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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/01620
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune
Uniform Title: Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Place of Publication: Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date: August 3, 2010
Frequency: daily, except sunday
daily
normalized irregular
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Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
System ID: UF00084249:01620

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N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 106 No.209TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010 PRICE 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNYWITH ASHOWER HIGH 92F LOW 79F By AVA TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter aturnquest@tribunemedia.net P OLICE are questioning four men following the mur der of a well-known fishing g uide in Exuma. C ely Smith, 45, was at his home in Stuart Manor on Sunday morning when four gunmen with dreadlocked hair kicked down his door and fired gunshots in his direction. Mr Smith later died of his i njuries at a local clinic. Sources close to the investigation report that four men helping police with theiri nquiries were arrested by Drug Enforcement Unit offi cers off the Montagu foreshore. It is believed that after shooting Mr Smith, the culprits fled to Staniel Cay where they commandeered a white coloured go-fast boat and headed for New Providence, however police were last night tight-lipped over the details. It is understood that in addition to the four men a ssisting police two others are being sought. Chrislyn Skippings, press o fficer of the Royal Bahamas Police Force, said there was no information to suggest thei ncident was drug-related at t his time. Police have also disputed claims that the incident wasl inked to a fight which took place yesterday in a nightclub in Black Point, a settlement1 5 minutes away from Stuart Manor, where two men got into an altercation which resulted in one of them beingg un butted and flown to hos pital in Nassau. According to relatives, Mr Smith had seven children and had lived at his two-storey home in Stuarts Manor for nearly 15 years. On the morning of his shooting, four of his sons were present two of whom are still in high school. A family member said: The Tribune THEPEOPLESPAPER BIGGESTANDBEST BAHAMASEDITION McCOMBO OF THE DAY N E W www.tribune242.com HORROR WEEKEND By AVA TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter aturnquest@tribunemedia.net THESE are the dramatic moments when bystanders and tourists rushed to rescue the victims of a horrific boardwalk collapse. The terrified victims were among a 50-strong party of mourners who had turned up on Saturday morning to pay their last respects to 32-year-old Sharmaine Smith-Downy. MOURNERSINDRAMATICBOARDWALKRESCUE S EE page nine THE BODY is removed from the scene on East Bay Street. Felip Major /Tribune staff By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net A 43-YEAR-OLD woman was last night being questioned by police after a man believed to be her husband was stabbed to death in a parking lot. The killing took place in the vacant lot located between the Green Parrot bar and Bahamas Air Sea Rescue Association (BASRA) headquarters on East Bay Street. While the victim has not been formally identified, The Tribune understands his surname is Williams. A manager at the Green Parrot Bar and Grill, which is next to the site of the death, said Mr Williams was arriving for his work shift at about 9pm on Saturday as a security guard securing property belonging to USbased civil engineering firm W OMAN QUESTIONED AFTERMANSTABBEDTODEATH SEE page eight F ishing guide is murdered in Exuma SEE page eight By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT The opening of the crawfish season on Grand Bahama was marked with tragedy when two men died in separate crawfishing incidents in the West End and East End areas. According to police reports, the body of one man was pulled from the waters near Memory Rock on Monday. His identity is being withheld by police. Two die in tragic opening to the crawfish season SEE page eight By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT: Grand Bahama Police seized almost $600,000 worth of illegal drugs and arrested two men, one of whom was shot during a high-speed chase and shootout with officers. Assistant Superintendent Hector Delva said police are searching for a third man who escaped after the vehicle being pursued by officers crashed into a tree. According to reports, DEU officers were LOCAL and international law enforcement agents in the past two days have apprehended more than 400 people attempting to enter the Bahamas illegally. The influx has caused the Royal Bahamas Defence Force to increase its patrols at sea and in the air. The US Coast Guard has reportedly done like wise. The first group, 159 Haitians, were apprehended on Friday north west of Great Inagua by the US Coast Guard $600,000 worth of drugs seized after chase, shootout SEE page nine 400 attempt to illegally enter Bahamas in two days SEE page eight P h o t o s / U l r i c W o o d s i d e PLEASE NOTE THAT, DUE TO TECHNICAL ISSUES, THERE IS N O USA TODAY IN TODAYS TRIBUNE

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B y DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedida.net FREEPORT Grand Bahama Police have receivedi nformation from the public t hat could possibly help iden tity the decomposed body found inside a high voltageb uilding on Kings Road. We have an unconfirmed identity of a person who was k nown to frequent the area, but we are still trying to make some determination and so w e are awaiting the results of an autopsy, Inspector Hector Delva told The Tribune O n Wednesday, police discovered the partly decomposed body of a black male, dressed in white t-shirt andd ark trousers. A dog was also found dead. A Grand Bahama Power C ompany statement said: We are saddened to learn of the recent loss of life found at our premises on Kings R oad. We are satisfied that every reasonable precautionarym easure was taken to prevent such an unfortunate mishap from happening. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Colonial Group International:Insurance,Health,Pensions,LifeIf you protect your lifestyle with a CGI company,you can pay less for motor and home insurance,and enjoy firstrate business cover too.From health insurance,rich in benefits and offering global coverage,to pensions and family protection,CGI companies offer flexible products to make the most of your budget.Insurance326-7100 for an agent Health326-8191* Pensions502-7526 Life 356-5433www.cgigroup.bm* Freeport 351-3960 Colonial Group International is rated A-(Excellentby AM Best. Lifestyle ProtectionHealth,wealth and happiness cover.Insurance,Health,Pensions,Life Colonial Pension Services (Bahamas Tel.502-7526 Atlantic Medical Insurance Tel.326-8191 Freeport Tel.351-3960 Security & General Insurance Tel.326-7100 By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net POLICE in Florida are c onfident they have found t he remains of a Bahamian w oman who went missing there in 2006. Cocoa Police Department believe the body to be that of 22-year-old Darice Knowles. They were tipped off to the location by a prison inmate. Barbara Matthews, a spokesperson for the Cocoa Police Department in Brevard County, Florida, told al ocal newspaper that police had not positively identified the remains, but were nonetheless certain that t hey belong to the Bahamian. Shes pretty much intact a nd you can make out the o utline of her remains, said M s Matthews T he discovery of Darices s uspected remains revives w hat had become a cold c ase file for local police. Darice was said to have flown to the US from Nassau in March 2006 to visit male friends from theB ahamas when she went m issing. Her disappearance w as not reported to police u ntil three months later. Foul play was suspected, but no one has ever been taken into custody in connection with the matter. A former Miss Bahamas contestant and law student, Darice is the only child of Mario and Princess Knowles. According to Darices cousin, Dana Munnings, many of her family members in Nassau h ave been locked in a state o f denial over the disappearance. T his weekend, detectives w ere said to be unwilling to discuss what may have happ ened to Darice, but said it w as likely she knew her a ttacker. One of the suspects in the matter went with police tot he scene to help find where Knowles body was located, a ccording to local reports T he first signs that law e nforcement officials may have found Darices remains came on Friday when police were able to locate a foot bone at a wooded site off State Road 524 in Brevard County. They were reported to have unearthed yet more bones yesterday, a week after police called in heavy equipment to begin clearing the area where they b elieved her body may have b een located. "Part of the thing that has k ept us driven for the last f our years to find her body was the fact that we wanted t o give the family closure, s aid Ms Matthews. Of c ourse, after we do what we need to do, everything will be turned over to the fami l y so they can give her a proper burial." Police in Florida confident they have found remains of Bahamian woman M ISSINGWOMAN: D arice Knowles Police receive information, but have yet to identify body SCENES from the Emancipation Day Junkanoo parade at Fox Hill yesterday morning. Crowds and Junkanoo groups took t o the streets to celebrate t he historical date. EMANCIPATIONDAY PHOTOS/FELIPE MAJOR

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By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter m reynolds@ tribunemedia.net WRITER, director and producer of Bahamian film Rain signed copies of the newly-released DVD for fans this weekend. Filmmaker Marian Govans f ilm about a 14-year-old girls journey from Ragged Island to i nner city Nassau in search of her estranged mother after her grandmothers death has won critical acclaim around the world since its release at the Bahamas International Film Festival (BIFF 2008. It premiered on the US cable TV channel Showtime in January and was released on DVD this week, to be sold on Internet shopping giant Amazon.com as well as stores across the United States. Sales of the DVD will not only repay Bahamian investors in the film and afford themsome profit, it will also support the success of the film at large. During the filming, the crew and cast stayed at a Cable Beach hotel, rented trucks and cars from local businesses, hired local caterers, musicians and actors to support the film. M s Govan said: We have to realise that investment in film is really important, in that it impacts the entire economy. It's time we begin cultivating alternative means of generating income while utilising our cre ative talent. Bahamians are such a creative people and yet our cultur al landscape can feel void at times. As we face forward, culture will need to take a front seat. Film is a powerful vehicle that can serve our community on so many levels both spiritually and practically. So for those of you who wish to support new, creative, Bahamian industry, buy a copy of Rain, buy two, and tell your friends and family to do the same. I do believe it is a film that will leave you proud to be Bahamian! The common Bahamian story of a child who forgoes the sheltered simple life of her home in Ragged Island after the death of her grandmother, p layed by Irma P Hall, to seek out her estranged mother in the big city of Nassau, told in 'Rain', is also a universal coming of age tale. Ms Govan described how Rain's dreams of a loving reconciliation are quickly shattered when she meets G lory, played by Nicki Micheaux, a scarred, proud, guarded woman bearing no resemblance of the mother she had hoped for. Glory's self-destructive lifestyle, diminished by drug abuse is rudely awakened byt he imminent role of motherhood. "Confronted by unforesee able trials, Rain's passion for running and deeply-rooted spir it brings two allies into her life: An insightful and inspiring track coach, played by CCH Pounder, and a charming rebellioust eenage neighbour. In time, Rain's spirit and talent take her to unimaginable heights," Ms Govan said. "Shot in a style that combines gritty realism, a bold and unfor gettable colour palette, soulful Bahamian music, and the use of local actors alongside seas oned pros, Rain takes us on a journey into the heart of a child, the pulse of a country and the spirit of its people." C M Y K C M Y K L OCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010, PAGE 5 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM THE Department of Meteorology is paying close attention to a tropicald epression which has f ormed in the Atlantic and which had reached very near tropical storm statusl ast night. According to Senior Meteorological Officer G eoffrey Greene, it is too e arly to say if the weather s ystem will directly impact the Bahamas as it is a good way off. However, the forecasters said that by Friday or Sat-u rday evening, meteorologi cal officers will be able to make a better determina tion in this regard. T he tropical depression is the fourth of the hurricane season, and if it does furt her develop, it may become T ropical Storm Colin. A t present, it is on a trajectory which sees it headed for the US Atlantic seaboard and the Carolinas, but it may yet swing outt o sea, according to r eports. Its location at 5pm yes terday was recorded by the U S National Hurricane Centre as: 13.0 degrees north, 42.5 degrees west, m oving west north west at 1 6 miles per hour with max i mum sustained winds of 35 miles per hour. METEOROLOGY DEPT EYES TROPICAL DEPRESSION B y MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net LONG-AWAITED renovations for Marsh Harbour airport were set in stone yesterday as a contract for the new architectural design was awarded yesterday. Minister of Public Works Neko Grant flew to A baco with a team of delegates from his department to award the $600,000 contract for the $10million development to Freeport company The Architects Incorporated in Marsh Harbour. An estimated 200,000 passengers pass through the Marsh Harbour airport every year, and Abaconians expect many more will visit when the expansion is complete. They hope the expansion promised in the F NMs 1992 manifesto will drive down high international ticket prices and encourage more direct travel between the United States and Abaco. The 24,000 sq ft single storey terminal and fire crash facility to be built west of the existing terminal has been designed with space for expansionin all directions, as it replaces the existing 3,315 sq ft facility which will be converted and utilised. Mr Grant said the new building will give visitors a sense of place as well as offer more facilities, including indoor arrival and departure lounges, airline offices and storage areas, and offices for the police, security staff and airport manager. Abaco continues to develop at a rapid place, the minister said. It has the third largest population after New Providence and Grand Bahama. Furthermore, it is estimated that in excess of 200,000 passengers utilise the Marsh Harbour International Airport annually. It is against this background that the government is proceeding with this plan to construct a larger, modern, state-of-the-art facility. The Marsh Harbour airport project follows completion of a new 6,100 ft jet runway, conversion of the original runway into a jet taxi-way and installation of new signage and lighting. Eight Bahamian architecture firms submitted fee proposals for the works, and The Architects Incorporated won the bid with a fee of six per cent of the construction cost and a commitment to provide tender documents for construction within three months. Marsh Harbour airport renovations set to take off Architectural design contract awarded Bahamian film Rain makes a splash at signing WEATHERNEWS

