor Tavi for six months before he can receive a transplant on the other eye. Mrs Collins said: We went in for surgery on Thursday, and were able to take the bandages off the next day, and it was such a relief that he didnt need any pain medication. He was still groggy on Friday, but by Saturday evening he was running around like nothing happened. They told me its only a matter of time if I get him in the right environment that he would catch up. Its only finding it I dont know where to go, I dont even know where to start. After seeking publiclyfunded care, she was told Tavi would not be able to attend a government programme until he was four years old. However, she is deter mined not to give up on her sons chances for a healthy and normal childhood. When he was born, Tavi's eyes were completely white, and the opaque tissue that covered most of his eye balls was identical to the symptom experienced by adults suffer ing from glaucoma, a disease i n which the optic nerve is d amaged. Doctors concluded that while in his mother's womb,T avi's eyes failed to develop fully for unknown reasons and he was diagnosed with Peter's Anomaly, a rare form of dama ge to the eye's cornea. In July during her initial interview with The Tribune t he 30-year-old Carmichael Road resident was visibly dis tressed over her sons increas i ngly pronounced developmental setbacks and the incalculable debt the family has already incurred from medi cal expenses. At eight months old, Tavi underwent surgery, costing $75,000, that widened his cornea and removed some of the dead tissue from his eyes however his sight was still severely limited. Then, Tavi was already three months behind his developmental timetable, and at three years old, he still could not speak or walked. It was as if he were just learning. Now, although still not s peaking, Tavi is walking norm ally and shows greater con fidence in his surroundings. In the period leading up to t he surgery, Mrs Collins said a source of comfort for her was a success story from a father whose son had suffered the s ame condition as Tavi. Son After learning of Tavis condition, the father reachedo ut to her about his sevenyear-old son who had had the t ransplant done on one of his eyes. Mrs Collins said the fathers story gave her a considerable amount of hope for Tavis future, as his son was described as unstoppable and enjoys a thriving academic and athletic life. Over the next six months as doctor's monitor Tavi's eye for tissue rejection, Mrs Collins is determined to resume the Dollar Day fundraiser every Friday and Saturday at Marathon Malla nd the East Street roundabout, in hopes to get enough funds to make a down payment for the second trans plant. She said: People were so p atient, and sometimes it was t he same people giving over and over and over. Its so many people. Some p eople donated everyday when they passed. Please know how grateful I am. We are so grateful for those people that called and met with us, met Tavi, andg ave us their support. He's going to be fine, once he gets in the right environ-m ent, he's going to be just fine. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010, PAGE 3 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Tavi enjoys fresh view of the world F elip Major / Tribune staff IMPROVING: Three-year-old Tavi Collins stares inquisitively at the camera, as his mother Erma Collins watches proudly. Mrs Collins t old the Tribune of how Tavis physical capabilities have drastically improved since he received a cornea transplant in his right eye. Doctors believe Tavi suffers from a rare form of damage to the eye-' s cornea called Peters Anomaly. D OCTORSBELIEVETHREE YEAR OLDEXPERIENCESTRUESIGHTFORFIRSTTIMEAFTEREYESURGERY H is attitude h as changed so much, hes so much h appier. Loud noises d ont bother him anymore. When t hey let me take the b andage off his eyes, there was an instant change inh is whole attitude. Thats one thing I can seriously say form yself because I saw i t with my own eyes it works the change was instant. T HEWAYHEWAS: A file photograph of Tavi Collins pictured w hen he came to the Tribune.

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EDITOR, The Tribune. I t is amazing to see the number of letters written toy our newspaper regarding t he saga of the knock off bags being sold in the present Straw Market. Frankly, let me say that t he Gucchi, Fendi, Prada a nd all the other big names i n handbags that are sold in the legitimate stores on Bay S treet are not the bags that m ost people could afford. If they didn't have those famous names stamped on them, would we even looka t them twice, they are not a ttractive bags at all. Check them out. If they were not being s old in the fancy stores in New York, Paris and Lon don at such ridiculous prices and they were bags made by Shanika Rolle or WandaP ratt in The Bahamas would y ou be spending $1,500 for their handbags? I don't think so. T he trend to purchase s traw bags of Harl Taylor started some years ago when B ahamians found out that O prah had a bag made by him and that his bags were being sold at one of the high end department stores in the USA like Lord & Taylor. O f course, as fashion usu ally takes off because some-o ne famous is wearing it, Taylor's straw bags were considered very trendy and sales soared for him here in Nassau. S ome 20 years ago, no Bahamian woman would be caught dead with a Bahamian straw bag at a function or at the office. But look at us today, there are handbags made by other Bahamians besides Harl Taylor which are just as nice as his, and carry names as Rolle, Knowles or Pratt. I look at these beautifully handcrafted bags and see the potential for our local ladies who are so skilled but c annot get the attention of the so-called knock off bags sold illegally in the Straw Market here. I believe that these skilled Bahamian women could be assisted by the Bahamian Government to have a proper workshop and manufact ure their straw goods. There would be no need for the women in the Straw Market to travel out of The B ahamas to buy goods made in China or knock o ff bags. This would be a winwin situation. Straw could be used from our Family Islands, Bahamian women could create fabulous designs here in The Bahamas and there wouldb e lots of competition so the prices would be reasonablef or tourists, as well as Bahamians. Recently I have seen t hese exquisite Straw bags i n stores in Nassau for over $150. Of course that is a bit excessive, if we would like t o sell these beauties in the New Straw Market in 2011. T hey would have to be lowe r in price if they want to make money. The Govern ment could help these s killed Bahamians with small loans to set up a goodw orkshop. These ladies could stock t he new Straw Market with bags and other straw articles MADE IN THE BAHAMAS, with Bahami-a n straw, by Bahamian peop le and feel proud when they tell the tourists, No,t his is not made in China, t his is made right here in T he Bahamas. Bahamian straw work could start a new fashion trend and the tourists could be the ones who could spread the trend of the beautiful straw work all over the world. W ouldn't that be a boost t o our economy with jobs for many people and exports for our country. There are o ther articles that can be s old in the Straw Market, m ade right here in The Bahamas. There are Bahamian candies, pepper sauces, shellwork, paintings, wood carv ings, post cards, pottery, spices and so many other beautiful articles that are right here under our noses. We need to support our own and boost our econo my. I t would be nice to start the New Straw Market next y ear on the right foot, with at least 90 per cent of goods, MADE IN THE BAHAMAS. What do you think? MARGO GONGORA Nassau, O crober 7, 2010. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., ( Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama TELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising A dvertising Manager (242 Circulation Department (242 Nassau Fax: (242 WEBSITE www.tribune242.com updated daily at 2pm THE last of the Chilean miners, the foreman who held them together when they were feared lost, was raised from the depths of the earth Wednesday night a joyous ending to a 69-day ordeal that riveted the world. No one has ever been trapped so long a nd survived. Luis Urzua ascended smoothly through 2,000 feet of rock, completing a 22-hour rescue operation that unfolded with remarkable speed and flawless execution. Before a crowd of about 2,000 people, he became the 33rd miner to be rescued. When Urzua stepped out of the capsule, he hugged Chilean President Sebastian Pine ra and shook hands with him and said they had prevailed over difficult circumstances. With the last miner by his side, the president led the crowd in singing the national anthem. One by one throughout the day, the men had emerged to the cheers of exuberant Chileans and before the eyes of a transfixed globe. The operation picked up speed as the day went on, but each miner was greetedw ith the same boisterous applause from res cuers. "Welcome to life," Pinera told Victor Segvia, the 15th miner out. On a day of superlatives, it seemed no overstatement. They rejoined a world intensely curious about their ordeal, and certain to offer fame and jobs. Previously unimaginable riches awaited men who had risked their lives goingi nto the unstable gold and copper mine for about $1,600 a month. The rescue was planned with extreme care. The miners were monitored by video on the way up for any sign of panic. They had oxygen masks, dark glasses to protect their eyes from the unfamiliar sunlight and sweaters for the jarring transition from subterranean swelter to chilly desert air. T he miners emerged looking healthier than many had expected and even cleanshaven. Several thrust their fists upwards like prizefighters, and Mario Sepulveda, the second to taste freedom, bounded out and led his rescuers in a rousing cheer. Franklin Lobos, who played for the Chilean national soccer team in the 1980s, briefly bounced a soccer ball on his foot and knee. N o one in recorded history has survived as long trapped underground. For the first 17 days, no one even knew whether they were alive. In the weeks that followed, the world was captivated by their endurance and unity. News channels from North America to Europe and the Middle East carried live coverage. Pope Benedict XVI said in Spanish that he "continues with hope to entrust to God's goodness" the fate of the men. Iran's state English-language Press TV followed events live for a time. Crews from Russia a nd Japan and North Korean state TV were at the mine. Estimates for the rescue operation alone have soared beyond $22 million, though the government has repeatedly insisted that money is not a concern. Mining is Chile's lifeblood, providing 40 per cent of state earnings. The rescue went so well that its managers abandoned a plan to restrict images of t he rescue. That included the surreal moment when the capsule dropped for the first time into the chamber, where the bare-chested miners, most stripped down to shorts because of the underground heat, mobbed the rescuer who emerged to serve as their guide to freedom. "This rescue operation has been so marvelous, so clean, so emotional that there wasn o reason not to allow the eyes of the world which have been watching this operation so closely to see it," a beaming Pinera told a news conference after the first miner safely surfaced. Chile has promised that its care of the miners won't end for six months at least not until they can be sure that each man has readjusted. P sychiatrists and other experts in surviv ing extreme situations predict their lives will be anything but normal. Since August 22, when a narrow bore hole broke through to their refuge and the miners stunned the world with a note, scrawled in red ink, dis closing their survival, their families have been exposed in ways they never imagined. Miners had to describe their physical and m ental health in detail with teams of doctors and psychologists. In some cases, when both wives and lovers claimed the same man, everyone involved had to face the conse quences. As trying as their time underground was, the miners now face challenges so bewildering that no amount of coaching can fully prepare them. Rejoining a world intensely c urious about their ordeal, they have been invited to presidential palaces, to take allexpenses-paid vacations and to appear on countless TV shows. Book and movie deals are pending, along with job offers. (This article was written by Michael War ren, Associated Press writer). Bahamian straw work could start fashion trend LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Last of miners is raised safely to surface E DITOR, The Tribune. Just returned to the island, and the immigration line was out past the bathrooms. Booths one through 12 unmanned, leaving booths 13 through 18 for visitor processing and (1920 Not a good first impression for tourists. PIETER HALE Nassau, October 8, 2010. Not a good first impression for tourists