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By SIR RONALD S ANDERS ( The writer is a Consultant and former Caribbean Diplomat). CLIMATE change is now u ndeniable according to a new study headed by the US National Oceans and Atmospheric Administration. It is already having a disastrous affect on small island states. The very existence of some of them, particularly in the Pacific and the Indian Oceans, is threatened. Caribbean islands too are e ndangered as are countries s uch as Belize and Guyana with low lying coastlands. In the latter case, coastal erosion is reducing beaches that are crucial to the tourism industry on which all o f the small Caribbean i slands now depend. The Atlantic coasts of both Guyana and Belize are below sea level, but it accommodates most of their popu-l ations and their agricultural l ands. Sea-level rise, theref ore, threatens all of them. The challenges that climate change poses to small states are not only overwhelming, they are impossi-b le to meet from the scarce r esources of the governments. In a recent speech in T rinidad and Tobago, the P rime Minister of St Vincent a nd the Grenadines put the matter in clear terms when he said: In mountainousS tates like my own, over 80 per cent of our major infrastructure is located along ourc oastline, within a few feet o f the inexorably rising seas. The cost of adaptation and preservation of our infras tructural developments are daunting, and beyond our individual capacity toa ddress. W hile small states are the primary victims of climate change, they are the least contributors to the greenhouse gas emissions that, as many studies have con f irmed, are causing climate change and global warming. Together, the harmful emissions of greenhouse gases from all small states account f or less than 0.1 per cent of the global total. I n a fatuous argument, the US Department of Energys Carbon Dioxide InformationA nalysis Centre had rated Trinidad and Tobago at number 9 in the worst emit ters of harmful gases in the w orld in the year 2007. However, the measurement was based on population s ize, not on the volume of emissions. To underscore the silliness of the argument, the tiny Caribbean island, Montserrat, with a popula-t ion of 10,000 people and no manufacturing or industrial production of any magnitude, was rated at number 17 in the world. T he reality is that, despite t he p er capita a rgument that developed countries and i nternational institutions are f ond of using to measure a range of issues to procure a desired (but illusionary r esult, small states contribute l ittle to global warming but they are its primary victims as evidenced by sea-levelr ise, stronger and more frequent hurricanes, flooding and other natural disasters. T hese same small states a re also the victims of the w orst trading arrangements in the world. T he World Trade Orga nization (WTO provision for their special cir-c umstances, nor does the I nternational Financial Institutions (IFIs International Monetary Fund (IMF Bank. Hence, small islands such as St Lucia (100,000p eople) and St Kitts-Nevis (50,000 people in the same way in the WTO a s the United States (350 million), Canada (33 million) or the European Union (400 million). No special rules a pply. In the IFIs, many small states and certainly allt hose in the Caribbean are graduated from concessional financing because, on the measurement of per capita income, they are rated as middle-income countries. T he point is that small s tates are the casualties of climate change but the large industrialized nations that cause the problem are doing little to help them cope with the difficulties that have a lready been created and t hat are worsening. The member countries of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECDw orlds most industrialized c ountries, are responsible for a n estimated 77 per cent of the total greenhouse gases which were emitted in the past. The IFIs that are cont rolled by the OECD gove rnments have no machinery in place to provide small states (especially those in the C aribbean who have been g raduated from concessional f inancing) with soft loans or grants to help them mitigate the impact of climate change,o n their key trade sectors, including agriculture, fisheries, forestry and tourism. A nd, the terms of trade a re punitive rather than helpful. A case in point is the Economic Partnership A greement (EPA the European Union (EU and individual small coun-t ries in the Caribbean and t he Pacific. Nowhere in the EPA is there an acknowledgment by the EU that its greenhouse gas emissions are adversely affecting climate change and harming smalli sland states and states with vulnerable coastlines. And, nowhere is there a correlation drawn between the cost of such harmful effects and t rade benefits that could be granted. I ndeed, small states are punished twice for their innocence. Their key trades ectors are compromised by climate change caused by industrialized nations, and then they are made to openu p their markets for a flood of goods and services from the industrialized nations on t he false idea of reciprocal treatment. The WTO admits that global greenhouse gas emiss ions have roughly doubled since the beginning of the 1970s. Current estimatesi ndicate that these emissions will increase by between 25 and 90 per cent in the period from 2000 to 2030. China, India and Brazil (now G20 countriest hree of the large develop ing countries contributing to t he projected increases, and they too have a responsibility to face up to the harm that they are doing to small count ries that lack the financial means to pay for adaptation and mitigation. There is clearly need for a major change in the IFIs in their policies toward small and vulnerable economies. The insistence on per capita income as a measure to graduate countries from concessionary financing has proven that, by itself, it is an illogical calculation for the capacity of small countries. But, the trade rules in the WTO also have to be adapt ed to cater for small and vulnerable states more widely and effectively than they do. A special category of special and differential treatment for small states is necessary both to provide these countries with the means to cope and, also, to make the WTO relevant to their needs. Small countries should refuse to sign any more agreements until their plight is acknowledged and machinery established to address the harmful effects of climate change on them. A growing body of litera ture now exists on the problems of climate change and trade for small states. But, the governments of small states themselves should be making the case in the WTO and the IFIs in a persistent fashion. A high-level team drawn from the Caribbean, Pacific, and the Indian Oceans should be created to press their case at the next meeting of the G20. It would be a good occasion for frank talks between offenders and suf ferers on an issue of human survival. Responses and previous commentaries at: www.sirronaldsanders.com C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 6, TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM No trade without help on undeniable climate change WORLDVIEW S IR RONALDSANDERS

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C M Y K C M Y K L OCAL NEWS PAGE 8, TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM American Bridge, which is located in the dirt lot, when h e was attacked. A merican Bridges B ahamian subsidiary, American Bridge Bahamas Ltd, is constructing part of the new Arawak Cay port, which is being developed by a public-private partnership made up of the Gove rnment and 19 private sector stakeholders. A ccording to the Green Parrot manager, a woman and the victim arrived together in a marooncoloured Chevrolet Blazer. She followed him out of the car. He was stabbed a numb er of times. T he man, who was weari ng khaki pants and a black s tripe shirt, died at the s cene. Witnesses reported t hat a young boy, thought to be his son, was in the car at the time. T here were a number of witnesses to the attack, including someone who was still sitting in their car in the parking lot when the stabb ing occurred. They are said to have run in to Green Parrot to alert security officers, who contacted the police. Another witness was a G reen Parrot chef who a rrived on the scene shortly a fter Mr Williams was attacked. According to the manager at the Bar and Grill, a woman was still standing o ver the body when the c hef arrived. She was freaking out. She told him to shine hisf lashlight on the body, said the manager. Peter Moree, owner of the Green Parrot Bar and G rill, expressed his sadness and that of his staff at the killing. Its an absolute tragedy, he told The Tribune. N onetheless, fearing that it could hurt his business, the owner also distanced his establishment from the crime, pointing out that none of those involved had b een patrons of the bar that e vening and the attack took p lace outside of the bounds of the popular hangout. I called ZNS when I saw their report which said it happened at Green Parrot t o tell them it was not actua lly us, it was the American Bridge property, said Mr Moree, acknowledging thatG reen Parrot does utilise the space as a parking lot on busy evenings. Police yesterday identif ied the woman being questioned as a resident of Nassau Village, and a relative o f the deceased. S enior Assistant Quinn McCartney reported that the victim and two other men were out crawfishing. Two of the men had dived overboard to retrieve traps while the victim waited on the boat. Our preliminary investigations indicate that the per son in the boat fell overboard. The boat went out of control and he sustained serious injuries that resulted in his death, said Mr McCartney. The victims body was brought to shore at Old Bahama Bay and transported by hearse to the Rand Memorial Hospital, where an autopsy will be held to deter mine the cause of death. In East End, residents there are saddened following the a pparent drowning of 35year-old Nixon Mitchell, of Sweetings Cay. The fishermen were checking on their crawfish traps on Sunday when Mr Mitchell failed to surface after a reasonable time. He was pulled from the sea bottom by his brother, whop erformed CPR. A doctor pronounced him dead at the scene. High Rock MP Kenneth Russell said Mr Mitchells death is a shock to the East End community. Mr Russell is urging people to make sure that they are well trained before they go diving for crawfish. Police are investigating both incidents. Cutter (USCGC Meanwhile, that same day, the Royal Bahamas Defence Force removed 177 Haitians (129 men, 43 women and five children) from Channel Cay in the southern Bahamas. These migrants were apprehended by police and Immigration officials in Exuma after their vessel reportedly ran aground on the island. It is believed this latest group was onboard a Haitian sailing sloop the Defence Force had been searching for since Wednesday morning During the operation, a Haitian man jumped overboard while being transported. A search for him is under way. The following day, the USCGC Chandeliur, with a Bahamian ship rider (Defence Force Marine fast boat in the area of Memory Rock, north of Grand Bahama, transporting 15 illegal migrants. When officials boarded the boat, they found five Jamaican men, four Haitian men, four Haitian women, one Peruvian man, one Peruvian woman and four Bahamians. The four Bahamians and 15 illegals were handed over to the police and immigration authorities in Freeport. Later on, 99 Haitians were apprehended in the Exuma chain by the Royal Bahamas Defence Force. While on patrol, Defence Force vessel EF 27 spotted a Hait ian sailing sloop in the area of Shroud Cay. Upon further investigation, they discovered 75 men and 24 women) aboard the vessel. The operations conducted over the two days has netted 450 illegal migrants apprehended by police, immigration, USCG and the RBDF. All of the Haitians are expected to be transported back to Haiti by the United States Coast Guard. The RBDF is concerned with these recent events and has since increased its patrols at sea and in the air. The US Coast Guard has reportedly done likewise, a statement released by the RBDF yesterday said. Woman questioned after man is stabbed to death FROM page one Three of them escaped, the oldest one and the two younger o nes, one stayed behind, but he was unharmed. I think the older one tried to wake him up but he wasnt getting up so he escaped with the younger ones. T he three sons reportedly jumped from an upstairs window and ran into nearby bushes. Mr Smith is the countrys 55th homicide, and police confirmed a team of officers from the Central Detective Unit have been flown into Exuma as investigations on the island continue. Though married, family members said Mr Smith had been s eparated from his wife for several years. He had 12 brothers and five sisters, and his mother, Mrs Eugene Smith Sr, 74, has lived in Stuart Manor for nearly 60 years. M rs Smith described her son as a good boy during his childhood, however she said she could not account for his life as a man. M rs Smith said: The whole island is in shock, this is the first major crime in this settlement. We never had no crime, I hardly lock my doors. Sometimes I lock my doors or when my chil d ren come they will lock the door. Fishing guide is murdered in Exuma F ROM page one FROM page one 400 attempt to enter Bahamas illegally FROM page one T wo die in tragic opening to the crawfish season

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C M Y K C M Y K L OCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010, PAGE 9 Practical or Luxury? C-CLASS ML-CLASS E-CLASS Tyreflex Star MotorsCall us today for your new Mercedes-Benz at 325.4961Wulff Road, P. O. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas Fax: 323.4667 You may ask the question: Is it practical to own a Mercedes-Benz or is it a luxury? W ell, Mercedes-Benz would like to ask you a question. Are excellent gas mileage, top safety standards and superior driving technology considered a luxury? Mercedes-Benz doesnt think so and you shouldnt either. You deserve to get the most out of your gas dollar. You and your family deserve to be safe and comfortable when maneuveringt hrough our nations less-than-perfect roadways. Thats why these features and so much more come standard in every class and model of Mercedes-Benz. So do something practical while still enjoying the best of life become an owner of a beautiful new Mercedes-Benz today. REPLACEMENT BULBS for all uses MEDICINE CABINET BULBS, SHOP LIGHT BULBS AND MORE!!!If its a Bulb we sell it NASSAU GLASS Mackey St 393-8165T HE LIGHT BULB CENTREa t the Nassau Glass Lighting Centre They had earlier attended a f uneral service for Mrs SmithDowny at Christ Community Church, on Bellot Road, and gathered at the boardwalk near the Beach Club Caf, Sandyport, to scatter her ashes into the sea. But panic broke out when a section of the boardwalk, which is connected to an adjacent gazeb o, collapsed underneath about 25 people, including children as young two. Almost immediately, people in the area pitched in to rescue the fallen loved ones, some of whom had slipped underneath the broken planks. Five people were taken to hospital by emergency medical services for minor injuries, one of whom was said to be an elderly woman who had suffered a seizure in the water. Some mourners, who had safely crossed the boardwalk on to the gazebo and were subsequently trapped, were rescued by a fishermans boat. Ulric Woodside, the photographer hired to document the ceremony, said he heard the nails on the boardwalk give way underneath the weight of peop le, just before it collapsed. It was really a community effort, he said, as soon as it happened everybody came over and assisted, jet-ski operators, beachgoers, tourists as well. Mr Woodside said the remaining mourners continued the ceremony and scattered Mrs Smith-D ownys remains into the sea a fter the situation was under control. Garth Buckner, president of Sandyport Development Company, said the company had little details concerning the incident but had launched an investiga-t ion into the matter. Mr Buckner said: The dock i s private property, so the public is welcome to use it but we do ask that we be informed before any events are put on so that we can provide adequate security and prepare. We were not informed, so we were not pre-p ared for anything. Police are investigating. on patrol around 11.25pm on Saturday when they observed a white 2000 Chevy Astro van exiting Magellan Road. The occupants were acting in a suspicious manner so officers pur sued the vehicle and a chase ensued. ASP Delva said there was an exchange of gunfire between the suspects and police. The driver of the Astro van eventually lost control of the vehicle and collided into a tree on Tarleton Road, where two suspects were apprehended. A third fled into bushes. While searching the vehicle, officers discovered 584lbs of sus pected marijuana with an estimated street value of $584,000. The officers also discovered that one of the suspects was shot in the upper shoulder. They were both taken into custody and received medical treatment for their injuries. Investigations are continuing. T HE c ollapsed boardwalk after Saturdays accident. F ROM page one F ROM page one $600,000 of drugs seized Mourners in boardwalk rescue

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B y LARRYSMITH IN the Bahamas, everything is a plot and everyone has an agenda. We are conspiracy mongerers of the worst kind a tendency that is amplified b y the anonymity offered by the internet, the diffic ulty of accessing accurate information, the lack of professionalism of many in the media, and the inability o f some to think critically, which is a legacy of our failed education system. T he plot at Lyford Cay t hese days is that behind t he gates of this sinister priv ate community are rich, w hite foreigners who are g etting away with murder and deploying advanced weaponry with impunity. Well, there are certainly rich, white foreigners living at Lyford Cay along with many members of our o wn black and white elite. And it is most definitely a private community. I have b een admitted only twice i n the last two decades on b oth occasions to attend a social event. But the narrative subtext t hat has lately been attached to the activities of this very reserved community is best captured by the word "sinister". One poster o n the popular Bahamas I ssues website put it this w ay: "Is it not the job of the police to investigate crime? Or was this action egregious because it involved a Lyford Cay resident. Every day regular Bahamians h ave investigations levied a gainst them by RBPF, so if this was Tony who lives i n Bain Town, and the p olice received information t hat weapons were seen on the premises, what should the police do? No one isa nd should be above the law." Well, by that logic if I tell the police that Hubert I ngraham and Perry Christie are stockpiling weapons at their old law o ffice to mount a coup, C ommissioner Greenslade s hould order his special force commandos to hand-c uff the former law partn ers together while picking through their things for several hours without a warrant. After all, no one is a nd should be above the l aw. T hat's the first point I wish to make about the recent events at Lycay just how ridiculously inappropriate this invasion of privacy was. It raises serious questions about judgm ent. L awyers say that when the police have reasonable s uspicion, a warrant is not r equired to search for f irearms or dangerous drugs in the Bahamas. They can enter your home orb usiness at will. This right of entry, they say, is based on the need for police offi cers to react immediatelyt o intelligence reports in the public interest. It is a hangover from colonial t imes aimed at countering a rmed insurgencies in the f ormer British Empire. Judgment But although police can e nter premises without a search warrant from a judge, it is expected that ah igh degree of common sense, good judgment and ordinary decency will be applied, one lawyer toldm e. "Normally the appointm ent to particular duties carries with it standing and assumed authority from thec ommissioner that generally empowers detectives to hunt for firearms and drugs. However, it is easy to a buse such a system, and our police often do not go for warrants even when there is the time, or the cir cumstances are appropri ate to do so. Partly, this is b ecause of the scale of the t ask they face, but there is a lso a disturbing trend of just showing up and demanding entry to search for firearms or drugs. This erodes our civil liberties and sophisticated criminals can and do impersonate officers using the same words. "These things are very hard for international persons, especially Americans, to understand, because their rights of privacy and premises are so well entrenched in law. This means that although international second home own ers should not be consid e red above the law, there n eeds to be greater sensitivity by the authorities in such circumstances." However, in this case the object of the search and seizure was not a firearm, which brings me to the seco nd point. Both traditional and i nternet "news" sites reported as if it were gospel the obviously cooked-up story that the "firearms" in q uestion at Lyford Cay were advanced militarygrade sonic blasters that c ould injure people and d amage property. Accordi ng to one "knowledgea ble" report, the equipment w as of "a type which is u sed by Israeli intelligence and has the affect of causing you to get loose bow els." Well, we don't know what kind of "intelligence" the police employed in this c ase, but we did hear a broadcast on Island FM just before the raid when a t alk show caller bracketed C ommissioner Greenslade a bout ultrasonic weapons being used with impunity by rich, white foreigners atL yford Cay. Greenslade said he would deal with the matter expeditiously because, after all, no one is or should be above the law. But these "ultrasonic weapons" were actually h igh-end outdoor speakers ( google Meyer Sound SB1). They are easily pur chased in the US and were l egally imported. Police returned the speakers no less than three hours after they were seized. Anda lthough they have yet to make a public statement, an inquiry is said to be underway and meetingsh ave been held to soothe ruffled feathers at Lyford Cay. The speakers were used a t Point House, the home of American financier Louis Bacon, as a response to aggravated and continual noise harassment from the adjacent property of Canadian fashion mogul Peter Nygard. According to a spokesman for Bacon, "the intent was to counterbalance loud music that origi nated from the Nygard property (by directing back to the specific location of the music. This was intended to repulse music originating from Nygard's property after it reached a certain decibel level. "It is unfortunate that the police were diverted from their work by such a f rivolous complaint," the s pokesman said. "With respect to the health risks associated with these speakers, there are none unless, of course, they were knocked over and fell on your foot." T his brings me to the main point. P roperty owners clearly have a longstanding issue with Nygard's development and operation of a major r esort over many years at the western tip of the Lyford Cay peninsula. In f act, there is a lengthy hist ory of complaints about n oise pollution emanating f rom the Nygard property a s well as other land use i ssues associated with unauthorized dredging and reclamation of the sea bed to the detriment of neighbouring properties. After initially trying to resolve these issues amicab ly, Bacon turned to the Lyford Cay Property Own er's Association to registert hese complaints. At least 1 6 complaints were made t o police and Lyford Cay security in the first half of this year alone, thes pokesman said. "The continued escalation of Nygard's late night parties and his refusal to abide by Lyford protocols left few options, but an effort to return in kind the music t hat he broadcasted." N ygard acquired his property in 1984 and it is well known that construc-t ion has been non-stop for the past 20 years, continually disturbing neighbours and the Lyford communityi n general. There are apparently no specific covenants that prevent "lawful" activities on theN ygard property, but the site is zoned for single family use and the conflict with the residential nature of thee xclusive community is obvious. Until a large portion of the resort burned down last November due to an elec trical fault, advertised facil ities included a disco with a 100-person dance floor, a human aquarium, waterslides, movie theatre, two yachts, swimming pools, tennis, volleyball and bas ketball courts, 10 bedrooms and a helicopter landing pad. Nygard has been seeking government approvals to rebuild the resort. At one point, Nygard wanted to build a restau rant on nearby Golding Cay, a Bahamas National Trust bird sanctuary. He also sought to import exotic animals, add a dolphin enclosure and build a shark tank. Dredge pumps have been used almost continuously for years to move sand from the bay onto the shoreline at the resort. But a report prepared in 2008 for the Lyford Cay Property Owners Association by Melanie Roach (a former public works direc tor) determined that Nygard did not have a hotel o r business license, and t here was no record of building approvals granted for resort amenities. There was also no record of a permit being issued for a helicopter landing pad at the property. A ll these facilities and more were being advert ised on various travel websites up to the time of the fire. For example, Unusual Villa & Island Rentals of R ichmond, Virginia promoted Nygard Cay like this: For only $42,000 in 2 008 (If you add the two s taterooms on the yacht the t otal price will be $47,000 p er day). Your group of c elebrities, executives, sports moguls or any person celebrating a birthday, anniversary, seminar, wedding, or vacation can have a trip of a lifetime. Special 4hour dinners are available f or $300 per additional person above 20 people. The Cay can hold up to 600 p eople. Unusual Villas and I sland Rentals is open 24 h ours per day, 365 days a year, for any information requests and booking poli c ies for Bahamas Luxury Nygard Cay." Resort Since the fire last year, N ygard has been seeking government approval to rebuild the resort. In recentm onths he has been making press statements abouta $50 million investment, touting the many jobs thisw ould create: "I want to d o it like Atlantis in two or three years (andw ould take a lot of people," h e said recently. Observers say it is no coincidence that the police raid on Bacon's propertyo ccurred several days after it was reported that Nygard received a letter from the Office of the Prime Minis t er demanding that he restore his property to its original deeded footprint. "What has now become increasingly evident is that much of the expansion and continued work at Nygard C ay has occurred on Crown land without permits." The letter from the OPM ordered Nygard to "remove any structures that would have been erected on this land over the years" and advised that "going forward no applications for construction on, or occupation of, the accreted land will be approved by any agencies of the government." So, does the plot thicken? It will certainly be interesting to see how this unfortunate melodrama plays out in the weeks and months ahead. What do you think? Send comments to larry@tribunemedia.net Or visit www.bahamapundit.com C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 10, TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Sandals Royal Bahamian Spa Resort & Offshore IslandInvites applications for the positions of:ENVIRONMENTAL COORDINATOR Applications should be faxed in to :327-6961 or email amusgrove@grp.sandals.com Inappropriate invasion of privacy at Lyford Cay

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C M Y K C M Y K L OCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010, PAGE 15 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM RECRUITS from the 47th entry to the Royal Bahamas Defence Force demonstrated acquired skills during their graduation ceremony on Friday. The graduation also marked the 17th entry since women were allowedt o join the force. THE47TH ENTRY TO ROYAL BAHAMAS DEFENCE FORCE NEW RATES& BILLING CHANGES EffectiveJuly1st,2010TheBahamasElectricityCorporation (BEC ProvidenceandtheFamilyIslands.Billingsforallconsumers during this transition period will be carried out as follows:BillsfortheserviceperiodMay16thtoJune15thwiththebillingdate July 3rd were mailed out on or around July 10th and were due for payment on July 23rd at the old rates; Bills for the service period June 15th to June 30th were estimated with a billing date of July 15th at the old rates. The bills for this abbreviated period are due for payment on August 6th; The new rate comes into effect for the service period commencing July1st,2010.Meterreadingsforthisserviceperiodwilltakeplace attheendofJuly,andbillswillbesentoutinmid-August.Paymentfor this period will become due on September 6th, 2010. C ommercial accounts that were billed at the end of June at the old rates will receive their next bill at the end of July at the new rates. The new rates as of July 1st, 2010 will be as follows: RESIDENTIAL0 -200 units per month10.95 cents per unit 201-800 units per month11.95 cents per unit Remaining units14.95 cents per unitM inimum monthly charge$5.00COMMERCIALAll units per month15.00 cents per unit Minimum monthly charge$10.00GENERAL SERVICEMONTHLY BILLS UNIT CHARGE KVA CHARGE Demand charge per month$11.36 per KVA 0-900,000 units per month8.70 cents per unit Remaining units per month6.20 cents per unit Minimum monthly charge$ 568.00TEMPORARY SUPPLIES16.38 cents per unit $20.00 connection fee $10.00 per month Meter RentalFUEL CHARGE(variable per unit to include total cost of fuel SPECIAL SERVICES Special Reading, Check Reading, Fuse Replacement $5.00 Meter Test Minimum charge$10.00 Visit with intent to disconnect Residential Consumer Commercial Consumer $10.00 $15.00 Reconnection Fee $20.00 Returned Cheque Fee$15.00 TARIFFBAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION Should you have any inquiries please call 302-1786 or 302-1639 F ELIPEMAJOR/TRIBUNESTAFF THE NEW RECRUITS fire a ceremonial three gun salute. MINISTER OF NATIONAL SECURITY Tommy Turnquest speaks to the recruits.