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010, PAGE 5 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

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By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune FreeportR eporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT Grand Bahamas economy will get a boost next month when more than 500 visitors are expected to visit Freeportf or the annual Junkanoo Jam Basketball tournament, injecting an estimate d $400,000 into the local e conomy. G rand Bahama Port Authority president Ian R olle commended Basketb all Travellers Inc for its c ontinuing commitment to m ake Grand Bahama the d estination of choice for the annual NCAA tournament. T he tournament takes p lace on November 25-29 and features some of the b est women collegiate basketball players in the United States. Eight teams will be competing in the tournament. The Grand Bahama Port Authority Limited is one oft he major sponsors of the e vent, which has been held in Freeport since 2003. M r Rolle noted that the tournament has been very beneficial to the economy. H e said that it also provides opportunities to build partnerships that benefit resi-d ents here on the island. This event brings in excess of 500 visitors to our island each year, which has a t remendous positive impact on our economy, he said. Many businesses, such as hotels, car agencies, restaur ants, tour operators, etc, benefit from their presence. In fact, an estimated $400,000 has been spent onisland annually by the partners, stakeholders and par-t icipants, he added. Significant The event has also played a significant role in sports t ourism on Grand Bahama. R osalyn Pinder Manager o f Sports Development, M inistry of Tourism & Aviation, said since the introduction of Junkanoo Jam, G rand Bahama has successf ully hosted more than 5,000 a rriving visitors directly a ssociated with the tourna m ent. S he noted that the tour n ament was embraced as an opportunity to further develop the destinations sports t ourism objectives. The aim was to increase revenue by attracting visi-t ors to the island by means of hosting intriguing sporting events with the hopes ofa ttracting large numbers of tourists in the form of fan followings, she explained. Sean McShane, Director o f Junkanoo Jam with B asketball Travellers Inc, was pleased by the tremendous support for the tour-n ament in Grand Bahama. We are grateful for the s upport, he said. Over the last eight years weve been so fortunate to partner with some of the industry leaders here on Grand Bahama w ho share the vision of not only bringing a fantastic basketball tournament downf or young players to aspire to, but to also generate funds into the local econo-m y, he said. According to McShane, the tournament is a signifi cant event in the US. I t is a sought after event i n the United States, with a reputation that is second to none, he stated. O f the eight teams travel ling to Grand Bahama, three are returning participants, accompanied by five newt eams. McShane said live media coverage of the individual NCAA games will provide added exposure for GrandB ahama. David Morley, former president of the Grand B ahama Basketball Feder ation, who was instrumen-t al in bringing the event to Grand Bahama, said the event will spur interest in w omens basketball by local high school students. A lot of our young female players come out to the games, with some even travelling from Nassau. And visiting college players are able to interact with our local players and talk with them and offer advice on how they can better their basketball skills, he said. Mr Morley is encouraging the public to support the event. He is especially urging Physical Education teachers to bring their teams out to the games so they can observe the fundamentals of the game. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM %4+2674'*17)*6 Hopes high of economic boost from Junkanoo Jam Basketball tournament JUNKANOO JAM BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT RETURNS: Junkanoo Jam, the popular sporting event on the NCAA and local basketball calendars, returns to Grand B ahama, November 25 to 29. On hand for a press conference to announce the 8th annual event were (left to right): Geneva Rutherford, Director of Community Relations, GBPA; Ginger Moxey, Vice President, GBPA; Sean McShane, Director of Junkanoo Jam with Basketball Travellers Inc; Ian Rolle, President, GBPA; Rosalyn Pinder, Manager of Sports Development, Ministry of Tourism & Aviation; David Morley, former president of the Grand Bahama BasketballF ederation; and Delroy Boothe, Assistant Director of Junkanoo Jam with Basketball Travellers Inc. More than 500 visitors expected to visit Freeport Over the last eight years weve been so fort unate to partner with some of the industry leaders here on Grand Bahama who share t he vision of not only bringing a fantastic b asketball tournament down for young playe rs to aspire to, but to also generate funds into t he local economy, I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s Sean McShane

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WOMEN who undergo routine mammograms at Doctors Hospital now have the latest in diagnostic technology available to them through Digital Mammography, obtainable through the Hospitals Comprehensive Breast Diagnostic Imaging Centre featuring Breast MRI, 3-D Breast Ultrasound and Digital Mammography. With its Comprehensive Breast Diagnostic Imaging Centre, Doctors Hospital has developed for its patients one of the most comprehensive approaches to womens breast health with physicians and health care professionals who strive to offer timely and comprehensive diagnostic care.The top priority is to help patients access high quality breast care services as easily as possible, in a timely manner, with the latest technology. The first healthcare provider in the Region to feature the state-of-the-art system, Selenia digital mammography together with the breast cushion, MammoPad from Hologic, Doctors Hospital now offers the latest in digital mammography screening technology. Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death among women, exceeded only by lung cancer. Statistics indi cate that one in eight women will develop breast cancer sometime in her life. The stage at which breast cancer is detected influences a womans chance of survival. If detected early, the five-year survival rate is 97 per cent. October is Breast Cancer Awareness month; all women over the age of 40 are encouraged to get their mammograms. It is now very little discomfort, more convenient, and is completed in shorter examination time. Selenia digital mammogra phy incorporates revolutionary imaging technology that provides incredibly sharp breast images, said a Doctors Hos pital spokesperson. The images appear on the technologists monitor in a mat ter of seconds, there is no wait ing for film to develop, which means less time in the breast imaging suite for patients. Digital mammography is different from conventional mammogra phy in how the image of the breast is acquired and, more importantly, viewed. The radiologist can now magnify the images, increase or decrease the contrast and invert the black and white values while reading the images. These features allow the radiologist to evaluate micro calcifications and focus on areas of concern. Selenia digital mammography offers a number of other practical advantages and patient conveniences lower radiation dose, shorter exam time, less repositioning, immediate results, and computer aided detection. Because there is no waiting for film to be devel oped, it significantly reduces the need for repeat exams due to under or over exposure. Digital images are easily stored and transferred electronically, elim inating the dependency on one set of original films, which can be misfiled or lost in transit. In addition to offering superior mammography technology, Doctors Hospitals Comprehensive Breast Diagnostic Imaging Centre offers a softer, warmer mammogram by using the MammoPad breast cushion for every patient. Mam moPad has been clinically demonstrated to reduce discomfort, associated with mammograms, for most women. Because the breast cushion is invisible to X-rays, it does not interfere with the image quality of the mammogram. By offering women a softer mammogram, Doctors Hospital hopes to increase the number of women who follow recommendations with regular screenings. JCI Accredited Doctors Hospitals Comprehensive Breast Diagnostic Imaging Centre maintains a high standard of clinical quality. Services are dedicated to women and centred on their needs and con cerns. Doctors Hospital, said the spokesperson, is committed to the fight against breast cancer. In offering digital mammography, 3-D Breast Ultrasound and Breast MRI as well as percutaneous core needle biopsy and wire localization of non palpable lumps the hospital provides the latest in imaging technology in the region. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010, PAGE 7 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM OfferavailableatparticipatingU.S.locations.Discountappliestobaserateonly.Taxes, insurance&optional itemsareextra.Rentermustmeetstandardageandcredit requirements.24-houradvancereservationrequired.Blackoutdatesandcapacitycontrols mayapply.Maynotbecombinedwithotherdiscountsorpromotions.Termsandconditions subject to changewithout notice.alamo.com OFF $15 USADDAPRICEBREAKTOYOURNEXTVACATIONS. 5HVHUYHD&RPSDFWWKURXJK)XOOVL]HFDU0LQLYDQRU SUV in the US. DOLGRQUHQWDOVRIGD\VRUPRU %HVXUHWRXVHWRUHTXHVWFRXSRQFRGH AD4974JDO IIHUH[SLUHV December 15, 2010 F or reservations, please contact Destinations at ( 242) 393.6900 or at (786 HIGH QUALITYCARE: Pictured left to right: Andin Edwards, Doctors Hospital Imaging Department with a patient. D OCTORS H OSPITALANNOUNCESCOMPREHENSIVEBREASTDIAGNOSTICIMAGINGCENTRE Latest technology available for women who undergo routine mammograms

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM P ROSPECTUS THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS BAHAMAS REGISTERED STOCK 2015, 2017, 2019 AND 2030 ISSUE OF B$100,000, 000.00 p hotos: D D S S C C 3 3 1 1 3 3 9 9 . J J P P G G D D S S C C 3 3 1 1 6 6 6 6 . J J P P G G Company creates scholarship in memory of former employee CUSTOM Computers officiall y launched its annual scholarship in partnership with the Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute, identifying the first winner as student TrevonK ing. The announcement was made during an awards ceremony a ttended by Minister of Education Desmond Bannister at Custom Computers on Cable Beach. T he companys co-owner and marketing director Pia Farmer said the scholarship was offered in memory of Theodore Ted Nutt, a long serving e mployee who died earlier this year. Mrs Farmer said the scholarship will be awarded each year to a promising BTVI student in need of financial aid who shows great enthusiasm andf acility with computers. Custom Computers has decided to create an annual scholarship at BTVI because we support BTVI and their efforts. We also know that practical training is very important, M rs Farmer said. Unfortunately one of our dear Know How team members, Ted Nutt, passed away this year. He was very young and we loved Ted very much as a person. He was always a great worker and he loved passionately what he did. So we decided how best to honour Teds memory and also continue thet radition of Custom Computers to support education. Mrs Farmer said that as a p art of the scholarship award, Mr King will also be given an opportunity to intern at Custom Computers during vacations to gain in knowledge and practical experience. On hand for the presentation w ere Ted Nutts brother, Niven Nutt, and his son Jesse Nutt, who both said they were moved and honoured by the gesture. Minister Bannister commended Custom Computers for its generosity and support of e xcellence in education. He admonished Mr King to continue to excel in his academic pursuits and advised him to take full advantage of this opportunity. Photos: Derek Smith Jr/Impact Images & Designs P P H H O O T T O O 3 3 1 1 6 6 6 6 Pictured (l-r Company creates scholarship in memo-

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010, PAGE 9 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Practical or Luxury? C-CLASS ML-CLASS E-CLASS Tyreflex Star MotorsCall us today for your new Mercedes-Benz at 325.4961Wulff Road, P. O. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas Fax: 323.4667 You may ask the question: Is it practical to own a Mercedes-Benz or is it a luxury? Well, Mercedes-Benz would like to ask you a question. Are excellent gasm ileage, top safety standards and s uperior driving technology considered a luxury? Mercedes-Benz doesnt think so and you shouldnt either. You deserve to get the most out of your gas dollar. You and your family deserve to be safe and comfortable when maneuvering through our nations less-than-perfect roadways. Thats why these features ands o much more come standard in every c lass and model of Mercedes-Benz. So do something practical while still enjoying the best of life become an owner of a beautiful new Mercedes-Benz today. Mercedes C/ML/E-2010.qxd 1/6/10 8:33 PM Page 1 Anentrepreneurialspirit,originalthinking,andapassiontosucceed. If you haveit,wewant you We are growing! Fidelity Bank invites applications for the position of:ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE SUBMIT BEFORE October 22nd, 2010 to: HUMAN RESOURCES Re:AutomationSpecialist, 51FrederickStreet P.O.BoxN-4853|Nassau|F:328.1108 careers@fidelitybahamas.comDuties & Responsibilities:Reporting directly to the Manager, Information Technology, the successful candidates main duties and r esponsibilities will be: Preparing procedures manuals for the automated functions Requirements / Qualifications: A competitive compensation package will be commensurate with relevant experience and qualification. Fidelity appreciates your interest, however, only those applicants short listed will be contacted.AUTOMATIONSPECIALIST

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A S THE latest cycle of t he Department of Youths Fresh Start Programme enters its third week, participants lauded the job-readiness initiative and its role in preparing young Bahamians for the workforce. This is a great experience t hat I have had, one that m ost young people in the Bahamas should go through, said 21-year-old Felecia Williams. Maybe if more young people would t ake part, we would have b etter customer service and attitudes. It also teaches usa bout writing resumes, cove r letters and what is expected of us on the job, espe-c ially work ethics and teamw ork. Ian Green Jr, 18, said he learned a lot from the programme from the import ance physical appearance to sexual harassment and how to go out and grab the j ob that you want. It also makes me feel g ood to be here because the B ahamas is lacking young m en who want to go out and g rab their jobs, Mr Green said. He added that it was encouraging to see a balance of men and women taking part and to note that his fellow male participants were s howing an interest. We have 47 excited and highly-motivated young B ahamians in this cycle, who a re driven to learn what they c an to be ready to shine in t he Bahamas workforce, s aid co-ordinator Lionel E lliott. Successful M inister of Youth, Sports a nd Culture Charles Maynard said Fresh Start is one o f the Department of Youths more successful programmes, yielding a high e mployment rate for partici pants. We want to do our best t o help to ensure that young p eople go into the business w orld being productive, Minister Maynard said. The Fresh Start programme was created in 1999 C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Participants praise Fresh Start Programme TABLETALK: Lionel Elliott (centre SEE page 11

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010, PAGE 11 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM A nentrepreneurialspirit,originalthinking,andapassiontosucceed. If you haveit,wewant you W e are growing! F idelity Bank invites applications for the position of:A BSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS P LEASE SUBMIT BEFORE October 22nd, 2010 to: HUMAN RESOURCES Re:AssistantNetworkAdministrator, 51FrederickStreet P.O.BoxN-4853|Nassau|F:328.1108 careers@fidelitybahamas.comD uties & Responsibilities:R eporting directly to the Manager, Information Technology, the successful candidates main duties and responsibilities will be: Ensuring LAN backups are performed daily Maintaining inventory of all PCs, hardware, software and related equipment on a regular basis Creating network and exchange profiles for authorized users Troubleshooting technical and operational problems of users Performs general maintenance on equipment weeklyR equirements / Qualifications: Associates degree in Computer Science or related field MCP qualification Proven database management skills Basics of IP technology & PBX integration Ability to support AS/400A competitive compensation package will be commensurate with r elevant experience and qualification. Fidelity appreciates your interest, however, only those applicants short listed will be contacted.ASSISTANTNETWORKADMINISTRATOR sh Start Programme to address the rising level of unemployment a mong the nations youth, following the f indings of a 1993 committee appointed to study the special needs of the young people i n the Bahamas and make recommendations to the government. In an effort to continue to address the c oncern of long-term unemployment, lack of j ob search skills and the lack of work place e xperience among our youth, the Fresh Start Programme was introduced, Mr Elliott said. It was designed to provide training to young persons between the ages of 16 and 25 years with job search and job retention skills. Mr Elliott who has more than 26-years o f experience in youth programmes and employment training said the objectives of the Fresh Start Programme include: preparing young persons for employm ent identifying potential employment opportunities encouraging proactive job search techn iques encouraging greater public/private sector collaboration in youth training sponsorship developing a tracking system to mea sure the effectiveness of Fresh Start Persons wishing to participate in the pro gramme can collect an application form f rom the Youth Department, Department of Labour, Department of Social Services, any Urban Renewal Office or at various comm unity and youth centres in New Provid ence. Mr Elliott said that upon the comp letion of the community service aspect of the programme, each participant is assigneda six-week internship with a participating p rivate sector company. Effective Participants are required to perform all t ask assigned to them in an effective and efficient manner, Mr Elliott said. We hope that at the end of internship, companies would grant permanent employment to each of the participants. However, if they are not granted permanent employment, the participants n ames are kept in a database and are a dvised of additional employment opportunities. M inister Maynard said: The whole prog ramme is designed to give the young par t icipants some basic tips on how to get a job and stay employed, with some training in the various areas of employment. Because of the programmes reputation, over the years, and because of the various businesses that partner with this ministry,m ost of the young people end up becoming p ermanent at various establishments. Temika Davis said that she met several interesting young people in the class and appreciated the various instructors. I learned about entrepreneurship and I would like to have my own business one day, she said. The whole programme wasa fun experience and all the participants benefited from being a part of this. GROUP SHOT: Mr Elliott (centre F ROM page ten