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By ROYALFIDELITY CAPITAL MARKETS It was a slow week of trading in the Bahamian stock market. Investors traded in four out of the 24 listed securities, with two advancers and the other securities remaining unchanged. EQUITY MARKET A total of 29,648 shares changed hands, representing an increase of 3,128 shares compared to the previous week's trading volume of 26,520 shares. Colina Holdings (CHL was the volume leader and lead advancer, trading 21,100 shares to see its stock close the week up by $0.05 at $2.55. Commonwealth Bank (CBL shares to see its shares close the week up by $0.02 at $6.04. BOND MARKET There was no activity in the bond market last week. COMPANY NEWS: Earnings Releases: Commonwealth Bank (CBL ed financial results for the quarter ended June 30, 2010, reporting total comprehensive income of $13.9 million, an increase of $3.8 million or 37 per cent from $10.1 million reported in the same quarter in the previous year. It was noted that while net interest income of $27.2 million increased slightly by $1 million or 3.9 per cent, up from $26.2 million in the comparative period, loan impairment expense fell significantly by $4.5 million or 59.6 per cent from $7.6 million to $3.1 million. Management noted that the improvement in loan impairment expense was due to improved credit quality and the stabilisation of its non-performing loans, which remained flat over the last two quarters. CBL's non-interest expense of $13.5 million increased by $1.5 million or 12 per cent year-over-year, due primarily to higher general and administrative expenses. Earnings per share for the quarter were $0.13, compared to $0.09 in the 2009 second quarter, an increase of $0.04. Total assets and liabilities of CBL were $1.4 billion and $1.17 billion respectively, compared to $1.38 billion and $1.15 billion at year-end December 31, 2009. It was noted that while CBL grew its deposit base over the six-month period by $15 million, its loan receivables declined by $24 million, with the offset being seen in increased cash /deposits with banks and investments by CBL, which rose collectively by $53 milllion during the period. Dividend Notes: FOCOL Holdings (FCL declared a dividend of $0.04 to all shareholders of record date as at July 30, 2010, payable on August 10, 2010. AGM NOTICE: Bahamas First Holdings has announced its AGM will be held at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel on August 4, 2010, at 5pm. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM /,9(t:25.,13$5$',6( (YHU\GD\RIWKH\HDU/LWWOHZLW]HUODQGLVDFRPSDQ\ZLWKRYHU\HDUVH[SHULHQFHLQOX[XU\UHWDLOLQJZLWKRYHUVWRUHV LQ7KH&DULEEHDQ)ORULGDDQG$ODVND:HVHOOJUHDWQDPHVOLNH%UHLWOLQJ7DJ+HXHU %DXPHt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oyalFidelity Market Wrap E QUITY MARKET TRADING STATISTICS Week ending 30.07.10 BISX SYMBOLCLOSING PRICEWKLY PRICE CHANGEVOLUMEYTD PRICE CHANGE AML................$1.04......................$-....................................0.........................-11.11% BBL.................$0.30......................$-....................................0........................-52.38% BOB.................$5.00......................$-....................................400.....................-15.25% BPF..................$10.63....................$-....................................0...........................-1.02%B SL..................$ 9.42.....................$-....................................0..........................-6.36% B WL................$ 3.15.....................$-....................................0............................0.00% CAB.................$11.11....................$-....................................0..........................11.32% CBL.................$ 6.04.....................$0.02..............................7,298.................-13.71% CHL.................$2.55......................$0.05..............................21,100..................-6.25% C IB...................$9.74......................$-....................................0...........................-2.50% C WCB.............$2.41......................$0.09..............................0.........................-15.44% DHS.................$2.00......................$-....................................0.........................-21.57% F AM................$6.07......................$-....................................0...........................-6.47% FBB..................$2.17......................$-....................................0...........................-8.44% FCC..................$0.27......................$-....................................0............................0.00% FCL..................$4.65......................$-....................................0...........................-2.52% F CLB...............$1.00......................$-....................................0............................0.00% F IN...................$8.90......................$-....................................850.......................-4.09% ICD .................$5.59......................$-....................................0............................0.00% JSJ....................$9.95......................$-....................................0............................0.00%P RE.................$10.00....................$-....................................0............................0.00% BOND MARKET TRADING STATISTICS BISX SYMBOLDESCRIPTIONVOLUMEPAR VALUE FBB13BB Series C Notes Due 20130$1,000 FBB15FBB Series D Notes Due 20150$1,000 F BB17FBB Series A Notes Due 20170$1,000 FBB22FBB Series B Notes Due 20220$1,000 I NTERNATIONAL MARKETS FOREX Rates C URRENCY W EEKLY% CHANGE C AD 0.97300.77 GBP1.56911.69 EUR 1 .30410.95

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By ROYALFIDELITY CAPITAL MARKETS It was a slow week of trading in the Bahamian stock market. Investors traded in four out of the 24 listed securities, with two advancers and the other securities remaining unchanged. EQUITY MARKET A total of 29,648 shares changed hands, representing an increase of 3,128 shares compared to the previous week's trading volume of 26,520 shares. Colina Holdings (CHL was the volume leader and lead advancer, trading 21,100 shares to see its stock close the week up by $0.05 at $2.55. Commonwealth Bank (CBL shares to see its shares close the week up by $0.02 at $6.04. BOND MARKET There was no activity in the bond market last week. COMPANY NEWS: Earnings Releases: Commonwealth Bank (CBL ed financial results for the quarter ended June 30, 2010, reporting total comprehensive income of $13.9 million, an increase of $3.8 million or 37 per cent from $10.1 million reported in the same quarter in the previous year. It was noted that while net interest income of $27.2 million increased slightly by $1 million or 3.9 per cent, up from $26.2 million in the comparative period, loan impairment expense fell significantly by $4.5 million or 59.6 per cent from $7.6 million to $3.1 million. Management noted that the improvement in loan impairment expense was due to improved credit quality and the stabilisation of its non-performing loans, which remained flat over the last two quarters. CBL's non-interest expense of $13.5 million increased by $1.5 million or 12 per cent year-over-year, due primarily to higher general and administrative expenses. Earnings per share for the quarter were $0.13, compared to $0.09 in the 2009 second quarter, an increase of $0.04. Total assets and liabilities of CBL were $1.4 billion and $1.17 billion respectively, compared to $1.38 billion and $1.15 billion at year-end December 31, 2009. It was noted that while CBL grew its deposit base over the six-month period by $15 million, its loan receivables declined by $24 million, with the offset being seen in increased cash /deposits with banks and investments by CBL, which rose collectively by $53 milllion during the period. Dividend Notes: FOCOL Holdings (FCL declared a dividend of $0.04 to all shareholders of record date as at July 30, 2010, payable on August 10, 2010. AGM NOTICE: Bahamas First Holdings has announced its AGM will be held at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel on August 4, 2010, at 5pm. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM /,9(t:25.,13$5$',6( (YHU\GD\RIWKH\HDU/LWWOHZLW]HUODQGLVDFRPSDQ\ZLWKRYHU\HDUVH[SHULHQFHLQOX[XU\UHWDLOLQJZLWKRYHUVWRUHV LQ7KH&DULEEHDQ)ORULGDDQG$ODVND:HVHOOJUHDWQDPHVOLNH%UHLWOLQJ7DJ+HXHU %DXPHt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oyalFidelity Market Wrap E QUITY MARKET TRADING STATISTICS Week ending 30.07.10 BISX SYMBOLCLOSING PRICEWKLY PRICE CHANGEVOLUMEYTD PRICE CHANGE AML................$1.04......................$-....................................0.........................-11.11% BBL.................$0.30......................$-....................................0........................-52.38% BOB.................$5.00......................$-....................................400.....................-15.25% BPF..................$10.63....................$-....................................0...........................-1.02%B SL..................$ 9.42.....................$-....................................0..........................-6.36% B WL................$ 3.15.....................$-....................................0............................0.00% CAB.................$11.11....................$-....................................0..........................11.32% CBL.................$ 6.04.....................$0.02..............................7,298.................-13.71% CHL.................$2.55......................$0.05..............................21,100..................-6.25% C IB...................$9.74......................$-....................................0...........................-2.50% C WCB.............$2.41......................$0.09..............................0.........................-15.44% DHS.................$2.00......................$-....................................0.........................-21.57% F AM................$6.07......................$-....................................0...........................-6.47% FBB..................$2.17......................$-....................................0...........................-8.44% FCC..................$0.27......................$-....................................0............................0.00% FCL..................$4.65......................$-....................................0...........................-2.52% F CLB...............$1.00......................$-....................................0............................0.00% F IN...................$8.90......................$-....................................850.......................-4.09% ICD .................$5.59......................$-....................................0............................0.00% JSJ....................$9.95......................$-....................................0............................0.00%P RE.................$10.00....................$-....................................0............................0.00% BOND MARKET TRADING STATISTICS BISX SYMBOLDESCRIPTIONVOLUMEPAR VALUE FBB13BB Series C Notes Due 20130$1,000 FBB15FBB Series D Notes Due 20150$1,000 F BB17FBB Series A Notes Due 20170$1,000 FBB22FBB Series B Notes Due 20220$1,000 I NTERNATIONAL MARKETS FOREX Rates C URRENCY W EEKLY% CHANGE C AD 0.97300.77 GBP1.56911.69 EUR 1 .30410.95

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By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THEGovernments decision to increase the Business Licence fee rate by 50 per cent for most contractors serves a great injustice on the Bahamian construction industry, the Bahamian Contractors Associations (BCA Business, and fails to recognise the extremely high risk firms could lose money on projects. Speaking after this newspaper revealed that the Government had abandoned initial plans to place all construction companies in a special category where they paid a Business Licence fee equivalent to 0.5 per cent of annual turnover, Stephen Wrinkle said: Were extremely disappointed, and its serving a great injustice to our industry. We had met with Minister Laing last year, and expressed our concerns and views, and made some proposals as to how to accommodate the construction industry. By and large, theyve been totally ignored. The BCA and its members are now working with the Chamber of Commerce to arrange another meeting with the Government in a bid to change the revised Business Licence Bill, which requires contractors generating turnover of greater than $500,000 per annum to pay a 0.75 per cent rate. Given that many perform on multi-million dollar jobs, most Bahamian contractors will be pushed from a 0.5 per cent rateto a 0.75 per cent rate, yet Mr Wrinkle pointed out again that in most cases they acted as pro ject managers, handling huge sums that were paid out to subcontractors, tradesmen and suppliers, and retaining only a small portion as their fee. Yet Bahamian contractors are being taxed on the gross amountof these contracts, something Mr Wrinkle agreed was unfair. Comparing a contractors role as project manager to that of an attorney holding funds in escrow for a client, the BCA president said attorneys were taxed on their net receipts, while contrac tors were hit on the gross. Theyve put us into a category inconsistent with the fidu ciary responsibilities of a con tractor, Mr Wrinkle told Tribune Business. The realtors and attorneys are able to hold large sums of money, but are not taxed on the gross receipts, just the net receipts. The general contractor is more of a project manager role rather than the actual builder. Most of the proceeds from a construction contract go to subcontractors, specialist workers and suppliers. One has to look at the industry as a whole, and begin to realise the cost will not be absorbed by contractors and will be passed on to consumers. Mr Wrinkle said several large contractors had told him the revised Business Licence Bill could add more than $100,000 to their annual fee payable to the Government. Referring to last years discussions with the Government, the BCA president added: Its not fair. Construction is a very volatile industry.. The risk of losing money on a project is extremely high. No consideration has been given for such losses. No consideration has been given for nonpayment by the client. No consideration has been given for growing your company at a time when unemployment in the Bahamas is high. Mr Wrinkle added that unlike most other countries, the amount of taxes levied on Bahamian contractors and other businesses appeared to increase the more they expanded, and the higher their revenues (turnover As a result, he lamented that there was no incentive to grow our business. The larger you get, the more they want to tax you. Khaalis Rolle, the Bahamas Chamber of Commerces president, confirmed that his organisation was arranging a meeting with Mr Laing on the contractors behalf to discuss their concerns. Its a process of we talk about it, and hopefully arrive at a solution that makes sense, Mr Rolle said. What Ive found with Mr Laing is that if you present a reasonable case, he will go to bat for you. Thats why I try to work closely with him, because he understands the countrys commercial issues. Well try and discuss every single issue that arises and reach a middle ground, which has been the case of late. C M Y K C M Y K B USINESS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010, PAGE 3B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Great injustice for contractors BCA chief says Business Licence fee changes fail to recognise extremely high risk nature of construction industry

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entrepreneurs because banks in this nation did not accept payments via PayPal a nd the Internet. A rguing that Baker Tilly Gomez give more service than we get, in the senset hat the work it does on the Bahamas EntrepreneurialV enture Fund is worth more t han the fee it receives, Mr Gomez said the fund had worked in the sense that there had been no political interference impacting its operations. Id say that over the five y ears of this fund, no politic al pressure has been a pplied at all, Mr Gomez s aid, adding that there had been no calls from politic ians along the lines of urging them to approve and finance a particular business idea. Half the MPs did not k now this fund ever existed, he joked. A cknowledging that the B ahamas Entrepreneurial Venture Fund had crossed o ver a bit with the Bahamas Development B anks (BDB ities, Mr Gomez said one notable difference between t he two was that the fund was far more involved with its entrepreneur clients. A part from the Board s eats it had taken in the 12 c ompanies in which it had equity stakes, Mr Gomez said the fund provided a source of constant advice and training, even going as f ar as paying for services the e ntrepreneur needed, such as accounts. The BDB does not offer t hese kind of value added services, Mr Gomez said. The BDB, once you get the loan, usually will not see you unless you default on it. Default on the loan, and they will come looking for y ou. H e added that the BDB a nd other organisations in t he Governments small business support infrastruct ure, such as the Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial C orporation (BAIC not have enough staff with the skills required, pointing o ut that many had been transferred into these agenc ies from other government departments and ministries. In response to audience q uestions, Mr Gomez said the Bahamas Entrepreneuri al Venture Fund had received virtually no business plans and applications related to the agricultural sector. I can only remember one p roject in five years that had a nything to do with agriculture, and that young gentleman did not have a clear vision of how to do it get a few acres here, through a f ew crops there, Mr Gomez s aid. We may need foreign h elp. We have to consider t hat that we need foreign help in agriculture in our economy. We may have to accept that. C M Y K C M Y K B USINESS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010, PAGE 5B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM THE COLLEGE OFTHE BAHAMASVisit our website at www.cob.edu.bs IMPOR T ANT DA TES Fall Semester2010 New Student OrientationParentsEveningTuesday, 17th August, 2010 6:30 p.m.-8:00 p.m.OrientationWednesday, 18th August, 2010 8:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m.Advisement & RegistrationWednesday, 18th August, 2010 2:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m.Advisement, Registration & Bill PaymentThursday, 19th August, 2010 Friday, 20th August, 2010 9:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m.Venue:Performing Arts Centre, The College Of The Bahamas Thompson Boulevard T HE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMASVisit our website at www.cob.edu.bsNotice to NewandCur r ent Financial Aid Applicants for Fall 2010 All current and new students are advised that the new Fall 2010 Financial Aid application form is now available online at www .cob.edu.bs and at all College locations. The deadline for Financial Aid applications, including the submission of supporting documents, has been extended to4:00 p.m. on 18th August, 2010. For more information, contact: Office of Financial Aid, Oakes Field Campus, Tel: (242 or email: financialaid@cob.edu.bs 1 2 7 & ( *UHJPLWKDQGRU*UHJPLWK t $VVRFLDWHV $UHQRORQJHUDXWKRUL]HGWR FRQGXFWEXVLQHVVRQEHKDOIRI67$5*(1(5$/,1685$1&( $*(1&<*5$1'%$+$0$f/7'$XWKRUL]HG$JHQWVIRU 5R\DO6WDU$VVXUDQFH/LPLWHG %DKDPDV)LUVW*HQHUDO,QVXUDQFH &RPSDQ\ /OR\GV:RUOGZLGHHGLFDO7UXVW ,QWHUQDWLRQDOHGLFDO*URXS,0*f Our goal is to have a fully Bahamian workforce under A PS, and develop a market where other companies enter the field with people who have been accredited. The reality is that there is no way we as a company can provide all the renewable energy sources for the entire Bahamas. We want to lead the transition to a renewable energy i ndustry, and our goal is to create employment. We dont w ant a foreign workforce. We want trained Bahamians. Apart from Mr Lyn, APS also provided other lecturers to the UWIs renewable energy technology courses. Mr Gilbert said APS ultimately wanted to take its school to all regional nations, as the aim was to educate a Caribbean market. M r Lyn told Tribune Business that when it came to r enewable energies, the key for the Bahamas was the right education for consumers and the industry, and then to get on with it. The IDB-funded contracts require APS to supervise the installation of the PV sys-t ems and solar water heaters on the selected number of B ahamian homes. Were excited as to what we could do, We get sun 365 d ays of the year, so we might as well take advantage of i t, Mr Gilbert said. T outing renewable energys benefits, he added: It r educes the carbon footprint, and the Bahamas at some point will be able to take advantage of carbon credits. APS undertakes a lot of its own research and development, extensively testing renewable energy products before bringing them to the Bahamas, to ensure they c an withstand the rigors of practical application. The company is now set to commence testing a wind t urbine which only requires two miles per hour winds to s tart generating electricity, as opposed to most contemporaries that need 12-13 miles per hour winds. Venture capital funds 193 jobs JEROMEGOMEZ FROM page one Renewable energy training plan for Bahamas unveiled FROM page one Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in theirn eighbourhoods. Perhaps y ou are raising funds for a g ood cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won ana ward. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

PAGE 13

now the highest in his lifetime, Khaalis Rolle said many Bahamian businesses were now afraid to conduct commerce at night, as crimi nals seemed to have no fear o f the law. Arguing that guns were s eemingly as commonplace a s cars in the Bahamas, Mr R olle said the FirstCaribbean armed robbery and high speed chase/shoot-o ut between the crooks and the police showed just whata lawless, dangerous society this nation had become. Its extremely frightening to do business in this country now, Mr Rolle s aid. When you get to the p oint where the criminals h ave equal or better ammunition than the police, andh ave absolutely no fear of t he law, whats the alternative? What do we do? Recalling a reggae song that described Jamaica as a Cowboy town, the Chamber president added: The Bahamas is far beyond a C owboy town, the Wild W ild West. Every single day there is a report of some a rmed robbery or attempted a rmed robbery. The crimi nals just dont have any fear of the law. I think about 10 years a go I spoke at a Toastmas ters meeting, and I had a conversation with a politi-c ian. I said the Bahamas was becoming an increasingly dangerous society and somet hing had to be done. His r esponse was as if there was n o concern, and were at the point now where businesspeople are extremely afraid to do business after dark. P ointing to the Supreme Court break-in at Justice Jon Isaacs office, Mr Rolle s aid this showed that no p lace is off limits. The criminals are so daring that they do what theyw ant to do during the day, a nd the one entity where youd have thought they would be off limits is no longer. The fellow broke into the courts. This is extremely serious, the Chamber president added, p ointing out that the implic ations went beyond just the immediate negative impact o n business and the Bahamia n economy. W arning that it would not be long before travel advisories and media reportsd eclared the Bahamas an unsafe destination, Mr Rolle added: Everyone seeming ly has a gun. Guns seem to be as ubiquitous as vehicles. Guns are everywhere; cars are everywhere. Gun crime is fare more pervasive thani t has ever been in my life. The mindset has degenerated to the point wherep eople do not believe there is a penalty attached to their actions, and if there is some penalty attached, peopled ont care. A cknowledging that it was easy to point the finger of b lame at the Government o r Royal Bahamas Police F orce for this nations crime problems, Mr Rolle told Tribune Business: Theres a huge implication for society a s a whole. I believe this problem goes far deeper, and if we d o not resolve it now, or at l east start taking preparator y steps to, were going to be in significant trouble inf ive years. In five years t ime, the Bahamas will not be the same Bahamas we see now. Weve got some issues that are going to impact this country, and even though I speak on behalf of the busin ess community, the implic ations far beyond. It goes back to deficiencies in the e ducation system, deficienc ies in the social system, and w e have to address these deficiencies and do it proactively. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 7(1'(5)257+(,6,21 6833/(0(17$5<< $&&(6625,(6 35,1&(66$5*$5(7+263,7$/7(1'(56$5(,19,7(')52048$/,),('&2175$&7256 73529,'(;$<6833/,(6$&&(6625,(6)257+( 35,1&(660$5*$5(7+263,7$/)25$3(5,2'21( <($5 7HQGHUGRFXPHQWVZKLFKLQFOXGHLQVWUXFWLRQVWR7HQGHUHUV VSHFLFDWLRQVDQGRWKHUUHOHYDQWLQIRUPDWLRQFDQEHFROOHFWHG 0RQGD\WKURXJK)ULGD\ DW WKH0DWHULDOV 0DQDJHPHQW'LUHFWRUDWH3ULQFHVV0DUJDUHW+RVSLWDOFRPSRXQG 6KLUOH\WUHHW $7(1'(5086768%0,77(',1'83/,&$,1$6($/(' (19(/23(253$&.$*(,'(17,),('$6 (1'(5)25 7+(3529,6,212)6833/(0(17$5<;$<7(1'(5 )256833/,(6$&&(6625,(635,1&(660$5*$5(7 +263,7$/ $1' $''5(66('7 7+(&+$,50$1 7(1'(56&200,77(( 7+(%/,&+263,7$/6$87+25,7< &25325$ 7+,5't:(677(55$&(6&2//,16$9(18( 3 1$66$8%$+$0$6 7(1'(56$5(7$55,9($77+(38%/,&+263,7$/6 $87+25,7<12/$7(57+$1 30RQGD\7+6HSWHPEHU/$7(1'(5f:,//127 $&&(37(' $FRS\RIYDOLGEXVLQHVVOLFHQVHDQGOHWWHURIJRRGVWDQGLQJ IURPWKH1DWLRQDO,QVXUDQFH%RDUGVKRXOGDFFRPSDQ\DOO SURSRVDOV 7KH 3XEOLF+RVSLWDOV$XWKRULW\UHVHUYHVWKHULJKWWRUHMHFWDQ\ RU7HQGHUVf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the Government got the best strategic partner both in terms of purchase price and terms/conditions. Cable & Wireless was described by one source as really well suited as the strategic partner. The committee believes theyre very interested in this asset, and have the right idea about value, but there are some important issues that would need to be negotiated. Some very fruitful discussions were said to have taken place between the BTC privatisation committee and Cable & Wireless, in a bid to get to a point where the Government might find its proposal attractive. BTC offer sparks competition fear FROM page one Bahamas far beyond Wild Wild West F ROM page one Shar e your news The Tribune wants to hear fr om people who ar e making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