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Anentrepreneurialspirit,originalthinking,andapassiontosucceed. I f you haveit,wewant you We are growing! Fidelity Bank invites applications for the position of:ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE SUBMIT BEFORE October 22n d, 2010 to: H UMAN RESOURCES Re:SystemAdministrator, 51FrederickStreet P.O.BoxN-4853|Nassau|F:328.1108c areers@fidelitybahamas.comDuties & Responsibilities:Reporting directly to the Group CIO, the successful candidates main duties and responsibilities will be: administering securityRequirements / Qualifications: Minimum 2 years experience in application support in a financial institution A competitive compensation package will be commensurate with r elevant experience and qualification. Fidelity appreciates your interest, however, only those applicants short listed will be contacted.S YSTEMADMINISTRATOR A life has been lost and we want to give the matter a thorough and proper investigation, Sgt Skippings said. So we dont want to rule anything out at this point. Relatives shocked by the death said they were unable to make any sense of the possi-b ility of either suicide or homicide yesterday. Its a shock because hes such a loving person, said Mr Nixons 52-year-old sister, Mrs Lenora Dean. He was very kind, and very loving. She said Mr Nixon had worked for Tropical S hipping for 26 years before he was let go two y ears ago. I t is reported that he raised two young children, aged seven and nine, at their home in Misty Gardens, off Cowpen Road, without the help of their mother. Dedicated A neighbour, Mrs Carolyn Hanna, said Mr Nixon appeared to be a dedicated father who took the youngsters to and from school everyd ay without fail. He seemed to have been such a good father, she said. Any man who would take care of his children like that is a good man. I n addition to the young son and daughter who lived with him, Mr Nixon and his wife had two adult daughters and a son. T he two older daughters and son ran to their fathers house at around 12.30pm, stopping their car just short of the police cordon. One of his daughters bolted towards her fathers house, wailing in grief. Im not going no further; dont touch me, she told police trying to hold her back as shec ried out and then doubled-over in tears. An officer gently escorted the young woman back to the other side of the cordon whereh er aunt hugged and consoled her, and her grandfather, Mr Nixons father, stood by with his wife. M r Nixons mother, Mrs Regina Nixon J ohnson, joined them around an hour later, weeping as she watched as her sons body was carried to the hearse. S he and other relatives were comforted by Sister Cecilia Albury of St Martins Convent, an aunt of the deceased, who provided coun selling for the family. He was a quiet person, very unassuming, Mrs Hanna said. Its so sad. Although police did not confirm Mr Nixons i dentity, nor classify his death yesterday, offi cers speaking off the record said the death a ppeared to be suicide. Relatives and friends speculated about the difficulties with which he might have strug-g led, but not expressed to those who knew and loved him. This is a small neighbourhood where e verybody gets to know everybody, said n eighbour Devaughn Williams, 53, a psychiatric nurse at Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre. This will be a huge shock to the commu nity. Theres a thing called smiling depression, w hen people may appear well but you dont k now whats lurking underneath the surface and the emotions they are dealing with. We all have problems, but its how we cope. If someone is feeling like that the best thing to do is to talk, confide in someone, because its even more difficult when you keepi t bottled up. Police inquiry after father found shot dead FROM page one S HAREDPAIN: F amily members hug each other at the s cene. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010, PAGE 13 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM B y LINDA DEUTSCH A P Special C orrespondent LOSANGELES T he Anna Nicole Smith drug conspiracy case, charging her lawyer-boyfriend and two doctors with providing the former Playboy model withe xcessive amounts of drugs, w as placed in the hands of a jury Friday. In a full week of final argum ents, opposing lawyers battled over whether the defend ants loved Smith and tried to relieve her pain or fed her addiction to medications to curry favour with a celebrity. Attorney Steve Sadow, the l ast defence lawyer to speak, s aid Smith was the love of H oward K. Stern's life and he t rusted the two doctors on tri al with him to ease her suff ering with prescription drugs. Witnesses testified during t he trial that Smith had chroni c pain syndrome and other a ilments. Sadow, who represents Stern, said his client was not q ualified to second-guess the doctors who were acting in good faith prescribing drugsf or Smith's physical and emotional pain after the birth of her daughter and death of her son. Jurors were told to select a f oreperson then sent home until Tuesday when they will b egin deliberations. Monday is a court holiday. After nine weeks of testimony and arguments, the last w ord to jurors came from a prosecutor who implored them to convict the defendants on all counts. Deputy District Attorney R enee Rose said the three d efendants committed fraud by using false names for Smith on prescriptions and c ontended the thousands of doses of opiates, sedatives and other pills were prescribed toc ater to an addiction. S tern was complicit in picking up prescriptions on many occasions, the prosecutor said. Superior Court Judge Robert Perry reminded jurors that the numbers of pills pre-s cribed do not legally prove addiction. The case is being closely watched by pain management doctors and patients. The judge has remarked there is some concern about doctorsu nder-prescribing pain med ication to suffering patients because of legal worries. R ose and Perry, who had d isagreements throughout the trial, clashed again during her rebuttal argument when thej udge said she was misleading the jury about some of the e vidence. He threatened at o ne point to let the defence have another chance at argument if the behaviour continued. "My concern is I have a prosecutor who is misrepres enting what was said," the j udge said. Rose apologized and said she never meant to misstate anything. Perry told the juryt o disregard a section of her argument that may have contained false implications. In the balance of her argument, Rose claimed the defendants were drawn into Smith's world of celebrity andb roke the law in treating her. In the real world, your doctor doesn't fly to you in the Bahamas if you're sick a nd then fly back," Rose said. "It happens in Anna Nicole Smith's world." S adow stressed that he was speaking for Stern. But in denying his client was part of a conspiracy, Sadow advocated for all three defendants. Their lawyers spoke earlier. Stern is charged as an aider a nd abettor to the doctors' actions. Sadow said that to be convicted, "Howard has tok now when a prescription is written that the doctor intended to break the law." H e said there has been no t estimony to support that claim. Stern and Drs. Sandeep Kapoor and Khris t ine Eroshevich have pleaded not guilty to conspiring to provide excessive prescription drugs to an addict and otherc harges. They are not charged in Smith's 2007 accidental overdose death in Florida. Anna Nicole Smith drug conspiracy case goes to jury ANNANICOLESMITH

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G rant, claimed the applicants had failed to bring the application for judicial review promptly or within the required period of six months. Attorney Maurice Glinton, who represents the Coconut Grove Business L eague (CGBL t hat the grounds for bringing t he application arose in M arch of this year. M r Delaney noted that t he applicants had delayed 10 years after the decision was made to begin the New Providence Road Improvement Project or after the grounds for bringing the application had arisen. He f urther argued that the applicants had no good reason to extend the period in w hich to bring the applicat ion, nor have they asked to d o so. The Attorney General also argued that the appli c ants had not sued Mr Grant in his capacity as Minister with responsibility for Road Traffic. This, he said, took the issue of traffic flow out of consideration. Mr Delaney submitted that the M inister had acted lawfully, a s well as reasonably, and had adhered to the pre scribed procedures in the R oad Act. T he hearing was adjourned to October 25. The Coconut Grove Business League, which consistso f a group of people affected by the roadflow change, w ere granted leave for a judicial review last July. Three of its members, SuperValue owner Rupert Roberts Jr; Arnold Heastie, owner of Heastie's Service Station; and businessw oman Leana Ingraham, h ave been given authorisat ion by the court to bring and defend judicial reviewp roceedings on behalf of the l eague. The March 30 road changes, which made Baillou Hill Road one-way northbound and Market Street one-way southbound, are a part of the govern ments $120 million NewP rovidence Road Improvem ent Project (NPRIP C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 14, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM A nentrepreneurialspirit,originalthinking,andapassiontosucceed. I f you haveit,wewant you We are growing! F idelity Bank invites applications for the position of:ABSOLUTELY NO P HONE CALLS PLEASE SUBMIT BEFORE October 22nd, 2010 to: HUMAN RESOURCES Re:ManagerInformationTechnology, 51FrederickStreet P.O.BoxN-4853|Nassau|F:328.1108 careers@fidelitybahamas.comD uties & Responsibilities:Reporting directly to the Group CIO, the successful candidates main duties and responsibilities will be: Managing the overall IT functions of the Fidelity operations in The Bahamas Working in conjunction with the regional IT departments Developing and maintaining IT procedures and security manual for The Bahamas operations Assisting the CIO in managing project plans and ensuring that project deadlines are met Weekly reviewing user profiles and passwords and deleting them as necessaryRequirements / Qualifications: Bachelors degree in Computer Science or related field MCSE certified Industry certifications such as CISSP or CCNA would be an asset or other financial institution Proven project management skills A competitive compensation package will be commensurate with relevant experience and qualification. Fidelity appreciates your interest, however, only those applicants short listed will be contacted.MANAGER,INFORMATIONTECHNOLOGY Judicial review bid over one-way system should be dismissed AG FROM page one CONTROVERSY : Vehicles are shown travelling northbound on Baillou H ill Road. John Delaney is pictured below. Share your news T he Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an awar d. I f so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 20, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010 THE TRIBUNE Your life, this car.You want the latest gadgets. You like cool design. Youre smart about your money. And that makes the new Fiesta the car for you. It has a style you just cant miss, and you can get it with great stu like available voice-activated SYNC,* Easy Fuel capless fuel ller and seven airbags, including a drivers knee airbag. Best of all, it gets up to 40 mpg** highway. So you put money in your pocket, not your fuel tank. Stop by Friendly Motors today tond out more. FRIENDLY MOTORS Thompson Boulevard, Nassau, Bahamas Tel: 356.2751* Driving while distracted can result in loss of vehicle control. Only use mobile phones and other devices, even with voice commands, when it is safe to do so. **EPA-estimated 29 city/40 hwy/33 combined mpg, automatic SFE; Fiesta SE shown: 29 city/38 hwy/33 combined mpg, automatic.2011 FIESTAD19625-0 FIE 1008103 FINT-00504 N/ABahamas Fiesta 11.625 x 10.5B. KOZIARA N/A N/A M. MORONEY N/A 11.625 X 10.5 AD SIZE 4COLOR PROCESS 200 100% 100% FOLDER: FINT-00504 FILE: FINT00504_D196250 J. VANDER EYK N/A M. MORENO N/A C. COCOZZOLI N/A N/A J. GROSFIELD M. CARPENTER J. SMITH N/A N/A N/A M. DANAHEY4109/22/10