PAGE 14

NEW YORK THEstock market began August with a huge rally after reports from around the world revived investors' faith in the global recovery, according to Associated Press. The Dow Jones industrial average rose 208 points Monday. All the major stock indexes rose about 2 percent. The first day of the month brought a stream of news that reassured investors who have worried about a slowing of economic growth in the U.S., China and Europe. Manufacturing was a common thread: The Institute for Supply Management's index of U.S. manufacturing activity during July was better than the market expected. Traders were pleased because the report still showed that manufacturing is growing. A manufacturing report for the 16 countries that use the euro was revised higher for July and showed that the European economy is recovering faster than expected. Strong earnings reports from European banks also pleased the market, especially after the continent's rising debt problems helped trigger a spring plunge in stocks. From China came news that industrial growth was moderate enough that Beijing isn't likely to take steps to slow that country's economy. Investors have periodically sold stocks on concerns that China's economy would slow and pull others down with it. Monday's news was encouraging after months of reports that showed the recovery was weakening. Those reports pulled the major stock indexes off their 2010 highs in late April and contributed to sharp swings in stock prices since then. The ISM report is significant because it is the first major reading of the economy from July, and investors are trying to determine just how strong the recovery will be in the second half of the year. The big advance was a bit of a surprise for traders who are used to more subdued trading as August arrives. Over the past 12 years, the Dow has fallen nine times on the first trading day in August, although it has risen the past three years. August in general is seen as a volatile month for stocks, largely because many traders are away on vacation. That makes for low trading volumes and exaggerated price moves. Some analysts were cautious even as stock prices jumped. Alan Gayle, senior investment strategist for RidgeWorth Investments in Richmond, Virginia, said Monday's news, while good, showed only small changes in the economy. "Fundamentally, I do believe the pace of the (economic) expansion is slowing and I think that's going to weigh on the markets as we go through the second half of the year," he said. The Dow Jones industrial average rose 208.44, or 2 percent, to 10,674.38. The Standard & Poor's 500 index rose 24.26, or 2.2 percent, to 1,125.86, while the Nasdaq composite index rose 40.66, or 1.8 percent, to 2,295.36. Six stocks rose for every one that fell on the New York Stock Exchange where volume came to a light 1 billion shares. With stocks looking more appealing, bond prices fell because investors felt less need to seek the safety of government securities. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note, which moves opposite its price, rose to 2.97 percent from 2.91 percent late Friday. Its yield is often used as a benchmark to set interest rates on mortgages and other consumer loans. Stocks were up across the market. Industrial and materials stocks, including 3M Co. and General Electric Co., rose after the ISM report. Investors were encouraged in particular by several key components of the index. Production and new orders both improved, as did companies' willingness to hire new employees. 3M rose $1.8799, or 2.2 percent, to $87.41, while GE rose 29 cents to $16.41. Energy companies rose as the price of oil gained on expectations that a healthier economy will lift demand. Exxon Mobil Corp. rose $2.26, or 3.8 percent, to $61.94, while Chevron Corp. jumped $1.59, or 2.1 percent, to $77.80. Benchmark crude rose $2.53 to $81.48 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange. Financial stocks rose on the strong earnings reports from European-based banking giants HSBC and BNP Paribas, which convinced investors that the continent's financial sector is not being hurt by the debt problems. HSBC shares trading in the U.S. rose $2.66, or 5.2 percent, to $53.74. Bank of America Corp. rose 40 cents, or 2.9 percent, to $14.44. JPMorgan Chase & Co. rose $1.36, or 3.4 percent, to $41.64. C M Y K C M Y K B USINESS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010, PAGE 7B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.341.00AML Foods Limited1.041.040.000.2500.0404.23.85% 10.759.67Bahamas Property Fund10.6310.630.000.0500.200212.61.88% 6.255.00Bank of Bahamas5.005.000.000.5980.2608.45.20% 0.580.30Benchmark0.300.300.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.493.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.1680.09018.82.86% 2.152.14Fidelity Bank2.172.170.000.0550.04039.51.84% 12.509.62Cable Bahamas11.1111.110.001.4080.3007.92.70% 2.842.50Colina Holdings2.552.550.000.5110.0405.01.57% 7.005.00Commonwealth Bank (S1 6.046.040.000.4600.23013.13.81% 3 .652.23Consolidated Water BDRs2.412.40-0.010.1110.05221.62.17% 2.551.60Doctor's Hospital2.312.310.000.6270.1103.74.76% 6.995.94Famguard6.076.070.00-0.0030.240N/M3.95% 1 0.908.75Finco8.908.900.000.1680.52053.05.84% 11.409.50FirstCaribbean Bank9.749.740.000.7200.35013.53.59% 5.533.75Focol (S 4.654.650.000.3660.17012.73.66% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 5.595.00ICD Utilities5.595.590.000.4070.24013.74.29% 10.509.95J. S. Johnson9.959.950.000.9520.64010.56.43% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1560.80064.18.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 99.4699.46Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029BAH2999.460.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 1 00.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +FBB13100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.00 5 2wk-Hi 5 2wk-Low S ymbol B id$ A sk$ L astPrice D ailyVol E PS$ D iv$ P /E Y ield BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:7% I nterest 7%RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)2 9 May 2015 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-232019 October 2022 P rime + 1.75% Prime + 1.75% 6.95%20 November 2029FRIDAY, 30 JULY 2010BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,486.14 | CHG -0.01 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -79.24 | YTD % -5.06BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basis)M aturity 19 October 2017FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%30 May 2013 5 2wk H i 5 2wk L ow S ymbol B id $ A sk $ L ast P rice D aily V ol E PS $ D iv $ P /E Y ield 10.067.92Bahamas Supermarkets9.4210.4214.00-2.9450.000N/M0.00% 8 .006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref2.006.254.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.350.400.550.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 Months %NAV 3MTH 1.48251.4387CFAL Bond Fund1.48253.046.961.460225 2.92652.8266CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.91991.140.852.911577 1.54381.4804CFAL Money Market Fund1.54382.434.281.527368 3.20252.8522Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund2.8522-8.49-8.08 13.638813.0484Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund13.41100.333.32 109.3929101.6693CFAL Global Bond Fund109.39295.207.60107.570620 105.779593.1998CFAL Global Equity Fund100.1833-1.523.56105.779543 1.11771.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.11772.525.19 1.09171.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.07850.985.29 1.11621.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.11622.345.45 9.57959.1005Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 19.54392.166.25 11.236110.0000Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 210.0344-6.845.63 10.00009.3299Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 39.3299-6.70-6.70 7.96644.8105Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund Equities Sub Fund7.3073-5.3116.22 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/200730-Jun-10BISX Listed Mutual FundsNAV Date 30-Jun-10 30-Jun-10 30-Jun-10CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752530-Jun-10 30-Jun-10 30-Jun-10 23-Jul-10 30-Jun-10MARKET TERMS30-Jun-10 NAV 6MTH 1.438700 2.886947 1.511377 103.987340 101.725415 30-Jun-10 30-Jun-10 30-Jun-10 30-Jun-10 C OMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2010 IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/qui/529 C ommon Law and Equity Division IN THE MATTER of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959 A ND I N THE MATTER of all that piece or parcel of land comprising One and Twenty-four Thousandths (1.024es situate approximately 300 Feet East of Wallys Restaurant o n the East Side of the Township of Marsh Harbour on t he Island of Great Abaco one of the Islands of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas A ND IN THE MATTER of the Petition of SADIES PLACE LTD.N O T I C ETHE PETITION OF SADIES PLACE in respect of:I n respect of all that piece or parcel of land comprising O ne and Twenty-four Thousandths (1.024es situate approximately 300 Feet East of Wallys Restaurant on the East Side of the Township of Marsh Harbour on the Island of Great Abaco one of the Islands of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas and bounded NORTHWARDLY by vacant land and running thereon for a distance of 255.45 feet and EASTWARDLY by a 10 feet wide road reservation and running thereon 138.47 feet to a point thence SOUTHW ARDLY 20.89 feet to a point thence EASTWARDLY to a point and running thereon 14.33 feet thence SOUTHWARDLY by land now or formerly the property or estate of Ednar Gotltlieb and running thereon 227.51 to a point t hence WESTWARDLY and by land 5.04 feet to a point thence SOUTHWARDLY to a point and running thereon 12.18 feet thence WESTWARDLY by land now or formerly the property of Ruthie Nedabylek and running thereon 169.73 feet to a point and continuing by land now or formerly the property of Viola Gordon and running thereon 37.78 feet to the beginning. Sadies Place claims to be the owner of the unincumbered fee simple estate in possession of the said land and has made application to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section Three (3 of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have its title to the said land investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined and declared in a Certicate of Title to be granted by the Court in accordance with the provisions of the said Act. Copies of the Petition and Plan of the said land may be inspected during normal oce hours in the following places: 1.The Registry of the Supreme Court, 2nd Floor Ansbacher Building. East Street North, in the City of Nassau, Bahamas; and 2.The Chambers of Lockhart & Co., #35 Buen Retiro Road, o Shirley Street, Nassau, Bahamas. NOTICE is hereby given that any person having dower or right to dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized in the Petition shall on or before the expiration of Thirty (30ys after the nal publication of these presents, le in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a Statement of his claim in the prescribed form veried by an adavit to be led therewith. Failure of any such person to le and serve a Statement of his Claim on or before the expiration of Thirty (30 days after the nal publication of these presents shall operate as bar to such claims.LOCKHART & Co. Chambers #35 Buen Retiro Road O Shirley Street Nassau, Bahamas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conomic reports give stocks big start for August

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C M Y K C M Y K THETRIBUNE SECTIONC HEALTH: Body and mind T UESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010 By JEFFARAH GIBSON Tribune Features Writer I n 1999, the Pandora jewelry manufacturers introduced for the very first time a charm bracelet to rival all charm bracelets. Pandora charm bracelets put a spin on the classical trinkets and captures some of lifes most precious memories. When the Pandora line was first introduced to the Bahamian public seven years ago by Bahama Republic, a local jewelry store located East By Street, it took jewelry lovers a while to catch the Pandora fever. Now, Pandora has become one of the hottest must-have jewelry items today. Women, teens, and tweens have all indulged in Pandoras charm. But what is it that actually puts them on the most wanted list? Is it because they are made with precious metals like gold, oxidised and sterling silver? Is it because they can be customised? Or is it because they are affordable and make great gifts? Tribune Woman spoke to Natalia, an assistant manager at Bahama Republic who said the answer to that question is all of the above. What makes a Pandora bracelet a must have item is they make great gifts. You might have a family mem ber you may want to purchase a gift for, you can purchase her a Pandora bracelet or if she already has one you can purchase a bead as reminder, she said. The idea of collecting beads to fill the entire patent threaded novelty is what makes it fun. Swapping charms to suit attire and mood is another reason women have fallen head over heels for Pandora. The charms can reflect your mood. You can switch them up. For instance if you are feeling happy you can choose a bead that signifies your happiness. If are feeling blue you can select a bead that suits your mood, Natalia explained. However, one of the main reasons women have fallen weak to Pandoras charm is because it allows them to tell stories with each bead. For three women, Pryia Simmons, Cara Bethel, and Alesha Cadet the bracelets dont just make fashion statements. They make statements about their lives and some of the people in it. Pryia Simmons has a few special beads on her bracelet. They are an angel, a suitcase, a heart stopper, and flowers. She said: I got the angel because I am my dads angel. I got the suitcase because I love to travel. The heart stopper represents my boyfriend because he keeps every thing in place in my life and the flower is so that my life could flourish, she told Tribune Woman. After having her first son last October, Cara Bethel is customising a bracelet to record every milestone in his life. She even named the bracelet after him. She calls it The Dylan Bracelet. My Pandora is a permanent reminder of the milestones in my baby's life. So far, I have two blue coloured beads, a little boy because he is a boy of course, a baby car riage, a mama monkey holding a baby monkey because his nursery has a monkey theme and a gift box because he is the best present I ever got, Mrs Bethel said. Alesha Cadet started her bracelet with a home bead. She said: Home is where the heart is and that is Eleuthera. I got the number 21 charm when I turned 21. I am going with light colours for my charm bracelet because they match my spirit. I am light hearted and happy, she said. One of her charm in particular represents a past love. She chose that bead because she said it motivates her to keep moving forward. The teddy bear is a reminder of an ex special love. Whenever I want to pick up the phone to give him a call, I look at it and it is a reminder of what to never get myself into, she told Tribune Woman. Pandoras Charm H OT WRIST: P andora bracelets (above and below

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AUSTRALIAN cricketer Brett Lee presents a creation by designers Abu Jani & Sandeep Khosla at the Pearls Infrastructure Delhi Couture Week 2010 in New Delhi, India. C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By MAGGIE BAIN JUST thinking of a series of articles about love produces a slideshow of picture memories, moving through our mind. Even better, we can control it ourselves; replay, fast forward, rewind and even pause at the highlights. First loves, summer loves, crazy puppy loves, one-sided loves, and the list goes on. Decades later, webask in the warm glow of happy flashbacks and amaze ourselves by how we survived the lows. As we journey around the world, we realise that the nature, process, and biology of love are universal;no society is exempt. Outwardly we may look different, speak different languages, have beenbrought up with different values and beliefs, but when it comes to love, we are the same. In our early years of innocence, we dreamt of being someones Cinderella or gallant Prince Charming.We had visions of being swept away on a wave of eternal love and leaving the ugly world behind. For many, romantic love conjures up images of tenderness, candlelight, pastel colours and a sense of peace and contentment. This is the perfect love we all desire to obtain at least once in our lives. Visible for all to see is a new inner glow that speaks of our inner happiness. The mere thought, touch or sight of our love stimulates our brains dopamine receptors, and we are on a high. Our newfound motivation is accompanied with a steely determination. We find ourselves automatically reshuffling our priorities and full attention directed to that special person. Our newfound energy and focus allows us to believe that anything is possible. It is not unheard of to feel you would go to the ends of the earth,even to sacrifice your life for them. Intense thoughts of our lover are fueled, day and night, by this newly channeled energy. It motivates us, but at the same time leaves us feeling naked in our vulnerability. It is exhilarating, floating on Cloud Nine, but we quickly discover that any small disappointment can send us on a free-fall. The result is a craving for more, and the strong attachment becomes all consuming. Only when you have experienced this particular euphoria can you truly appreciate the saying, Love is a drug. The dependence and obsessive nature of romantic love could essentially class persons a s addicts. R ejection, unreciprocated love, a nd breakups trigger similar withdrawal symptoms, as in other recognised addictions. This analogy may seem incongruous to some, but is backed by scientific research. What makes it all the more interesting is that candidates also included those who were experiencing unrequited love, rejection or the end of the relationship. In all cases, the right ventral tegmental area (VTA right caudate nucleus in the brain were stimulated. These are the dopamine rich areas associated with reward, motivation, and also affected by cocaine use. Romantic love speaks of true motivational drive, and possibly acts as a constant reminder of human reproduction. It is quite different from sexual drive because of its specific ability to conserve energy and focus on one individual. In fact romantic love is possible with out sex, and is often described as emotional or spiritual love. Knowing this allows us to understand those who mutually decide to abstain from premarital sex. Their constant state of elation allows for a deepening of emotions, and in turn satisfies their deep cravings. We then go on to comprehend those who are able to maintain long distance relationships, communicate only by written word, or who are physically challenged. To close your eyes and dwell in the pure joy that it produces, can be equated to great sex for others. If you are going through life feeling fulfilled but not being able to relate to this description of romantic love, then perhaps you need to review your relationship or dating life. Remember we only have one life to live and love fully, and no time to waste. Listen to Love on the Rock with Maggie Bain every Thursday 5-6 pm on Island FM 102.9 For appointments call364-7230, email relatebahamas@yahoo.com or www.relatebahamas.blogspot.com Romantic Love By MAGGIE BAIN Weeks of fashion in India... A MODEL presents a creation by designers Abu Jani & Sandeep Khosla at the Pearls Infrastructure Delhi Couture Week 2010 in New Delhi, India. A MODEL presents a creation by designers Abu Jani & Sandeep Khosla at the Pearls Infrastructure Delhi Couture Week 2010 in New Delhi, India. (AP Photos A MODEL presents a creation by J J Valaya at Bangalore Fashion Week in Bangalore, India. A MODEL presents a creation by J J Valaya at Bangalore Fashion Week in Bangalore, India. A MODEL presents a creation by Neeru's at Bangalore Fashion Week in Bangalore, India.