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G rant, claimed the applicants had failed to bring the application for judicial review promptly or within the required period of six months. Attorney Maurice Glinton, who represents the Coconut Grove Business L eague (CGBL t hat the grounds for bringing t he application arose in M arch of this year. M r Delaney noted that t he applicants had delayed 10 years after the decision was made to begin the New Providence Road Improvement Project or after the grounds for bringing the application had arisen. He f urther argued that the applicants had no good reason to extend the period in w hich to bring the applicat ion, nor have they asked to d o so. The Attorney General also argued that the appli c ants had not sued Mr Grant in his capacity as Minister with responsibility for Road Traffic. This, he said, took the issue of traffic flow out of consideration. Mr Delaney submitted that the M inister had acted lawfully, a s well as reasonably, and had adhered to the pre scribed procedures in the R oad Act. T he hearing was adjourned to October 25. The Coconut Grove Business League, which consistso f a group of people affected by the roadflow change, w ere granted leave for a judicial review last July. Three of its members, SuperValue owner Rupert Roberts Jr; Arnold Heastie, owner of Heastie's Service Station; and businessw oman Leana Ingraham, h ave been given authorisat ion by the court to bring and defend judicial reviewp roceedings on behalf of the l eague. The March 30 road changes, which made Baillou Hill Road one-way northbound and Market Street one-way southbound, are a part of the govern ments $120 million NewP rovidence Road Improvem ent Project (NPRIP C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 14, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM A nentrepreneurialspirit,originalthinking,andapassiontosucceed. I f you haveit,wewant you We are growing! F idelity Bank invites applications for the position of:ABSOLUTELY NO P HONE CALLS PLEASE SUBMIT BEFORE October 22nd, 2010 to: HUMAN RESOURCES Re:ManagerInformationTechnology, 51FrederickStreet P.O.BoxN-4853|Nassau|F:328.1108 careers@fidelitybahamas.comD uties & Responsibilities:Reporting directly to the Group CIO, the successful candidates main duties and responsibilities will be: Managing the overall IT functions of the Fidelity operations in The Bahamas Working in conjunction with the regional IT departments Developing and maintaining IT procedures and security manual for The Bahamas operations Assisting the CIO in managing project plans and ensuring that project deadlines are met Weekly reviewing user profiles and passwords and deleting them as necessaryRequirements / Qualifications: Bachelors degree in Computer Science or related field MCSE certified Industry certifications such as CISSP or CCNA would be an asset or other financial institution Proven project management skills A competitive compensation package will be commensurate with relevant experience and qualification. Fidelity appreciates your interest, however, only those applicants short listed will be contacted.MANAGER,INFORMATIONTECHNOLOGY Judicial review bid over one-way system should be dismissed AG FROM page one CONTROVERSY : Vehicles are shown travelling northbound on Baillou H ill Road. John Delaney is pictured below. Share your news T he Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an awar d. I f so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor Sandals is eyeing the pur chase of another Exuma-based resort from receivership, this time the $110 million Grand Isle Villas Resort, Tribune Business can reveal, the situation having caused "immediate panic" and a "total sense of shock" on the island. The all-inclusive resort chain would be an obvious purchaser of the 78-unit property, given that it sits at the heart of the Emerald Bay resort, which Sandals purchased from a different set of receivers in late 2009 for around $25 million. "I believe Sandals would be very, very interested," one source told Tribune Business yesterday. This newspaper understands that the resort chain may have already made an initial offer to acquire Grand Isle Villas, but this has not yet been accepted. Tribune Business also understands that the Lennox Paton law firm, which is acting for the debenture holder of Grand Isle's debt, is also working on a potential deal to facilitate the property's acquisition by Sandals. Craig A. 'Tony' Gomez, the Baker Tilly Gomez accountant C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission f rom the daily report.$ $4.19 $4.20 $4.22 Sleep well while your money grows. N ow open on Saturdays.Village Rd. & Harrold Rd.9:30AM 1:00PM It can get a little hectic during the week. So weve opened our Village Road and Harrold Road branches on Saturdays. BOB Saturday Banking 9:30AM 1:00PMNow open on Saturdays. By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor Sandals purchase of the Emerald Bay Resort has not made the economic impact Exuma hoped for, the president of the islands Chamber of Commerce said yesterday, arguing that its all-inclusive nature meant that trickle down and spin-off effects for Bahamian-owned businesses were limited. Speaking at a press conference to promote the upcoming Exuma Business Outlook Conference, Floyd Sandals all-inclusive model hurts Exuma Chamber president says economic impact from Emerald Bay opening not as anticipated, as no trickle down/spin-off effect for Bahamian firms W arns that many people now shocked into reality, and that island s population dwindling Exumians move to take control of own destiny, and end colonial mentality that has governed islands development from capital* Fears of brain drain from island SEE page 6B By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor T he Governments planned L and Registry could end up being less than accurate, a B ahamian attorney warned yesterday, because unlike other Caribbean countries this n ation is aiming to enter real e state ownership information without previously vetting a ll rights and interests in every parcel. Sharlyn Smith, an attorney with Sharon Wilson & Com p any, yesterday expressed concerns over key aspects of the Land Adjudication Bill a nd Registration of Land Bill, both of which the Govern ment is currently consulting o n and, when passed into Accuracy fears on Land Registry Attorney expresses concern that all rights and interests in land will not be vetted before entry on s ystem designed to r evolutionise Bahamian conveyancing Worries that all power in m inisters hands, as B ahamas seemingly opts for l and reform route different to other Caribbean nations SEE page 9B By ALISON LOWE Business Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net The second draft report of the National Energy Policy Committee has been submitted to the Government, and provides it with all the information to make an informed decision on the sustainable energy mix it would like to implement in the Bahamas, the committees chairman said yesterday. The National Energy Policy Committee, chaired by Philip Weech, director of the BEST Commission, projects that once approval of the report is given, many of the recommendations and reforms proposed to pave the way for sustainable energy in the Bahamas could be implemented in eight to 18 months. Major changes required are the creation of a Sustainable Energy Unit in government to implement, monitor and report on the achievement of policy targets, and generally drive the shift to renewables on the Government side; the resourcing of the independent utilities regulator the Utilities Regulation and Competition Authority (URCA tricity sector; and the creation and implementation of new legislation and updated regulations to incentivise and govern the introduction of renewables and encourage energy efficiency, such as by providing for net-metering that allows consumers to be credited for excess renewable energy they produce in their homes. Energy policy reforms in to 18 months National Energy Policy Committee targeting 15% and 30% renewable share of Bahamas energy mix by 2020 and 2030 respectively SEE page 5B By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The financier for an $857 million Bahamas-based resort pro ject has urged the New York State Supreme Court to impose sanctions against the develop ments former general partner for its frivolous conduct in halting the affirmation of an arbitration ruling in its favour, warning that South Ocean continues to languish and urging: Enough is enough. Connecticut-based hedge fund, Plainfield Asset Management, in its October 12, 2010, motion against Roger Stein and his RHS Ven tures vehicle,d escribed the latters allega tions that it fabricated the unavailability of a key witness and coerced a former employee to sign a false affidavit as one more delay tactic pulled from $857m resort project: Enough is enough ROGER STEIN SEE page 5B A BEACH VILLA at sunset at the Sands Emerald Bay resort. Sandals eyes new resort purchase n All-inclusive chain seeking to acquire another Exuma resort from receivership, this time Grand Isle Villas n Latter's property owners also interested in banding together to make purchase, with 47 of 78 units sold n Receiv ership caused 'total shock' and 'immediate panic' in Exuma SEE page 4B By ALISON LOWE B usiness Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net Bahamian electricity con sumers could save $5 billion over a period of decades if steps are taken to increase energy efficiency and implement renewable energy technologies i n the Bahamas, according to a German company contracted to study the potential costs and benefits of these energy sources. Dr Ole Langniss, a senior consultant with Fichtner, pre sented this figure as he gave an insight into his company's work in assessing the potential sav ings for the Bahamas from the introduction of energy efficien cy measures. Fichtner analysed the potential both technical and economic for various renewable energy technologies to be introduced, the costs and benefits associated with imple menting energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies, and policy recommendations to $5bn ener gy savings goal SEE page 4B