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SWEET NOTHINGS C M Y K C M Y K HEALTH THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010, PAGE 9B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM SUGARS seductive power is proven in the fact that the actual Amer-i can consumes 150 pounds of sugar per year. This all despite warnings from doctors who say it spikes blood sugar levels and leads to the storage of fat! The American Heart Association (the people responsible for efforts to reduce death associated with cardiovascular disease) is the latest agency to releases data on the dangers of sugar. W here does the sugar come from? Mostly soft drinks and candy, followed by cakes, cookies and pies. But don't give a knowing smile if you turn your back on these kindso f snacks: sugar sneaks into items you'd never believe, including fruit-f lavoured yogurt (eight ounces can have six teaspoons of added sugar) and frosted whole grain c ereal (3 teaspoons in one cup). The next professional to warn against sugar intake may be your skin therapist, as new findings show sugar does impact skin. C ollagen, essential to skin strength and elasticity, is a protein. A diet r ich in sugar can create excess waste products in the form of glucose. Instead of burning off, this glucose (sugar attaches to proteins in our skin. This process is clas s ified as glycation, and leads to the formation of Advanced Glycation E nd-products (AGEs which increases inflam mation in the body. Inflammation breaks down collagen and leads to the loss of elasticity: in laymen's terms, this means wrinkles, sagging and loss of tone. To check for added s ugar, look at the label for sugar, corn syrup, fructose, dextrose, molasses or evaporated cane juice in the ingredient list. And doctors andd ietitians say moderation is one way to keep skin and body healthy, but keeping active is also key. As part of healthy aging diet, eschew refined sugars for whole grains, fruits and vegetables, and topically treat skin with AGE Smart products that include Glucosamine, Soy, Genestein, Vitamin A, licorice, and the unique Argine/Lysine Polypeptide which binds and traps sugars to help prevent formation of AGEs. This information was taken from dermalogica.com. Sara Beek is a Dermalogica Skin Care Therapist at The Dermal Clinic in Sandyport. Please call 327-6788 for more information or visit www.dermal-clinic.com . D epression is a serious condition that can impact every area of your life. It c an affect your social life, your family relationships, your career, and your sense of self-worth and purpose. And for women in particular, depression is common. If you're feeling sad, guilty, tired, and just generally down in the dumps, you may be suffering from major depression. But the good news is that depression is treatable, and the more you understand depression's particular implications for and its impact on women, the more equipped you will be to tackle the condition head on. R R i i s s k k F F a a c c t t o o r r s s f f o o r r d d e e p p r r e e s s s s i i o o n n i i n n W W o o m m e e n n -Family history of mood disorders -Personal past history of mood disorders in early reproductive years -Loss of a parent before the age of 10 years -Childhood history of physical or s exual abuse -Use of an oral contraceptive, especially one with a high progesteronec ontent -Use of gonadotropin stimulants as part of infertility treatment -Persistent psychosocial stressors (e.g., loss of job -Loss of social support system or the threat of such a loss S S i i g g n n s s a a n n d d s s y y m m p p t t o o m m s s o o f f d d e e p p r r e e s s s s i i o o n n i i n n w w o o m m e e n n The symptoms of depression in women are the same as those form ajor depression. Common com plaints include: -Depressed mood Loss of interest or pleasure in activities you used to enjoy -Feelings of guilt, hopelessness and worthlessness -Suicidal thoughts or recurrent thoughts of death -Sleep disturbance (sleeping more o r sleeping less) -Appetite and weight changes -Difficulty concentrating -Lack of energy and fatigue S S p p e e c c i i f f i i c c s s a a b b o o u u t t d d e e p p r r e e s s s s i i o o n n i i n n w w o o m m e e n n Seasonal affective disorder-depres sion in the winter months due to lowe r levels of sunlight-is more common in women W omen are about twice as likely as men to suffer from depression. This two-to-one difference persists across racial, ethnic, and economic divides. In fact, this gender difference in rates of depression is found in most coun tries around the world. There are a number of theories which attempt to explain the higher incidence of depression in women. Many factors have been implicated, including biological, psychological, and social factors. B B i i o o l l o o g g i i c c a a l l c c a a u u s s e e s s o o f f d d e e p p r r e e s s s s i i o o n n i i n n w w o o m m e e n n Postpartum depression Many new mothers experience the baby blues. This is a normal reaction that tends to subside within a few weeks. However, some womene xperience severe, lasting depression. This condition is known as postpartum depression. Postpartum depres sion is believed to be influenced, at least in part, by hormonal fluctuations. Perimenopause & menopause Women may be at increased risk for depression during peri menopause, the stage leading to m enopause when reproductive hormones rapidly fluctuate. Women with past histories of depression are at an increased risk of depression during menopause as well. S S o o c c i i a a l l a a n n d d c c u u l l t t u u r r a a l l c c a a u u s s e e s s o o f f d d e e p p r r e e s s s s i i o o n n i i n n w w o o m m e e n n Role strain Women often suffer from role strain over conflicting and over whelming responsibilities in their life. The more roles a woman is expected to play (mother, wife, working woman), the more vulnerable she is to role strain and subsequent stress and depression. Depression is more common in women who receive little help with housework and child care. Single mothers are particularly at risk. Research indicates that singlem others are three times more likely than married mothers to experience an episode of major depression. Unequal power & status Women's relative lack of power and status in our society may lead to feelings of helplessness. This sense of helplessness puts women at greater risk for depression. These feelingsm ay be provoked by discrimination in the workplace leading to underemployment or unemployment. Low socioeconomic status is a risk factor for major depression. Another contributing factor is society's emphasis on youth, beauty, and thinness in women, traits which to a large extent are out of their control. Sexual and physical abuse Sexual and physical abuse may play a role in depression in women. Girls are much more likely to be sexually abused than boys, and researchers have found that sexual abuse in childhood puts one at increased risk for depression in adulthood. Higher rates of depression are also found among victims of rape, a crime almost exclusively committed against women. Other common forms of abuse, including physical abuse and sexual harassment, may also contribute to depression. Relationship dissatisfaction W hile rates of depression are lower for the married than for the single and divorced, the benefits of mar-r iage and its general contribution to well-being are greater for men than for women. Furthermore, the benefits disappear entirely for women whose marital satisfaction is low. Lack of intimacy and marital strife are linked to depression in women. Poverty Poverty is more common among w omen than men. Single mothers have the highest rates of poverty across all demographic groups. Poverty is a severe, chronic stressor than can lead to depression. P P s s y y c c h h o o l l o o g g i i c c a a l l c c a a u u s s e e s s o o f f d d e e p p r r e e s s s s i i o o n n i i n n w w o o m m e e n n Coping mechanisms W omen are more likely to ruminate when they are depressed. This includes crying to relieve emotionalt ension, trying to figure out why you're depressed, and talking to your friends about your depression. However, rumination has been found to maintain depression and even make it worse. Men, on the other hand, tend to distract themselves when they are depressed. Unlike rumination, dis traction can reduce depression. S tress response According to Psychology Today, women are more likely than men to develop depression under lower lev els of stress. Furthermore, the female physiological response to stress is different. Women produce more stress hormones than men do, and the female sex hormone progesterone prevents the stress hormone systemf rom turning itself off as it does in men. Puberty and body image The gender difference in depression begins in adolescence. The emer gence of sex differences during puber ty likely plays a role. Some researchers point to body dissatisfaction, which increases in girls during the sexual development of puberty. Body image is closely linked to self-esteem in women, and low self-esteem is a risk factor for depres sion. Prepared by Public Relations Department Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre Understanding depression in women By SARAH B EEK Share your news The Tribune wants to hear fr om people who are making news in their neighbour hoods. Per haps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your stor y SIGNS & SYMPTOMS of depression in women include lack of energy and fatigue. By STEPHANIE NANO Associated Press Writer NEW YORK (AP Over the long term, a lowcarb diet works just as well as a low-fat diet at taking off the pounds and it might be better for your heart, new research sug gests. Both diets improved cholesterol in a two-year study that included intensive group counselling. But those on the low-carbohydrate diet got a bigger boost in their so-called good cho lesterol, nearly twice as much as those on low-fat. In previous studies, lowcarb diets have done better at weight loss at six months, but longer-term results have been mixed. And there's been a suggestion of better cholesterol from low-carb eating. The latest test is one of the longest to compare the approaches. At the end of two years, average weight loss was the same for both about 15 pounds (6.8 kilograms) or seven per cent. The key difference was in HDL, or good cholesterol: a 23 per cent increase from low-carb dieting compared to a 12 per cent improvement from low-fat, said Gary Foster, director of Temple University's Center for Obesity Research and Education, who led the federally funded study. He said the low-carb boost is the kind one might get from medicines that improve HDL. "For a diet, that's pretty impressive," Foster said. The findings, published in Tuesday's Annals of Inter nal Medicine, are based on a study of 307 adults, twothirds of them women. Par ticipants were obese but didn't have cholesterol problems or diabetes. Half followed a low-carb diet modelled after the Atkins' plan and half went on a low-calorie, low-fat diet. All attended group sessions to help them change bad eating habits, get more active and stick to their diets. The volunteers had periodic checks of their weight, blood, bone density and body composition. After two years, there was no major differences between diet groups, except in good cholesterol. Why the lowcarb diet had a bigger effect on good cholesterol isn't known, the researchers said. As low-carb plans became popular, experts feared the diet would drive up the risk of heart disease because it allows more fat. The latest results suggest those concerns are unfounded, Foster said. In the low-carb group, there was an early rise in "bad" cholesterol, the kind that builds up in arteries. But after two years, both groups ended up with similar improvements to bad cholesterol. The study's strengths include its size, length and its multiple locations Denver, Philadelphia and St Louis, said Dr William Yancy, of the Durham VA Medical Center in North Carolina. "These are results we should have a lot of confidence in," said Yancy, who has done similar diet research but was not involved in the study. Foster, the study leader, said dieters should be less concerned about which diet to use, and focus on finding the support or technique like writing down what they eat that keeps them on track. "It doesn't make a difference for weight loss how you get there," he said. With the current obesity epidemic, more than one way is needed to attack the problem, Yancy said. "Both of these are options. These diets work," he said. Lo w-carb diet tr umps low-fat on good cholesterol These are results we should have a lot of confidence in. Dr William Yancy