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B YDEIDREM.BASTIAN I t is easy to steal on the Internet, but that doesn't make it legal. As we are all aware, lifting and stealing not only happens through the use of a gun, since it is quite prevalent in cyberspace via the simple use of a right click key. The best way to keep your images youri mages is not to put them o n the Internet at all. Indeed, one school of thought subscribes to the b elief: "If you put it on the W eb, others can (and will make copies of it. Have you ever wondered w hy there is a big disparity in the cost of Website development? While copyright garners a significant amount of atten-t ion, some website develop m ent firms misunderstand concerns regarding these i ssues. O n the face of it, when a site is completed the developer should immediately p rovide the client with ALL r elevant documents, including image and software licenses, domain registration a greements, Web hosting terms of service, and copyright release. T his cannot work in isolation or continue until we f irst define copyright. W hat is copyright? Copyright is a form of legal protection enforced bym ost countries. It gives authors the exclusive right to publish, reproduce and seek compensation from those who make unautho rised copies or reproduc t ions of these works. Always Use a Contract E ven though you may t rust each other, a good rule of thumb is to always use a c ontract that protects both p arties. When do I have copyright protection? The minute you create a design and its embodied in a tangible medium (meani ng no longer just an idea in your head but sketched out o n paper). An author or designer owns the design even if you dont place a copyright symbol on the work. Do I need to register my design? Registration is a prerequisite to filing a lawsuit for copyright infringement. Generally, you cannot seek statutory damages unless you register the copyright. What about designs crea ted by employees? E mployees who create work within the scope of their e mployment do so as a work made for hire. In that case, the employer o wns the design. Is every copy an i nfringement? C ertain copyrighted work may not require a license, depending on several fac-t ors, such as: 1 ) When your new work alters the original one with new expression or meaning 2 ) The nature of the work 3) The quantity and quali ty of the original work used Being on the Web doesn't m ake it Public Domain If you did not write or cre ate the graphic or data, no one mistakenly left it out there for you. Sorry, it was not an oversight W hat can you copyright? Copyrightable works i nclude literary works such as journals or computer programs, pictures, graphics, blueprints of architecture,m usic, song lyrics, plays and screenplays, and audiovisual recordings such as movies and sound recordings. How e ver, you may not copyright common phrases, or death and taxes, nor theories ori deas. If I dont tell, how will they know? Bear in mind: "Integrity is doing the right thing even if no one is watching". Programs called "spiders" exist to search images and text on the Web and review for copyright infringements. What can I do to protect my design from copyright? Well, you can employ technical measures, but reg istering your material is your best defence. Despite modi fications, renaming or colour c hanging, it can still be f ound, and offenders are still liable. Remember, you do not acquire copyright rights automatically, just because y ouve paid someone to crea te the material. Furthermore, complaining about snitchers removing your work is like leaving boxes of $100 notes outside on the pavement at night and expecting them to be t here when you awake. H ere are some temporary w ays to protect your work Be sure to put your copyright notice ( 2010 Your Name Here) in smallt ype on your document online. Make images harder to "borrow" by reducing the i mage size for screen viewing. Lower the image resolution to 72 dpi and size it to b e 400 pixels or smaller on t he longest side. Use electronic watermarking to protect youri mages. Post a notice on your home page asking others to g et your permission before linking to your page. I s the copyright symbol necessary? F or work to be copyright protected, it does not need a copyright notice because all published material is auto m atically copyrighted. How long does copyright last? Copyright protection, in most cases, expires 50 yearsa fter your death. What is fair use? Fair use is that which m akes it OK to copy some one else's work. It is a defence against a charge of c opyright infringement that a llows others to use small portions of your work, but not in its entirety. The judge then makes a decision based upon the fair use arguments. Disclaimer: The informat ion in this article is meant o nly as a reference tool and not as legal advice. However, if you have specific legal questions about copyright issues on the Web, you s hould consult a lawyer. Im a minor; can I claim copyright? Sure. There are no age limits to copyright. In this spirit, your designs and text are your lifeblood. J ust as a jeweller protects h is jewels in a locked case, valued designs should be safeguarded as well. Almost anyone capable of using your image is capable o f borrowing them indefinitely. You wont believe the many additional avenues that can be taken to lift locked photos or text from the web. H eres the kicker: "Don't practice the no-right-click orW atermark image thing to prevent theft, just simplym ake it not worth stealing!" So until we meet again, have fun, enjoy life and stay on t op of your game. NB: The author encourages feedback at: deedee2111@hotmail.com C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010, PAGE 3B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM DOCTORS HOSPITALT hursday, October 21st, 2010 @ 6pmD octors Hospital Conference Room LECTURE DATE Please join us as our guest every third Thursday of t he month for this scintillating series of the most relevant health issues affecting society today.DISTINGUISHED LECTURE SERIES S P E A K E R: Dr. Theodore TurnquestHematology/OncologyP urpose:To educate the public about the important health issues, presented by Screenings:Get your Free Blood Pressure, Cholesterol, and 5pm & 6pm.RSVP: THIS MONTHS TOPICBREAST CANCER SCHEDULELECTURE SERIES November Lecture is Diabetes December Lecture is TBA Entrance to the copyright web THE ART OF GRAPHIX DEIDRE M.BASTIAN I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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and partner, declined to comment yesterday when contacted by Tribune Business. David Johnstone, the Lennox Paton partner who acts for the debenture holder, also could not be reached. Tribune Business understands that Mr Gomez is working on setting up an 'Open Bid' auction for Grand Isle Villas in case any of the potential purchasers fail to come through. Apart from Sandals, another option on the table is a potential offer from Grand Isle's existing property owners, who collectively own 47 of its 78 units the other 31 remaining unsold. "I've heard of that strategy," one source said, in relation to the property owners' interests in acquiring Grand Isle outright. "They're very wealthy owners, so much so that they could go ahead and buy it. Both of those strategies Sandals and the owners are on the table." The property owners would have the collective financial wherewithal to obtain the debt financing necessary to acquire Grand Isle Villas from receivership. The main creditor/debenture holder is understood to be Textron Finance, the financial arm of the defence contractor of the same name, and it is thought to be in no rush to offload Grand Isle Villas, eschewing a fire sale price in favour of getting top dollar for the luxury resort asset. That could impact Sandals, given that the resort chain usually likes to make its acquisitions at attractive entry prices, hence the deals for Emerald Bay and the Royal Bahamian. Speaking at yesterday's press conference to promote the Exuma Business Outlook Conference, Floyd Armbrister, president of that island's Chamber of Commerce, said news of Grand Isle's receivership had created "immediate panic" on the island. Pointing out that just months prior Grand Isle had been named as among the leading Caribbean resort properties for occupancy, Mr Armbrister said that "to have the property in receivership was a total shock to the people of Exuma and the economy of Exuma". He added of the $110 million property's 60 staff: "Many people are fearful they will be without a job as a result of the receivership. The receiver and the owners appear to be moving in different directions. '"The owners, other than the 31 empty units, want to acquire the property, and other people are trying to buy the property." Grand Isle Villas' developer was EGI Ltd, whose principals were Pamela McCullough and Jim Clabaugh. They invested heavily in the property's development, and its operations were relatively successful, but sources suggested too much was spent on construction when Grand Isle could have been successful with more modest spend. As a result, Grand Isle never generated enough cash flow to service its debt repayment obligations. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM U/LX=HOLQ/HRf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fDVGHQHGE\ PDQDJHPHQW 7HFKQRORJ\XVHUVZLWKLQWKHVFRSHRIUHVSRQVLELOLW\PXVWEHGHYHORSHGWRHQDEOH XVHUIRFXVHGGD\WRGD\VXSSRUWRISULPDU\EXVLQHVVV\VWHPV (QVXUHVHFXUH,7RSHUDWLRQVE\LPSOHPHQWLQJDQGPDQDJLQJWKH*OREDOt+RWHO ,7HFXULW\ROLFLHVDLQWDLQGDWDEDFNXSLQWHJULW\DQGNHHSFXUUHQW&RQWLQJHQF\t 'LVDVWHUHFRYHU\SODQVDQGZRUNZLWKKRWHORSHUDWLRQVGHSDUWPHQWVWRGHYHORS PDLQWDLQDQGWHVW%XVLQHVV&RQWLQXLW\SODQVSHUWDUZRRG+RWHOVtHVRUWV SXEOLVKHG,QWHUQDO$XGLWWDQGDUGV 6NLOOVt$ELOLWLHV 0XVWEHDEOHWRVSHDNUHDGZULWHDQGXQGHUVWDQGWKHSULPDU\ODQJXDJHVfXVHGLQ WKHZRUNSODFH 5HTXLUHVJRRGFRPPXQLFDWLRQVNLOOVERWKYHUEDODQGZULWWHQXVWSRVVHVVEDVLF FRPSXWDWLRQDODELOLW\ 0XVWEHDEOHWRSHUIRUPDYDULHW\RIGXWLHVRIWHQFKDQJLQJIURPRQHWDVNWR DQRWKHURIDGLIIHUHQWQDWXUHZLWKRXWORVVRIHIFLHQF\RUFRPSRVXUH $ELOLW\WRIRFXVDQGPDLQWDLQDWWHQWLRQWRSHUIRUPDQFHRIWDVNVDQGWRZRUNDQG FRPSOHWHDVVLJQPHQWVRQWLPHGHVSLWHIUHTXHQWVWUHVVIXOHPHUJHQF\FULWLFDORU XQXVXDOLQWHUUXSWLRQV $ELOLW\WREHUHVRXUFHIXOFUHDWLYHDQGPDLQWDLQH[LELOLW\ 4XDOLFDWLRQVt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isit our website at www.cob.edu.bs Sandals eyes new resort purchase FROM page 1B help the Bahamas achieve a sustainable energy future. He was speaking as a presenter at a stakeholder workshop entitled A Sustainable Energy Program for the Bahamas being held at the Atlantis hotel on Paradise Island on day one of the Caribbean Regional Energy Forum (CREF forum is expected to draw hundreds of participants from the private and public sector to discuss renewable energy and its future in the Bahamas and the Caribbean in particular. According to Dr Langniss, Fichtner's research determined that 10 million barrels of oil equivalent to a cost of $10 billion US dollars could be saved over a period equivalent to the average lifetimes of the energy efficient equipment and renewable energy plants that could be introduced into The Bahamas. Highlighting Fichtner's find ings in its recent 12-month study in the Bahamas relating to the potential cost savings associated with the introduc tion of energy efficiency measures the replacement of incandescent bulbs with CFLs (compact fluorescent lamps the replacement of air-conditioning units, refrigerators, dish washers, washing machines and stereos with energy star-stan dard equipment Dr Langniss s aid that if all households and hotels were to implement such energy-saving measures, an estimated 26-34 per cent of present power generation could be saved. Energy audits were conducted by the company in a number of private households, hotels and public buildings to p rovide a baseline for their analyses. In terms of renewable energy production, calculations by Fichtner revealed that the renewable energy source with the greatest technical potential for the Bahamas was wind, followed by photovoltaic (PVo r solar power in an open field setting, ocean thermal energy, solar water heaters, biomass, installation of PV cells on buildings, and waste-to-energy facilities. However, the energy source with the greatest economic potential at present based on its viability to be implemented in a cost-effective manner is biomass, which involves the conversion of biological material, such as wood, into useful energy. Biomass is suggested as a renewable energy source which could, based on present conditions, generate up to 300 gigawatt hours of power per year. Dr Langniss explained that Fichtner undertook studies on the viability of various forms of renewable energy in six Family Islands. Coming out of this analysis, Fichtner found that among the most viable energy projects would be a 20 megawatt biomass energy facility in Eleuthera. Dr Langniss suggested that a "very important option", which should be considered by the Government, was to interconnect islands like New Providence and Eleuthera so that energy generated in certain islands can be transferred to others where generation capac ity is limited. "We feel this should be investigated further interconnecting some of the islands because the (renew able power generation) poten tial in New Providence, the main load centre in the Bahamas, is quite limited, but on the other islands the poten tial is huge," said Dr Langniss. F ROM page 1B $5bn energy savings goal

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the same playbook that has repeatedly delayed attempts to ratify the arbitration ruling in law. Plainfield, which has invested $85 million in the proposed redevelopment of the 375-acre South Ocean resort in southwestern New Providence, alleged that Mr Stein and RHS Ventures had not stopped representing themselves as the projects general partner despite being ordered to cease doing so immediately by the arbitration tribunal. The hedge fund also alleged that Mr Stein and RHS Ventures had c0ntinued to interfere in South Oceans business affairs, despite being ordered not to do so, and had failed to co-operate in the transition from their control to Plainfield. In addition, Mr Stein and his various RHS companies were alleged to have failed to pay $3.634 million back to the South Ocean project, despite being ordered to do this by the arbitration tribunal within 30 days of the verdict being handed down. Respondents have done none of these things and are m anoevering to maintain that state of affairs for as long as possible, Plainfield alleged. The[ir] Motion to Amend is nothing more than a continuation of respondents improper efforts to obstruct enforcement of the Award at every step. The unfortunate consequence of r espondents tactics is that the underlying real estate project continues to languish in the Bahamas. And, for good measure, Plainfield added: The Motion to Amend is not only baseless and offensive, but also consistent with what the Arbitral Trib unal unanimously found to be respondents continuing course of misconduct, misappropriation, deceit and spoilation of evidence. In the unanimous award, the Arbitral Tribunal found, a mong other things, that Stein was not only evasive and not credible, but also had secretly destroyed evidence through the use of computer scrubbing software in violation of orders from the Arbitral Tribunal and a Bahamian court in a related action. Repsondents prevarications must be stopped. Today is October 12, 2010. The unanimous Arbitral Award held, among other things, that Stein was properly removed as general partner in November 2008, finding that Stein had, inter alia, breached fiduciary duties, misa ppropriated millions of dollars, and concealed his improper activities. Two years after Steins proper removal as general partner, Stein continues to seek to evade, delay and avoid the cons equences of his misconduct. Petitioners submit that enough is enough. Describing as baseless Mr Steins allegations that it coerced a former employee, Eric Reehl, to sign a false affidavit, Plainfield produced new affidavits from Reehl, plus its e xternal and in-house counsel, Howard Kaplan and Steven Segaloff, all denying that this had occurred. As for the supposed unavailability of witness Niv Harizman, Plainfield said he had been available by phone, but Mr Stein and his attorneys declined to examine h im. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010, PAGE 5B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 14thAmericas Food&Beverage Show&Conference For information contact Omar Gonzalez at omar.gonzalez@fas.usda.gov. Great airline and hotel discounts available.October26-27,2010M iamiBeachConventionCenterM EET +350 exhibitors from +27 countries WITNESSthe Americas Chef Competition, where Olympic Chefs try to conquer the AmericasVISIT20 international pavilions, offering u nique products and servicesNETWORKwith 6,000 food and beverage buyers from 63 countries under one roofBENEFITfrom a one stop opportunity for ideas, products and business Attend theRegister NOW:www.americasfoodandbeverage.comD ONT MISSt he Taste of Peru Pavillion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fDVGHQHGE\ PDQDJHPHQW 7HFKQRORJ\XVHUVZLWKLQWKHVFRSHRIUHVSRQVLELOLW\PXVWEHGHYHORSHGWRHQDEOH XVHUIRFXVHGGD\WRGD\VXSSRUWRISULPDU\EXVLQHVVV\VWHPV (QVXUHVHFXUH,7RSHUDWLRQVE\LPSOHPHQWLQJDQGPDQDJLQJWKH*OREDOt+RWHO ,7HFXULW\ROLFLHVDLQWDLQGDWDEDFNXSLQWHJULW\DQGNHHSFXUUHQW&RQWLQJHQF\ t 'LVDVWHUHFRYHU\SODQVDQGZRUNZLWKKRWHORSHUDWLRQVGHSDUWPHQWVWRGHYHORS PDLQWDLQDQGWHVW%XVLQHVV&RQWLQXLW\SODQVSHUWDUZRRG+RWHOVtHVRUWV SXEOLVKHG,QWHUQDO$XGLWWDQGDUGV 6NLOOVt$ELOLWLHV 0XVWEHDEOHWRVSHDNUHDGZULWHDQGXQGHUVWDQGWKHSULPDU\ODQJXDJHVfXVHGLQ WKHZRUNSODFH 5HTXLUHVJRRGFRPPXQLFDWLRQVNLOOVERWKYHUEDODQGZULWWHQXVWSRVVHVVEDVLF FRPSXWDWLRQDODELOLW\ 0XVWEHDEOHWRSHUIRUPDYDULHW\RIGXWLHVRIWHQFKDQJLQJIURPRQHWDVNWR DQRWKHURIDGLIIHUHQWQDWXUHZLWKRXWORVVRIHIFLHQF\RUFRPSRVXUH $ELOLW\WRIRFXVDQGPDLQWDLQDWWHQWLRQWRSHUIRUPDQFHRIWDVNVDQGWRZRUNDQG FRPSOHWHDVVLJQPHQWVRQWLPHGHVSLWHIUHTXHQWVWUHVVIXOHPHUJHQF\FULWLFDORU XQXVXDOLQWHUUXSWLRQV $ELOLW\WREHUHVRXUFHIXOFUHDWLYHDQGPDLQWDLQH[LELOLW\ 4XDOLFDWLRQVt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he passing of a solar ordinance demanding that all new Bahamian homes be equipped with solar water heaters, and changes to the current building code to include energy efficiency standards, are also envisaged. The new draft report, which was presented to the Ministry of Environment this month and will shortly go before Cabinet, adds into the mix the findings of two InterAmerican Development Bank (IDB ed studies on the Bahamian energy sector, plus the research done by German consultants Fichtner, who undertook an extensive 12-month report into the potential for various alternative energy sources in the Bahamas, making recommendations on policies and reforms. In this sense it fills infomation gaps that existed in the first report, which was presented to the Government in November 2008, due to a lack of available relevant data on the sector and what could work in the Bahamas. Speaking at the Caribbean Regional Energy Forum at Atlantis yesterday, where multiple national and international stakeholders will meet this week to discuss renewable energy in the Bahamas and the Caribbean, Mr Weech said: What we knew at that time (that the first report was produced) were that there were plenty holes and we had to find a way of filling them. It makes no sense saying the Bahamas is going to go to biomass for energy if theres been no studies of what sort of biomass could be grown in the Bahamas, used in the Bahamas, and whether there were sufficient resources to make it significant in terms of the input into the nation al energy production and electricity production. That work was done. Weve done the preliminary work on wind, the preliminary work on waves. All that information is now in place in order to make an informed decision on what a sustainable energy matrix could look like for the Bahamas, said Mr Weech. The NEPCs latest report to government highlights the most technically and economically viable renewable energy sources for the Bahamas in the short and longer term, including biomass, photovoltaic power, waste -to-energy, solar water heating and ocean thermal energy and where the greatest potential exists to conserve energy usage. Such energy-saving potentials were termed the low hanging fruit in the sustainable energy equation. They are ready now, at low cost, for all consumers and sectors, said Mr Weech. The NEPC is targeting a share of at least 15 per cent and 30 per cent renewable power in the Bahamas energy mix by 2020 and 2030 respectively. Its latest report is more heavily focused on the electricity sector, said Mr Weech, as electricity generation accounts for the use of almost 70 per cent of all oil imports in the Bahamas, and its cost is rising rapidly. In his presentation, the NEPC chairman noted that between 2001 and 2007, the percentage of revenue expatriated from the Bahamas for oil imports grew from the equivalent of 16.6 per cent to 26.7 per cent of estimated tourism expenditure, with the total expenditure on oil imports in 2008 was equal to $1.1 billion or 10 per cent of Gross Domestic Product. Demand for electricity is expected to grow by 8 per cent per annum over the next five years, primarily as a result of foreign direct investment. Mr Weech said he hopes the Government can promptly provide feedback on the latest report to the NEPC. We cannot move forward unless we have that interaction with the politicians to say OK, move forward, go do something else. Give us an indication of what we need to do, he said. In the meantime, it is expected that the Government will move ahead in the short term with the introduction of a waste-toenergy facility at the Tonique WilliamsDarling landfill site, which will both address pressing waste management issues and potentially provide up to 15 megawatts of the total 300 megawatts power demand in New Providence from renewable sources. Mr Weech described such a project as being likely to provide the quickest bang for your buck as a renewable energy option for the Bahamas at this time. Min ister of State for the Environment, Phenton Neymour, was unable to put a timeline on when bidding on this project would be put out to tender by the Government yesterday. F ROM page 1B Energy policy reforms in to 18 months $857m resort project: Enough is enough F ROM page 1B