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C M Y K C M Y K GARDENING THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010, PAGE 11B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM WHEN I put my book A Year With Gardener Jack together I started with September and ended with August, a month that in many ways is the low point of the growing year but in many other ways is remarkably fecund. All the vegetables we grow during the cooler months are absent from the veggie plots. We may have a few cherry tomatoes and peppers to boast about but beyond that we only have very hardy producers like okra, Malabar spinach and snake beans to comfort us. In the absence of prime vegetables it might be wise to cover your veggie plots with clear plastic, a process called solarisation. The plastic will stop weeds growing and will also sterilise the soil. August gives the last opportunity to solarise before the new vegetable growing season gets under way. Make sure your soil is wet to a depth of 5-6 inches before covering it. August is a wonderful time for tropical fruits. The last of the Barbados cherries may still be around while the first carambolas ripen. In the garden and along the shore, seagrapes can be found in several stages of development and ripeness. August is also the beginning of the guava duff season with guava trees hanging with fruit. Many flowering shrubs are at their best during August. Hibiscus, oleander, crepe myrtle, bougainvillea and bridal bouquet give abundant colour while yellow poinciana (Peltophorum pterocarpum takes over from royal poinciana as the main flowering t ree. Back to vegetables. Many gardeners look upon early tomatoes as a priority. Nor mal tomatoes set fruit at 68 d egrees or lower and we ordinarily experience suitable nighttime temperatures in late October. There are some hybrid tomatoes developed d uring the past decade that were developed for Florida Solar Fire is an example and set fruit at a higher tempera ture and therefore are candid ates to give the earliest crops. Even regular tomatoes can set fruit early if exceptional conditions happen along. Tomatoes at the flowering stage may be triggered into fruit production by a cool tropical storm during September. Bahamian gardeners are divided over whether to sow tomatoes in August in the hope that the right conditions come along (including the absence of hurricanes) or leave the task until September. If you plan to aim for early, sow your tomatoes in pots that can be easily moved and allow the seedlings to develop in semi shade. Harden them off by increasing the amount of direct sunlight every day over a week or two until the plants can take full sun, then transplant them into their prepared growing area. Peppers are natural warm weather vegetables and are best started early. Cabbages and cucumbers are also candidates for an early start. Any early vegetables will be at the mercy of hurricane activity, which is more likely in September than any other time. That said, if a hurricane strikes one of the last things we will be worrying about is tomatoes. Plants in their pots can be brought inside for a day or two without doing them any harm. If your lawn is not looking good right now, it never will. Fertilize with a high nitrogen mix at least every month during the rainy season and you will maintain a good colour well into the dry season. If you have St. Augustine grass it will grow profusely whether you fertilize it or not. Add fertilizer and it will grow but be much more verdant. g g a a r r d d e e n n e e r r j j a a c c k k @ @ c c o o r r a a l l w w a a v v e e . c c o o m m August The end or a new beginning? EARLY TOMATOES have to be sown early. Jack will be trying Solar Fire this year to get really early tomatoes.

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C M Y K C M Y K TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010 THETRIBUNE PAGE 12 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net I n the twilight of the XXI Central American and Caribbean (CAC c ountrys most decor ated amateur boxer added t o his legacy and won the Bahamas final medal. Valentino Knowles captured a gold medal in the mens light welterweight division on Saturday in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico Knowles put some of his best boxing skills on display at perhaps the timeliest point in the tournament, with a dominating round three to defeat Luis Romero of Venezuela, 6:2 on points. Both fighters failed to score a single point over the course of the first two opening rounds and headed into the decisive third round 0:0. The 21-year-old Knowles outboxed Romero 6:2 in the third round to secure the gold. He became the third Bahamian to win a boxing medal at the games following Nathaniel Knowles who won the silver medal in 1973 and Marvin Smith who won silver in 1986. Earlier this year, Knowles m oved up from the 60 to the 64 kilo weight class after he won the Bahamas' first medal at the AIBA World Championships in 2009. He followed with the highest honour of any Bahamian fighter ever at the Commonwealth Boxing Championships when he won a silver medal. Along with Carl Hield, he also competed in the Continental Elite Championships in Ecuador in June. In the CAC semifinals, Knowles defeated Juan Pablo Romero of Mexico 7:5 on points to earn a berth in the gold-medal match. A dominant first round ulti mately paved the way for the win as Knowles came out witha n aggressive first round to outscore Romero, 4:1. He continued to hold a decisive advantage following the second round as both fighters managed to score a single point. Romero won his first round of the match in the third, but the 3:2 was far from enough to close the three-point deficit. He defeated Ricardo Garcia Tejada 6:5 in the other semifinal to advance. Valentino wins gold Becomes third Bahamian to win boxing medal at the CAC Games NUMBER ONE: Valentino Knowles captured a gold medal in the mens light welterweight division at the CAC Games in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico, on Saturday. T homas, Barry jump high for gold and silver... See page 14

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010, PAGE 13 BAILLOU HILL ROAD Temporary Road Closure & DiversionsJose Cartellone Construcciones Civiles S.Awishes to advise the motoring public that construction works will be carried out on the eastern side of Baillou Hill Road effective Monday August 9th, 2010 for approximately twenty-four (24 asphalt paving & landscaping. M otorist travelling northbound on Baillou Hill Road should expect changes as construction works will be carried out in four (4stages. The following lateral streets will be temporarily closed to motorist & pedestrians: PALM TREE AVE, COCONUT GROVE AVE, POINCIANAAVE, BAHAMAAVE, WESTEND AVE, CORDEAUX AVE, PALMETTO ST, NEWBOLD ST, BAKER ST & FATHER CALNAN RD. S TAGE 1 Motorist travelling through Palm Tree Ave should use Robinson Road as an alternative route and continue through First Street or Second Street to their destination. STAGE 2 Motorist travelling through Coconut Grove & Poinciana Avenue should use Palm Tree Avenue as an alternative route. STAGE 3 Motorist travelling through Bahama Avenue,West End Avenue & Cordeaux Avenue should use Poinciana Avenue as an alternative route from the southern side. STAGE 4 Motorist travelling through Palmetto Street, Newbold Street, Baker Stree t & Father Calnan Road should use Oxford Avenue as an alternative route. and follow the signs posted DIVERSION Access will be granted to the residents of the affected streets.MINISTRY OFWORKS & TRANSPORT NOTICE CORRIDOR 11A The Project Execution Unit Ministry of Works & Transport Hotline: (242 Email: publicworks@bahamas.gov.bs Jose Cartellone Construcciones Civiles S.A Email: bahamasneighbor@cartellone.com.arWe apologize for the inconvenience & delays caused. For further information please contact: TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM EARLY into their historic bid against the worlds best in youth baseball, the Bahamas has been on both sides of the win-loss column after two games. At the Pony-13 World Series in Fullerton, California, the Bahamas lost in its opening match but rebounded to take game two over the weekend. The team got off toa slow start against Chula Vista, California, when they were shutout 10-0. In game two, the Bahamas rebounded to take a game two win over the hosts Fuller-ton, California, in a hard fought one run win, 14-13. The Bahamas advanced for the first time in the countrys nine year Caribbean Zone participation. After hosting the Caribbean Zone Tournament, which also included an area host team from the Grand Bahamas and the Panama Champions, the winner of the pool advanced directly to the Championship with the top seed. The team from Nassau got off to a rough start in their first two games to the Bahamas area team from Grand Bahama 18-8 and 9-6. They rebounded and took a 4-3 win over Panama but lost 9-3 in its second contest. Nassau made history in the Championship, when they beat Panama 10-2 to become the countrys first Zone Championship and securing a spot in the PONY-13 World Series for the first time. Bahamas loses opening matc h but rebounds to take game 2 By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net THE largest team ever assembled under the current Bahamas Olympic Committee administration, with more than 100 athletes participating, delivered a series of noteworthy performances and brought in the largest medal total ever for the Bahamas at the Central American and Caribbean (CAC Team Bahamas won a record-setting total of 18 medals which included seven gold, five silver and six bronze at the 21st edition of the games which concluded yesterday in Mayaguez Puerto, Rico. The team medalled in four disciplines, beginning with swimming that won eight medals, track and field finished with six, the tennis team won three medals and boxing finished with one. The Bahamas finished 10th overall in the final medal standings. Mexico topped the overall medal count with 384 medals which included 133 gold, 129 silver and 122 bronze. Venezuela finished second with 322 medals (114g, 104s, 104b), Colombia was third with 260 (100g, 84s, 76b Puerto Rico fourth with 167 medals (48g, 44s, 75b the Dominican Republic rounded out the top five with 133 medals (31g, 37s, 65b Jamaica was the leading medal winner of all EnglishSpeaking Caribbean countries with 42 total medals (15g, 10s, 17b). The represented disciplines included athletics, bowling, judo, rugby, sailing, swimming and tennis. Arianna Vanderpool-Wall ace became the story of the g ames early on for Team B ahamas as she hauled in a total of six medals and set a pair of new meet records. The 20-year-old Olympian won four individual medals, including gold in 50m and 100m butterfly and a pair of bronze medals as a member of relay teams. On the tennis court, Larika Russell won a bronze in the womens singles and teamed with Nikkita Fountain to win gold in doubles play. In track and field, a trio of Olympians returned to top form when Leevan Sands, Donald Thomas and Christine Amertil took gold in their respective signature events. Valentino Knowles won the final medal of the games for the Bahamas in the boxing ring when he took gold in the welterweight division. The Bahamas surpassed its medal total of 10 from the 2006 CAC Games in Cartegena, Colombia, when they totalled 10 medals, six silver and four bronze. In 2002 in El Salvador, the team won just two silver medals. In 1998 in Maracaibo, Venezuela, the Bahamas won eight medals, two gold, two s ilver and four bronze and in 1 993 in Ponce, Puerto Rico t hey totalled four medals, one gold and three bronze. It was the third time Puerto Rico hosted the CAC Games, they also hosted in San Juan in 1966 and Ponce in 1993. Approximately 5,000 athletes participated in 39 sports held across Puerto Rico, from July 17 to August 1. Team Bahamas hauls in record 18-medal total F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s P USHING HARD: J amaica's Allodin Fothergill (left Bahamas Demetrius Pinder in the men's 4x400 meter relay at the Central American and Caribbean Games in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico, on July 30, 2010. (AP Photo SKY HIGH: Bahamas' Bianca Stuart competes in the women's long jump at the Central American and Caribbean Games in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico July 30, 2010. (AP Photo

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By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net AFTER several days marred with disqualifications, injuries and disappointments, the Bahamas ended the ath letics competition at the XXI Central American and Caribbean Games with four medals won on the final day. Three medals won in the field, and another added in the finale on the track brought the total medal count in the athletics discipline to six. Donald Thomas and Trevor Barry highlighted the final session for the Bahamas with a gold and silver finish in the mens high jump. Both recorded the winning jump of 2.28m, however, Thomas cleared the mark on his first attempt for the gold, while Barry was unsuccessful on his first attempt and cleared in round two. Wagner Miller of Colombia finished third with a leap of 2.19m. Thomas entered the com petition at 2.16m, cleared on his first attempt, and followed to do the same at 2:19. The former IAAF World Champion and Pan Am Games silver medallist fouled both first attempts at 2.22m and 2.25m but cleared on the second. Barry entered the contest at 2.10m and cleared on his first attempt. He passed on 2.13m but followed to clear 2.16m and 2.19m on first attempts. Barry failed two attempts at 2.22m before clearing on his third and also failed on two attempts at 2.25m before advancing. In the womens long jump, Bianca Stuart needed just a single jump to secure her standing atop the medal podi um and claim the bronze medal. Stuart recorded the mark of 6.50m on her first attempt for the third place finish. It was one of only two successful attempts for Stuart over the six rounds of the competition. Rhonda Watkins of Trinidad and Tobago set a new meet record to win the gold medal with a leap of 6.67m to surpass the old mark of 6.61m. Jovanee Jarrett of Jamaica finished with a silver medal with her mark of 6.52m. Watkins started the competition with a list of 6.55m and held the top position for the duration of the contest. Stuart took hold of second place with her jump, but was surpassed by Jarrett in round two. Her only other recorded mark of the competition was a leap of 6.21m in the fourth round. The mens 1600m relay team finished with a silver medal just behind Jamaica who set a new games record in 3:01.68s. The team of Andretti Bain, Michael Mathieu, LeSean Pickstock and Demetrius Pinder finished in a new seasons best time of 3:01.82s. Trinidad and Tobago fin ished third, also in a seasons best time of 3:04.07s. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 14, TUESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2010 TRIBUNE SPORTS TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Thomas, Barry get gold and silver in high jump Bianca Stuart jumps long for bronze Mens 1,600 relay team win silver GETTIN UP: Bahamas Trevor Barry clears the bar during the high jump at the CAC Games July 30, 2010. (AP Photos UP AND OVER: Bahamas Donald Thomas clears the bar during the high jump at the Central American and Caribbean Games in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico, July 30, 2010. HES OFF: Bahamas Andretti Bain starts the men's 4x400 meter relay at the CAC Games on July 30, 2010. (AP Photo IN FLIGHT: Bahamas Bianca Stuart competes in the women's long jump at the CAC Games July 30, 2010. (AP Photo ALL FOR ONE: Athletes compete (Team Bahamas far right Games in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico on July 30, 2010.


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