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 3523(57<%$5*$,1,1+($6 $ OLPLWHGQXPEHURIVLQJOH IDPLO\DQGGXSOH[ORWVLQ 6 RXWKHDV(VWDWHVDW J HQHURXVO\GLVFRXQWHGSULFHV 6RXWK6HDV ZKLFKLVORFDWHGLQWKH:HVWHUQ 'LVWULFWRI1HZ3URYLGHQFHLVDQXSVFDOHZDWHUIURQW J DWHGFRPPXQLW\GHVLJQHGIRUIDPLOLHVZKRSUHIHU V DIHDQGRSXOHQWHQYLURQPHQW 6SHFLDO)HDWXUHV,QFOXGH +RXUHFXULW\ -RJJLQJDQGDWXUH7UDLOV /LJKWHG7HQQLV&RXUWV %RDUG:DON %HDFK$FFHVVIRUDOOKRPHVLWHV /DQG ORFNHGPDULQDDQGFDQDOZLWK FRQQHFWLQJGHHSZDWHUFKDQQHOWR$WODQWLFFHDQ $OOORWVRIIHUHGDUHZLWKLQPLQXWHVZDONLQJ G LVWDQFHWREHDFK $OOORWVUHDG\IRULPPHGLDWHKRPHFRQVWUXFWLRQ '21,667+,6%$5*$,1 &DOOHWHU*DODQRV ),1$1&,1*&$1%($55$1*(' Armbrister said many Exum ians had been shocked into r eality since the Sandals p roperty re-opened earlier this year, and now recognised that the growth years enjoyed when Emerald Bay was operated under the Four Seasonsb rand may not return. The impact has not been a nticipated, Mr Armbrister said, when questioned by Tribune Business about whether the Sandals acquisition, and subsequent Emerald Bay re-o pening, had produced the p rojected economic benefits. Many people were still in Four Seasons mode, he added, but were shocked i nto reality when they recogn ised those days were gone, and probably gone for good. Mr Armbrister suggested t hat the all-inclusive resort model, as successfully prac-t iced by Sandals and other h otel chains throughout the Caribbean, was not the best fit for islands such as Exuma. He said this was because guests at such properties had not only paid for their airline tickets and room in one pack-a ge, but also their food and beverage, plus sporting and activities requirements. As a result, with everything paid for and available on the resort campus, there was no r eason for tourists to leave t he hotel and patronise nearby Bahamian-owned busi nesses, eliminating the trickl e down and spin-off effects. A gentlemen and I discussed the impact of an alli nclusive on small economies, a nd in the discussions we said that 10 years ago, a person coming to the Bahamas with $ 10,000 to spend might be spending $1,500 on his airline ticket, and another $1,000-$ 2,000 on accommodation. T he rest of the monies went into the community, Mr Armbrister said. But if someone is now staying at an all-inclusive, $8,000 is going on the ticket and accommodation, and theres just $2,000 for the local community. That is the typeo f impact all-inclusives have on the local economy. However, he acknowledged that the demand for all-inclusives among travellers was on the rise across the world. T he combination of the F our Seasons-operated Emera ld Bays failure, which put more than 500 staff out of work (at least temporarily and the global recession had resulted in Exumas popula-t ion shrinking again, Mr Armb rister said. The Chamber recognises the island of Exuma has experienced significant setbacks over a number of years, MrA rmbrister said. Once upon a time, during the Four Seas ons era, we had people flocki ng to the island for opportun ities. E xumas population had remained relatively flat at a round 3,000 for many years, Mr Armbrister said, but at the Four Seasons peak, the num b er of vehicle licence plates i ssued on the island exceeded 3,000, a definite sign of population increase. That population, he added, had dwindled, because every week when the Fast Ferry isc oming in people are lining up with their vehicles and moving off the island, resulting in properties being put on the market or into foreclosure. M r Armbrister, a realtor by p rofession, said many of the foreclosed properties were multi-family, abandoned byp ersons who felt there no longer remained any opportunities on Exuma and had n o further use for them. While employment levels had picked up since Sandals re-opened Emerald Bay ear l ier this year, hiring some 300400 persons, Mr Armbrister said many jobs recently created on Exuma were domestic and menial, and not similar to those held by locals and Bahamians during Four Seasons. There are some concerns that some people working there [Sandals] are doing jobs that locals could be doing. Mr Armbrister described Exumas economy as being in a slow or stop state, with m any small Bahamian-owned r estaurants appearing to have closed their doors for good, having sold-off much of their equipment. Hope Still, the Exuma Chamber president said much hope remained, especially asi slanders were moving to plan t heir own future themselves, rather than rely on Nassau and other outsiders to dictate the development of their island using a colonial minds et. The Exuma Congress, which is an initiative that has just come to the forefront,w as created as a result of the people of Exuma realising the need to assist in determining t he direction of the island of E xuma, Mr Armbrister said. For far too long, weve relied on direction from peop le from the capital, and from people selected and elected to govern. From my perspec-t ive, its been from what I w ould call the colonial mentality This goes there, that goes there rather than involve local persons who feel the pain and recognise the direction the island of Exu m a and its economy need to go in. Exuma was suffering from a brain drain, with its most talented workers unable to find jobs that paid the remu-n eration they wanted, with t he island also witnessing the deterioration of our physical infrastructure and deterioration of school and education infrastructure. The Exuma Congress, Mr Armbrister added, aimed to develop a paper setting out the direction the islandsd evelopment needed to take, so the people of the Bahamas and Exuma will be the true beneficiaries of what happens in the island of Exuma. T he Chamber president s aid Exuma would receive an i mmediate lift if the Georgetown Dock was relocated or repaired, something that had been under discussion for several years. Land had also beenc leared for the construction o f a mini-hospital, but nothing had happened, while a new primary school had been promised for 30 years. Mr Armbrister said one t eacher was teaching across all six grades in Williams T own, while both the high s chool principal and district e ducation officer were both o perating in an acting capacity. The high school is in a terrible state of disrepair, and if we do not have an educatedl abour force, we will have m any social ills, he added. Mr Armbrister added that he would also address the impact the Real Property Tax Act, and increases to this tax, had made on Exumas winterr esidents. Arguing that the one policy fits all cannot work, he argued that this Act needed to be tailor-made for different Family Islands, and w arned that tax increases t ook much-needed money out of the economy during a recession. T he Exuma Chamber was also aiming to launch a seminar series, Mr Armbrister s aid, providing tips on how to survive the recession and create new businesses, since many successful companies w ere born in such an envi ronment. Sandals all-inclusive model hurts Exuma FROM page 1B

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010, PAGE 9B statute, will change entirely the present system of conv eyancing in the Bahamas. T he Land Adjudication Bill, she explained, was an attempt to reform and do away with the concept of generation land, since it aims to grant title over one acre to persons who can show they h ave been in uninterrupted possession of that real estate parcel for 12 years or more. Persons in that situation will receive a Certificate of Title to that one acre, or possibly 1.5 acres in certain circumstances. But Ms Smith said that if the amount of real estate involved was, say two acres or five acres, under theB ills terms the amount of land in excess of one acre would go to the Government. That is one concern that has arisen, Ms Smith said, adding that another was the f act that the Land Ajudicat ion Bill sought only to deal with generation property, and did not look at commonageo wnership. Another issue she identified was that the Bill appeared to make no provis ion for documentary title h olders wishing to assert their claims to so-called generation property. S peaking ahead of her address to the Exuma Business Outlook Conference, MsS mith said: I will invite the G overnment to consider another approach that does n ot limit rights of adjudication to one acre and 12 years. She suggested extending adjudication under the Bill to all properties, given that perhaps this will allow for a more accurate land registry, given the significance the landr egistry will play in con veyancing in the future. Ms Smith pointed out that i ncluding all Bahamas-based real estate parcels and properties in a centralised Land Registry was a task that would not be accomplishedo vernight, as the Cayman I slands had only completed this mission within the last three to four years, despite passing its land registry law as far back as 1971. Explaining that many Caribbean countries hadb ased their land registration legislation on a model proposed by the UK Foreign Office in the late 1960s, with subsequent tweaks to accountf or the local situation on the ground, Ms Smith said that a major difference between the B ahamas proposed legislation and what had been adopted in other Caribbeanc ountries was that this nation aimed to complete the Land Registry before all real estate was adjudicated upon. Our proposed legislation d iffers in a significant way f rom the model used in other C aribbean countries because there, all the land has already been adjudicated upon, MsS mith said. All the rights and interests are vetted beforet hey go on the Registry. We appear to not be going t hat route, and it may lead to the Registry being less than accurate. The Registrar will h ave to register a conveyance once it is presented, and there is no process to ensure. Undert he Registration of Land Act, once a person receives a Certificate of Title and presents it, the Registrar has to enter it o n the Register without vet ting, even if its being chal lenged on the basis of fraud. If i t was adjudicated previously, such an issue would not arise. As a result, she expressed c oncern that land title documents could be included on the Bahamas Land Registry w ithout any record of owner ship challenges, such as via the Quieting Titles Act. As a result, a vendor might be able to sell property to someone who, having checked the Reg-i stry and seen no red flags, p urchases it without knowing the title was being challenged on the grounds of, say, fraud. The Land Registry is intended to show all encumberances and charges over a specific piece of Bahamianr eal estate, in addition to providing ownership details and those of mortgagees. Ms Smith said the Land Registrys creation shoulds horten the time taken to close real estate purchases and reduce associated costs, s uch as attorneys fees. Attorneys normally charge a fee equivalent to 2.5 per c ent of the purchase price, but since the Land Registry would reduce the risk associated with title searches (proving clean titles), these fees might c ome down. It will eliminate title s earches as we know it, Ms Smith said. All interests in land will be entered on ther egistry. Individuals simply have to look at the Registry tos ee all rights and interests in a p iece of land. F loyd Armbrister, the Exuma Chamber of Commerces president, yesterday quest ioned the impact the new leg islation would have on the Quieting Titles Act and others tatues. Comparing the Bahamas Land Adjudication Bill with legislation already in effect in T rinidad & Tobago, Mr Arm brister said: A significant dif ference is that more power s eems to be in the hands of the Minister in the Bahamas, rather than the courts, as in Trinidad & Tobago. M s Smith added: The legislation being tabled in Parliament will change entirely t he present system of con veyancing in the Bahamas. Accuracy fears on Land Registry FROM page 1B


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